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DELIA GDELIA GOTT BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE SEGMENT 2 DESIGN PORTFOLIO 2011 - 2012

DELIA F. GOTT

29 CAMBRIA ST SOMERVILLE, MA 02143 443-373-7085 DELIA.GOTT@THE-BAC

EDUCATION Present

Boston Architectural College, Boston, MA Candidate for Bachelor of Architecture

06/07-12/08

Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown, DE Degree: Associates of Science in Architectural Engineering

06/00-04/05

University of Architecture and Urbanism, Bucharest, Romania Candidate for Bachelor of Architecture

EXPERIENCE 01/12-present 04/10-present

01/08-01/09

01/02-08/05

Maguire Group, Inc., Boston, MA Intern Architect Responsibilities: • construction document preparation - drafting, ‘red line’ corrections • construction administration support • marketing - proposal assembly, promo sheets and presentation materials • client meetings and interviews Warner Larson, Inc. – Landscape Architects, Boston, MA Project Assistant Responsibilities: • planning - master planning and site analysis • construction document preparation - drafting, ‘red line’ corrections • marketing - proposal assembly, promo sheets and presentation materials • client meetings and interviews • 3D, Plan Graphics, and Illustrations Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown, DE Peer Tutor Artis Project, Bucharest, Romania CAD Drafter

SKILLS DESIGN AND GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION

INTERESTS

• Computer assisted drafting (AutoCAD 2010, Revit, Sketch Up) • Traditional architectural delineation, free-hand sketching, perspective drawing • Graphic design - excellent rendering skills (Adobe Creative Suite CS5) ORGANIZATIONAL AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS • Good organizational skills, acquired while performing light accounting tasks • Persistent and driven, I worked a full time job while being a full time student • Detailed oriented • Fluent in Italian and Romanian; Conversational in Spanish AWARDS • Intern Development Program started 06/11 • NOMA (National Organization of Minority Architects) – BAC Student Chapter Secretary NOMA Student Competition 2011– 3rd Place National Recognition • Volunteer: Rudy Bruner Award, Common Boston 2011, Solar Decathlon 2009 • Scholarships: Boston Architectural College, Punkin’ Chunkin’, Delaware Engineering Society • Delaware Tech President’s List, Summa Cum Laude Graduate

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PROJECT ASSISTANT

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SKILL NOTE: SIZE OF SKILL BAR INDICATES LEVEL OF PROFICIENCY

1982

AWARDS AND HONORS 1. DELAWARE ENGINEERING SOCIETY SCHOLARSHIP 2. PUNKIN’ CHUNKIN’ SCHOLARSHIP 3. PUNKIN’ CHUNKIN’ SCHOLARSHIP 4. SUMMA CUM LAUDE GRADUATE - A.S. ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 5. BAC CREATIVE EXERCISE SCHOLARSHIP 6. SOLAR DECATHLON - TEAM ‘BOSTON’ MEMBER 7. ECOTOPIA - AWARDED TEAM ‘INHABITAT’ MEMEBER 8. NOMAS STUDENT DESIGN COMPETITION - 3RD PLACE NATIONAL RECOGNITION 9. BAC EXPECTED GRADUATION - B.ARCH.

2000

LEGEND

pg. 9

pg. 33

pg. 49

pg. 73

S.C. -1.1 S.C. -1.2 S.C. -2.1 S.C. -2.2 Studio C - 1.1

Studio C - 1.2

SPRING 2011 INSTRUCTORS: SHANA SHEVITZ - COHEN JEFFREY LECLAIR

SUMMER 2011 INSTRUCTORS: MARTA PASTRIAN PABLO RAMOS

P.S.

UPDATING DOWNTOWN

Studio C - 2.1

Studio C - 2.2

FALL 2011 INSTRUCTOR: ANDY GROGAN

SPRING 2012 INSTRUCTORS: SETH RISEMAN ROB HAGAN

A NEW PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR HOLYOKE, MA

RE-WORKING HOUSING

pg. 105

pg. 117

pg. 129

pg. 151

A.C.

D.C.

P.C.- L.A. P.C.-ARCH.

Academic Component Design Competitions Practice Component Practice Component Landscape Architecture AUTODESK REVIT WORLD UNITY LANDMARK Architecture SPRING 2011 SUMMER 2011 INSTRUCTOR: GREG DEMCHACK

TEAM: DAVID HANSEN / DELIA GOTT

IDEAS AND DESIGN - FILM AND SOCIETY

NOMA STUDENT DESIGN COMPETITION

SPRING 2012 INSTRUCTOR: AMY VAN LAWKE

SUMMER - FALL 2011 TEAM: JAHIM BASKERVILLE / DAVID HANSEN CHRIS MCINTOSH / DELIA GOTT

WARNER LARSON, INC. 2010-2012

MAGUIRE GROUP, INC. 2012

P.S. STUDIO

INSTRUCTORS: SHANA SHEVITZ COHEN / JEFFREY LECLAIR SPRING 2011

S.C. -1.1

PROJECT 1: POST CARD EXHIBIT

In a challange to simplify and express a complex emotion, we were asked to design a post card describing our feeling of ‘home’ . At that moment, I was very much ‘in between’ places, and my representation of home is a piece of a ‘vacancy’ motel sign.

DURATION: 3 WEEKS

Under the guidance of two instructors formed at RISD, this studio had a multi-sensory approach to design. How does one perceive space? What defines the experience? If our eyes are not pleased, can we improve upon the “feel” of a space by tactile sensations? Can we enrich an acoustical experience by adding smells? Can a visual experience be coordinated with haptic sensations? Art will appeal to different senses. There is the art of cooking with the wonderful tastes and smells. There is the art of music pleasing to ears and spirit, and the art of painting, so inspiring to look at. Imagine living in an artistic space that pleases all the senses! A space with all these virtues becomes The Space, unique, remembered and desired.

ay, ighw of night, h e l rk mp no si he da oad, n and t follow, r a y s w e. da ma re i The een the no one teps alon s o Betw if you g or your f And path is t a h T

. STUDIO STON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE RING 2011 It is very difficult to clearly determine how people feel about space. It is not something you calculate easily, as you do with numbers. Even the most precise description, listing all visible features, will not give an inkling of what we feel is the essence of the space. Architecture provides not only new ways of considering form, but of

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linking form to physical content, expanding the possibilities of Architecture as multi sensory Architecture that engages all the senses, such as sight, sound, touch, smell and taste, etc Architects are constantly seeking opportunities to establish the sense of love between space and its users. At the end of the day we hope to have discovered and orchestrated the dimensions that engage all senses - in a way that pleases, lingers, and ultimately leaves the user satisfied.

INSTRUCTORS: SHANA SHEVITZ COHEN JEFFREY LECLAIR

original concept

I was interested in capturing the turn of a wrist motion in an tectonic form. Invisible strings hold the post card in tension. The nonparallel edges, cause the card to slowly twist.

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section, scale 1/8”=1’-0” The introductory exercise was designing a post card exhibit. This was a challenge to look at the substance of small things... Post cards hold emotions, stories and memories on a 4”x6” piece of paper. I took interest in the experience of receiving a post card...First looking at the image, then turning it to the other side to unveil a message from a far. In the simple wrist turn, one can ‘travel’ long distances and feel close to a loved one.

First lacked

installation balance

iteration .

Thinking of a series of post cards instead of a singular moment, determined the full scale installation of the design apparatus. .

section, scale 1/8”=1’-0”

After the initial design of the apparatus, we were asked to place the installation in a real site of our choice. I imagined a temporary exhibit “Post Cards from the Past”, located at the Government Center t stop. As early as the 1950s, city officials had been mulling plans to completely tear down and redevelop the Scollay Square area, in order to remove lower-income residents and troubled businesses from the aging and seedy district.

Physical and 3D models.

INSTRUCTORS: SHANA SHEVITZ COHEN JEFFREY LECLAIR

Attempts to reopen the sullied Old Howard Theatre by its performers had been one of the last efforts against redevelopment; but with the theater gutted by fire, a city wrecking ball began the project of demolishing over 1000 buildings in the area; 20,000 residents were displaced. With $40 million in federal funds, the city built an entirely new development on top of old Scollay Square, renaming the area Government Center, and peppering it with city, state, and federal government buildings: Boston City Hall, City Hall Plaza, Government Service Center, Edward W. Brooke Courthouse.

The site of the installation. original concept

section. N.T.S.

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The post card exhibit will showcase images of Scollay Square as well as a collection of messages and memories of its former inhabitants and the dislocated community.

STUDENT: DELIA GOTT section, scale 1/8”=1’-0”

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“My dad (who was known as Snuffy) was a boxer - the featherweight champ of N.E. Back in the 1930’s. He had to use his brother’s name to fight because at the time he wasn’t old enough to fight by the boxing commissions regulations! He fought at the Boston Garden, Boston Arena, etc. My dad was very well known and loved in the North End. Grandma owned apartment buildings on Stillman Street there and we used to go to visit every weekend and look forward to checking out the markets and carts selling fruits, veggies and our favorites, roasted peanuts and cooked crabs!!! We’d walk down the street and people would yell out from everywhere, “ hey Snuffy”. I was so proud of him!!!! Oh well, so much for the past, it’s gone and so is Scollay square, I thank God for the memories and only wish kids nowadays had the same opportunity to enjoy that quality of life!” Eleanor so u r c e: w ww. ba m b i no m u s i cal . com/Scollay/Memories.html

S

We were introduced to two different sites, both located in Somerville, MA and we were asked to do a comparative documentation based on the acoustical experience.

PROJECT 2: RADIO STATION DURATION: 13 WEEKS

How does one document a sound? How can the audio experience be related to the traditional site analysis? It was imperative to reinvent a language a representation that was non-traditional to architectural standards.

Sound does not travel linearly, and in an urban site noises come from various directions and at different intensities.

Documenting the experience was done based on the imaginary ‘dome’ of hearing... the sounds were analyzed based on their nature and intesity.

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SITE A

SITE B

13

The sounds were divided in two categories based on the nature of their source: O R G A N I C •Environmental (wind, water, etc.) •Biological animals or humans) I N O R G A N I C •Mechanical (engines, AC units) •Synthetic (doors slamming) •Harmonic (music)

14 Site analysis.

CONCEPT CONCEPT ONCEPT In order for the sound analysis to inform the building development, a strong set of rules needed to be set. A deeper understanding of sound quality and quantity was necessary.

QUANTITATIVE QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS: ANALYSIS: UANTITATIVE ANALYSIS: CONCEPT DEFINES DEFINES SHAPES SHAPES EFINES SHAPES QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS: Sound 2 is louder than sound 1. Sound 3 has a higher pitch than sound 2. Sound 1

Sound 2

Sound 3

DEFINES SHAPES

QUALITA QUALIT QUALITAT 15 DEFINES DEFINE DEFINES QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS: The QUALITATIVE analysis shall define the materiality.

DEFINES MATERIALITY BRIGHT COLORS / MOIRE PATTERN

BRIGHT COLORS/ MOIRE PATTERN MESH

SOUND 2 IS LOUDER THAN SOUND 1. SOUND 3 HAS A HIGHER PITCH THAN SOUND 2.

1. 1. 1. SOUND SOUND SOUND THAN THAN THAN LOUDER LOUDER IS 2 IS 2 IS2 LOUDER OUND SOUND UND 2. 2. 2. SOUND SOUND SOUND THAN THAN THAN PITCH PITCH PITCH A HIGHER A HIGHER HIGHER HAS 3 HAS 3A 3 HAS OUND SOUND UND

CONCRETE/ STONE CONCRETE / STONE

METAL/ GLASS

METAL / GLASS WOOD/ FABRIC

PLANTING WOOD / FABRIC The QUANTITATIVE analysis shall define the shapes.

PLANTING

16 Aerial context.

a. a. a.

e.

d.d. site site site site

b. b. b.

c. c. c.

f.

e.e. longitudinal sound quantity longitudinal sound quantity longitudinal sound quantity longitudinal sound quantity

f.quantity f.sound cross sound quantity quantity crosscross sound cross sound quantity

d. d. d.

e. e. e.

g.

g. sound g.sound general sound quantity general quantity general quantity general sound quantity

pedestrian path pedestrian pedestrian pathpath pedestrian path

a a+ +bb+ +c c= =dd a a+ +e e= =f f f =gg dd+ +f =

uantity antity

general sound quantity general sound quantity

pedestrian path17

pedestrian path pedestrian path

access tunnel access to to tunnel

access to tunnel

general concept general concept

general concept

f.

a acces

a a d

18

19 First formal iterations, based on the rules previously set.

ST PEDE

COMMUTER RAIL

RIAN N

ECTIO CONN

SACRAMENTO STREET

BEACON

PETSI PIES CONNECTI ON STREET

SACRA M

VEHICULA

R CONNEC

The sheer size of the program in its context, generated the 1/2 buried strategy to help minimize the impact on the neighborhood.

TREET

ENTO S

ALITATIVE ANALYSIS: INES MATERIALITY

CONNECTIVITY One of the main goals of the site approach is to re-establish the pedestrian connection between the two sides of Sommervile, separated by the commuter rail.

BRIGHT COLORS/ MOIRE PATTERN MESH

WITH THE IMMEDIATE VICINITY: PETSI PIES

CONCRETE/ STONE

WITH THE NEIGHBORHOOD: TUNNEL ACCESS ENHANCED AND HIGHLIGHTED

METAL/ GLASS

TION

WITH THE CITY OF BOSTON: VIEWS FROM THE RESIDENTIAL UNITS WITH THE LARGER SCALE: RADIO

WOOD/ FABRIC

PLANTING

20

SECTION SCALE 1/16”=1’

CONTEXT

CONCEPT

VEGETATED SPACE

PARKING

BATHROOMS LOBBY

HOUSING POSTCARD EXHIBIT VEHICULAR ACCESS CLIMBING WALL OFFICE CONFERENCE ROOM

AUXILIARY SPACE

GREEN ROOM OUTDOOR AUDITORIUM CONTROL BOOTH STAGE

SOUND STUDIO

CAFE

MUSIC LIBRARY

MARKET

MUSIC STORE

FIRST FLOOR PLAN N.T.S. FIRST FLOOR PLAN SCALE 1/32”=1’ PARKING

HOUSING LIBRARY CONFERENCE ROOM

21

ORE

=1’

FIRST FIRSTFLOOR FLOORPLAN PLANSCALE SCALE1/32”=1’ 1/32”=1’ MARKET

MUSIC STORE

PARKING PARKING

FIRST FLOOR PLAN SCALE 1/32”=1’ HOUSING HOUSING PARKING

LIBRARY LIBRARY HOUSING

CONFERENCE CONFERENCEROOM ROOM LIBRARY

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CONFERENCE ROOM

SECOND SECONDFLOOR FLOORPLAN PLANSCALE SCALE1/64”= 1/64”= SECOND FLOOR N.T.S. PLAN SCALE 1/64”=1’

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

MATERIAL STUDIES

MUSIC STORE

OR PLAN SCALE 1/32”=1’

M

SECTION SCALE 1/16”=1’ a+b+c=d a+e=f d+f=g

BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE P.S. STUDIO INSTRUCTORS: SHANA SHEVITZ COHEN JEFFREY LECLAIR STUDENT: DELIA GOTT

eral concept

LOOR PLAN SCALE 1/64”=1’ MATERIAL STUDIES

CROSS SECTION

N.T.S.

MATERIAL STUDIES

23

SECTION SCALE SECTION SCALE 1/16”=1’ 1/16”=1’ LONGITUDINAL SECTION

N.T.S.

BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE P.S. BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE P.S.STUDIO STUDIO

INTERIOR STUDIES

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25

MATERIAL STUDIES BASED ON THE RULES SET ABOVE

26

27

EXTERIOR VIEWS

28

29

As a conclusion to the studio, we were challenged to represent a sense we had not previously investigated. I designed ‘smell boxes’ to further explore the nature of the spaces, and a ‘taste map’, to essentialize the design.

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S.C. -1.2 UPDATING DOWNTOWN INSTRUCTORS: PASTRIAN + RAMOS SUMMER 2011

DOWNTOWN CROSSING: FILENE’S INTERVENTION DURATION: 8 WEEKS - SUMMER SESSION

This studio started with the analysis of 2 words. My choices: SYNERGY & PARASITISM. These 2 concepts will be analyzed in the context of Downtown Crossing, and the empty shell of Filene’s building. I was thinking about the information age we live in. An age where our smart phones are rapidly becoming the remote control to our lives, filling in the gap between exerting physical effort to turn the computer on and watching a movie or listening to music on the pc. Through an unlimited amount of apps, we become more productive and efficient and have access to a n unlimited source of human intelligence. we are connceted with our devices, and in synergy with the rest of the world. SYNERGY the term comes from the Greek word syn-ergos, meaning “working together” two or more things functioning together to produce a result not independently obtainable a cohesive group is more than the sum of its parts, synergy is the ability of a group to outperform even its best individual member

SYNERGY SYNERGY SYNERG SYNERGY

the term synergy the term comes synergy the from term comes thesynerg Greek fro the term synergy comes from the Greek word syn-ergos, meaning syn-ergos, “working meaning syn-ergos, together” “working mean syn-ergos, meaning “working together”

two or more two things or more functioning two things or more together function thin two or more things to producefunctioning a resultduce nottogether independently a resultduce not independe a result obtainab no duce a result not independently obtainable

a cohesive group a cohesive is more group a than cohesive isthe more sum group tho a cohesive group is more than sum of of parts, synergy parts, isthe thesynergy ability parts, isitsthe asynergy group abilitytoiso parts, synergy isform the even abilityitsof a group to outperform best even individual itsform best member even individua its be form even its best individual member

in media economics, in mediasynergy economics, in media is theeconom synerg prom in media economics, synergy is the and sale of aand product salepromotion of throughout aand product sale of the throug a pro var and sale of a product throughout the various subsidiaries of subsidiaries a media conglomerate: subsidiaries of a media cong offila subsidiaries of asoundtracks media conglomerate: films, soundtracks or video games soundtracks or video games or v soundtracks or video games

example : keyboard example and : keyboard example mouse:and keybo m king information I about was thinking the ageinformation weabout live the in.age An information we agelive where in.age An ourwe age smart livewhere in. phones An ourage are smart where rapidly phones our becoming smart are rapidly phones the remote becoming are rapidly control the becoming remote control the remote control in media is the example keyboard and mouse es, e gap filling to our between lives, theage exerting gap filling between in physical the smart gap exerting effort between physical to economics, turn exerting effort the synergy computer physical to turn effort the on and computer to watching turn the on computer aandmovie watching oron listening and a movie watching or listening a : movie or listening we live in.inAn where our phones are promotion and rapidly sale of becoming a product the remote control on rough the to an music pc.unlimited Through on effort theamount an pc. Through apps, amount an we unlimited become ofthe apps, amount more wesubsidiaries become of productive apps,a more weand become productive efficient more and andproductive have efficient access and andtohave efficient access and tohave access to throughout various xerting physical tounlimited turnof the computer on and watching movie or listening of a media conglomerate: films, ted asource n intelligence. unlimited human source we are of connceted human weintelligence. are withconnceted our we devices, are with connceted and our indevices, synergy with our with in devices, the synergy of with inthethe synergy world. rest with of the theworld. rest of the world. dhuman amount ofof apps, weintelligence. become more productive and efficient and haveand access torestand soundtracks or video games ce. we are connceted with our devices, and in synergy with the rest of the world.

34

example : keyboard and mouse

I was thinking about the information age we live in. An age where our smart phones are rapidly be to our lives, filling in the gap between exerting physical effort to turn the computer on and wat to music on the pc. Through an unlimited amount of apps, we become more productive and effi a n unlimited source of human intelligence. we are connceted with our devices, and in synergy w

PARASITISM PARAS

the word parasitism comes from the Greek sitos- “one who eats at the of another thetable word paras PARASITISM

sitos- “one who

PARAS

relationship between organisms of differen

The word parasitism comes from cies where one organism, the parasite, ben the Greek parasites “one who eats at the table of another” the expense of the other

relationship be the where word para cies one 35 sitos“one the expensewh o

Relationship between organisms of different species where one organism, the parasite, benefitsparasites at are generally much smaller than t the expense of the other

host

Parasites are generally smaller than their host

much

relationship parasites are bg cies where on host the expense o

In many cases, it is difficult intomany cases, it is difficult to demonstrate demonstrate that the host is harmed the host is harmed OK, so I admit that thinking about credit cards as parasites is a bit of a stretch... However, the previous definition fits the nature of the beast. Debt results when a client of a credit card an itemexample or example : parasite dwelling : parasite dwelling OK, so I admit that thinking about credit cards as parasites is a bit of a stretch... however, the previous definition fits thecompany nature of purchases the service through the card system. beast. Debt results when a client of a credit card company purchases an item or service through the card system. Debt accumulates and increases via interest and penalties when the consumer does not pay the company for the money he or she has spent. Debt accumulates and increases The results of not paying this debt on time are that the company will charge a late payment penalty , which further via interest and penalties when increases the amount of debt the consumer has. Total U.S. consumer debt: $2.43 trillion ( $ 2,430,000,000,000,000,000). the consumer does not pay the

in many cases, parasites g the host is are harm host

company for the money he or she has spent.

in many cases The results of not paying this debt theofhost is ha example OK, so I admit that thinking credit cards ahowever, bit of isa stretch... the that previous definition fits the nature of the OK, so I admit thatabout thinking about cards asisparasites athe bit previous of ahowever, stretch... however, the previous definition fits the nature the: para OK, so I admit that thinking about credit cards as parasites is a credit bitasofparasites a stretch... fitsthe the nature of on definition time are company willthe charge asystem. late payment penalty beast. results a card client ofaaclient credit company anthrough item orthe through the card system. accumulates results when ofcard a credit company anservice item service through the ,cardDebt system. Debt accumulates beast. Debt results whenDebt a beast. client ofDebt awhen credit company purchases an card itempurchases or servicepurchases card or Debt accumulates which further increases the amount increases via interest penalties the when consumer does not does pay company for the money he or she has spent. increases viaand interest and when penalties thethe consumer not pay the company for the money he or she has spent. and increases viaand interest and penalties when the consumer does not pay company for the the money he or she has spent. of debt the consumer has. Total U.S. consumer debt: $2.43 trillion ( $ The paying results of results not this debtthat on the timecompany are time thatwillare thecharge company will payment chargewillapenalty late payment penalty which further The of paying this debt on that the company charge late payment , which further The results of not this debtpaying on not time are a late , a which further , penalty 2,430,000,000,000,000,000). increases the amount ofamount debthas. the consumer has. Totalhas. U.S.Total consumer debt: trillion $ 2,430,000,000,000,000,000). of Total debt the consumer consumer debt: $2.43( trillion ( $ 2,430,000,000,000,000,000). increases the amount of increases debt the the consumer U.S. consumer debt: $2.43U.S. trillion ( $$2.43 2,430,000,000,000,000,000).

OK, so I admit that thinking about credit cards as parasites is a bit of a stretch... however, the previous definition fits the nature of the beast. Debt results when a client of a credit card company purchases an item or service through the card system. Debt accumulates and increases via interest and penalties when the consumer does not pay the company for the money he or she has spent. The results of not paying this debt on time are that the company will charge a late payment penalty , which further increases the amount of debt the consumer has. Total U.S. consumer debt: $2.43 trillion ( $ 2,430,000,000,000,000,000).

example : par

TRANSPORTATION STREET VENDORS

COMMERCE

COMMERCE

CAFE/RESTAURANT

CAFE/RESTAURANT

INSTITUTION INSTITUTION

VERTICAL PARASITISM

OFFICE

OFFICE

RESIDENTIAL

RESIDENTIAL ENTERTAINMENT TRANSPORTATION

ENTERTAINMENT

STREET VENDORS

TRANSPORTATION STREET VENDORS

VERTICAL SYNERGY 27%

7%

2% 14%

13% 19%

18%

HORIZONTAL PARASITISM

27%

HORIZONTAL SYNERGY

7%

2% 14%

13% 19%

18%

The parasitic relations are mostly identified in the physical form: layers of added building skin, 27% removed pieces of the original building, dysfunctional vertical occupancy as a result of poor street traffic. 13% The synergies identified on the site 19% appear mostly at programmatic level. A variety of functions accommodate a diverse group of users, however these relationships happen instinctual, without a master plan that could promote a healthy use of the area 24 hours a day.

7

VERTICAL PARASITISM

VERTICAL PARASITISM

VERTICAL SYNERGY

VERTICAL SYNERGY

HORIZONTAL PARASITISM

HORIZONTAL SYNERGY

HORIZONTAL PARASITISM

HORIZONTAL SYNERGY

37

VERTICAL PARASITISM

VERTICAL PARASITISM

overover timetime layers and and layers of of dif layers layers different treatments have have facade been added to the original b been added to the original building: signs, graffiti. different materials, signs, graffiti. when these elements when these elements are are not not con VERTICAL PARASITISM suffocate building they which appe controlled or the removed, suffocate the building which upper floors harder to rent appears deserted, making the upper floors harder to rent

VERTICAL SYNERGY different element may be added t VERTICAL if theySYNERGY are executed in a controlle they improve the quality of the e different element may be added to upper floor occupancy the higher original structure. VERTICAL SYNERGY if they are executed in a controlled and tasteful manner, they improve the quality of the experience, with results in higher upper floor HORIZONTAL PARASITISM occupancy

this appears at a functional level: parasites of others HORIZONTAL example:PARASITISM parking lot and theatre this appears at a functional level: book store and university HORIZONTAL PARASITISM some programs become parasites cafe/restaurant and office of others

example: parking lot and theatre HORIZONTAL SYNERGY book store and university this relationship cafe/restaurant and officeis very similar to

but is usually different due to ow example: HORIZONTAL SYNERGY office and parking garage university and university owned b HORIZONTAL SYNERGY

this relationship is very similar to the horizontal parasitism but is usually different due to ownership example: office and parking garage A veryand special relationship university university owned is defin and the book store andstreet cafe vendors. While the

ergy, the street vendors profit fro between the two.

A very special relationship is defined by the T exit, Macy’s and the street vendors. While the T and Macy’s are in synergy, the street vendors profit from the pedestrian path between the two.

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

P

COMMERCE CAFE/RESTAURANT INSTITUTION OFFICE RESIDENTIAL ENTERTAINMENT TRANSPORTATION STREET VENDORS

Program use diagram on a week day. Notice the uneven distribution of use. The proposed building aims to create night time program and a more balanced usage throughout the day.

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P

P

P P

P

P

P P

P

P P

P

COMMERCE & EDUCATION

ENTERTAINMENT & SHOPPING

HOUSING & VEGETATED SPACE

FOOD & OFFICE COMMERCE & TRANSPORATION

PARKING & ENTERTAINMENT

OFFICE & EDUCATION

FROM

TO

PARASITISM

SYNERGY

the word parasitism comes from the Greek parasitos- “one who eats at the table of another” relationship between organisms of different species where one organism, the parasite, benefits at the expense of the other parasites are much smaller than

generally their host

in many cases, it is difficult to demonstrate that the host is harmed

M

E

D

I

From the previous analysis we understand that different programs can enhance each other (synergy) or compete with each other (parasytism).

the term synergy comes from the Greek word syn-ergos, meaning “working together”

The proposed building is eager to solve the problems on site: it announces its presence as a foreign object, occupying the empty shell that used to be Filene’s. Its tentacles lure you in, and you might find yourself inside the building without even realizing it.

a cohesive group is more than the sum of its parts, synergy is the ability of a group to outperform even its best individual member

A T

H

two or more things functioning together to produce a result not independently obtainable

E

Q

U

E

BAC C-1 STUDIO: UPDATING DOWNTOWN instructors: Pastrián + Ramos student: Delia Gott

BUILD FORM

FUNCTION

BEHAVIORAL

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SITE ANALYSIS

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

P

P

P

P P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

INITIAL MODEL EXPLORATIONS

GROUND LEVEL

EK DAY

1ST FLOOR: PRINTED MEDIA

GARDEN CONNECTED TO RESIDENTIAL FOOD

2 3 4 5 6DANCE 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

P

P

P

P P

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PERFORMANCE

RECORDING STUDIO

P

P

P P

P

P P

The mediatheque program allows for a flexible use at different times of the day. The focus of activity changes depending on the time of day (or night). Spaces flow one into another, and the open space is designed to accommodate adaptive reuse.

P

APPLIED MEDIA LABS

UNPROGRAMED SPACE CONNECTED TO OFFICE AND SCHOOL

PRINTED MEDIA LIBRARY

2ND FLOOR: UNPROGRAMMED SPACE RECHARGE MEDIA STATION

PUBLIC SPACE

E DIAGRAM OVER A WEEK DAY T EXIT

GROUND LEVEL

1ST FLOOR: PRINTED MEDIA

2ND FLOOR: UNPROGRAMMED SPACE

3RD FLOOR: MEDIA LABS

3RD FLOOR: MEDIA LABS

GARDEN CONNECTED TO RESIDENTIAL FOOD

N SCALE 1/16”=1’-0” DANCE

PERFORMANCE

RECORDING STUDIO

APPLIED MEDIA LABS

UNPROGRAMED SPACE CONNECTED TO OFFICE AND SCHOOL

PRINTED MEDIA LIBRARY

RECHARGE MEDIA STATION

PUBLIC SPACE

T EXIT

SECTION SCALE 1/16”=1’-0”

4TH FLOOR: VISUAL PERFORMANCE 5TH FLOOR: PARTICIPATORY PERFORMANCE

6TH FLOOR: FOOD/ GREEN SPACE

The street level creates an artificial topography…- a space to recollect and recharge. The second level engages the façade where the previous awning used to be, but it becomes a connection with the buildings in the vicinity as well as the street. It is designed to become a secondary street level, floating on top of the existing one, engaging with the programs

Previously inaccessible from the ground floor. Lastly, the boldest façade intervention is the explosion of the Performance space; visible from the street, as well as accessible from the building across, the space breaks the existing façade, and stretches it towards Macy’s.

hopes that the reactivation of this historically difficult space in Boston will eventually reinvent the building. By parasitizing the shell of downtown past, the design aims to create a synergetic place.

This building attempt to reinvent the downtown typology and it

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CONCEPTUAL MODEL

43

The site analysis highlights the different types of parasitic and synergetic relationships: The parasitic relations ions are mostly identified in the physical form: layers of added building skin, removed pieces of the original building, dysfunctional vertical occupancy as a result of poor street traffic. The synergies identified on the site appear mostly at programmatic level. A variety of functions accommodate a diverse group of users, however these relationships happen instinctual, without a master plan that could promote a healthy use of the area 24 hours a day. The proposed building is eager to solve the problems on site: it announces its presence as a foreign object, occupying the empty shell that used to be Filene’s. Its tentacles lure you in, and you might find yourself inside the building without even realizing it. The street level creates an artificial topography… a space to recollect and recharge. The second level engages the façade where the previous awning used to be, but it becomes a connection with the buildings in the vicinity as well as the street. It is designed to become a secondary street level, floating on top of the existing one, engaging with the programs previously inaccessible from the ground floor. Lastly, the boldest façade intervention is the explosion of the performance space; visible from the street, as well as accessible from the building across, the space breaks the existing façade, and stretches it towards Macy…s.

EAST ELEVATION

The mediatheque program allows for a flexible use at different times of the day. The focus of activity changes depending on the time of day (or night). Spaces flow one into another, and the open space is designed to accommodate adaptive reuse.

SCALE 1/16”=1’-0”

M E D I A 44 T H E Q U E

This building attempt to reinvent the downtown typology and it hopes that the reactivation of this historically difficult space in Boston will eventually reinvent the building. By parasitizing the shell of downtown past, the design aims to create a synergetic place.

UPDATING

AERIAL CONTEXT

CONTEXT DIAGRAM SITE OBSERVATIONS

DOWNTOWN ARCHITECTURE FROMSITE PARASITISM TO PAVING SYNERGY FURNITUREINSTRUCTORS: AND PASTRIAN+RAMOS : DELIA GOTT PATTERNS MAKING STUDENTTHE CONNECTION TO PARK STREET T STOP.

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

INTERVENTION DIAGRAM P

P

P

P P

P

P

P P

P

P P

P PARASITISM G R E E K ‘ PA R A S I TO S ’ ONE WHO EATS AT THE TABLE OF ANOTHER S Y N E R G Y G R E E K ‘SYN-ERGOS’ W O R K I N G T O G E T H E R

USAGE DIAGRAM

EXISTING

EAT EAT RELAX RELAX MEETMEET

WATCH WATCH LISTEN LISTEN LEARN LEARN READREAD

M

SURFSURF

PLAN PLAN SCALESCALE 1/16”=1’-0” 1/16”=1’-0”

CROSSCROSS SECTION SECTION SCALESCALE 1/16”=1’-0” 1/16”=1’-0” SECOND FLOOR PLAN SOUTH ELEVATION

CROSS SECTION

SCALE 1/16”=1’-0”

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PLAN

SCALE 1/16”=1’-0”

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

CIRCULATION AND CONNECTIVITY

EYE LEVEL IMAGE OF FILENE’S BUILDING AND PARASITE ‘TENTACULES’

INTERIOR SPACES

CONTEXT DIAG

INTERVENTION DIAGRAM

EXISTING

SUBTRACTION

ADDITION

46

OUTH ELEVATION

SCALE 1/16”=1’-0”

INTERVENTION DIAGRAM INTERVENTION DIAGRAM

EXISTING EXISTING

CIRCULATION AND CONNECTIVITY

SUBTRACTION SUBTRACTION

ADDITION ADDITION

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S.C. -2.1 THE IDEA IS THE OBJECT THE OBJECT IS THE IDEA A NEW PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR HOLYOKE, MA INSTRUCTOR: ANDY GROGAN FALL 2011

A NEW PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR HOLYOKE, MA

multimedia

DURATION: 16 WEEKS

In order to understand the functioning of a library, we were asked to do a precedent analysis. In the award winning scheme for two libraries at Jussieu, a technical university in Paris, OMA radically reconfigures the typical library layout. Rather than stacking one level on top of another, floor planes are manipulated to connect; thus forming a single trajectory - much like an interior boulevard that winds its way through the entire building.

multimedia

periodicals

In this way a single trajectory traverses the entire structure like a warped interior Boulevard. The visitor becomes a Baudelairean flaneur, inspecting and being seduced by a world of books and information and the urban scenario. Through its scale and variety, the effect of the inhabited planes becomes almost that of a street, a theme which influences the interpretation and planning of the Boulevard as part of a system of further supra-programmatic urban elements in the interior: plazas, parks, monumental staircases, cafes, shops.

Boston Architectural College CD102D Core 2 Studio THE OBJECT IS THE IDEA. THE IDEA IS THE OBJECT. A new Public Library for Holyoke, MA

physics

Instructor: Andy Grogan Student: Delia Gott chemistry

biology

cartography

earth sciences

50 Boston Architectural College

WEEK 2: PRECEDENT STUDY OMA-Tres Grande Biblioteque

humanities library

auditorium audiovisual lab

event hall reception

general culture

multimedia

humanities library

physics chemistry

auditorium audiovisual lab

biology

office

reprographics event hall

cartography

dining

earth sciences

gallery

reception

multimedia

general culture

office

reprographics dining gallery

periodicals

ed

elf,

PRECEDENT STUDY: OMA-TRES GRANDE BIBLIOTEQUE

In this way a single trajectory traverses the entire structure like a warped interior Boulevard. The visitor becomes a Baudelairean flaneur, inspecting and being seduced by a world of books and information and the urban scenario.

In the award winning scheme for two libraries at Jussieu, a technical university in Paris, OMA radically reconfigures the typical library layout. Rather than stacking one level on top of another, floor planes are manipulated to connect; thus forming a single trajectory - much like an interior boulevard that winds its way through the entire building.

Through its scale and variety, the effect of the inhabited planes becomes almost that of a street, a theme which influences the interpretation and planning of the Boulevard as part of a system of further supra-programmatic urban elements in the interior: plazas, parks, monumental staircases, cafes, shops

Boston Architectural College CD102D Core 2 Studio THE OBJECT IS THE IDEA. THE IDEA IS THE OBJECT. A new Public Library for Holyoke, MA

Instructor: Andy Grogan Student: Delia Gott

WEEK 2: PRECEDENT STU OMA-Tres Grande Biblioteq

Typical assembly could hold 500 books.

SHELVING STRATEGY:

SHELVING STRATEGY: MULTIFUNCTIONAL KIT OF PARTS

MULTIFUNCTIONAL KIT OF PARTS

The parts could be assembled and reassembled as needed in the future. This aslo sets up a great opportunity The parts could be assembled for tracking changes, for shinking or expanding. and reassembled as needed in the future. This aslo sets up a great opportunity for tracking changes, for shinking or expanding.

HELVING STRATEGY: SHELVING STRATEGY: ULTIFUNCTIONAL KIT OF PARTS 52

MULTIFUNCTIONAL PARTS parts could be assembled and reassembled as neededKIT in theOF future. This aslo sets up a great opportunity The parts be assembled and reassembled as needed in the future. This aslo sets up a great opportunity acking changes, for shinking or could expanding.

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The different parts could fit under vertical circulation or roof pitches.

The same kit of parts could be assembled in seating areas, desks, oversized book storage, etc.

GY: STRATEGY: LVING STRATEGY: KIT OF PARTS KIT OF PARTS TIFUNCTIONAL eassembled asKIT needed inreassembled the future. This setsinupthe a great opportunity TIONAL OF PARTS could be assembled and asaslo needed future. This aslo sets up a great opportunity

This was a study of shelving for the children’s library, but soon raised questions related to organization and order.

expanding. sembled andfor reassembled needed in the future. This aslo sets up a great opportunity ng changes, shinking oras expanding. for shinking or expanding.

A scale study shows the extent of this type of shelving, in order to accomodate 500, 10 000 and respectively 100 000 volumes required by the program. 500 VOLUMES

500 VOLUMES 500 VOLUMES

The typical library shelf engages the user in a series of horizontal browsing sessions. The different layers hold information organized in related subject topics. I one is looking for a volume on the ‘orange’ shelf, one completely ignores the ‘green’ shelf.

If the layers would be diagonal, the browsing would expose the user to a multitude of subjects. this would encourage an interdisciplinary approach, and exposure to a multitude of fields. While this was discovered through the diagonal shelf, it was soon realized that the same effect could be accomplished with regular shelving and sloped circulations. This solves the inconvenience of storing books in a rhombus shelf.

10,000 VOLUMES 10,000 VOLUMES 10,000 VOLUMES

SIT

E

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SITE ANALYSIS: LIBRARY AS SOCIAL AGENCY Holyoke is a struggling community, with a fantastic infrastructure, and valuable build environment. A quick Demographic analysis highlights the social and economic strugles, particularly in the area referred to as “The Flats”.

ENGLISH SPEAKING POPULATION

Based on MASS GIS information, we can see that the young population in the community is living under the poverty level, and is lacking the educational opportunity to overcome their condition. It has become clear that the Library’s role is to provide services for an underprivileged community, and It could potentially become the catalyst of its revitalization.

NON-ENGLISH SPEAKING POPULATION

55 MEDIAN GROSS INCOME

POPULATION UNDER 18 RENT AS PERCENT OF HOSEHOLD INCOME

POPULATION 18-64 HOUSEHOLD EARNING LESS THAN 25K

POPULATION OVER 65

The challange of our studio is to look at the relationship of objects and ideas, and the way archiving them supports knowledge. At urban scale those can be interpreted as the rich build environment of Holyoke; the object, and it’s troubled society: the idea. There is an obvious dissonance between the object and idea, between the past and the present. The fantastic potential of the city could become accomplishment if a synergy between object and idea is established.

(

‘THE IDEA’ IS REPRESENTED BY ALL THE SCHOOLS AND EXISTING LIBRARY IN THE IMMEDIATE VICINITY.

EXISTING STRUCTURE

THE OBJECT IS THE IDEA, THE IDEA IS THE OBJECT: REINFORCE THE OBJECT WITH IDEA The challenge of our studio is to look at the relationship of objects and ideas, and the way archiving them supports knowledge. At urban scale those can be interpreted as the rich build environment of Holyoke; the object, and it’s troubled society: the idea. There is an obvious dissonance between the object and idea, between the past and the present. The fantastic potential of the city could become accomplishment if a synergy between object and idea is established.

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OPEN TO “THE FLATS”

HOLYOKE USED TO BE ONE OF THE WEALTHIEST CITIES IN THE U.S. AT THE BEGINNING OF THE 19TH CENTURY. THE RICH ARCHITECTURAL AND URBANISTIC HERITAGE REPRESENTS ‘THE OBJECT’ IN OUR EQUATION. PL

SITE STRATEGY:

AN VIE NE W T D OW DE A VE RD LO S PM EN

T

SHORT (BLOCKED) VIEWS

PEDESTRIAN ACCESS

MA I

STEEP SLOPE

THE OBJECT IS THE IDEA, THE IDEA IS T

57

Haunted by the idea of creating synergy between the object and the idea I started experimenting with the physical translation of the concepts.

While the two representations of the object and idea are interesting on the own, when placed adjacently they truly enhance each other.

‘The idea’ is represented by floating words, engraved on transparent surfaces - ethereal and dynamic.

Regardless of which side of the transparent medium the words are placed, they all become legible through reflection.

‘The object’ is represented by steel elements - earthy and static.

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59

The Library strives to provide enlightenment to an undeserved community, and the effects of reflection could be a symbol of Library as equalizer. Bilingual quotes would be engraved on the facade - in English and Spanish. Their translations are engraved in the interior - but the reflections allow for both the original and the translation to be read and understood inside...

Further more, the stacks become the stitching reconmnecting the social fabric of the community.

The main trajectories frame iconic buildings of Holyoke.

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61

site plan: scale 1/32” = 1’-0”

first floor plan: scale 1/16” = 1’-0”

M (C AIN IT Y V I HA EW LL )

MA ect

TO ATS”

REFERENCE OFFICE & STORAGE TECHNICAL SERVICES ELEVATOR

REFERENCE OFFICE REFERENCE STACKS & STORAGE REFERENCE TECHNICAL SERVICES COMPUTERS REFERENCE DESK ELEVATOR

REFERENCE STACKS REFERENCE COMPUTERS REFERENCE DESK

STAFF ROOM DIRECTOR OFFICE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR FINANCIAL MANAGER OFFICE RESTROOM INDIVIDUAL STUDY SPACE

RESTROOM KITCHEN STORAGE

CAFE DVD’S $ CD’S PERIODICALS CONFERENCE ROOM COMPUTER CLASSROOM CAFE PUBLIC MEETING DVD’S $ CD’S SPACE

PERIODICALS CONFERENCE ROOM COMPUTER CLASSROOM PUBLIC MEETING SPACE

BRARY FOR HOLYOKE , MA

second floor plan: scale 1/16” = 1’-0”

A LOCAL HISTORY ROOM ART GALLERY CIRCULATION OFFICE CIRCULATION OFFICE CIRCULATION DESK INTER-LIBRARY LOAN OFFICE

NON- FICTION STACKS FICTION STACKS CIRCULATION DESK NEW AQUISITION GROUP STUDY SPACE

FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY ROOM

RESTROOM CHILDREN’S OFFICE CHILDREN’S STACKS CHILDREN’S CLASSROOM

A YOUNG ADULT STACKS

63

65

CURTAIN WALL OUTSIDE MULLION

DOUBLE PANE UV GLAZING ENGRAVED WITH BILINGUAL QUOTES LIGHT SHELF

66

Typical assembly.

CURTAIN WALL CUSTOM OVERSIZED INTERIOR MULLION WITH HIGHLY REFLECTIVE SURFACE

TRANSOM TO MATCH BENCH AND SHELF HEIGHT

SEAT CUSHION

REINFORCED CONCRETE

METAL DECKING

STRUCTURAL I BEAM

RIGID INSULATION

CUSTOM SHELVING / SEATING UNIT

SOFFIT - SUSPENDED FROM STRUCTURE ABOVE

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68

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S.C. -2.2 RE-WORKING HOUSING

INSTRUCTORS: SETH RISEMAN / ROB HAGAN SPRING 2012

MICRO LIVING UNIT DESIGN

CAVE DWELLING IBES OF WARRIORS

DURATION: 5 WEEKS

S THE ANCIENT THE CLIFF DWELLER STABLISHMENT THIS WAS STUDIO

HAS A DIFFERENT APPROACH: THE DESIGN DEVELOPS ROTHERFROM DEVISED ATHE INSIDE, STARTING WITH DWELLING PLACE, THE HUMAN SCALE APPARATUS, AND TO PLACE OVER THE DEVELOPING IN THE UNIT, ASSEMBLY CHANGE, NATURAL GING SEASONS. AN AND FINALLY COMPLEX BUILDING.

PIRIT.”

ng City”

THE FIRST EXERCISE IS EXPLORING MICRO-LIVING PRECEDENTS.

74

EDECESORS - THE GHTLY CONNECTED

OF THE AMERICAN TURER’S HOME, IN ERRITORIES.

TRODUCED TO THE TARGETTING THE NADOS.

E GENERAL PUBLIC E AND CONVENIENT E WITH TRANSIENT THEIR OWN, WHITH THE SEASONS OR HOME WILL THUS THE LOW INCOME, IETY OCCUPANT. A RMED: THE “TRAILER

ATIVE WILL NEVER WONDERER AS ITS A STIGMA ON THE CTED TO THE ROAD, EEDOM.

D TO BE OUTSIDE OF EY CONTINUOUSLY AND ETABLISHING . EVERY MOVE IS A WITHIN THE SAME

“MANKIND WAS DIVIDED INTO CAVE DWELLING AGRARIANS AND WANDERING TRIBES OF WARRIORS [...] THE CAVE DWELLER WAS THE ANCIENT CONSERVATIVE[...] WHO BECAME THE CLIFF DWELLER AND BEGAN TO BUILD CITIES. ESTABLISHMENT WAS HIS. HIS GOD WAS A MURDERER. HIS SWIFTER, MORE MOBILE BROTHER DEVISED A MORE ADAPTABLE AND ELUSIVE DWELLING PLACE, THE FOLDING TENT. FROM PLACE TO PLACE OVER THE EARTH FOLLOWING THE LAW OF CHANGE, NATURAL LAW TO HIM, HE WENT IN CHANGING SEASONS. AN ADVENTURER. HIS GOD WAS A SPIRIT.” Frank Lloyd Wright - “The Disappearing City”

MOTOR HOMES AND THEIR PREDECESSORS - THE HORSE PULLED WAGONS, ARE TIGHTLY CONNECTED WITH THE AMERICAN SOCIETY. THEY WERE ONCE A SYMBOL OF THE AMERICAN DREAM - THE ULTIMATE ADVENTURER’S HOME, IN THE QUEST FOR THE WESTERN TERRITORIES. THE MOTORIZED HOME WAS INTRODUCED TO THE MARKET IN THE EARLY 1930’S, TARGETING THE CAMPING AND HUNTING AFICIONADOS. IT DID NOT TAKE LONG FOR THE SECTION SCALE 1/2” = 1’-0” GENERAL PUBLIC TO DISCOVER THIS AFFORDABLE AND CONVENIENT ALTERNATIVE OF LIVING. THOSE WITH TRANSIENT JOBS COULD HAVE A HOME OF THEIR OWN, WITH THE ABILITY TO MOVE WITH THE SEASONS OR THE EMPLOYMENT. THE MOTOR HOME WILL THUS FOREVER BE ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOW INCOME, OUTSIDE OF MAINSTREAM SOCIETY OCCUPANT. A NEW AMERICAN TYPOLOGY IS FORMED: THE “TRAILER TRASH”. THE CAVE DWELLER CONSERVATIVE WILL NEVER UNDERSTAND OR ACCEPT THE WONDERER AS ITS EQUAL. INSTEAD IT WILL CAST A STIGMA ON THE COMMUNITY SO TIGHTLY CONNECTED TO THE ROAD, TO MOBILITY AND PERSONAL FREEDOM. THE OUTCAST FEEL PRIVILEGED TO BE OUTSIDE OF THE SHADOW OF THE WALL. THEY CONTINUOUSLY REINVENT THEIR COMMUNITY, AND ESTABLISHING THEIR UTOPIA IS WITHIN REACH. EVERY MOVE IS A NEW SCENARIO, A NEW TRIBE WITHIN THE SAME RULES AS THE PREVIOUS ONE.

ADAPTABILITY

DAY USAGE

NIGHT USAGE

FUNCTION OVERLAP

PLAN SCALE 1/2” = 1’-0”

KEY DESIGN ELEMENT: EFFICIENT STORAGE

10 SMALL PLEASURES OF LIFE 1. TO SIT COMFORTABLY AND READ OR TALK A. Relaxation and entertainment are 2 of the most important functions of a home. Being able to have visitors in the privacy of the apartment is essential to the quality of life of the inhabitant. B. The spaces are flexible and can host a variety of activities. 2-3 separate zones can accommodate a group of people with different interests or age groups.

2. TO SLEEP NAKED

3. TO PLAY PIRATES

A. This speaks not only about thermal comfort, but mostly about the privacy level. B. The different ways in which the sleeping area can be configured or arranged allow the user to adjust the privacy level to his own needs, or according to his own comfort.

A. Or fireman, or hide and seek, or wrestle, or wii, or music… play is what we do when we are not working. B. The apartment allows for both active play and imaginative play. A child would love a lofted space, an indoor ‘tree house’.

4. TO WORK OR WRITE AT A CREEPER BORDERED WINDOW A. A space for recollection and writing is essential in the quality of life. Whether you are paying bills, or writing a novel, or taking watercolor classes… a desk is necessary in every home. B. Having a desk by the window adds pleasure to necessity. This writing surface could be incorporated as fixed furnishing, on the outside wall.

5. TO HAVE EASY ACCESS TO POSSESIONS WITHOUT SENSING THEIR PRESENCE ALL THE TIME 6. TO SEE THE SUNLIGHT SPREAD ACROSS THE FLOOR 7. TO SEE THE VIEW WHILE SITTING 8. TO READ IN BED 9. TO ENJOY VENTILATION

HIGH

LEVELS

OF

10. TO STAND AND LOOK OUT WITHOUT GLARE

CRO-LIVING PRECEDENT STUDY: MOTOR IVING PRECEDENT STUDY: MOTOR HOM ROTOTYPICAL LIVING UNIT OTYPICAL LIVING UNIT “MANKIND DIVIDED INTO CAVE DWELLING “MANKIND WAS DIVIDED INTOWAS CAVE DWELLING AGRARIANS AND WANDERING TRIBES OF WARRIORS AGRARIANS AND WANDERING TRIBES OF WARRIORS [...] [...] THE CAVE WAS THE ANCIENT THE CAVE DWELLER WAS DWELLER THE ANCIENT CONSERVATIVE[...] WHODWELLER BECAME THE CLIFF DWELLER CONSERVATIVE[...] WHO BECAME THE CLIFF AND BEGAN TO BUILD CITIES. ESTABLISHMENT WAS AND BEGAN TO BUILD CITIES. ESTABLISHMENT WAS HIS. HIS GOD WAS A MURDERER. HIS. HIS GOD WAS A MURDERER. SWIFTER, MOREDEVISED MOBILE BROTHER DEVISED A HIS SWIFTER, MOREHIS MOBILE BROTHER A MORE ADAPTABLEAND MORE ADAPTABLEAND ELUSIVE DWELLING ELUSIVE PLACE, DWELLING PLACE, THE FOLDING FROM PLACE THE FOLDING TENT. FROM PLACE TOTENT. PLACE OVER THE TO PLACE OVER THE EARTH FOLLOWING THE LAW OF CHANGE, NATURAL EARTH FOLLOWING THE LAW OF CHANGE, NATURAL LAWINTO HIM, HE WENT IN CHANGING SEASONS. AN LAW TO HIM, HE WENT CHANGING SEASONS. AN ADVENTURER. HIS GOD WAS A SPIRIT.” ADVENTURER. HIS GOD WAS A SPIRIT.” Frank Lloyd Wright - “The Dissapearing City” Frank Lloyd Wright - “The Dissapearing City”

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The micro-living unit is designed to accomodate the comfort and joy of the home. while in sclae, it is large The micro-living unit is small designed to accommodate the comfort and joy of the in possibilities through the flexibility home. of the apparatus and the user driven While small in scale, it is large in possibilities through the flexibility of adaptability.

HOUSING UNIT

the apparatus and the user driven adaptability.

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BOSTON ARCHITEC

R instructors: SETH R

MICRO-UNIT PROTOTYPE FLOOR PLAN

375 S.F.

ser to adjust the privacy level to his own needs, or according to his own comfort.

D OR TALK

PLAY PIRATES eman, or hide and seek, or wrestle, or wii, or music… play is what we do of the most important functions of a home. n we are not working. cy of theallows apartment is essential to the play. A child would love apartment for both active play and imaginative ofted space, an indoor ‘tree house’.

DAY USAGE

st a variety of activities. 2-3 separate zones DAY USAGE

WORK OR WRITE AT A CREEPER BORDERED WINDOW with different interests orisage groups. ace for recollection and writing essential in the quality of life. Whether are paying bills, or writing a novel, or taking watercolor classes… a desk is ssary in every home. ng a desk by the window adds pleasure to necessity. This writing surface comfort, but mostly about the privacy level. d be incorporated as fixed furnishing, on the outside wall.

ping area can be configured or arranged allow

HAVE EASY ACCESS TO POSSESIONS WITHOUT SENSING THEIR is own needs, or according to his own comfort. NIGHT USAGE SENCE ALL THE TIME

NIGHT USAGE

SEE THE SUNLIGHT SPREAD ACROSS THE FLOOR

estle, or wii, or music… play is what we do

SEE THE VIEW WHILE SITTING

READ IN and BED e play

imaginative play. A child would love

’.

ENJOY HIGH LEVELS OF VENTILATION

STANDBORDERED AND LOOK OUTWINDOW WITHOUT GLARE PER is essential in the quality of life. Whether FUNCTION OVERLAP or taking watercolor classes… a desk is SCALE:1/2”=1’-0” pleasure to necessity. This writing surface LONGITUDINAL SECTION ng, on the outside wall.SCALE:1/2”=1’-0”

FUNCTION OVERLAP

CROSS SECTION

SCALE:1/2”=1’-0” SCALE:1/2”=1’-0”

SESIONS WITHOUT SENSING THEIR

ACROSS THE FLOOR

G

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

CROSS SECTION PLAN SCALE 1/2” = 1’-0”

CROSS SECTION SCALE 1/2” = 1’-0”

TILATION

HOUT GLARE

LONGITUDINAL SECTION SCALE 1/2” = 1’-0”

KEY DESIGN ELEMENT: EFFICIENT STORAGE

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KEY DESIGN ELEMENT: EFFICIENT STORAGE

FLEXIBILITY •‘HARD’ STRATEGY • WITHIN THE TECTONIC

79

FACADE IN RELATIONSHIP WITH INTERIOR PROGRAM. THE SIZE OF THE WINDOW DETERMINES THE LEVEL OF PRIVACY INSIDE THADJACENT AREA. EACH UNIT HAS A PLANTER RIGHT OUTSIDE THE KITCHEN AREA.

LIGHT SHELF TRIPLE PANE HIGH EFFICIENCY WINDOWS BRICK VENEER UNIT PLANTER ZINC PANELING SYSTEM

EXPLODED APPARATUS AXONOMETRIC

THE FLEXIBILITY OF THE APPARATUS ALLOWS FOR CUSTOMIZATION OF THE INTERIORS ACCORDING TO THE DIFFERENT USERS OR THE CHANGING NEEDS THROUGH TIME.

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GYPSUM WALL BOARD REINFORCED CONCRETE METAL DECKING SOUND INSULATION STRUCTURAL BEAM LIGHT SHELF TRIPLE PANE HIGH EFFICIENCY WINDOWS

UNIT PLANTER ZINC PANELING SYSTEM

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GWB SOFFIT UNIT STORAGE

CO-WORKING SPACE FLEXIBLE WORKING PRECEDENT STUDY: GOOGLE HEADQUARTERS, MOUNTAIN DURATION: 4 WEEKS

AFTER DEFINING THE LIVING UNIT, WE WERE ASKED TO LOOK AT ALTERNATIVE WORK ENVIRONMENTS, AND AS PRECEDENT STUDY, I ANALYZED THE GOOGLE HEADQUARTERS,LOCATED IN MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA.

In 2004 Google undertook a strategic reevaluation of its workplace processes. They held an invited design competition, which Clive Wilkinson Architects won based on their proposal to create a diversified campus environment, integrating highly focused software engineering workspace within a support system of learning, collaboration, recreation, and food facilities. EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE

STRUCTURAL CONSTRAINTS

These accessory functions were strategically placed along a logical “main street” which allowed for the churning of ideas among the community, while the workplaces were located to allow for more concentrated, “head down” activities.

FIRE COMPARTIMENTATION

ENT STUDY: GOOGLE HEADQUARTERS, MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA In 2004 Google undertook a strategic reevaluation of its workplace processes. They held an invited design competition, which Clive Wilkinson Architects won based on their proposal to create a diversified campus environment, integrating highly focused software engineering workspace within a support system of learning, collaboration, recreation, and food facilities.

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OVERSIZED HEIGHT ZONES

EARLY M

BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE SPRING 2012 ReWorking Housing DELIA GOTT

These accessory functions were strategically placed along a logical “main street” which allowed for the churning of ideas among the community, while the workplaces were located to allow for more concentrated, “head down” activities. STRUCTURAL CONSTRAINTS

FIRE COMPARTIMENTATION

OVERSIZED HEIGHT ZONES

EARLY MORNING OCCUPANCY

LATE NIGHT OCCUPANCY

RKING PRECEDENT STUDY: GOOGLE HEADQUARTERS, MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA

BOST

GOOGLE FORTRESS PROS

PERSONALIZED WORK ENVIRON

CAMPUS ATMOS

NON-WORK AME

PRIMARY CIRCULATION

ENCLOSED MEETING SPACES

NETWORK LEARNING

WORKLIFE BALANCE

NOMADIC WORK ZONES

SECTION SCALE 1” = 20’-0” GOOGLE FORTRESS

PLAN SCALE 1” = 60’-0”

PLAN SCALE 1/2” = 1’-0”

10 DEFINING ELEMENTS OF A GOOD WORK ENVIRONMENT 1.EFFECTIVE GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL SPACES 2.DEVELOPING PARTNERSHIPS AND ALLIANCES 3.USER ATTRACTION AND RETENTION 4.EMOTIONAL ATTACHMENT TO WORK PLACE 5.INVOLVEMENT IN LOCAL COMMUNITY 6.PRODUCT/SERVICE QUALITY AND VALUE 7.EFFECTIVE INFORMATION SHARING AND COMMUNICATION 8.ADAPTATION TO TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE 9.OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCY 10.IMAGE AND BRANDING

1

83 PLAN & SECTION

SCALE 1/8” = 1’- 0”

FURNISHINGS: ‘HARD’ STRATEGY

FINISHES: ‘SOFT’ STRATEGY

2 3

2

5

5 4

4

4

4

5

6

7 1

PRIVATE

2

3

4

5

6

7

PUBLIC

• • • •

Y OF SPACE

common space • common space private work rooms • private work rooms conference room • conference room food preparation and sanitation • food preparation and sanitation

equipment: equipment: • flexible furnishings • flexible furnishings • electrical outlets • electrical outlets • office equipment: fax, projector, printers • office equipment: fax, projector, printers

GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL WORK G PARTNERSHIPS CONFIGURATION AND ALLIANCES CIRCULATION & GENERATED SPACE ACTION AND RETENTION ATTACHMENT TO WORK PLACE NT IN LOCAL COMMUNITY ERVICE QUALITY AND VALUE INFORMATION SHARING AND COMMUNICATION N TO TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE AL EFFICIENCY physical spaces: spaces: BRANDING physical

use-scenarios: use-scenarios: • different types of proffessions = more opportunities to network • different types of proffessions = more opportunities to network • same field = better programed spaces • same field = better programed spaces

The co-working space is designed to accomodate the needs of multiple types of users, based on the size of the group, extent of stay, type of activity and privacy needs.

PUBLIC

physical spaces: physical spaces: • common space • common space • private work rooms • private work rooms • conference room • conference room • food preparation and sanitation • food preparation and sanitation

equipment: equipment: • flexible furnishings • flexible furnishings • electrical outlets • electrical outlets • office equipment: fax, projector, printers • office equipment: fax, projector, printers

• • • • • • • •

common space common space private work rooms private work rooms conference room conference room food preparation and sanitation food preparation and sanitation

WORK SPACE PROTOTYPE

use-scenarios: use-scenarios: • different types of proffessions = more opportunities to network • different types of proffessions = more opportunities to network • same field = better programed spaces • same field = better programed spaces

TheThe PARTI PARTI is applied is applied at multiple at multiple scales: scales: individual individual scalescale - work- work station station groupgroup scalescale - space - space partitions partitions

equipment: equipment: • flexible furnishings • flexible furnishings • electrical outlets • electrical outlets • office equipment: fax, projector, printers • office equipment: fax, projector, printers

Through Through the option the option of personalizing of personalizing the space, the space, the the user user takestakes ownership ownership of a of temporary a temporary space, space, therefore therefore reinforcing reinforcing the relationship the relationship with with the establishment, the establishment, and and becoming becoming a repeat a repeat customer. customer.

use-scenarios: use-scenarios: • different types of proffessions = more opportunities to network • different types of proffessions = more opportunities to network • same field = better programed spaces • same field = better programed spaces

1.EFFECTIVE GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL WORK 6.PRODUCT/SERVICE QUALITY AND VALUE 2.DEVELOPING PARTNERSHIPS AND ALLIANCES 7.EFFECTIVE INFORMATION SHARINGAND COMMUNICATION 3.USER ATTRACTION AND RETENTION 8.ADAPTATION TO TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE 4.EMOTIONAL ATTACHMENT TO WORK PLACE 9.OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCY WITHIN FURNISHINGS SPRING 2012 ADAPTABILITY AND FLEXIBILITY ReWorking Housing TYPICAL FURNITURE ARRANGEMENT 5.INVOLVEMENT IN LOCAL COMMUNITY 10.IMAGE AND BRANDING DELIA GOTT

PROTOTYPICAL WORKSPACE DEVELOPMENT

84

PLAN & SECTION

FURNISHINGS: ‘HARD’ STRATEGY

SCALE 1/8” = 1’- 0”

FINISHES: ‘SOFT’ STRATEGY

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

PRODUCT/SERVICE QUALITY AND VALUE EFFECTIVE INFORMATION SHARING AND COMMUNICATION ADAPTATION TO TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCY physical spaces: spaces: IMAGE AND BRANDING physical • • • • • • • •

common space common space private work rooms private work rooms conference room conference room food preparation and sanitation food preparation and sanitation

equipment: equipment: • flexible furnishings • flexible furnishings • electrical outlets • electrical outlets • office equipment: fax, projector, printers • office equipment: fax, projector, printers

85

use-scenarios: use-scenarios: • different types of proffessions = more opportunities to network • different types of proffessions = more opportunities to network • same field = better programed spaces • same field = better programed spaces

MATERIAL STUDY OF ROTATING PANEL

TYPICAL PLAN

TYPICAL SECTION

SITE ANALYSIS CONGLOMERATION IMPLEMENTATION

DURATION: 7 WEEKS

86

ONLY AFTER HAVING DEFINED BOTH THE LIVING AND THE WORKING UNITS WERE WE ALLOWED TO PROCEED WITH THE ASSEMBLY OF THE ARCHITECTURAL OBJECT.

SITE ANALYSIS

BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE SPRING 2012 ReWorking Housing instructors: SETH RISEMAN / ROB HAGAN student:DELIA GOTT

87

SITE ANALYSIS AND BUILDING MASSING

88

VICINITY CONTEXT ANALYSIS

BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE SPRING 2012 ReWorking Housing instructors: SETH RISEMAN / ROB HAGAN student:DELIA GOTT

BUILDING CONTEXT PARTI DIAGRAM

HOUSING UNITS COMMON FACILITIES

SITE IMPLEMENTATION

89

EGY USE

NIGHT TIME USE DAY TIME USE

THE ‘WORKAHOLIC’

‘BACHELOR’

UNIT VARIANTS

90

THE ‘CLAN’

A UNIT A UNIT

A UNIT

C UNIT

B UNIT

A UNIT B UNIT

UNIT ASSEMBLY

91

HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL CIRCULATIONS

ReWorking Housing

UNIT MIX SPREADSHEET SITE 1 UNIT TYPE

DESCRIPTION

NRSF

LEVEL 1

TYP LEVEL

UNITS

NRSF

Unit A1

basic Studio

376

61

0

61

22,936

Unit A2

wide Studio

475

24

0

24

11,400

Unit A3

long Studio

553

14

0

14

7,742

394 600

99 33 12

0 0 0

99 33 12

13,002 7,200

12

0

12

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0

111

0

111

62,280

Total A Units Unit B2 Unit B2

short studio penthouse

Total B Units Unit C1 Unit C2 Total C Units

2 Bed 2 Bed

0 0

Total Units Res. GSF (incl. Stairs & Corridors)

92

MIX

89.2%

10.8%

0.0%

68,789

red = fill in

Workspace GSF

14,998

green = start here

Average Unit NRSF

561

90.5%

100.0%

Res. Efficiency

# of Residential Floors (not ground)

5

Parking GSF

8,700

Interior Parking Exterior Parking

0

92,487

Total

0

Total Project GSF

0

Total Project GSF

92,487

Page 1 of 1

Exterior Parking

0

Total

0

student:DELIA GOTT

OPEN KITCHEN GROWING CENTER HALEY HOUSE/ CO-WORKING SPACE CO-WORKING SPACE

AERIAL VIEW - SITE PLAN

MEZANINE FLOOR PLAN - SCALE 1/16”=1’-0”

RESIDENT PARKING

RESTAURANT

94

FIRST FLOOR PLAN - SCALE 1/16”=1’-0”

AN

95

GYM

LIBRARY

RESIDENT PARKING

RESTAURANT

FIRST FLOOR PLAN - SCALE 1/16”=1’-0”

SECOND FLOOR PLAN - SCALE 1/16”=1’-0”

OPEN KITCHEN

FOURTH FLOOR PLAN - SCALE 1/16”=1’-0”

DAYCARE / PLAY ROOM

GROWING CENTER HALEY HOUSE/ CO-WORKING SPACE CO-WORKING SPACE

THIRD FLOOR PLAN - SCALE 1/16”=1’-0” MEZANINE FLOOR PLAN - SCALE 1/16”=1’-0”

FIFTH FLOOR PLAN - SCALE 1/16”=1’-0”

96

ROOF GARDEN DAYCARE / PLAY ROOM LIBRARY

GYM

CO-WORKING SPACE

ELEVATED GARDENS PARKING

OPEN KITCHEN

ELEVATION ELEVATION -- SCALE SCALE 1/16”=1’-0” 1/16”=1’-0”

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONA

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

98

TYPICAL ROOF @ SKYLIGHT AND PV PANEL SCALE1/2"=1'0"

1

1

TYPICAL ROOF @ SKYLIGHT AND PV PANEL SCALE1/2"=1'0"

1

SOUTHERN FAC SCALE1/2"=1'0"

SOUTHERN FACADE @ CURTAIN WALL

SCALE1/2"=1'0" TYPICAL ROOF SCALE1/2"=1'0"

TYPICAL ROOF @ GARDE SCALE1/2"=1'0"

TM 632 Architectural Det Fall 2011

AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

1

SEE A-1 FLOOR PLAN

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Scale: 3/32"=1'-0" Date: 11/15/2011 Drawn by: Delia Gott Checked by: Jennifer

Reflected DETAILS Ce Plan SOUTHERN FACADE SCALE1/2"=1'0"

TYPICAL ROOF SCALE1/2"=1'0"

TYPICAL ROOF @ GARDEN SCALE1/2"=1'0"

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

1

A -2. D-1.0

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

1

FACADE @ CURTAIN WALL SCALE1/2"=1'0"

T F

3

WINDOW JAMB, TYP SCALE1"=1'0"

S D D C

R D P

4

WINDOW SILL, TYP SCALE1"=1'0"

2

WINDOW HEAD, TYP SCALE1"=1'0"

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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A D

100

101

102

103

A.C. AUTODESK REVIT INSTRUCTOR: GREG DEMCHACK

SPRING 2011

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107

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A.C. IDEAS AND DESIGN - FILM AND SOCIETY INSTRUCTOR: AMY VAN LAWKE SPRING 2012

ANTI CONSUMERISM in the Past 50 Years of Cinema

112

Easy rider (1 Genre: drama (b

Memorable Q Captain Ame be a helluva goo what's gone wro Billy: Man, eve happened. Hey, second-rate hote you dig? They th or somethin'. The CA: They're no They're scared o B: Hey, man. Al somebody who n CA: Oh, no. Wh B: What the hel CA: Oh, yeah, t That's what's it's to be free when free, 'cause then gonna talk to you gonna scare 'em B: Well, it don't CA-: No, it mak

While the idea of consumerism and subliminal marketing has been around for a very long time, the American society of the past 50 years has undergone a major transition from a culture of necessity to one of commodification. Anti-Consumerist movies make a stand against a lifetime of constant, unthinking consumption, through different genres: drama, horror, musical, action and satire. The expansion of mass production in the twentieth century had led to the commodification of culture, with the rise of culture industries. Consumption served the interests of manufacturers seeking greater profits, and citizens became the passive victims of advertisers. Processes of standardization, they argued, were accompanied by the development of a materialistic culture, in which commodities came to lack authenticity and, instead, merely met ‘false’ needs. These needs were generated by marketing and advertising strategies and, it is argued, increased the capacity for ideological control or domination.

6

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Easy rider (1969) - "A man went looking for America. And couldn't find it anywhere" Genre: drama (borderline documentary) Memorable Quotes: Captain America: You know, this used to be a helluva good country. I can't understand what's gone wrong with it. Billy: Man, everybody got chicken, that's what happened. Hey, we can't even get into like, a second-rate hotel, I mean, a second-rate motel, you dig? They think we're gonna cut their throat or somethin'. They're scared, man. CA: They're not scared of you. They're scared of what you represent to 'em. B: Hey, man. All we represent to them, man, is somebody who needs a haircut. CA: Oh, no. What you represent to them is freedom. B: What the hell is wrong with freedom? That's what it's all about. CA: Oh, yeah, that's right. That's what's it's all about, all right. But talkin' about it and bein' it, that's two different things. I mean, it's real hard to be free when you are bought and sold in the marketplace. Of course, don't ever tell anybody that they're not free, 'cause then they're gonna get real busy killin' and maimin' to prove to you that they are. Oh, yeah, they're gonna talk to you, and talk to you, and talk to you about individual freedom. But they see a free individual, it's gonna scare 'em. B: Well, it don't make 'em runnin' scared. CA-: No, it makes 'em dangerous.

Dawn of the Dead (1978) - “ They’re us, that’s all, when there’s no more room in hell “ Genre: horror

True Stories (1986) – “Shopping is a feeling” Genre: musical Memorable Quotes:

Memorable Quotes: Roger: Well, we’re in, but how the hell are we gonna get back? Peter: Who the hell cares! Let’s go shopping! Roger [looking in a display case]: Watches! Watches! Peter: Wait a minute man, let’s just get the stuff we need! I’ll get a television and a radio. Roger: Ooohh, ooohh, lighter fluid! And chocolate! Chocolate! [he runs down a clothing aisle] Roger: Hey, how about a mink coat! Peter: Why not?

Miss Rollings: It’s like how hot dogs come in packs of 10, and buns come in packs of eight or 12 - you have to buy nine packs to make it come out even. Narrator: I really enjoy forgetting. When I first come to a place, I notice all the little details. I notice the way the sky looks. The color of white paper. The way people walk. Doorknobs. Everything. Then I get used to the place and I don’t notice those things anymore. So only by forgetting can I see the place again as it really is. : I have something to say about the difference between American and European cities. But I’ve forgotten what it is. I have it written down at home somewhere. Kay Culver: Be sexy in business. Be successful at night. Narrator: Look at this. Who can say it isn’t beautiful? Sky, bricks. Who do you think lives there? Four-car garage. Hope, fear, excitement, satisfaction. Narrator: Some people say ‘Freeways are the Cathedrals of our time’. Not me.

60’s 70’s 80’s Visionaries

The sixties were the age of youth, as 70 million children from the post-war baby boom became teenagers and young adults. The movement away from the conservative fifties continued and eventually resulted in revolutionary ways of thinking and real change in the cultural fabric of American life. No longer content to be images of the generation ahead of them, young people wanted change. The changes affected education, values, lifestyles, laws, and entertainment. Many of the revolutionary ideas which began in the sixties are continuing to evolve today.

The movie comes at the end of the decade, and in many ways it encompasses the spirit of the era. With an outstanding soundtrack, and long still illustrative images of the south-west, it tells the story of 2 bikers: Billy and Captain America, heading to New Orleans to sell cocaine hidden in the American flagged gas tank, and use the money to retire. On their journey they meet various characters living at the edge of mainstream society, or fighting to fit in: the family man and farmer with his Mexican-American clan, the drop-out hippies, trying to live of the deserted land, the alcoholic rich lawyer, who is suddenly exposed to new ideas of freedom. The two main characters sell their haul for profit, and the outstanding last dialogue of the movie, speaks of the end of an era: Billy: We did it, man. We did it, we did it. We’re rich, man. We’re retirin’ in Florida now, mister. Captain America: You know Billy, we blew it... This was the collective thought of the young generation, which has seen radical changes in the past decade, and who was feeling that their efforts were like cultivating a dusty landscape: pointless. As more and more of them, would abandon the quest for the ultimate freedom, in order to make a profit, more and more would come to the conclusion: “we blew it…” While it is not anti-consumerist per se, the idea of living not for consumption, but for creation and spiritual enlightenment is the strongest concept in the film.

Death of Idealism

The chaotic events of the 60’s, including war and social change, seemed destined to continue in the 70’s. Major trends included a growing disillusionment of government, advances in civil rights, increased influence of the women’s movement, a heightened concern for the environment, and increased space exploration. Many of the “radical” ideas of the 60’s gained wider acceptance in the new decade, and were mainstreamed into American life and culture.

In 1970 one in every thirty-four households in the United States subscribed to Consumer Reports, and many more had access to the publication in public libraries. American consumers, people who bought goods sold in the United States, had become a demanding lot. They were asking for quality at lower and lower prices, faster production and larger quantities. Noteworthy developments of the 1970s included the invention of the email, laser printer and the barcode.

The epochal event of the seventies as an era in its own right was the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries’ oil embargo, which lasted for six months in the fall of 1973 and the spring of 1974. Everything that happened in the sixties was predicated on the assumption of economic prosperity and growth; concerns like personal fulfillment and social justice tend to emerge in the middle class only at times when people take it for granted that they’ll be able to make a living. For thirty years—ever since the effects of World War II on the economy had begun to kick in—the average American’s standard of living had been rising, to a remarkable extent. As the economy grew, indices like home ownership, automobile ownership, and access to higher education got up to levels unknown anywhere else in the world, and the United States could plausibly claim to have provided a better life materially for its working class than any society ever had. That ended with the OPEC embargo. American culture grew individualistic, rather than communitarian, which means that notions like deferred gratification, sacrifice, and sustained national effort are a very tough sell. In this horror film an American shopping mall becomes the site of battles between the zombies who have overrun the country, four human “survivors” who exterminate the zombies and appropriate the mall for themselves, and a gang of marauding bikers which, in the movie’s violent climax, seeks to take over the mall. These battles serve as a useful, if melodramatic metaphor for recent theoretical disputes over the nature and value of consumerism, disputes which remain of central importance among cultural critics of differing political persuasions.

The Era

The 1980s became the Me! Me! Me! generation of status seekers. Durin

‘If you’ve got it’, flaunt it and ‘You can have it all!’ were watchwords. Forbe its 500 largest companies. Binge buying and credit became a way of life a

Video games, aerobics, minivans, camcorders, and talk shows became part Reagan declared a war on drugs, Kermit didn’t find it easy to be green, hospi

On the bright side, the US Constitution had its 200th birthday, Gone with the W gave $115,000,000,000 to charity. nternationally, at the very end of the deca for the decade to come! At the turn of the decade, m

What is this strange movie about? Shopping malls, easily (and shabbily) c loneliness and the pursuit of attention, mass media, metal buildings, compu into the principles of the ledger sheet and the skyscraper. These and othe

David Byrne took on the entire emerging power establishment of the late like a bleak testament to the disappearance of a previous way of life. Most prophesize. “T

One scene that really brings out the film’s themes is “The Parade of Speci ‘lawnmower brigade’). This scene is more about the disappearance of small small town parades. As the painfully brief parade passes, the crowd stares a an empty distance. Where are they

113

True Stories (1986) – “Shopping is a feeling” Genre: musical Memorable Quotes: Miss Rollings: It’s like how hot dogs come in packs of 10, and buns come in packs of eight or 12 - you have to buy nine packs to make it come out even.

?

Narrator: I really enjoy forgetting. When I first come to a place, I notice all the little details. I notice the way the sky looks. The color of white paper. The way people walk. Doorknobs. Everything. Then I get used to the place and I don’t notice those things anymore. So only by forgetting can I see the place again as it really is. : I have something to say about the difference between American and European cities. But I’ve forgotten what it is. I have it written down at home somewhere.

et a televi-

Kay Culver: Be sexy in business. Be successful at night. Narrator: Look at this. Who can say it isn’t beautiful? Sky, bricks. Who do you think lives there? Four-car garage. Hope, fear, excitement, satisfaction. Narrator: Some people say ‘Freeways are the Cathedrals of our time’. Not me.

Fight Club (1986)-“ The things you own end up owning you… It’s only after we’ve lost everything that we’re free to do anything.” Genre: Action drama

Idiocracy (20 Genre- satire

Memorable Quotes:

Narrator: The Some had high h but sadly the gre and prolonging e

Tyler Durden: You’re not your job. You’re not how much money you have in the bank. You’re not the car you drive. You’re not the contents of your wallet. You’re not your fucking khakis. You’re the all-singing, all-dancing crap of the world. Tyler Durden: We’re consumers. We are by-products of a lifestyle obsession. Murder, crime, poverty, these things don’t concern me. What concerns me are celebrity magazines, television with 500 channels, some guy’s name on my underwear. Rogaine, Viagra, Olestra. Tyler Durden: Man, I see in fight club the strongest and smartest men who’ve ever lived. I see all this potential, and I see squandering. God damn it, an entire generation pumping gas, waiting tables; slaves with white collars. Advertising has us chasing cars and clothes, working jobs we hate so we can buy shit we don’t need. We’re the middle children of history, man. No purpose or place. We have no Great War. No Great Depression. Our Great War’s a spiritual war... our Great Depression is our lives. We’ve all been raised on television to believe that one day we’d all be millionaires, and movie gods, and rock stars. But we won’t. And we’re slowly learning that fact. And we’re very, very pissed off.

Memorable Q

Pvt. Joe Bow country, a long ti People wrote bo it was and why it

Costco Gree love you. Welcom to Costco, I love Secretary of

Narrator: Joe Vice President F dumbest kids ev he got the ball ro

0’s 80’s 90’s 0

eath of Idealism

cial change, seemed destined to continue in the 70’s. Major trends included a vil rights, increased influence of the women’s movement, a heightened concern n. Many of the “radical” ideas of the 60’s gained wider acceptance in the new decade, and were mainstreamed into American life and culture.

ed States subscribed to Consumer Reports, and many more had access to the eople who bought goods sold in the United States, had become a demanding lot. , faster production and larger quantities. Noteworthy developments of the 1970s included the invention of the email, laser printer and the barcode.

wn right was the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries’ oil embargo, spring of 1974. Everything that happened in the sixties was predicated on the rns like personal fulfillment and social justice tend to emerge in the middle class ey’ll be able to make a living. For thirty years—ever since the effects of World erage American’s standard of living had been rising, to a remarkable extent. As omobile ownership, and access to higher education got up to levels unknown uld plausibly claim to have provided a better life materially for its working class than any society ever had.

e grew individualistic, rather than communitarian, which means that notions like ferred gratification, sacrifice, and sustained national effort are a very tough sell.

es the site of battles between the zombies who have overrun the country, four appropriate the mall for themselves, and a gang of marauding bikers which, in These battles serve as a useful, if melodramatic metaphor for recent theoretical disputes which remain of central importance among cultural critics of differing political persuasions.

The Era of the Self

The 1980s became the Me! Me! Me! generation of status seekers. During the 1980s, hostile takeovers, leveraged buyouts, and mega-mergers spawned a new breed of billionaire. ‘If you’ve got it’, flaunt it and ‘You can have it all!’ were watchwords. Forbes’ list of 400 richest people became more important than its 500 largest companies. Binge buying and credit became a way of life and ‘Shop Til you Drop’ was the watchword. Labels were everything, even (or especially) for children.

Video games, aerobics, minivans, camcorders, and talk shows became part of our lives. The decade began with double-digit inflation, Reagan declared a war on drugs, Kermit didn’t find it easy to be green, hospital costs rose and we lost many, many of our finest talents to AIDS. On the bright side, the US Constitution had its 200th birthday, Gone with the Wind turned 50, ET phoned home, and in 1989 Americans gave $115,000,000,000 to charity. nternationally, at the very end of the decade the Berlin Wall was removed - making great changes for the decade to come! At the turn of the decade, many were happy to leave the spendthrift 80s for the 90s.

What is this strange movie about? Shopping malls, easily (and shabbily) constructed suburban building projects, computer dating, loneliness and the pursuit of attention, mass media, metal buildings, computers, evangelist preachers, the disappearance of culture into the principles of the ledger sheet and the skyscraper. These and other topics pervade “True Stories’” disparate plot lines and imagery. David Byrne took on the entire emerging power establishment of the late 1980s in this film. Today the film views like a warning, like a bleak testament to the disappearance of a previous way of life. Most of us live in the culmination of what this film seemed to prophesize. “True Stories” is cultural criticism embedded in campy film. One scene that really brings out the film’s themes is “The Parade of Specialness” in Virgil, Texas (with the Shriners in cars and the ‘lawnmower brigade’). This scene is more about the disappearance of small town culture and pride and less about the freakishness of small town parades. As the painfully brief parade passes, the crowd stares at the tail end of the festivities as it slowly fades away into an empty distance. Where are they going? Away, seemingly forever, to nowhere. And quickly.

The Virtual Age

The World Wide Web was born in 1992, changing the way we communicate, spend our money (online gambling, stores), and do business (e-commerce). In 1989, 15% of American households had a computer. And by 2000, this figure increased to 51%, with 41.5% online. Internet lingo like plug-ins, BTW (by the way), GOK (God only knows), IMHO (in my humble opinion), FAQS, SPAM, FTP, ISP, and phrases like “See you online” or “The server’s down” or “Bill Gates” became part of our everyday vocabulary. We signed our mail with a :-) smile, a ;-) wink, or a :-* kiss and everyone has a cell phone.

Many Americ partisanship, that belief. W made disaste

Some big issues were health care, social security reform, and gun control - debated and unresolved throughout the whole decade. Violence seemed a part of life. In 1992 South-Central Los Angeles rioted, 1993 brought terrorism to the American shores as a bomb was detonated in the garage beneath the World Trade Center. In 1995 a football hero was tried for murder and a bomb exploded in the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. In the months between February 1996 and April 1999 there were at least fourteen incidents of school shootings with the most lethal being on April 20, 1999 when 14 students and 1 teacher were killed and 23 wounded at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado.

Britney Spea provided min with bankrup

There was good news, too. The booming economy led to record low unemployment. Minimum wage was increased , the stock market reached an all time high as individuals learned to buy and trade via the internet. Americans enjoyed the country’s affluence by traveling more (up 40% since 1986), by reveling in sporting events such as the Atlanta Summer Olympics -1996, and by consuming as never before. Told in a conventional fashion, Fight Club would still have been engaging. However, Fincher’s gritty, restless style turns it into a visual masterpiece.The film’s narrator attends support groups of all kinds as a way to “experience” something within his unfeeling, commercial existence. Even before the film’s official premiere, voices have been raised claiming that the movie glorifies violence by portraying it as something positive. There’s no denying that Fight Club is a violent movie. Some sequences are so brutal that a portion of the viewing audience will turn away. But the purpose of showing all this bloody pummeling is to make a telling point about the bestial nature of man and what can happen when the numbing effects of day-to-day gruntwork cause people to go a little crazy. The men who become members of Fight Club are victims of the dehumanizing and desensitizing power of modern-day society. They have become cogs in a wheel. The only way they can regain a sense of individuality is by getting in touch with the primal, barbaric instincts of pain and violence. When combined together, the satire, violence, and unpredictable narrative make a lasting and forceful statement about modern-day society.

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about modern-day society.

Idiocracy (2006) – “A dumbing down. How did this happen?” Genre- satire Memorable Quotes: Narrator: The years passed, mankind became stupider at a frightening rate. Some had high hopes the genetic engineering would correct this trend in evolution, but sadly the greatest minds and resources where focused on conquering hair loss and prolonging erections. Pvt. Joe Bowers: [addressing Congress] ... And there was a time in this country, a long time ago, when reading wasn’t just for fags and neither was writing. People wrote books and movies, movies that had stories so you cared whose ass it was and why it was farting, and I believe that time can come again! Costco Greeter: [Greeting every customer] Welcome to Costco, I love you. Welcome to Costco, I love you. Welcome to Costco, I love you. Welcome to Costco, I love you. Secretary of State: I’m Secretary of State, brought to you by Carl’s Jr. Narrator: Joe and Rita had three children, the three smartest kids in the world. Vice President Frito took 8 wives and had a total of 32 kids. Thirty-two of the dumbest kids ever to walk the Earth. OK, so maybe Joe didn’t save mankind, but he got the ball rolling, and that’s pretty good for an average guy.

00’s

Apathy / Reality Conclusion

Many Americans consider the last decade “the worst ever.” A quick review of the decade seems to back up this belief. Hyper political partisanship, two wars, terrorism, natural disasters, economic collapse, scandal, corruption, and reality television are used to back up that belief. While the economic collapse was one of the big stories of the 2000’s, 9/11 was the story of the decade. In addition to man made disasters, nature decided to pile on. In 2005, Hurricane Katrina destroyed New Orleans. Shortly after, the Pacific Tsunami made people believe that the end was near. Britney Spears rose and fell and rose again. Harry Potter made us want to read. American Idol and a million other reality TV shows provided mindless television at a low cost. Martha Stewart went to prison. The Terminator became Governor. The economy collapsed with bankruptcies and bailouts. Finally, we proved that we were ready for change by electing the only thing left … hope. This past decade was rough. That’s why we are choosing to look back and laugh. Modern science fiction usually portrays the future world as a shiny utopia of science and advanced learning. Either that, or it’s a postapocalyptic wasteland ravaged by science gone amok or man’s own arrogance. Idiocracy takes a look at where the world’s headed right now and says forget it. None of that’s going to happen, we’re just going to get really stupid. The future is full of idiots who’ve thrown everything they have into buying Big-Gulps and watching porn. The most popular television show is called “Ow, My Balls” and features exactly what you’d expect. The highest grossing movie of all time is called Ass, and consists of 90 minutes of the same naked, hairy butt on screen farting itself silly. America has gone to hell in a hand basket. Garbage avalanches are common, crops have failed, and people are staving, all because there’s no one left who’s smart enough to know how to fix any of it. The film’s all-out, hilarious assault on the future’s culture is also a biting criticism of our own. As the world’s people have gotten dumber so have its businesses. It’s corporate America that takes the biggest belly blow, and there’s no way Judge did it with their blessing. Costco is an all-powerful, all-purpose monolith. Carl’s Jr.’s is the world’s leading food provider/robber baron, a Gatorade-like drink with “electrolytes” has replaced water (except in toilets), and Starbucks has become a popular chain of jack-shacks. Ordering a “latte” is now an inexpensive and socially acceptable way to get full-release. Back to the point, what all of that adds up to is a bitingly funny movie that shoots sharp, sometimes subtle, sometimes in-your-face arrows at the Jackass crowd and the general dumbing down of mankind.

The internet… brought us closer together, and we are doing everything on it! From research to video sharing and more, to shopping and more shopping… but in the 2010’s we realized we were not the only ones shopping on the internet…. The internet was shopping for us! We are not consumers anymore…we are the products! The immense online databases holding personal information, preferences, links, likes and relationships has become a source for marketers to target us with specific and personalized products. If the previous decade was one of voyeurism, where we glanced for days at other people life on reality TV, we are now becoming the victims of an omnipresent peeping Tom. Or maybe we are just now acknowledging it...are waking up from a sleep that lasted over 50 years? Underground fads are becoming mainstreem: freegans, locavores, organic food, thrift shopping... We are turning back to our communities for that immediate human connection, and to the original values of society. Have we had enough? BAC SPRING 2012 Ideas & Society:Film, Space & Perception Prof. Amy Van, Lauwe Stud. Delia Gott

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D.C. WORLDTEAM: UNITY LANDMARK DAVID HANSEN / DELIA GOTT SUMMER 2011

BRICK ASPHALT CONCRETE STEEL WATER GRANITE REFLECTION VEGETATION DECKING

UNITY:

120

DIVERSE PARTS CONGLOMERATED INTO ONE WHOLE

119

D.C. NOMA STUDENT DESIGN COMPETITION

TEAM: JAHIM BASKERVILLE / DAVID HANSEN / CHRIS MCINTOSH / DELIA GOTT SUMMER - FALL 2011

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P.C. PRACTICE ESSAY

130

When I accepted the position at Warner Larson Landscape Architects, in the spring of 2010, I could have never imagined the fantastic opportunities that were to come. Working for a Landscape Architect has allowed me to expand my knowledge of design, and approach all my Architecture projects holistically. I strongly believe that the two disciplines should be applied as a system, and not as separate professions.

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Some of the advantages of my practice are of course the better understanding of site design, which is essential in setting up a good building. Not only I now understand grading and drainage, but I added knowledge regarding sustainability, including soils, wetlands, rain gardens, permeable paving systems and planting. All of the above are not typically taught in Architecture school, and they are treated as a separate specialty. Another one of my favorite things is the constant exposure to various scales: I am now comfortable working at large scales, and I am flirting with the idea of an advance degree in planning. At the same time, the scope of work, allows for a more condensed project, therefore I get a greater exposure to the design process, and the various phases of our work. The firm specializes in public projects, and particularly in educational and institutional work. I have found a new passion in the importance of incorporating educational opportunities in design. It is really empowering to work on projects of such significance. Unfortunately, I understood some of the disadvantages of working in a parallel field as well. Even though I tried to use every opportunity to design small structures whish are part of our scope, I needed to get better practice at designing details and architectural components. In January of 2012 I started an Architectural internship at the Maguire Group. Since then, I have been exposed to a variety of projects, both in scope, and scale. I am currently working on the construction administration of the East Somerville High School, a School Assessment for the Town of Lincoln and a variety of smaller projects. I am very excited to continue working in educational design. I am very lucky to have found employers which become mentors. I am confident that the experience accumulated in the past 2 years will be nothing but beneficiary to my future as an Architect.

P.C.-L.A. WARNER LARSON, INC. PROJECT ASSISTANT 2010-2012

EDISON K-8 SCHOOLYARD BRIGHTON, MA

PROGRAMMING The school faced an increased number of users, after 3 different Brighton schools were merged under it’s roof. The programing phase required the accommodation of multiple programs, for a variety of age groups while still providing parking for the staff. While trying to educate the user to different parking schemes - we showed 3 different program diagrams. Tandem parking is the most efficient way of using the courtyard , and the teachers agreed to this scheme, to serve the best interest of the students.

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I was responsible for the drafting of the plans, and the graphic presentation. I was also present at all the client meetings and server as a liaison between the City of Boston representatives the client) , and the School Committee (the user).

SCIENCE PATH

ARTS PATH

GREENROOF STORAGE SHED PLANTERS

OUTDOOR CLASSROOM

Edison K-8 School MEADOW KNOLL

AL DW AR BO

EDISON K-8 SCHOOLYARD BRIGHTON, MA

WOODLAND

K

STORAGE CUBBIES

OUTDOOR CLASSROOM

SOCIAL SEATING AREA

K

AL DW

AR BO

FINAL DESIGN

PAVED PLAY

I was involved in all the phases of the final design: drafting, graphic representation, construction documents and material selection.

TRACK

The following page shows the play equipment options. I worked directly with two manufacturers in order to provide two different designs which would accommodate the same number of students and with the same budget.

EXISTING PLAY STRUCTURE NEW PLAY STRUCTURES

BASKETBALL COURT

SON SCHOOLYARD ROVEMENT PROJECT GN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

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28 TANDEM PARKING SPACES

SCALE: 1”= 20’ 20’

10’

0

20’

40’

SEATING

NEW PLAY STRUCTURES

ARTIFICIAL TURF FIELD 60’ X 100’

SEATING

DECEMBER 15,

EDISON K-8 SCHOOLYARD BRIGHTON, MA

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MATERIAL SELECTION

OPTION A

OPTION 1

PLAY AREA 1

PLAY AREA 2

Total no. Safety Surface of users Square Footage Eqiupment costs No. of Users Area 1 Area 2 Area 1 Area 2 Area 1 Area 2 500 s.f. 16,800 s.s 25,000 s.f. 35,000 s.f. 35 25 60

OPTION B

OPTION 2

Total no. Safety Surface of users Square Footage Eqiupment costs No. of Users Area 1 Area 2 Area 1 Area 2 Area 1 Area 2 500 s.f. 18,500 s.s 10,000 s.f. 40,000 s.f. 25 40 65

PLAY AREA 2

PLAY AREA 1

DECEMBER 15, 2010

PLAY AREA 1

PLAY AREA 2

EDISON K-8 SCHOOLYARD BRIGHTON, MA

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THE OUTDOOR CLASSROOM - in its current shape - still under construction

EDISON K-8 SCHOOLYARD BRIGHTON, MA

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CONSTRUCTION ADMINISTRATION

Since I was so intimately involved with the generation of the CD’s, I was also given the opportunity to provide CA support. Submittal, review, site visits, documenting the construction process through both photographs and meeting notes was a great learning experience.

EDISON K-8 SCHOOLYARD BRIGHTON, MA

143 Meeting Minutes Project Date Location Purpose Attendees

Edison K-8 Schoolyard 07/19/11, 1:00 p.m. Jobsite Construction Meeting #2 James Sessum, PFD Kathy Hanley, PFD Anthony Freda, STR Tom Lewis, LLN David Warner, WLI Delia Gott, WLI

Weather Abbreviations

85⁰ Sunny PFD Public Facilities Department JS James Sessum KH Kathy Hanley STR Strada Construction Company, Inc. AF Anthony Freda DAE Daedalus Projects Inc. LLN TL WLI DW DFG

Submittals Weekly Outlook

Leo’s Landscaping Nursery, Inc. Tom Lewis Warner Larson Inc. David Warner Delia Gott

6x6 artificial turf edge substitution is acceptable, provide submittal for record Completing saw cutting and asphalt removal. Installing tree protection. Installing drainage.

Old Business 2.01 After understanding DAE’s schedule and scope, PFD recommends the following phasing: •

STR to start work in the play area, while DAE will work on improvements to the school wing adjacent to the O.C.

STR to start work on O.C. after DAE completes work and removes all equipment from the area; DAE to work on improvements to the school wing adjacent to the Arts area

STR to start work on Arts area after DAE completes work and removes all equipment; DAE to work in the inside court

130 WEST BROADWAY, BOSTON MA 02127

T 617.464.1440

F 617.464.1442

Edison K-8 Schoolyard Construction Meeting #2 July 19, 2011 Page 2 of 2

www.warnerlarson.com

STR to start work on ‘Social Area’ after DAE completes work and removes all equipment. 7/19/11 Daedalus is not following the sequence. They are not concentrating their main work load in the play area as discussed.

New Business 4.01

STR/WLI

Reviewed and confirmed trees in the O.C. area identified for transplant or protection.

4.02

PFD

In order to protect the existing from possible damage due to roofing work, a protection fence needs to be installed along the entire length of the west façade, 8’ away from building. DAE shall provide and install protection fence.

4.03

WLI/LLN

Leo’s Landscaping must identify plant material sources for specified cultivars and reserve spring dug trees in well-maintained nursery. Root ball size for trees to be transplanted must meet the ANLA Standard for Nursery Stock and in all cases shall always be of a diameter and depth to encompass enough of the fibrous and feeding root system as necessary for the full recovery of the plant.

4.04

WLI /PFD

Tree transplant to be completed in mid September, after the trees harden off. No work in O.C. to be done until the transplant of trees in completed. WLI requested STR provide an updated schedule for the O.C. working backwards from cold weather limitations to determine the construction window after transplanting.

4.05

WLI/PFD

Arts and social area could be completed by the beginning of September. All new planting shall be completed as soon as possible, without the concerns of transplanting scheduling.

Next Meeting: Prepared by:

July 26th, 2011, 1:00 p.m. DFG

These notes constitute our understanding of the issues discussed. Please report any corrections within 48 hours so revisions can be redistributed. Otherwise, these notes will serve as the record.

PLAY AREA CONSTRUCTION

ROGER WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY BRISTOL, RI

144

TREE MASTER PLANNING

planning In determining the objectives for this Campus Tree Planning, we studied and discussed the primary and secondary campus views, significant and declining existing trees, potential development sites and locations of annual events. This evaluation equally established constraints and opportunities.

Please see the following plans: CAMPUS VIEWS A student or parent’s first impression is often based on the aesthetic appearance of a campus. This plan identifies those ‘First Impression’ views and routes, plus illustrates other significant and key areas. Notably, open views to the Mt. Hope Bay, across quadrangles, and towards the Mt. Hope Bridge, all of which are signature elements on campus. These primary viewsheds help identify landscape priorities, and where investment and/or preservation remain essential. SPECIAL SITES Potential building locations, areas for annual events and key snow storage zones have been noted. Generally, this overlaid plan represents constraint areas for new tree plantings. We anticipate in the coming years, some of these site uses will change. When this happens, new trees may be appropriate in these locations. EXISTING TREES This diagram shows significant trees, and edge defining woodlands. The word “significant,” simply implies those trees which define spaces, and are greater than 12” caliper. Some of them may not be specimen quality, but nonetheless provide noteworthy canopy cover. Other trees are shown to be in decline. See the following Tree Recommendations for suggested removals and new tree locations. TREE RECOMMENDATIONS Based on the evaluation of the Campus Views, Special Sites, and Existing Tree studies, we have identified trees that should be removed, and opportunities for new tree plantings that will improve the campus aesthetic. Note: while this analysis reviews some primary water views through the area defined by the Coastal Resource Management Council (CRMC), our recommendations exclude that area as it is regulated and restrictions already defined.

The University has recently build a new residential hall, in the immediate vicinity of what used to be a service road. the increased traffic transformed the road into a main access, but the tree material - part of their branding and image failed to impress. Addittional site improvements throughout the campus have damaged existing plants.

This master plan looks at the condition of the vegetaion, and proposes solutions to the issues discovered. My resposabilities included site visits and documentation of existing conditions, book assembly, graphic presentation, and plant material research.

145

introduction

purpose and goals

The mature tree canopy that exists throughout campus reinforces the history and longevity of the institution. Prior to the University developing the Bristol campus, in the late 1960’s, many of the oldest and largest existing trees were part of the Ferrycliffe Farm. These trees were primarily, linden, horsechestnut, various oaks, black tupelo, and eastern red cedar’s. Many of these large trees help define the legacy and character of the campus today.

campus tree planting concept The existing tree canopy signifies an accumulative investment in time and dollars, and is a real asset to the campus landscape. These trees unite the campus vocabulary, reinforce outdoor spaces, provide shade, and convey a unique sense of place. New tree plantings shall be of appropriate type and planted in the proper locations to ensure they reinforce the existing tree canopy, and avoid conflicts with utilities or important views.

Guidelines for future campus plantings: • Plant long-lived, native (when appropriate) trees that will provide interest, diversity, and preserve or enhance the overall campus character. • Select proper tree species, and strive to follow planting details. • Deciduous trees should be informally placed, yet carefully located to frame desired views and reinforce outdoor spaces. • Utilize understory ornamental trees sparingly as gateway accents and building entries. Introduce unique or ornamental species within quadrangles/special places. This will add distinct character to these spaces.

Over the years, as the campus continued to grow and develop, another generation of trees were planted to help provide shade, line drives, and define quadrangles. The majority of those tree species were sycamore, maple, honeylocust, zelkova and dawn redwood. The more recent tree plantings were selected to enhance the existing tree canopy, increase the plant diversity, define new spaces, and direct significant views. Some of these species include: elm, tulip poplar, beech, Carolina silverbell, katsuratree, and multiple oak varieties. The guidelines in this Campus Tree Planning are intended to build on this momentum, and think about the campus holistically verses on a building-by-building basis. We anticipate these ideas will improve the overall campus aesthetic by enhancing and preserving the landscape. The process by which these recommendations were established began with an inventory and analysis of campus viewsheds, existing trees, potential future buildings and outdoor event spaces.



This Campus Tree Planning was developed to primarily: • Improve ‘First Impressions’ • Encourage educational and fundraising opportunities • Identify significant existing trees, special sites and view corridors • Plant long-lived, native (when appropriate) trees that will provide interest, diversity, and preserve or enhance the overall campus character

Admission building, from quad, framed by deciduous trees.

• Define proper tree species selection and planting recommendations that will establish and reinforce outdoor spaces and views

CAMPUS TREE PLANNING

CAMPUS TREE PLANNING

Residence hall planting where gathering spaces and circulation are reinforced by the tree planting.

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AREA 1

WARNER LARSON, INC.

My responsibilities include project sheet layout, stock and stationary design and professional production, as well as proposal assemblies for both private and public entities.

DEL I A G O T T PROJECT ASSISTANT

T

148

C

443.373.7085

F

6 1 7. 4 6 4 . 1 4 4 2

D G OT T @ WA R N E R L A R S O N .CO M

BRANDING AND MARKETING MATERIALS

w w w.wa r n e r l a r s o n .c o m

Oliver Hazard Perry Schoolyard

Oliver Hazard Perry Schoolyard

South Boston, Massachusetts

South Boston, Massachusetts Since 1995, the Boston Schoolyard Initiative has been transforming urban schoolyards, often paved over completely, by introducing exciting new designs for active play and outdoor classrooms for experiencing nature in the learning process.

The design of the south-facing outdoor classroom introduces elements of sustainability: solar orientation, shade trees, buffer planting, permeable pavement and a dry river bed to accommodate storm water runoff, create not only a comfortable microclimate but are used as teaching tools.

Warner Larson and Joanne Hiromura, of Play Site Architecture facilitated a series of workshops that brought the community together in support of the new schoolyard and outdoor classroom design. A key topic for the group was the parking and after-hours access. We utilized a simple series of functional diagrams that focused the group on the parking issues early in the process. Once this basic decision was made, we were able to refocus the group on the design of the play areas and outdoor classroom.

The play area faced the challenge of serving a large number of users from different age groups. A custom play boat encourages imaginative play while strengthening the maritime theme of the design. The same theme can be found in the active play installations, which are designed to build upper body strength and encourage social interaction.

Precedent imagery including other playgrounds as well as general thematic photographs were displayed to encourage green light thinking and discussion amongst the group.

www.warnerlarson.com

6 1 7. 4 6 4 . 1 4 4 0 x 1 9

www.warnerlarson.com

ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

Boston Parks and Recreation Department

149

David J. Warner WARNER LARSON, INC. Principal-in-Charge Phase 1: 10%

Phase 2: 20%

Phase 3: 10%

Phase 4: 20%

Tileston Johnson WARNER LARSON, INC. Project Manager Phase 1: 720%

Phase 2: 40% Phase 3: 70% Phase 4: 75%

Joanne Hiromura, CPSI

James O’Brien P.E.

Studio MLA Playground Design Consultant Phase 1: 10% Phase 3: 20%

7.

a. b.

c.

CSI Engineering Electrical Engineer

Phase 2: 40% Phase 4: 5%

As needed for Site Lighting

Brief Resume Of ONLY Those Prime Applicant And Sub-Consultant Personnel Requested In The Advertisement. Confine Responses To The Space Provided On The Form And Limit Resumes To ONE Person Per Discipline Requested In The Advertisement. Resumes Should Be Consistent With The Persons Listed On The Organizational Chart In Question # 6. Additional Sheets Should Be Provided Only As Required For The Number Of Key Personnel Requested In The Advertisement And They Must Be In The Format Provided. By Including A Firm As A Sub-Consultant, The Prime Applicant Certifies That The Listed Firm Has Agreed To Work On This Project, Should The Team Be Selected. Name And Title Within Firm: a. Name And Title Within Firm: David J. Warner, ASLA, Principal Ti Johnson, LEED AP Project Assignment: b. Project Assignment: Principal in Charge Project Manager Name And Address Of Office In Which Individual Identified In 7a Resides: Warner Larson Inc. 130 West Broadway Boston, MA 02127

c. MBE WBE

Name And Address Of Office In Which Individual Identified In 7a Resides: Warner Larson Inc. 130 West Broadway Boston, MA 02127 7

MBE WBE 5

Years Experience: With This Firm:

d.

Years Experience: With This Firm:

e.

Education: Degree(s) /Year/Specialization Bachelor / 1991 / Landscape Architecture

e.

Education: Degree(s) /Year/Specialization Bachelor/1998/Landscape Architecture

f.

Active Registration: Year First Registered/Discipline/Mass Registration Number 1999 / Landscape Architect / 1209

f.

Active Registration: Year First Registered/Discipline/Mass Registration Number: 2003 / Landscape Architect / 1375

g.

Current Work Assignments And Availability For This Project: David is currently working on several projects at various phases, and is available to meet the site services needs of this project as principal-in-charge.

g.

Current Work Assignments And Availability For This Project Ti is currently working on several projects at various phases, and is available to meet the site services needs of this project as project manager.

h.

Other Experience And Qualification Relevant To The Proposed Project: (Identify Firm By Which Employed, If Not Current Firm): Dedham HS Athletic Complex Maynard HS Southbridge MS/HS Taunton High School Weymouth High School Medway High School Paul Revere Elementary School Revere, MA Newton South High School Hopkinton High School Stowe Schools Feasibility Study Pembroke High School and Middle School Holliston High School, Hingham High School

h.

Other Experience And Qualification Relevant To The Proposed Project: (Identify Firm By Which Employed , If Not Current Firm): Paul Revere Elementary School Revere, MA Taunton High School Weymouth High School Ambrose Elementary School, Winchester, MA Pembroke High School Dedham High School Athletic Feasibility Study Stowe Schools Feasibility Study Lexington Elementary Schools Feasibility Study

Updated July 2011

6

With Other Firms:

 

d.

14

With Other Firms:

 

DSB Sub-Consultant Form

P.C.-ARCH MAGUIRE GROUP, INC. INTERN ARCHITECT 2012

SMITH BAY BATH HOUSE ST. THOMAS U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS

152

60% SCHEMATIC DESIGN

Due to the small footprint of this building I was placed in charge of the construction documents production.

I was responsible for the drafting of plans, elevations, sections and details of the building, while respecting the chief architect’s design intent and coordinating with the structural drawings.

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154

155

156

SIMS METAL SHREDDER FACILITY PROVIDENCE, RI

The client wishes to renovate an existing shipping facility, and to build an office and storage building for their metal shredding facility.

SCHEMATIC DESIGN

Still in schematic design I was challanged to produce o few options for the facade renovation / extension of the shipping facility, and to generate a 3D model for the design already established of the office / storage building.

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EAST SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL SOMERVILLE, MA

Currently under construction, the East Somerville High School was an opportunity to review submittals, respond to RFI’s and issue sketch changes. Pictured below is a sketch issued for a flooring pattern. I had to consider the original design, the materials and colors in the specifications and the particular use of the room.

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CONSTRUCTION ADMINISTRATION

OPM

OWNER’S PROJECT MANAGEMENT

H2 ONT

TH 3

MON

TH 4

MON

M

H5 ONT

MO

6 NTH

TH 7

MON

t Stree r ress Cong 1th Floo 1 211 110 2 0 A n, M 440 Bosto •778•1 617

M TH 1 MON N O I AT DUR days 344 ys a 90 d s www.maguiregroup.com ay Architecture for these projects by Jacunski Humes Architects, LLC 90 d s E eek t c w M e j A 2 o N r r s P e K y n S a y TA afet ittee/Ow 46 d s lic S ek t Pub g Comm oval 2 we ys men p r in lo p d Buil ding Ap & Deve 0 da ys e er Fun election 0 da anag Scop S eks Site Project M ement & r/ Local) e w 2 iste ertis er's week Own pare Adv ntral Reg 1 ys ation Pre tise (Ce ations 0 da r Evalu ic ays Adve e Qualif k Quals. d 0 iv c eks Rece nce Che rview w 2 e ys te re Refe List for In ucted da 0 e d t ys guag Shor ws Con 0 da t Lan ie c v a r r t e ays on 3 Int d C p / 8 o 5 T ns eks Rank egotiatio d w 2 e ys e N Fee to Proce ntal 0 da e nme 7) s nviro Notic ct Award (MGL c cope week t&E 3 S a n n r e t & io l) s n ek Co lopm elect tisement er/ Loca 2 we ek Deve ner S ist er Land Desig pare Adv ntral Reg 1 we s n t n y atio Pre tise (Ce ations 0 da eme r Evalu ic nag ys Adve e Qualif k Quals. t Ma 0 da c iv c e j e e ro eks Rec nce Ch rview ’s P 2 we ys te re ner Refe List for In ucted Ow da 0 e g d t a r n u ering Sho days s Co Lang gine 280 ys view ract & En Inter Top 3 da Cont ture / c 0 e 4 s it n Arch ays Rank egotiatio 60 d s N This flyer was designed for a trade show. ent Fee ct Award day agem 0 n a 2 a 1 r M It was originally meant to be handed out Cont rocess ) days mergency e s D 0 a S 2 ( h P 1 E n se gP but it also incorporated standards USPS s Desig grammin sign Pha D) e rc ou De t (D Pro r Res requirements for post card mailing. matic elopmen (CD) Wate e h c v S n De cuments ineering I was in charge of the design, quote ig s e g o D D En ract Civil and sample requests from different Cont tion

MARKETING MATERIALS

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MAGUIRE OPM FLYER

porta Trans

vendors and compliance with USPS requirements.


SEGMENT 2 PORTFOLIO