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DEL AWARE COUNT Y VOTERS’ GUIDE 2012

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF DELAWARE COUNTY

2012 VOTERS GUIDE

LWVDELAWARECOUNTYOHIO.COM INFO@LWVDELAWARECOUNTYOHIO.COM

COURTESY OF THE DELAWARE GAZETTE, THE SUNBURY NEWS AND THE LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS

GENERAL ELECTION • NOVEMBER 6, 2012

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he League of Women Voters, founded in 1920, is a nonpartisan political organization that encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and influences public policy through education and advocacy. Complementing it is the League of Women Voters of Ohio Education Fund that provides nonpartisan information and educational services to citizens. Prior to each state and national election, the League of Women Voters of Ohio Education Fund provides nonpartisan information on statewide candidates and issues to its local Leagues and Ohio voters.

This information is used in Voters’ Guides which are distributed by local Leagues throughout the state. Statewide offices in the 2012 General Election are U.S. Senator and Justice of the Supreme Court of Ohio. On the ballot for the November General Election are two issues: Issue 1, which concerns holding a constitutional convention; and Issue 2, a proposed constitutional amendment changing the way legislative and congressional districts are drawn. All statewide candidates who filed their intent to run for office with the Ohio Secretary of State were sent questions relating to the office they were seeking, as well as instructions on how to

complete the candidate questionnaire. The League does not alter, edit, correct, or evaluate any candidate’s reply, and each candidate is solely responsible for the accuracy and truth of his or her statements. Each candidate is advised in writing to carefully note the word limitations listed on their questionnaire. A candidate’s answers are accepted and printed only with the understanding that the material will not be used in any way that may be deemed to be an endorsement by the League of his or her candidacy or views.

LOCAL RACES • DELAWARE COUNTY COMMISSIONER RICHARD BIRD Party: Democratic Address: 6961 Whitetail Lane, Westerville Occupation: Risk Executive Education: B.A. Ohio State, Graduate Studies, George Washington University Qualifications for Office: Well known business leader, corporate executive and community activist with a history of working with other community leaders and elected officials, regardless of political party.

JOHN K. HARTMAN

GARY D. MERRELL

Party: Democratic Address: 3554 ClarkShaw Road, Powell Occupation: Professor of Journalism Education: B.S. journalism, 1967; MA, radio-TV-film, 1977; Ph.D., communication, 1986, Bowling Green State University Qualifications for Office: Elected 5 times to Bowling Green board of education (1978-1997), 2 years as president, 2 years as vice president. Served 5 years on Penta Vocational board.

Party: Republican Address: 3481 Royal Dornoch Circle, Delaware Occupation: Former newspaper publisher/group publisher Education: BBA Marketing; minors in Finance and Accounting Qualifications for Office: I have a 40year career in newspapers that began in sales/marketing and evolved to managing sales groups, ad departments, newspapers and groups of newspapers.

RYERSON

On November 6th, elect

J O H N

State Representative – 68th District – Knox and Eastern Delaware Counties

KEN O’BRIEN Party: Republican Address: 2831 Curve Road Occupation: County Commissioner Education: B.A. Cum Laude; Ohio State University, M.A. Eastern Kentucky University Qualifications for Office: Budgeting, fiscal management, policy making. Delaware County Commissioner, DKMM Solid Waste District Board, Regional Planning, Central Ohio Youth Center, Family and Children First Council and the 911 Board.

John will: Q Help to bring jobs and economic development to the district Q Work to strengthen public education Q Work to make our school funding system fair and constitutional Q Support the rights of public employees Questions? Visit www.ryersonforstaterep2012.com Paid for by Ryerson for State Representative 2012, John T. Ryerson, Treasurer, 417 Chase Avenue, Gambier, Ohio 43022

DE L AWA RE COUN T Y VOTERS’ GUIDE 2012 W h a t sp e c i f i c c h a n ge s w o u l d y o u m ak e t o i m p r ov e t he d e c or u m an d c o op e r a ti on a mo n g a n d b et w e e n th e o th er c o mm i s s i o n e rs ? •RICHARD BIRD: The specific change I would make to improve decorum and cooperation within the county commission board is simple; replace Ken O’Brien. Ken is the sole contributor to the dysfunction and unprofessionalism many have come to associate with the county commissioners. There are literally hours of video recordings of Ken throwing tantrums, screaming, and berating his fellow commissioners. Simply through the experience of working in difficult circumstances on high profile projects and initiatives in the corporate world over the last 20-plus years, I’ve learned that you cannot bully your way to success, you cannot shout down other’s ideas and you must treat ever yone with respect. It is clear that Ken has learned none of these basics and if things are to get better on the commission board, it will be because he is defeated in November. •JOHN K. HAR TMAN: On June 11, I appeared before the board of county commissioners to present my proposal for charter reform whereby county commissioners would be elected in four districts to bring the government closer to the people in Delaware County. I explained how charter reform would streamline county government, make it more efficient, and free up funds for economic development and safety without raising taxes. I answered questions about the proposal from the commissioners and there was a pleasant give and take about the issue. I urged the commissioners to vote to place the measure on the Nov. 6 ballot, but they declined. We were able to disagree without becoming disagreeable. I believe this respectful approach is the hallmark of an effective public body and I would continue in this manner if voters choose to elect me county commis-

sioner in the coming election. I pledge a bipartisan approach to county government as well. •GARY D. MERRELL: People who know me say, “Gar y gets things done in a respectful manner and does not take disagreements personally.” Commissioners have a tough job, a job that requires a great deal of research, evaluation, and often considerable passion. So frequently, strong disagreements as to the best course of action may arise among us and the constituents we ser ve. After thoughtful deliberation, different commissioners can view the solution much differently. We must remind ourselves that when we disagree, which we will and should, it should never be personal. I believe I will have the respect of my fellow commissioners and together we will create an environment that will be positive and productive. I am excited about ser ving, and have no concerns about appropriate decorum and cooperation. I will conduct myself in a professional, courteous manner, and treat my fellow commissioners with respect; I know they will do the same. •KEN O’BRIEN: The taxpayers of Delaware County deserve a board of commissioners that treat taxpayers fairly and equally regardless of wealth and who it is they know. They also deserve a board that is well informed in which each commissioner makes sure they have all the facts before they make decisions. When taxpayer money is at stake, tough questions need to be asked — regardless if it is small dollar items that add up or it is a $3.13 million boondoggle. I will never sidestep asking pointed questions in the name of decorum when taxpayer money is potentially being wasted. That is not to say decorum could not be enhanced. Next year, I will again attempt to have rules adopted as to how meetings are run. Rules that facilitate a fair, full venting of the facts and allows commissioners to complete a thought without being

interrupted will facilitate decorum and cooperation. Wh a t sp e c if i c f un din g so ur ce s o r c h an g e s i n fu n d i n g w o u l d y o u s u p p o r t o r op p o s e t o m ee t t h e g r ow i n g f i n an c i a l n e e d s o f De l a wa r e C o u n ty ? ( e. g . s h a r e d s e r v i c e s w i th ci ti e s an d t o wn s hi p s , a t ax i n c r e a s e, b e t t e r e f f i c i en c i e s . ) •RICHARD BIRD: Expense management is the key to Delaware’s continued growth. Revenue is simply not an issue when all current streams are considered. Between local entity taxes, city taxes, property taxes and sales tax, Delaware County shouldn’t have a single pothole, a single underperforming school or a single unfinished development project. Having managed more than $2 billion in corporate budgets over the last several years, expense control is always the key. Shared ser vices must become the rule and not the exception within the county, to drive expenses down for all county ser vices. As a county commissioner I will bring the county into the 21st centur y with requirements for true financial budgeting and expectations tied to those budgets, as opposed to the wasteful process supported today. The county commissioners provide an open checkbook to ever y county agency, where budgets only ser ve as guidelines and not as fixed requirements for annual performance. •JOHN K. HARTMAN: I believe my proposal for charter reform, where four county commissioners would be elected by districts and one elected at-large, would lay the groundwork for meeting the financial needs of Delaware County in the future. Under my proposal, the county commissioners would become part-time rather than the current fulltime and the county government would be run by an elected county executive overseen by the commissioners. This would increase accountability and get the government closer to the people. Some elected county positions would be

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phased out, but the many hard-working county employees would continue to provide valuable service. Charter reform would enable functions to be combined and would free up money for economic development and safety without increasing taxes. Regarding shared services, cities, villages and townships should be encouraged to look for ways to combine services, but should be allowed to make those decisions in a democratic fashion and not have them imposed on them. •GARY D. MERRELL: First, and most importantly, in those areas managed/controlled by the county commissioners I do not see a situation where I would support any tax increases. I believe our funding is sufficient for business growth in the county. There are opportunities where we have the potential to avoid duplication of ser vices, possibly improve efficiencies, etc. Since the March primar y, I have spent considerable time educating myself. The process, as I have spoken to office holders and administrators, is that I will understand, evaluate, and then I will comment. I am not looking for political points. My goal is to do my homework, ask the necessar y questions, and then offer solutions. •KEN O’BRIEN: I am opposed to tax increases. Delaware County must budget within its existing taxes. I am also committed to keeping the 1 mill tax-rollback promise. There are changes to our current funding. Delaware County will be receiving a por tion of the casino tax money which will help of fset the reductions in revenues in other areas such as the local government funds and reclaim funds reductions from the state. Although I am a fiscal hawk, I do believe the county should continue its Emergency Medical Ser vices (EMS). It’s expensive, and it’s helpful to have fire depar tments augment our ser vice, but the taxpayers should

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DEL AWARE COUNT Y VOTERS’ GUIDE 2012

have medics available even when there is a fire — particularly when there is a fire. But, when it does make sense to save money, we need to work with other entities. I have diligently worked for shared solutions regarding youth detention, solid waste and 911 ser vices.

A s yo u l oo k to t h e y ea r 2 0 2 0 , w h a t s t r a te g i c p l a n n i n g c ha n g es d o y ou e n v i s i o n to p re p ar e t he c o u n t y f or a g r ow i n g po p u l a t i o n a n d g r ow i n g n e e d s? •RICHARD BIRD: The strategic focus for 2020 and beyond must be driven by the rapid expansion and development of the I-71 and U.S. 36/OH 37 interchange and the surrounding area. In order for Delaware County to capitalize on economic growth that isn’t tied solely to new subdivisions or the Polaris region, infrastructure improvements must focus on the center and northern reaches of Delaware County. There is plenty of evidence to show that the political brawling within the Delaware County Republican party over I-71 and U.S. 36/OH 37 has not only delayed progress in improving a decades old problem, but has negatively impacted the economic growth potential for the central portion of the Delaware County. A strategic development focus in this area will improve almost every aspect of life for the county’s growing population; diversification of industry, increased employment opportunities and significant improvements and reductions to travel time for both industry and private citizens. •JOHN K. HAR TMAN: In order to maintain the quality of life

in Delaware County, I believe its leaders should be increasingly vigilant to insure its orderly development. My proposed charter reform, with four commissioners elected by districts and an elected county executive, would lay the groundwork for guiding future growth. Regarding specific projects, I believe a new interchange along I71, if built, should be done with the needs of the public first and foremost. Elected officials should decide its location and then coordinate with private developers, not vice versa. If fracking and storage of fracking fluid come to Delaware County, they should be carefully scrutinized and monitored so as not to endanger residents or upset the quality of life. We should all support the neighbors in Concord Township in seeing that new power lines stick to existing locations and are not built through people’s homesteads. Installation of weather warning sirens throughout the county will be a high priority if I am elected county commissioner. •GARY D. MERRELL: Economic development is extremely important. Many of our residents work outside the county; we do want a balance of quality jobs inside/outside the county. We should offer reasonable economic incentives for businesses to locate/create jobs in Delaware County. We are a leader in growth/development in Ohio; we need to maintain quality of life, soundness of planning, fiscal responsibility, and vision. We have dedicated people who are focused on maintaining an atmosphere of cooperation and bringing businesses and new residents to

Delaware County. We will strengthen our law enforcement/emergency services by working with the townships. With our county engineer and ODOT, we will maximize our road/bridge funding, complete Sawmill Parkway, and solve the congestion issues at U.S. 36/ Ohio 37 and I-71. Growth is important; change is unavoidable. Delaware County is diverse and we should continually be aware of the impact growth can have on our agricultural community and its value to our county. •KEN O’BRIEN: Within budget constraints — that is, no new taxes — Delaware County should help municipalities and townships implement their own comprehensive land use plans, not tell them what to do. With that in mind, the county should improve infrastructure and create economic development plans that take into account all stakeholders — schools, townships, parks, libraries, Board of Developmental Disabilities, Council for Older Adults, etc. Tax incentives need to be constructed in a manner that the return on tax incentives is a tangible, positive event for ever yone. Delaware County needs to update its infrastructure within budget constraints, e.g. Sawmill Parkway. We should coordinate with Delaware City to get the parkway to the city limits. But, the county should not build a road to a hayfield, nor should we let that money sit in the bank when we have other road needs in the county if the parkway isn’t built. I f e le c t ed , w h a t s p e c i f i c c h a n g e s w o u l d y o u m a ke i n t h e R e c o r d er ’ s of f i c e d u r i n g th e n e x t te r m ?

DELAWARE COUNTY RECORDER RICK BEER Party: Democratic Address: 8565 Clover Glade Dr. Lewis Center Occupation: Manager of The Title Dept. for TableRock Land Services Education: Graduate of Capital University, North Central State and Columbus State Qualifications for Office: Searched records at the Recorders office for over 20 years. Manager with Real Estate firms for approximately 15 years.

MELISSA JORDAN No information received for Melissa Jordan, Delaware County Recorder.

•RICK BEER: If elected, I would work full time in the Recorder’s Office, unlike the current Recorder, to allow the general public the opportunity to have their questions answered in a timely manner. Also, I would implement a subdivision file system to assist homeowners and developers in finding restrictions, easements and homeowner associations that may be located on property they own, or may want to purchase. I would meet with the many townships and municipalities to determine if we can interface with them to make records collection easier and more cost effective for the county taxpayers. Additionally, I would meet with

Margaret Ann Ruhl for 68th House District State Representative Knox County & Parts of Delaware County Paid for by Ruhl for State Representative, Kelly Schermerhorn, Treasurer 508 E. Gambier St., Mount Vernon, OH 43050 2325701

DE L AWA RE COUNT Y VOTE RS’ GUIDE 2012 the staff in both a group and individual setting to discuss work flow, ways to improve the system to make it more cost effective, and how we can improve morale. By utilizing the experience I obtained while working in Ohio, Virginia and Florida’s recorders office I would implement changes that would help the office run more smoothly. Lastly, I would review state statute compliance, storage preservation, and meet with our private sector partners to discuss with them any and all changes the Recorder’s Office can make that would be mutually beneficial. For more details, my 100 day plan for the office can be found on my website at votebeer.com.

A s y o u l o o k t o t h e y e ar 20 2 0, wh a t s t r a t e g i c p l a nn i ng ch a n g e s d o y o u e n v is io n t o p r e p a r e t h e o f f i c e f o r a g r o wi n g p o p u l a t i o n a n d g r o w i n g n eeds? •RICK BEER: As we look to the future, we need to review our current computer system and contracts with the companies we are currently working with to determine what options are available for improvement. The current computer system is unproductive and inefficient for a county of our growing size. Our current Recorder made the change to the current computer system without considering the quality of the product or obtaining feedback from our private sector partners. To preserve our records for future generations, I would strive to convert more of our physical records into a digital format that would accessible by computer. Lastly, I would review the department’s formal and informal organization, and exam staffing numbers to determine if we have the appropriate quality of personnel to deal with the growing amount of documents needing to be filed. W h at im p a c t o n t h e R e co r d e r ’ s o f f i c e d o y o u s e e a s a r e s ul t o f p o t e n t i al o il an d g as f r a ct u r i n g , an d t h e n e e d f o r l e as e s f o r o il , g as a n d m in e r a l r i gh t s? •RICK BEER: Since I currently work in the oil industry, my knowledge in this field would only serve as an asset to Delaware County. The first item we can address for our residents

when fracturing arrives in the county is to provide our residents with the contact information for agencies and local attorneys who specialize in oil and gas. Secondly, I would work with the oil and gas companies to seek financial assistance to upgrade our printers and copiers. To relieve the traffic levels in our office, I would focus on imaging documents that oil and gas companies would more likely need. I would consider moving staff around to limit the amount of guests in the office during the day: this would allow no disruption to our local residents and clients. If oil and gas fracturing impacts Delaware County, I will work diligently to ensure that the oil and gas companies pay their fair share for the services our county residents and taxpayers have supplied.

UNCONTESTED LOCAL RACES DELAWARE COUNTY PROSECUTOR

CAROL HAMILTON O’BRIEN Party: Republican Address: 196 W. Lincoln Ave., Delaware Occupation: Prosecuting Attorney Education: B.A. Political Science, Northwestern University 1980; JD, University of Toledo, 1983 Qualifications for Office: I was appointed Prosecuting Attorney in January 2011 and I have fulfilled the duties of the office since that date. I have served as an assistant prosecuting attorney in both Franklin and Delaware Counties. I began working in Franklin County in 1989 and worked there until 1996 when I became an Assistant Attorney General.I have been appointed as a special prosecutor in many other counties prosecuting cases involving complicated civil and criminal cases. No response to the question What specific plans, changes and/or improvements do you envision for your next term?

DELAWARE COUNTY CLERK OF COMMON PLEAS COURTS

JAN ANTONOPLOS Party: Republican Address: 8671 Dunsinane Dr., Dublin Occupation: Clerk of Common Pleas Courts Education: Bliss College Associate Degree in Business Qualifications for Office: Appointed to position in 2002. Worked diligently for 10 years to improve efficency in cost effective manner.

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most is the responsibility to provide the best law enforcement service possible at a standard that is acceptable to the community we serve. Over the next four years our intent is to return to the basics of public safety and provide it in the context of a “lean” well trained and responsive office. Training will be emphasized and resources dedicated to the ongoing professionalism of the office. We will proceed in a manner that is always sensitive to the community we serve and measured against the priority of good stewardship with tax payer dollars and the implied trust that is bestowed upon the Office.

DELAWARE COUNTY ENGINEER W h at s p e c if ic p l a n s , c h an g e s a nd /o r i m p r o v e m e nt s d o y o u e n v i s i o n f o r y o u r n e xt t e r m ? •JAN ANTONOPLOS: To continue to improve the efficiency of the clerk’s office both in the title and legal divisions in a cost effective manner. Delaware County’s Clerk of Common Pleas was the first in Ohio to accept electronic filings. We also scan documents for public review but always with privacy issues as a top priority. We have implemented payments online and acceptance of debit and credit cards in both offices.

DELAWARE COUNTY SHERIFF

RUSS MARTIN Party: Republican Occupation: Sheriff Education: B.S. Bowling Green State University Criminal Justice, A.A. James Rhodes State College LE technology Qualifications for Office: Former Chief of Police, City of Delaware

W h at s p e c if ic p l a n s , c h an g e s a nd /o r i m p r o v e m e nt s d o y o u e n v i s i o n f o r y o u r n e xt t e r m ? •RUSS MARTIN: First and fore-

CHRIS BAUSERMAN Party: Republican Address: 8671 Dunsinane Dr., Dublin Occupation: County Engineer Education: Ohio Northern University, BSCE Qualifications for Office: Delaware County Engineer since 1996, State of Ohio registered Professional Engineer and Surveyor W h at s p e c if ic p l a n s , c h an g e s a nd /o r i m p r o v e m e nt s d o y o u e n v i s i o n f o r y o u r n e xt t e r m ? •CHRIS BAUSERMAN: We have made ver y significant strides toward improving the overall condition of our county-owned system of roads and bridges. As our county continues to grow, our focus now shifts to addressing capacity and safety issues. Over the next four years, projects will be planned and constructed that target highly congested intersections and high accident locations. We will also continue our commitment to maintaining our transportation infrastructure in a ser viceable and cost-effective way. And, we will remain committed to partnering with other government agencies to collectively attack multijurisdictional problems.

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DEL AWARE COUNT Y VOTERS’ GUIDE 2 012

DELAWARE COUNTY TREASURER

JON PETERSON No information received for Jon Peterson, Delaware County Treasurer.

DELAWARE COUNTY COMMON PLEAS JUDGE

EVERETT H. KRUEGER Party: Republican Address: 91 N. Sandusky St., Delaware, 3rd floor Occupation: Delaware County Common Pleas Judge Education: B.A. Hanover College, J.D. Capital University Qualifications for Office: 29 years as judge W h a t s p e c i f i c p l a n s , c ha n g e s a nd / o r i m p r o v e m e nt s d o y o u e n v i s io n f o r y o u r n e x t t e r m? •EVERETT H. KRUEGER: The primar y reason for seeking reelection is for the purpose of initiating and continuing a Recover y Docket for those who are addicted to drugs. Far and away the most criminal of fenses are being committed by persons addicted to drugs and especially opiates. An opiate task force was established in the county to explore ways to educate folks about the problem and to reduce the population of addicted persons through collaboration of various agencies or entities. Opiate addiction is a scourge on our families and community. A recover y docket is one device which has proven effective. Those dependent on drugs are under intense super vision and must meet with the judge as often as ever y two weeks to check their status.

DELAWARE COUNTY CORONER

MARK HICKMAN Party: Republican Address: 206 N. Franklin St., Delaware Occupation: Family physician Education: Ohio State University College of Medicine Qualifications for Office: Certified Death Investigator W h a t sp e c i f i c p l a n s , c h a n g es a n d / or i mp r o ve m en t s d o y ou e n v i s i o n fo r y o u r n ex t te r m? •MARK HICKMAN: I will continue to build relationships with local law enforcement agencies. In addition, our office will continue to provide timely and thorough death scene investigations.

LOCAL QUESTIONS AND ISSUES •PROPOSED TAX LEVY (Renewal) — VILLAGE OF ASHLEY A renewal of a tax for the benefit of the Village of Ashley for the purpose of maintaining and operating the cemetery at a rate not exceeding 1 mill for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to $0.10 for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for 5 years, commencing in 2012, first due in calendar year 2013. •PROPOSED TAX LEVY (Renewal) — CONCORD TOWNSHIP A renewal of a tax for the benefit of Concord Township for the purpose of general construction, reconstruction, resurfacing, and repair of roads and bridges, at a rate not exceeding 1 mill for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to $0.10 for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for 5 years, commencing in

2012, first due in calendar year 2013. •PROPOSED TAX LEVY (Additional) — ELM VALLEY JOINT FIRE DISTRICT An additional tax for the benefit of Elm Valley Joint Fire District for the purpose of constructing a fire station to operate the same at a rate not exceeding ninety seven hundred (.97) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to nine and seven tenths cents ($0.097) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for 30 years, commencing in 2012, first due in calendar year 2013. •PROPOSED TAX LEVY (Renewal) HARLEM TOWNSHIP A renewal of a tax for the benefit of Harlem Township for the purpose of providing and maintaining fire apparatus, appliances, buildings or sites therefor, or sources of water supply and materials therefor, or the establishment and maintenance of lines of fire alarm telegraph, or the payment of permanent, part-time, or volunteer firefighters or firefighting companies to operate the same, including the payment of the firefighter employers’ contribution required under section 742.34 of the Revised Code, or the purchase of ambulance equipment, or the provision of ambulance, paramedic, or other emergency medical services operated by a fire department or firefighting company at a rate not exceeding 3.5 mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to $0.35 for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for 4 years, commencing in 2012, first due in calendar year 2013. •PROPOSED TAX LEVY (Replacement and Increase) — LIBER TY TOWNSHIP A replacement of 6 mills of an existing levy and an increase of .6 mill to constitute a tax for the benefit of Liberty Township for the purpose of providing and maintaining fire apparatus, appliances, buildings or sites therefor, or sources of water supply and materials therefor, or the establishment

and maintenance of lines of fire alarm telegraph, and the payment of permanent, part-time firefighters or firefighting companies to operate the same, including the payment of the firefighter employer’s contribution required under section 742.34 of the Ohio Revised Code, or to purchase ambulance equipment, or to provide ambulance, paramedic, or other emergency medical services operated by a fire department or firefighting company, at a rate not exceeding 6.6 mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to $0.66 for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for 5 years, commencing in 2012, first due in calendar year 2013. •PROPOSED TAX LEVY (Renewal and Increase) — ORANGE TOWNSHIP A renewal of a tax of 5 mills and an increase of 2.8 mills to constitute a tax for the benefit of Orange Township for the purpose of providing and maintaining fire apparatus, appliances, buildings, or sites therefor, or sources of water supply and materials therefor, or the payment of permanent, part-time, or volunteer firefighters to operate the same, including the payment of the firefighter employers’ contribution required under section 742.34 of the Revised Code, or to purchase ambulance equipment, or to provide ambulance, paramedic, or other emergency medical services operated by the fire department at a rate not exceeding 7.8 mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to $0.78 for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for 3 years, commencing in 2012, first due in calendar year 2013. •PROPOSED BOND ISSUE — CITY OF POWELL Shall bonds be issued by the City of Powell, Ohio, for the purpose of constructing, improving, and repairing streets, roads, sewer and other related infrastructure improvements; constructing, improving, and repairing municipal parks, bike paths, and other park-related infrastructure; constructing, improving, and repairing the City’s public service facility, with

related site improvements and appurtenances thereto; and constructing and improving general municipal improvements, in the principal amount of $7,100,000, to be repaid annually over a maximum period of 10 years, and an annual levy of property taxes to be made outside the tenmill limitation, estimated by the county auditor to average over the repayment period of the bond issue 1.8 mills for each one dollar of tax valuation, which amounts to $0.18 for each one hundred dollars of tax valuation, commencing in 2013, first due in calendar year 2014, to pay the annual debt charges on the bonds, and to pay debt charges on any notes issued in anticipation of those bonds?

•PROPOSED TAX LEVY (Replacement) — RADNOR TOWNSHIP A replacement of a tax for the benefit of Radnor Township for the purpose of providing and maintaining fire apparatus, appliances, buildings, and sites therefor, or sources of water supply and materials therefor, or the establishment and maintenance of lines of fire alarm telegraph, or the payment of permanent, parttime, or volunteer firefighters or firefighting companies to operate the same, at a rate not exceeding 5 mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to $0.50 for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for 5 years, commencing in 2013, first due in calendar year 2014. •PROPOSED TAX LEVY (Replacement) — SCIOTO TOWNSHIP A replacement of a tax for the benefit of Scioto Township for the purpose of providing and maintaining fire apparatus, appliances, buildings, or sites therefor, or sources of water supply and materials therefor, or the establishment and maintenance of lines of fire alarm telegraph, or the payment of permanent, part-time, or volunteer firefighters or firefighting companies to operate the same, including the payment of the firefighter employers’ contribution required under section 742.34 of the Revised Code, or the purchase of

ambulance equipment, or the provision of ambulance, paramedic, or other emergency medical ser vices operated by a fire department or firefighting company at a rate not exceeding 3.25 mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to $0.325 for each one hundred dollars in valuation, for 5 years, commencing in 2012, first due in calendar year 2013. •PROPOSED TAX LEVY (Replacement and Decrease) — THOMPSON TOWNSHIP A replacement of a portion of an existing levy, being a reduction of .4 mill to constitute a tax for the benefit of Thompson Township for the purpose of providing and maintaining fire apparatus, appliances, buildings, or sites therefor, or sources of water supply and materials therefor, or the establishment and maintenance of lines of fire alarm telegraph, or the payment of permanent, part-time, or volunteer firefighters or firefighting companies to operate the same, including the payment of the firefighter employer’s contribution required under section 742.32 of the Revised Code, at a rate not exceeding 1.7 mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to $0.17 for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for 5 years, commencing in 2013, first due in calendar year 2014.

OVERLAPPING QUESTIONS AND ISSUES •PROPOSED TAX LEVY (Additional) — TRI-RIVERS JOINT VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT An additional tax for the benefit of TRI-RIVERS JOINT VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT, Marion, Crawford, Delaware, Hardin, Morrow, Union, and Wyandot Counties, Ohio for the purpose of purchasing a site or enlargement thereof and for the erection and equipment of buildings, and for enlarging, improving, or rebuilding thereof at a rate not

7 DE L AWA RE COUNT Y VOTE RS’ GUIDE 2012 exceeding 0.5 mills for each one dollar which amounts to $0.64 for each one hundred dollars of tax valuation, for of valuation, which amounts to $0.05 a continuing period of time? for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for 10 years, commencing in •PROPOSED INCOME TAX 2012, first due in calendar year 2013. (Renewal) — JOHNSTOWNMONROE LOCAL SCHOOL •PROPOSED TAX LEVY DISTRICT (Renewal) — CENTERBURG Shall an annual income tax of one LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICT percent (1 percent) on the school district income of individuals and of A renewal of a tax for the benefit estates be imposed by the Johnstownof the Centerburg Local School District, Knox, Delaware and Licking Monroe Local School District, Licking and Delaware Counties, OH, Counties, Ohio for the purpose of to renew an income tax expiring at permanent improvements, including the end of 2013, for a period of five but not limited to repairing, improvyears, beginning January 1, 2014, for ing and remodeling buildings and the purpose of providing for the curgrounds purchasing and equipping rent operating expenses of the School motor vehicles and equipping and District? furnishing buildings at a rate not exceeding 1.5 mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to LOCAL LIQUOR $0.15 for each one hundred dollars of OPTIONS valuation, for a continuing period of time, commencing in 2013, first due •DUBLIN C PAR TICULAR in calendar year 2014. LOCATION – Spirituous Liquor •MHRI Inc., dba Morgan House •PROPOSED BOND ISSUE AND Restaurant, 5300 Glick Road, Dublin TAX LEVY — DUBLIN CITY OH 43017 SCHOOL DISTRICT Shall the Dublin City School District be authorized to do the following: 1. Issue bonds for the purpose of expanding, renovating, repairing, improving, and maintaining existing school buildings and facilities; replacing and refurbishing existing equipment; and upgrading and improving technology and building security enhancements district-wide in the principal amount of $15,871,610, to be repaid annually over a maximum period of 13 years, and levy a property tax outside the ten-mill limitation, estimated by the county auditor to average over the bond repayment period 0.54 mill for each one dollar of tax valuation, which amounts to $0.054 for each one hundred dollars of valuation, to pay the annual debt charges on the bonds, and to pay debt charges on any notes issued in anticipation of those bonds? (2) Levy an additional property tax to pay current operating expenses at a rate not exceeding 6.4 mills for each one dollar of tax valuation,

•DUBLIN C PAR TICULAR LOCATION — Sunday Sales (10 a.m. -Midnight) Wine and Mixed Beverages & Spirituous Liquor •MHRI Inc., dba Morgan House Restaurant, 5300 Glick Road, Dublin OH 43017 •ORANGE G PAR TICULAR LOCATION – Wine & Mixed Beverages •L&L Restaurants LLC dba Polaris Street Tavern, 8939 S. Old State Road, Lewis Center, OH 43035 •ORANGE G PAR TICULAR LOCATION – Sunday Sales (11 a.m. -Midnight) – Wine and Mixed Beverages & Spirituous Liquor •L&L Restaurants LLC dba Polaris Street Tavern, 8939 S. Old State Road, Lewis Center, OH 43035 •SUNBURY A PAR TICULAR LOCATION – Wine and Mixed Beverages & Spirituous Liquor •Tepic, LLC dba Mi Sombrero Grill, 488 W. Cherr y St. Sunbur y, OH 43074

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•SUNBURY A PAR TICULAR LOCATION — Sunday Sales (11 a.m.-Midnight) — Wine and Mixed Beverages & Spirituous Liquor •Tepic, LLC dba Mi Sombrero Grill, 488 W. Cherry St. Sunbury, OH 43074

STATEWIDE BALLOT ISSUES •ISSUE 1: Question presented pursuant to Article XVI, Section 3 of the Constitution of the State of Ohio (Required to be presented to the voters every 20 years)

out the approval of the General Assembly. •Opponents of holding a constitutional convention argue that: 1. The Ohio General Assembly should propose revisions as recommended by the Ohio Constitutional Modernization Commission. 2. Special interests may dominate the convention. •ISSUE 2: Proposed constitutional amendment to create a state funded commission to draw legislative and congressional districts (Proposed by Initiative Petition) •To revise Sections 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, and 13, repeal Sections 8 and 14, and add a new Section 16 to Article 11 of the Ohio Constitution.

•A YES vote means approval of holding a constitutional convention.

•A YES vote means approval of the amendment.

•A NO vote means disapproval of holding a constitutional convention.

•A NO vote means disapproval of the amendment.

A majority YES vote is required to hold a constitutional convention.

A majority YES vote is required for the amendment to be adopted.

•League Explanation of Issue 1: Under the Ohio Constitution, ever y 20 years voters are asked: ”Shall there be a convention to revise, alter, or amend the constitution?” If voters decide in favor of the constitutional convention, the General Assembly will make provisions concerning electing delegates for a convention to revise, amend or change the Ohio Constitution. The delegates to the constitutional convention may agree on amendments, which must be approved by the voters before taking effect. A constitutional convention was last held in 1911.

If approved, the proposed amendment will take effect 30 days after the election.

•Proponents of holding a constitutional convention argue that: 1. Portions of the Ohio Constitution should be revised and the General Assembly has not acted to revise them. 2. Holding a constitutional convention will permit citizens to place amendments before the voters with-

•League Explanation of Issue 2: The amendment would create a 12person commission to draw legislative and congressional districts. Final legislative and congressional districts are to be those that most-closely meet four criteria: preser ving whole communities; maximizing the number of competitive districts; balancing the number of districts leaning toward one party or another to closely match the state’s political leaning; and keeping districts compact. No map is to be adopted with intent to favor a political party, incumbent or potential candidate. At least seven votes would be required to approve the districts. All meetings and records would be public. If approved, new districts would be drawn for the 2014 election. Any eligible Ohioan could apply to be a commission member., Specified elected office holders, can-

didates, political party officials, paid lobbyists and public employees and family members would be ineligible. A panel of 8 state appeals-court judges would accept applications and pick 42 potential members, divided evenly among Democrats, Republicans and Ohio voters unaffiliated with either major party. The House speaker and minority leader could reduce the list to 24. From that pool, a random drawing would select 3 people from each party, and 3 unaffiliated members. Those 9 people would select the final 3 members, one from each major party and one unaffiliated member. •Proponents of the proposed amendment argue that: 1. The proposal is a common sense reform towards fixing a broken system. 2. It would reduce the extreme partisanship that makes compromise difficult. 3. The drawing of congressional and legislative district lines needs to be more accountable, transparent and balanced. 4. Politicians and special interests would not be able to rig the system to their advantage. •Opponents of the proposed amendment argue that: 1. Redistricting should not be put in the hands of unelected bureaucrats. 2. Commission members would not have requirements about ethics and financial disclosure and could not be removed. 3. The commission would have unlimited funding. 4. Most Ohioans would be prohibited from serving on the panel based on rigid eligibility rules. Websites •In support of the proposed amendment: votersfirstohio.com (Voters First)

•In opposition to the proposed amendment: protectyour voteohio.com (Protect Your Vote)

STATE RACES U.S. SENATE SHERROD BROWN Party: Democratic Address: 340 East Fulton St. Columbus Occupation: United States Senator; educator Education: 1974, Yale B.A.; 1979, Ohio State M.A., Education; 1981, Ohio State M.A., Public Administration. Qualifications for Office: United States Senator 2007-present; United States Representative 1993-2007; Ohio Secretary of State, 1983-1991; Ohio State Representative, 19751983

JOSH MANDEL Party: Republican Address: 50 W. Broad St., Suite 1900, Columbus Occupation: State Treasurer Education: B.A., The Ohio State University, 2000; J.D., Case Western Reserve University School of Law, 2003 Qualifications for Office: City of Lyndhurst, Ohio, City Councilman, (2004-2006); State Representative (District 17), (2007-2010); State Treasurer, (2011-present), Intelligence Specialist and Intelligence Chief, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve and active duty time 2000-2008), including two tours.

W i t h s t r on g p r es s u r e to re d u c e e x p en di t u r e s , w h e r e w o u l d y o u m a ke s i g n i fi c a n t c u t s i n t h e f ed e r a l b u d g e t? I n c re as e s ? •SHERROD BROWN: While I oppose cutting benefits for Ohioans who rely on Social Security and Medicare, I support several approaches to reducing spending: allow Medicare to negotiate for lower prescription drug prices; reform farm programs to save $23 billion, and end $20 billion in subsidies to oil companies reaping huge

DEL AWARE COUN T Y VOTERS’ GUIDE 2012 profits. I support investments in our roads, bridges, and water systems, to save money in the long run and put Ohioans to work to help grow our economy. We should invest in educational opportunities to our children by supporting our teachers rather than demonizing them, and providing grants and affordable loans for higher education. And I was proud to vote to keep taxes low for middle-class families while asking the wealthiest to pay their fair share to help reduce our deficit.

•JOSH MANDEL: We need massive reductions in our spending that reduce the deficit by significant margins in the next few years and allow us to actually pay down the debt shortly thereafter. We do not need budget gimmicks that promise to cut spending while actually allowing for increases in spending. There has been far too large of a gap between rhetoric on cutting spending and actual cuts in spending in Washington today. This needs to change. H ow w o u ld y ou b a la n c e th e i n te re s ts of c i t i z en s , th e e n v i r on me n t a n d t he b u s in e s s co m mu n ity ? •SHERROD BROWN: I reject the false choice between protecting the health of Ohio’s families and expanding job opportunities for the middle-class and I have worked hard to confer with business interests and citizen groups about how we can create jobs in manufacturing and energy while protecting the environment. I have tried to strike that balance by organizing a job fair with Chesapeake Energy to recruit Ohioans looking to move into the energy field and I have also supported local officials when they have expressed concerns about the environmental impacts of drilling in their communities. Working together with business and local communities, I believe Ohio can be a leader in energy jobs, particularly green energy, while making sure that our drinking water and air are safe for Ohio’s children and families.

•JOSH MANDEL: Affordable, abundant and reliable energy is critical for a growing economy. It is not only essential to fuel our cars and heat our homes, it is instrumental to every aspect of the American economy, from agriculture, to retail, to transportation, to manufacturing. America is blessed to have abundant natural resources beneath our country. Washington politicians refuse to do what is needed to allow us to develop these resources, reduce our energy costs, and move toward energy independence. While protecting the air we breathe, water we drink and environment for future generations, it is important that we embark on aggressive and responsible exploration of our natural resources. This exploration is a “win-win-win” for new jobs, affordable energy and natural security. H ow w o u ld y o u a d d re s s c o n c e r n s ab o u t i mm i g r ati on ? •SHERROD BROWN: I think we must continue to find ways to strengthen our border security, not just to stem illegal immigration but also to guard against terrorism, trafficking in drugs and humans, and other illicit activities. To achieve that, most importantly we need to enforce our immigration laws with regards to both illegal immigrants and employers that illegally hire workers. •JOSH MANDEL: First and foremost, I strongly believe in legal immigration to the United States. Many years ago, my grandparents immigrated to America by following the laws of this nation, worked hard, and provided a better life for their children and grandchildren in pursuit of the American dream. America is a nation built upon a shared respect for the rule of law. In respect to illegal immigration, I believe that we need to protect our borders and enforce immigration laws that are already on the books. For this reason, I do not support amnesty. If individuals want to pursue the American dream and live in this country, they should do so following the rule of law.

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE 12TH DISTRICT JIM REESE Party: Democratic Address: 545 E. Town St., Columbus Occupation: Managing partner with Bogart & Reese LLC, a CBA Ethics Committee member and an attorney poll observer. Education: Hillsdale College, B.A. in American Studies with a Minor in Music (2000); Capital University Law School, Juris Doctorate (2004) Qualifications for Office: Jim is a small business owner with a passion for main street economics. Jim interned with the United States Senate Subcommittee on Immigration and the Senate Judiciary Committee. Jim is currently a managing partner with Bogart & Reese LLC, a CBA Ethics Committee member and an attorney poll observer.

PAT TIBERI Party: Republican Address: 2931 E. Dublin Granville Road, Suite 190, Columbus, OH 43231 Occupation: Current U.S. Representative for the 12th District. Education: Columbus Northland High School, Ohio State UniversityB.A. in journalism. Qualifications for Office: I have lived in the 12th Congressional District my entire life. This is the place where I choose to raise my children, and it’s the community I care about. I want to return to Congress so I can continue to fight for a better future for all of our children. H ow w o u ld y o u “ r ea c h a c r os s th e a i s le ” t o f os t e r b e tt er c o op e ra ti on a m o n g a n d be t w e e n m e m b e r s ? •JIM REECE: I will “reach across the aisle” by representing my constituents and focusing on issues common to all Americans.

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•PAT TIBERI: I have a proven record of working with others “across the aisle” to get things done. I will work with anyone, no matter their party affiliation, that is interested in finding common-sense ways to create an environment that encourages job creation, reduces spending and balances the budget. T he U .S . S u p re m e C o u r t re c e n t ly r u l ed t ha t th e p e rs o n a l ma n d a t e o f t he “Af f o r d a b le H e a l t h C a r e A c t” i s c o n s t i tu ti on a l. H o w d o y ou t hi n k i t w i ll a f f ec t y ou r c o n s ti tu en t s i n te r ms o f t he i r h e a l th c a r e a n d t he i m pa c t o n th e e c o n om y o f c en tr a l O hi o? •JIM REECE: My constituents will have access to health insurance at a reasonable cost and will benefit from the competitive health insurance marketplace fostered by the Affordable Health Care Act. The central Ohio economy will likewise benefit by ending health insurance cartels, increasing competition, lowering prices and raising quality of health care services and products in the market. •PAT TIBERI: I’ve heard from folks from all over Ohio that President Obama’s health care law is not what they want and should be repealed. It breaks the president’s promise not to raise taxes on the middle class, and according to the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office, it will actually increase the amount families pay for health care. The measure is a bad prescription for families, small businesses, and seniors. The president’s law only provides health coverage by adding millions of people to government rolls by dramatically expanding Medicaid. The nation doesn’t need to expand an already unsustainable, bloated government program to further bust our budget. Instead of a government take-over of health care, we need health care reform that reduces the number of uninsured Americans by driving down the cost of coverage while expanding access allowing families to chose the type of coverage they want.

1 0 DEL AWARE COUNT Y VOTERS’ GUIDE 2012 I f e l ec t e d , w h a t s p e c i f i c l e gi s la t i on w ou ld y ou i n tr o d u c e or s u p po r t t o s t i m u l a t e t h e e c o n o m y, s u p p o r t j o b g r ow th a n d a d d r es s th e d e b t a n d d e fi c i t c on c er n s ? •JIM REECE: I would introduce legislation to amend the “cost of goods deduction” of the corporate tax code to favor domestic freight and export freight, instead of subsidizing the import of foreign manufactured goods, thus revitalizing domestic manufacturing and American small business and ensuring a level playing field for the American worker. •PAT TIBERI: Comprehensive tax reform would help promote stability by simplifying the code to create two marginal rates for individuals and families and a lower corporate tax rate. American entrepreneurs need a stable business environment in order to grow, expand and hire. As we work on comprehensive tax reform, we should extend the current tax rates for one year, giving families and businesses necessary certainty. We need to work toward a balanced budget; I support a constitutional amendment to ensure a balanced budget. Families across Ohio live within their means, and it’s time for the government to do the same.

OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 67TH DISTRICT ANDREW O. BRENNER Party: Republican Address: Powell, Ohio Occupation: State Representative Education: BSBA Marketing & Economics Ohio State, Buckeye Valley High School Qualifications for Office: I possess numerous endorsements and just this week I received the “Watchdog of the Treasury Award.” For a complete list of endorsements including biography go to: andrewbrenner.com.

DAVID HOGAN Party: Democratic Address: 202 Pinecrest Dr., Delaware Occupation: Professor of History, Heidelberg University (since 1989) Education: BSBA Marketing & Economics Ohio State, Buckeye Valley High School Qualifications for Office: Doctor of Arts, History, Carnegie Mellon University (1989); M.A., History, State University of New York at Binghampton (1985); B.A. History, State University of New York, at Fredonia (1981).

Be y on d s t i p u l a t i on s i n pr o p er t y d e ed s , f r a c t u r i n g fo r ga s a n d oi l ha ve vi r t u al l y n o p r ov i s i o n s fo r a n y l oc a l c on t r o l. Wo u ld y ou s u p p o r t or o pp o s e l e gi s la t i on t o o b t a i n s om e d e g re e o f l o c al c o n tr o l ? W h y o r w hy n o t? •ANDREW O. BRENNER: Are we to presume that local control is needed in regulating fracking? The state of Ohio and the federal government already regulate fracking. We passed additional regulations dealing with fracking in the general assembly which were signed into law by Governor Kasich. Standards need to be consistent throughout the state; otherwise, industries will flee the state because of the massive burden that possibly hundreds of different regulatory zones could have on the industries companies. •DAVID HOGAN: Hydraulic fracturing may be a good idea, and might be our state’s economic salvation. It may also include unforseen problems. Rushing headlong into it without fur ther research and experience seems reckless. Local governments should have some degree of control over activities within their boundaries, including fracturing, for both safety and revenue purposes. If it proves to be safe, and as bountiful as predicted by its opponents, localities should be allowed to share in both the liabili-

ties and the profits. I would suppor t legislation to protect both the rights and safety of individual landowners and local governments. Wh a t i n c e n t i v e s w o u l d y o u s u p p or t f o r r en ew a b l e e n e rg y s ou r c e s ? •ANDREW O. BRENNER: When you lower taxes and streamline regulations for all businesses, businesses will want to come to Ohio. I do not believe in picking winners and losers. If we lower taxes and streamline regulations overall, renewable energy companies and many other businesses will want to participate in Ohio’s pro-business economy. •DAVID HOGAN: Renewable energy is essential for Ohio’s stable and profitable future. Now enthusiastically distracted by drilling for natural gas, we seem to forget that all fossil fuels are finite, with an inevitable depletion point. In the meantime, we need to promote and develop alternative energy sources. Solar and wind power sources are already viable in Ohio — fields of panels in Upper Sandusky and turbines surrounding Van Wert — and should be further encouraged by aggressive tax credits, research grants and other state government. Governments exist to serve Ohio’s people and commerce within the state, and should lead these alternative energy initiatives. Wh a t s pe c i f i c l e g i s l a t i o n w o u l d y o u p l a n t o i n t r o d u c e du r i n g t h e u p c o mi n g tw o - ye a r te r m i n t he O hi o Ho us e ? •ANDREW O. BRENNER: I will continue to work on Education Reform, Education Funding Reform, Pro-Business Legislation, Government Regulatory reform, Bureau of Worker’s Compensation Reform, Making government streamlined and more efficient, lowering taxes and I already supported the elimination of the Ohio estate tax. For details on all legislation I have introduced or supported visit andrewbrenner.com. •DAVID HOGAN: Education funding is the most glaring problem

in our state. We need to streamline and stabilize how we pay for our schools, guaranteeing that ever y child has the opportunity to achieve their greatest potential. Right now, state funding for schools resembles a malfunctioning rollercoaster, either working or breaking down with each new governor or legislature. First of all, we need to remove it from politics. Most Ohioians agree that we need the best schools possible. Most Ohioans want their children to have ever y opportunity for success in their careers and life. We need to wrench away control of school funding from career politicians, instead devising a permanent and dependable funding system immune from political scheming and manipulation. Wh a t i s y o u r p o s i t i o n r e g a r d i n g t he pr o p os e d O hi o C o n s ti tu t i o n a l Am e n d me n t , I s s u e 2, t he Oh io C i t i z e n ’ s I n d e p en d en t Re d i s t ri c ti n g C o m m i s s i o n ? P l ea se e x pl a i n . •ANDREW O. BRENNER: If you want an unaccountable system that makes the courts more partisan, puts the unions in control, and does away with an elected official’s responsibility to the voters, support Voters First. Voters First does not put the voters first. Instead, you will have an unaccountable board making decisions by which we will all have to live. As Americans we support electing our Representatives and removing them from office if we don’t support their decisions. The Ohio State Bar Association, Ohio Appeals Court Judges, and most editorial boards have come out against state issue 2. •DAVID HOGAN: Capricious redistricting is just a bad practice for ever yone in this state and both parties. Republicans are the most recent culprits, but Democrats are certainly not above it. Legislative districts should not be dictated by whichever party dominates state government at a particular moment. Though nobody is completely impartial, I do believe that many Ohioans share my moderate views, and are not swayed by

extreme political ideologies. I sincerely hope that we could eventually convene meetings of reasonable people to decide fair districts. In fact, my hope is that we could convene an entire Ohio General Assembly that is reasonable, and interested in truly helping our state, not motivated by partisan ideology, huge campaign donations or sustaining their lifelong political careers.

STATE REPRESENTATIVE 68TH DISTRICT MARGARET ANN RUHL Party: Republican Address: 3 Swingle Ave., Mount Vernon Occupation: State legislator Education: Fredricktown High School Qualifications for Office: Have held the office for four years. Local government background.

JOHN T. RYERSON Party: Democratic Address: 417 Chase Avenue, Gambier. Occupation: Attorney Education: Kenyon College, B.A. Economic, Northwestern University M.S. Journalism, Ohio State University Moritz College of Law, J.D. Qualifications for Office: Legislative staff member for the Illinois Senate, employed in government relations for many years, was President and Member of the Gambier Village Council, and currently Counsel for the Village of Martinsburg, Ohio, and involved in issues relating to families and children in my practice.

B e y on d s t i p u l a t i on s i n p r o p er ty d e ed s , f r a c t u r i n g fo r g a s a n d oi l ha ve vi r t u al l y n o p r ov i s i o n s fo r a n y l oc a l c on t r o l. Wou ld y ou s u p p o r t or o pp o s e l e gi s la t i o n t o o b t a i n s om e d e gr e e o f l o c a l c o n t r o l ? W h y o r w h y n o t?

•MARGARET ANN RUHL: I believe there is local control out there for at least the management of the roads and infrastructure. I would be supportive of local control as long as it does not take away the property owner’s rights. •JOHN T. RYERSON: I would suppor t legislation to obtain some degree of local control over hydraulic fracturing. The need for this local control includes the need for monitoring truck and other traffic on lightly travelled county and township roads, because the heavy loads may quickly cause deterioration of those roads, and necessitate additional resources needed for maintenance and upgrading of those roads, which may be beyond the capability of our local governments. Fur ther reasons for such local control would include preservation of the environment, including existing homes and businesses, from the ef fects of increased truck traf fic and noise. Finally, we need some degree of local control to insure the quality of the groundwater, and the ef fect of the volume of the wastewater and the wastewater by-products on existing municipal and county wastewater processing systems. W h a t i n c e n t i v es w o u l d yo u s u p p or t f o r r en ew a b l e e n e rg y s ou r c e s ? •MARGARET ANN RUHL: In the last General Assembly, we passed a bill to help with the turbine (wind energy) to get the wind energy industr y started in Ohio. I have been supportive of the one local school that is utilizing solar energy in Knox County and ver y proud that they are looking to the future with this project. I would support alternative energy sources with the use of current energy, like coal and natural gas. •JOHN T. RYERSON: To the extent possible, I would support incentives under the existing state commercial activity tax structure to give credit for investment in such renewable energy sources that would

DE L AWA RE COUNT Y VOTE RS’ GUIDE 2012 1 1 produce both renewable energy and our future is important, and high new jobs. I would also work with our speed rail has many benefits. Senators and Congress persons to Wh a t i s y o u r p o s i t i o n r e g a r d i n g advocate for such legislation of the t he p r o p os e d Ohi o C o n s ti tu t i o n al federal level, where it would have more effect. Finally, and I think most A m e n d me n t , I s s u e 2 , t h e O h i o C i t i z e n ’ s I n d e p en de n t R e d i s t r i c t i n g importantly, I would work with the C o m m i s s i o n ? P l ea se e x pl a i n . many existing energy-related companies within the district and the state to encourage their interest in and •MARGARET ANN RUHL: I am investment in such renewable energy against it. I think the system has sources. worked well for many years and does not need changed. We did not appeal Wh a t sp e c i f i c l e g i s l a t i o n w o u l d when the Democrats had control and y ou p l an t o i n t r o d u c e d u ri n g t he drew the lines to have “the advanu p c o mi n g t w o - ye a r te r m i n t h e O h i o tage.” I believe the voters are smart Ho us e ? and will vote for the right people regardless of the way the districts •MARGARET ANN RUHL: I are drawn. plan to work with the district on legislation to help them grow, be it agri•JOHN T. RYERSON: I support cultural needs, senior citizen needs, the proposed Issue 2 because I transportation needs or just oversight believe that redistricting is too imporof the state expenditures. I do not tant to be left to the political whims have my own agenda that I am workof the sitting General Assembly and state officials. Our current system ing at. The people of my district give pays little or no attention to logical me the ideas for legislation. The geographic characteristics which General Assembly and I worked with should play a part in shaping legislathe Assistant County Prosecutor and tive districts. I believe that this passed a bill outlawing synthetic amendment would be a good first drugs, known as Spice. It was not my step in restoring the confidence of idea, but that of concerned citizens in the public in our political system. my district. •JOHN T. RYERSON: My first priority would be to introduce legislation which would have a goal to make our elementar y and secondar y school funding system constitutional, as it has been ruled unconstitutional four times by the Ohio Supreme Court. I would propose looking at the entire system, and leave no stone unturned in an effort to come to a constitutional solution. My second specific bill I would introduce would be a bill to allow for enforceable open adoptions in Ohio, upon agreement of the adoptive parents, the birth parents and the court, because such agreements would save much time, heartache and expense that I have obser ved under our current child protective ser vices system. Finally, I would introduce legislation to provide for research and development of high speed rail in Ohio, for planning for

JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT OF OHIO FOR FULL TERM COMMENCING JANUARY 1 & 2, 2013

ROBERT R. CUPP Address: 211 S. Fifth St., Columbus. Occupation: Justice, Ohio Supreme Court (2007-present) Education: Ohio Northern University, B.A. (Political Science), J.D. (law) Qualifications for Office: Judge, Court of Appeals, Third District (2003-2006); former state senator, four terms, and Senate President Pro Tempore; former Lima city prosecutor and assistant law director; former Allen County Commissioner; 25 years in private law practice.

1 2 DEL AWARE COUNT Y VOTERS’ GUIDE 2012 the elected and the appointed methTERRENCE ods of selecting judges. Although the O’DONNELL appointed method eliminates camAddress: 3400 Delmar paign contributions necessar y in an Drive, Rocky River, OH elected system, citizens also lose Occupation: Justice, their right to vote, at least in the iniSupreme Court of Ohio tial selection. In Ohio, voters have on Education: St. Edward several occasions opted to keep judiHigh School; Kent cial elections by defeating constituState University, Bachelor of Arts; tional amendments which would Cleveland State University, Juris have created an appointed system of Doctor judicial selection. One reason is that Qualifications for Office: Cuyahoga selection by appointment does not County Common Pleas Court, 14 eliminate politics but merely drives it years, Ohio Court of Appeals, 8 behind closed doors where it loses years, Supreme Court of Ohio, now transparency and public accountabiliin my 10th year ty. Judicial election campaigns ser ve an important purpose of helping to remind and educate the public about WILLIAM O’NEILL the essential role of the judiciar y in Address: 21 West Broad our three-branch constitutional sysStreet, Suite 700 tem. On balance, I believe the electOccupation: Pediatric ed system, although not without Emergency Room drawbacks, is an open process which Nurse has the advantage. Education: Bachelor of Science, Journalism, •TERRENCE O’DONNELL: Ohio University, 1969; Juris Doctor, Our Ohio Constitution mandates popCleveland Marshall College of Law, ular election of judges and in 1987, 1979; Registered Nurse, Huron Ohio voters resoundingly rejected a School of Nursing, Associate, 2001 proposal to change that system. The Qualifications for Office: Judge, oath of office I took requires me to 11th District Court of Appeals, 1997support the Constitution — not alter2007; Assistant Attorney General, nate forms of its provisions. State of Ohio 1984-96 Accordingly, I favor the system of having the voters choose judges. While the task of remaining fair and MIKE SKINDELL impartial often requires a judicial Address: 545 E. Town candidate to refrain from announcing St. Columbus views on disputed or controversial Occupation: matters that may come before the Attorney/Legislator court, it helps to increase public conEducation: Graduated fidence in the judiciar y. Popular elecwith a B.A. in Business tion of judges allows the voters the and Political Science opportunity to identify with individfrom Walsh College in 1983. In 1987, ual candidates and thus be more he graduated with a Juris Doctorate involved than with a merit system from Cleveland-Marshall College of where selection of jurists would be Law. left to others without input from the Qualifications for Office: Mike electorate. In the last analysis, while Skindell has been a practicing attornot perfect, our system has produced ney for nearly 25 years. Currently a some outstanding jurists like Tom State Senator. Moyer, and all can agree on a choice…. D o y o u s u p po r t o r o pp o s e t he el e c •WILLIAM O’NEILL: Yes I supt i on o f j u d g e s a n d w hy ? port the election of Judges. We have •ROBER T R. CUPP: There pos- the power to decide who goes to jail and who goes free; who inherits your itive and negatives aspects to both

possessions when you die; and who raises your children when you are alive. Those responsibilities are simply too important to be left to an appointee or a bureaucrat. The voters are entitled to decide who shall fill these critically important positions. •MIKE SKINDELL: I support the popular election of judges. Elections keep judges accountable and advances our constitutional democracy, which is based upon three separate branches of government. Wh a t c h a n g e s w o u l d y o u r e c o m m en d t o r ed u c e t he p er c e i v e d i n fl u e n c e of mo n e y c o n t ri b u ti on s i n o u r co u r ts ? •ROBER T R. CUPP: The key word in this question is “perceived.” I don’t believe the limited amounts permitted to be contributed to judicial campaign committees have any actual influence on the outcome of any individual court case. Civic organizations, the media, bar associations, and judicial organizations can help reduce any unwarranted perceptions by a sustained effort informing the public that the Code of Judicial Conduct, which regulates the conduct of judges and judicial candidates, provides important safeguards, including (1) strict limits on the amount of any money contributions, (2) a prohibition on judicial candidates personally soliciting another for a contribution or personally accepting contributions, (3) a prohibition on promising or appearing to promise to decide specific cases or issues in a particular way; (4) that public disclosure of all contributions is required by statute; and (5) that judges whose impartiality may reasonably be questioned are required to recuse from a case. •TERRENCE O’DONNELL: We need to better educate the public to the fact that campaign contributions are not given to judges, but rather to campaign committees that spend the money on major media advertising. Reducing the cost of political adver-

tising would dramatically change the amount of money needed to compete in Ohio’s major media markets. In fact, public ser vice announcements are available at no cost and a form could be used to reduce the perceived influence of contributions to judicial candidates. With more than 700 judges in Ohio, it is unlikely the General Assembly will begin to publicly fund judicial campaigns as the cost at current advertising rates would likely run into the tens of millions of dollars. I favor limiting the size of individual contributions to a campaign and publicly reporting the names of the contributors to maintain transparency and keep the public informed about this issue. •WILLIAM O’NEILL: Very simply stated it is fundamentally wrong for Judges to be accepting money from anyone. Recently two Justices on the Ohio Supreme Court accepted a combined $12,600 from a donor during the time period they were deciding a major case for that very donor. Money and Judges don’t mix. Never have and never will. It is time for the people of Ohio to demand a better system of electing our Judges. I would propose a $10.00 court cost on every new lawsuit filed and that money would fund a judicial education fund which could be given to judicial candidates. In return all judicial candidates would be prohibited form taking any money from anybody. •MIKE SKINDELL: I suppor t the public financing of judicial campaigns. As stated by a commission of the American Bar Association “public financing of judicial elections will address the perceived impropriety associated with judicial candidates accepting private contributions from individuals and organizations interested in the outcomes of cases those candidates may later decide as judges.

JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT OF OHIO FOR UNEXPIRED TERM ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2014

YVETTE MCGEE BROWN Address: 340 E. Fulton, Columbus Occupation: Justice, Supreme Court of Ohio Education: Ohio University, B.S. 1982; The Ohio State University, Moritz College of Law, J.D. 1985 Qualifications for Office: Supreme Court Justice (2011 – present), Franklin County Common Pleas Court Judge (1993 – 2002), Founding President Center for Child and Family Advocacy (2002 – 2010), Assistant Attorney

SHARON L. KENNEDY Address: 21 West Broad Street, Suite 700 Occupation: 2005 to present, Administrative Judge, Court of Common Pleas, Domestic Relations Division, Butler County, Ohio Administrative Judge; 1999 to 2004 Judge, Court of Common Pleas, Domestic Relations,, Butler County Education: Juris Doctor, University of Cincinnati, College of Law (1991); Bachelor Degree of Social Work, University of Cincinnati, School of Social Work (1984)

D o y o u s u pp o r t o r o p p o se t h e e l ec ti on o f j u d g es a n d w h y ?

•YVETTE MCGEE BROWN: I support the election of judges as long as Ohio’s constitution requires it. In 1986, the voters resoundingly rejected a proposal to allow merit selection of judges. 25 years later, it may be time to revisit the question. That is why I participated in late Chief Justice Moyer’s conference to look at the way Ohio selects judges. Other states use various models like citizens commissions and retention elections. While the current system is not perfect, I would want to carefully examine any proposed alternative. The chief objective of any system must be to find the most qualified judges. We must also guard against the danger of placing judicial selection in the hands of a few selected individuals who may not truly ser ve the interests of the people. •SHARON L. KENNEDY: I suppor t the election of judges. The Ohio Constitution originally provided for the appointment of judges. Due to legislative abuses of removing judges without cause, in 1850 a constitutional convention changed the provision for the appointment of judges to a provision for the election of judges. While there are legitimate concerns about electing judges, the alternative is a legislative or third–par ty appointment process. Those alternatives are fraught with similar concerns of undue influence, political engineering, and allegations of pay-to-play politics. Until the voters decide to amend their Constitution and create a better system, I stand with Ohioans constitutional right to elect their judicial representatives.

DEL AWARE COUNT Y VOTERS’ GUIDE 2012 1 3 W h a t c h a n ge s w o u l d y o u re c o m cation, technological advancements me n d to r ed u c e t he pe r c e i v ed i n f l u permit independent non-lawyer en c e o f m on ey c o n tr i b u t i o n s i n o u r access and review of judicial decico ur t s? sions. Increasing decision-making transparency would improve the public’s understanding and impar•YVETTE MCGEE BROWN: tiality confidence measures. Lastly, Any change to the current system subject to legislative, executive and will require a constitutional amendvoter approval, the creation of ment that changes the way judges Associate Justice districts is a way are selected. With the current systo restructure statewide judicial tem, the Ohio Supreme Court has elections to reduce reliance on camestablished limits on individual conpaign contributions and expenditributions to combat the perceived tures, while advancing confidence influence of money in judicial elections. Judges are required to present in an impar tial judiciar y. Only the Chief Justice is elected statewide. their qualifications to the electorate and in a state as large as Ohio, television and other paid media is the best vehicle for conveying our message. OHIO 5TH DISTRICT We also rely on groups like the LWV and the State and local Bar COURT OF APPEALS Associations to support and endorse candidates they find credible. I PATRICIA A. encourage voters to trust non-partiDELANEY san endorsements, and not just TV Address: 20 W. Central advertising, as another way to Ave., Delaware reduce the perception of the influOccupation: Presiding ence of money. Judge, 5th District Court of Appeals •SHARON L. KENNEDY: Education: B.A. (1987), There are three ways to improve J.D. (1990) University of Toledo, OH Ohioans confidence in the justice Qualifications for Office: system. First, improve and increase Unanimously selected in 2012 to civic education. Second, improve serve as Presiding Judge of 15-counand increase decision-making transty district; first elected to the 5th parency. Lastly, with appropriate District Court of Appeals in 2006 to approval, reform the statewide eleca 6-year term. Authored over 500 tion process. Often, myths and misopinions in first term. Serve on conceptions about the judicial sysnumerous bar association committem and the work of individual tees and professional organizations. cour ts exist. Improving and increasServed as assistant Columbus City ing civic education to dispel myths Attorney and assistant Ohio and correct misconceptions can Attorney General prior to election to bench. Committed to public service, improve the public’s understanding integrity and fairness. and impar tiality confidence measures. In conjunction with civic edu-

“Experience

Over 20 years" Fiscal Responsibility - Fulltime Recorder

1 4 DEL AWARE COUNT Y VOTERS’ GUIDE 2012 judges permits the general public to SCOTT GWIN directly choose their judges. A decade Address: 110 Central ago, the issue was put on the ballot Plaza South, Ste. 320, and the voters overwhelmingly supCanton ported the direct election of judges. Occupation: Judge, 5th District Court of •JEANETTE MOLL: I believe Appeals that the current system in Ohio is Education: John Carroll flawed as to the election of judges. University, B.A. Political Science, Judicial candidates either need to cum laude, 1973, Akron University have the ability to run campaigns like School of Law, 1976 other candidates or be appointed. Qualifications for Office: Extensive The current system which attempts experience in both private and pubto find a middle ground leads to conlic sector. Thirty-six years practicing fusion and difficulties for both the law, 24 years on the Court of candidates and the voters. Moreover, Appeals, handling more than 10,000 due to judicial candidates being cases in both the criminal and civil unable to discuss issues which may sectors. come before them as judges combined with restrictions on the ability to raise funds and the lack of party JEANETTE MOLL designations, even the most diligent Address: 195 Eagles voters who seeks to make an Nest Road, Zanesville informed decision is unable to truly Occupation: Attorney get access to relevant information. Education: University of Notre Dame, B.A., T he r e i s a p er c e p ti on a mo n g s om e Oxford University, f ol k s th at “ mo n e y b u y s ju s t i c e . ” W ha t studied Comparative c h a n g e s w ou ld y ou m a k e t o r e d u c e Law, The Ohio State University, J.D. t he p e r c e i v ed i n f l u e n c e o f fi n a n c i a l Qualifications for Office: c o n t ri b u ti on s i n o u r c ou r t s y s t em ? Magistrate, Guernsey County Court of Common Pleas 1997-2007, •PATRICIA A. DELANEY: Attorney. Educate the public about the true role of financial contributions in a judicial campaign. Low contribution limits JOHN W. WISE and public reporting of contributions No information received for creates transparency in the system. Ohio Court of Appeals 5th District The recusal process also is one way a candidate John W. Wise. judge can remove themselves if it is perceived that a financial contribution Do y o u s u p po r t o r o pp o s e t h e el e c - could influence the judge’s decision. Some type of public financing for judit i on o f j u d g e s a s c o m pa re d to a cial campaigns may also help. m er i t a p po i n t m en t a n d r et e n ti on e le c t i o n ? W hy ? •SCOTT GWIN: An ideal system would involve public funding of •PATRICIA A. DELANEY: judges thereby removing contribuSupport both methods, advantages tions by those who practice in the and disadvantages to both. A hybrid courts or have matters pending in the system of both (election, followed by courts. retention election) is also advantageous. Ohio has a strong judiciary •JEANETTE MOLL: The current under the current system and I am restrictions on the ability of judicial proud to serve on the bench and candidates to raise funds attempts to would continue to serve no matter reduce or eliminate the perception what type of selection process is utithat “money buys justice.” lized. Additionally, contribution limits seek the same purpose. With no ability to •SCOTT GWIN: The election of

personally, individually solicit funds due to the low limits set, the current system ensures that no judicial candidate’s election can be dependent upon a few “big” donors such that judicial candidates must either have a wide base of support or the ability to self-fund. However, by encouraging self-funding, the current system favors those who are incumbents or those whose income level exceeds the average income of their voters.

OHIO STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 6 MICHAEL COLLINS Party: Position is nonpartisan Address: 6169 Sugar Maple Drive, Westerville Occupation: President, Promotions One, Inc. Education: B.S. Education, Miami University, M.A. Education, Ball State Unversity Qualifications for Office: Educator on local, state and national level. Member and president of local school board, State Board of Education member, business founder and owner, parent of three successful graduates.

KRISTEN MCKINLEY Party: Non-partisan Address: 3656 Cannongate Drive, Columbus Occupation: Attorney Education: B.A. Economics, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Juris Doctorate, Ohio Northern University Qualifications for Office: Incumbent, representing District 6 for the past four years. Member of Capacity, Advocacy and Outreach, Appointments, and Budget committees. National Association of School Boards of Education, Board of Directors and Government Affairs Committee. Legal practice includes school environments.

JOHN P. STACY Party: Position is nonpartisan Address: 5447 Maple Canyon Ave, Columbus Qualifications for Office: I understand how our education system works because I have over 20 years experience in various educational arenas. I know how to make a difference for students and taxpayers. Currently, I am the Executive Director of two nonprofits focusing on marginalized populations. The Autism Society of Ohio helps families with special need children access the educational support services they need and the St John Learning Center assists high school drop-outs earn their GED certificate. In addition, I am an adjunct faculty instructor at the University of Phoenix and serve on the School Board for two urban charter schools. Previously, I worked for over fifteen years at the Ohio House of Representatives including two years as the Senior Aide for the House Education Committee where I attended to state Board of Education as the designee for the chairman. Lastly, I worked for three years at the Ohio School for the Deaf. Wh a t c h a n g e s w o u l d y o u s u p p o r t f or eq u i t a b l e f u n d i n g o f e d u c a ti on i n Oh io ? •MICHAEL COLLINS: The most significant changes I will support include: •Eliminating the current and most of the previous funding patterns (with the exception of the ’09-’10 Biennium Package); •Reinstating the majority of the Spending Formula plan attached to the Evidence Board Model of the last two years of the Strickland Administration; •Substantially increasing the level of state support for all public schools and significantly reducing public schools reliance on local property taxes; •Ensuring additional funding for programs that assist with special needs and gifted students in counties that have limited capacity for revenue generation.

•KRISTEN MCKINLEY: I would support any changes that truly have the result of making funding equitable in Ohio. All students deserve to have the same opportunities to obtain the best education possible. While how school districts use the funds available to them will differ based upon their own local priorities, no school district should have substantially less funding to educate its students than another district. The Ohio Supreme Court ruled that the way we fund education in Ohio is unconstitutional. It is time that a system of funding is developed that is constitutional and benefits all students. The Governor and the legislature are each working on a new funding plan. The bottom line is that all children in Ohio should benefit from any new plan equally. •JOHN P. STACY: I am all about transparency in school funding. I often think that it’s been designed to discourage taxpayers from understanding how much is really needed to ensure “a thorough and efficient system…” as mandated by our state constitution. Funding comes from local, state and federal dollars, lottery & casino tax, etc… So it can get confusing very fast. My proposal is simple. First, determine the base rate needed to ensure a quality education for a typical student. Two-thirds of this amount comes from the state and a third from local district. Both need to contribute something. Any earmarked federal dollars are used for supplemental services for low performing or special need students. If a local community wishes to have school levies for additional services they can do so. But these elections can only be held once a year during the fall general election. Make your case and let the voters decide. A d d r e s s t h e a c c o u n t a b i l i t y, l a c k t he re o f, i n t he p u b l i c f u n d i n g o f p r i v at e an d c h ar te r s c h o ol s •MICHAEL COLLINS: There is a definite absence of accountability equability as it relates to the appropriation of public dollars for private and charter schools. These include: •The lowest 121 school districts/schools (below Youngstown and Warren School Districts which are in Academic Emergency and be addressed as such) in the Annual

School District/Schools Index are charter schools, with the majority of White Hat Schools failing in this capacity; •There are no accountability requirements for private schools which accept publicly funded vouchers; •The three year remedy extensions for charter schools to move out of academic/financial emergency is too long; •My overall remedy for this difficulty is “no public dollars should follow students to private or charter schools that do not meet the same standards as public schools” •KRISTEN MCKINLEY: Private and charter schools that receive public funds are not currently held to the same standards of accountability with which public schools have to comply. All schools that receive public dollars should have to account for them in the same manner. Public funds are taxpayer dollars. Taxpayers should demand that anyone receiving them be held accountable to show where and for what the money was used. •JOHN P. STACY: The more pertinent question is how we hold ALL schools accountable, not just private and public charter schools. Ohio law is very clear that public charter schools are required to take the same achievement tests, follow the same state and federal education laws and the same safety standards as traditional district schools. But here is the big difference, if the student’s in a charter consistently fails to meet state proficiency standards that school will be shut down. This sudden death clause forces charters to work harder, be more innovative with less dollars than district schools. Charters are only allowed to operate in poor performing urban districts to give parents a choice for their children. They are meant to work with districts and parents to offer creative alternatives to a one-size-fits-all education. So if your local school is doing its job they have nothing to fear from charters. D o y o u s ee a n e ed f or u n i f o r m i t y i n t ea c h e r q u a l i f i c a t i o n s, t e s t i n g p er f or m a n c e s ta n d a r d s , e tc ., f o r a l l O h i o s c ho ol s — p u b l i c , pr i v a t e, p a r o c hi a l a n d c ha r t er ? •MICHAEL COLLINS: In both my local and state Board Member

DE L AWA RE COUNT Y VOTE RS’ GUIDE 2012 1 5 better informed when comparing roles, I have pursued uniformity. As them. the Chair of the State Board’s Achievement Committee, I coordinat•JOHN P. STACY: As a conservaed the approval of the new academic tive my philosophy is that we are limstandards concerning the public schools in 2013-2014 school year; and, ited to establishing minimum content standards based on what we believe I will do all I can to make sure they our citizens must know in order to be apply to all schools in all settings. With re-election, I will dedicate a lot of productive members of society (reading, writing, financial literacy, math my efforts to getting this uniformity skills, citizenship, vocational/college instituted legislatively (which has counseling, etc…) In addition, we been rejected by this legislature), in should set base teaching qualificapolicy, in implementation of rules and tions, rules ensuring a safe learning regulations, etc., and this effort will environment, and a commitment that translate through the following special need students receive proper actions: •Ensuring teacher and administra- supplemental services to help them achieve their potential. Notice I said tive evaluation requirements are minimum statewide standards. Above implemented in all settings and beyond that is up to the local • Ensuring new testing requirements and instruments align with the community to decide for themselves. It is also up to them to pay for those Common Cove in all school settings additional programs and services. The role of government is to level the •KRISTEN MCKINLEY: All Ohio schools and teachers should be playing field to set students up for success. We use state achievement judged based upon uniform stantests to help parents and taxpayers dards of evaluation. This will allow know if the people they entrust their them to compete on a level playing children to are being successful or field and be assessed in the same not. Trust but verify. manner so that the public will be

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Invited Candidates for Congress, State and County Offices Written questions will be taken from the audience – Light refreshments will be served www.lwvdelawarecountyohio.com | www.lwvohio.org | Vote 411.org YOUR SOURCES FOR THE ELECTION INFORMATION YOU NEED

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1 6 DEL AWARE COUNT Y VOTERS’ GUIDE 2012

DELAWARE COUNTY POLLING LOCATIONS Ashley . . . . . . . . . . White Lily Chapel, 20 Main St., Ashley Berkshire A. . . . . . Berkshire Twp Hall, 1454 Rome Corners Road, Galena Berkshire B. . . . . . Berkshire Twp Hall, 1454 Rome Corners Road, Galena Berlin A . . . . . . . . . Berlin Township Hall, 3271 Cheshire Road, Delaware Berlin B . . . . . . . . . Rural Chapel United Methodist Church, 5860 Cheshire Road, Galena Berlin C . . . . . . . . . Grace Point Community Church, 2393 Peachblow Road, Delaware Berlin D . . . . . . . . . Grace Point Community Church, 2393 Peachblow Road, Delaware Berlin E . . . . . . . . . Rural Chapel United Methodist Church, 5860 Cheshire Road, Galena Brown . . . . . . . . . . Kilbourne United Methodist Church, 5591 Ohio 521, Kilbourne Columbus A . . . . . The Church At Polaris, 1250 Gemini Place, Columbus Columbus B . . . . . The Church At Polaris, 1250 Gemini Place, Columbus Columbus C. . . . . . The Church At Polaris, 1250 Gemini Place, Columbus Columbus D . . . . . The Church At Polaris, 1250 Gemini Place, Columbus Columbus E. . . . . . The Church At Polaris, 1250 Gemini Place, Columbus Concord A . . . . . . . Bellpoint United Methodist Church, 4771 Ohio 257S, Delaware Concord B . . . . . . . Eli Pinney Elementary, 9989 Concord Road, Dublin Concord C . . . . . . . Concord Township Hall, 6385 Home Road, Delaware Concord D . . . . . . . Bellpoint United Methodist Church, 4771 Ohio 257S, Delaware Concord E . . . . . . . Eli Pinney Elementary, 9989 Concord Road, Dublin Concord F . . . . . . . Concord Township Hall, 6385 Home Road, Delaware Concord G . . . . . . . Eli Pinney Elementary, 9989 Concord Road, Dublin Concord H . . . . . . . Eli Pinney Elementary, 9989 Concord Road, Dublin Delaware 1-A. . . . District Technology Center, 621 Pennsylvania Ave., Delaware Delaware 1-B. . . . District Technology Center, 621 Pennsylvania Ave., Delaware Delaware 1-C . . . . District Technology Center, 621 Pennsylvania Ave., Delaware Delaware 1-D. . . . Pathway Church Of God, 201 Pennsylvania Ave., Delaware Delaware 1-E . . . . Delaware Grace Brethren Church, 375 Hills-Miller Road, Delaware Delaware 1-F . . . . Pathway Church Of God, 201 Pennsylvania Ave., Delaware Delaware 1-G. . . . District Technology Center, 621 Pennsylvania Ave., Delaware Delaware 2-A. . . . Delaware Christian Church, 2280 Marysville Road, Delaware Delaware 2-B. . . . Delaware Christian Church, 2280 Marysville Road, Delaware Delaware 2-C . . . . Delaware Christian Church, 2280 Marysville Road, Delaware Delaware 2-D. . . . Valleyview Evangelical Friends Church, 868 W William St. Delaware 2-E . . . . Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church, 140 S Washington St. Delaware 2-F . . . . Delaware Christian Church, 2280 Marysville Road, Delaware Delaware 2-G. . . . Delaware Christian Church, 2280 Marysville Road, Delaware Delaware 3-A. . . . William Street United Methodist, 28 W. William St., Delaware Delaware 3-B. . . . Delaware Bible Church, 45 Belle Ave., Delaware Delaware 3-C . . . . Highpoint Nazarene Church, 795 Pollock Road, Delaware Delaware 3-D. . . . Delaware Bible Church, 45 Belle Ave., Delaware Delaware 3-E . . . . Highpoint Nazarene Church, 795 Pollock Road, Delaware Delaware 3-F . . . . Highpoint Nazarene Church, 795 Pollock Road, Delaware Delaware 4-A. . . . Pathway Church Of God, 201 Pennsylvania Ave., Delaware Delaware 4-B. . . . Mingo Park Complex, 500 E. Lincoln Ave., Delaware Delaware 4-C . . . . Mingo Park Complex, 500 E. Lincoln Ave., Delaware Delaware 4-D. . . . Delaware County District Library, 84 E. Winter St., Delaware Delaware 4-E . . . . Grace United Methodist Church, 385 E. William St., Delaware Delaware 4-F . . . . Grace United Methodist Church, 385 E. William St., Delaware

Delaware Twp. A. . Delaware Township Hall, 2590 Liberty Road, Delaware Delaware Twp B . . Delaware Township Hall, 2590 Liberty Road, Delaware Dublin A. . . . . . . . . Deer Run Elementary, 8815 Avery Road, Dublin Dublin B. . . . . . . . . Deer Run Elementary, 8815 Avery Road, Dublin Dublin C. . . . . . . . . Deer Run Elementary, 8815 Avery Road, Dublin Dublin D . . . . . . . . Deer Run Elementary, 8815 Avery Road, Dublin Galena . . . . . . . . . . Galena United Methodist Church, 2777 Sunbury Road, Galena Genoa A. . . . . . . . . Genoa Township Hall, 5111 S. Old 3C Highway, Westerville Genoa B. . . . . . . . . Genoa Baptist Church, 7562 Lewis Center Road, Westerville Genoa C . . . . . . . . . Genoa Baptist Church, 7562 Lewis Center Road, Westerville Genoa D. . . . . . . . . Heritage Christian Church, 7413 Maxtown Road, Westerville Genoa E . . . . . . . . . Seventh Day Adventist Church, 6481 Tussic Street Road, Westerville Genoa F . . . . . . . . . Galena United Methodist Church, 2777 Sunbury Road, Galena Genoa G. . . . . . . . . Genoa Baptist Church, 7562 Lewis Center Road, Westerville Genoa H. . . . . . . . . Genoa Baptist Church, 7562 Lewis Center Road, Westerville Genoa I . . . . . . . . . Heritage Christian Church, 7413 Maxtown Road, Westerville Genoa J . . . . . . . . . Genoa Baptist Church, 7562 Lewis Center Road, Westerville Genoa K. . . . . . . . . Genoa Baptist Church, 7562 Lewis Center Road, Westerville Genoa L . . . . . . . . . Genoa Baptist Church, 7562 Lewis Center Road, Westerville Genoa M . . . . . . . . Heritage Christian Church, 7413 Maxtown Road, Westerville Genoa N. . . . . . . . . Heritage Christian Church, 7413 Maxtown Road, Westerville Genoa O. . . . . . . . . Heritage Christian Church, 7413 Maxtown Road, Westerville Genoa P. . . . . . . . . Genoa Baptist Church, 7562 Lewis Center Road, Westerville Genoa Q. . . . . . . . . Heritage Christian Church, 7413 Maxtown Road, Westerville Genoa R. . . . . . . . . Genoa Township Hall, 5111 S. Old 3C Highway, Westerville Harlem A. . . . . . . . Harlem United Methodist Church, 5520 Harlem Road, Galena Harlem B. . . . . . . . Harlem United Methodist Church, 5520 Harlem Road, Galena Harlem C . . . . . . . . Harlem Township Hall, 3883 Ohio 605S, Galena Harlem D. . . . . . . . Harlem Township Hall, 3883 Ohio 605S, Galena Kingston A . . . . . . Kilbourne United Methodist Church, 5591 Ohio 521, Kilbourne Kingston B . . . . . . Kilbourne United Methodist Church, 5591 Ohio 521, Kilbourne Liberty A . . . . . . . . Shepherd Of Peace Lutheran Church, 520 Village Park Drive, Powell Liberty B . . . . . . . . Lodge At Deer Haven Preserve, 4183 Liberty Road, Delaware Liberty C . . . . . . . . Liberty Presbyterian Church, 7080 Olentangy River Road, Delaware Liberty D . . . . . . . . Liberty Township Community Building, 7761 Liberty Road, Powell Liberty E . . . . . . . . Powell Christian Church, 8901 Liberty Road, Powell Liberty F . . . . . . . . Gateway Community Church, 8794 Big Bear Ave., Powell Liberty G . . . . . . . . Sawmill Baptist Church, 10635 Sawmill Road, Powell Liberty H . . . . . . . . Powell United Methodist Church, 825 E Olentangy St., Powell Liberty I. . . . . . . . . Gateway Community Church, 8794 Big Bear Ave., Powell Liberty J. . . . . . . . . Liberty Township Community Building, 7761 Liberty Road, Powell Liberty K . . . . . . . . Gateway Community Church, 8794 Big Bear Ave., Powell Liberty L . . . . . . . . Gateway Community Church, 8794 Big Bear Ave., Powell Marlboro . . . . . . . . Marlboro Township Hall, 666 Norton Road, Waldo Orange A . . . . . . . . Delaware County Board Of Developmental Disabilities, 7991 U.S. 23 Orange B . . . . . . . . Delaware County Board Of Developmental Disabilities, 7991 U.S. 23 Orange C . . . . . . . . Orange Township Hall, 1680 E. Orange Road, Lewis Center Orange D. . . . . . . . Orange Road Friends Church, 3467 E. Orange Road, Lewis Center

Orange E . . . . . . . . Delaware County Board Of Developmental Disabilities, 7991 U.S. 23 Orange F . . . . . . . . Berlin Presbyterian Church, 5175 S. Old State Road, Lewis Center Orange G . . . . . . . . Orange Township Hall, 1680 E. Orange Road, Lewis Center Orange H. . . . . . . . St. Andrew's Anglican Church, 7521 S. Old State Road, Lewis Center Orange I. . . . . . . . . Orange Road Friends Church, 3467 E. Orange Road, Lewis Center Orange J . . . . . . . . Orange Township Hall, 1680 E. Orange Road, Lewis Center Orange K . . . . . . . . Orange Road Friends Church, 3467 E. Orange Road, Lewis Center Orange L . . . . . . . . Berlin Presbyterian Church, 5175 S. Old State Road, Lewis Center Orange M . . . . . . . Alum Creek Church Of Christ, 6256 S. Old State Road, Lewis Center Orange N. . . . . . . . Orange Road Friends Church, 3467 E. Orange Road, Lewis Center Orange O. . . . . . . . Orange Road Friends Church, 3467 E. Orange Road, Lewis Center Orange P . . . . . . . . Orange Road Friends Church, 3467 E. Orange Road, Lewis Center Orange Q. . . . . . . . Alum Creek Church Of Christ, 6256 S Old State Road, Lewis Center Ostrander . . . . . . . Scioto Township Hall, 3737 Ostrander Road, Ostrander Oxford . . . . . . . . . . Oxford Township Hall, 5125 Shoemaker Road, Ashley Porter A . . . . . . . . . Porter Township Hall, 12826 Mckay St., Sunbury Porter B . . . . . . . . . Porter Township Hall, 12826 Mckay St., Sunbury Powell A . . . . . . . . Powell Christian Church, 8901 Liberty Road, Powell Powell B . . . . . . . . Powell United Methodist Church, 825 E. Olentangy St., Powell Powell C. . . . . . . . . Powell City Offices, 47 Hall St., Powell Powell D . . . . . . . . Shepherd Of Peace Lutheran Church, 520 Village Park Drive, Powell Powell E. . . . . . . . . Sawmill Baptist Church, 10635 Sawmill Road, Powell Powell F. . . . . . . . . Sawmill Baptist Church, 10635 Sawmill Road, Powell Powell G . . . . . . . . Powell City Offices, 47 Hall St., Powell Powell H . . . . . . . . Powell Grace Brethren Church, 7600 Liberty Road, Powell Powell I . . . . . . . . . Powell Grace Brethren Church, 7600 Liberty Road, Powell Powell J . . . . . . . . . Powell Grace Brethren Church, 7600 Liberty Road, Powell Radnor. . . . . . . . . . Radnor Township Hall, 4061 Ohio 203, Radnor Scioto A . . . . . . . . . Scioto Township Hall, 3737 Ostrander Road, Ostrander Scioto B . . . . . . . . . Scioto Township Hall, 3737 Ostrander Road, Ostrander Shawnee Hills . . . Shawnee Hills Civic Association, 36 W Mohawk Drive, Powell Sunbury A. . . . . . . Vineyard Church Of Delaware County, 1001 W Cherry St., Sunbury Sunbury B. . . . . . . Sunbury United Methodist Church, 100 W Cherry St., Sunbury Sunbury C . . . . . . . Sunbury Christian Church, 250 Rainbow Ave., Sunbury Sunbury D. . . . . . . Sunbury United Methodist Church, 100 W Cherry St., Sunbury Thompson. . . . . . . Thompson Township Hall, 4373 Ohio 257n, Radnor Trenton A . . . . . . . Trenton Township Hall, 15495 Hartford Road, Sunbury Trenton B . . . . . . . Trenton Township Hall, 15495 Hartford Road, Sunbury Troy A . . . . . . . . . . . Delaware Grace Brethren Church, 375 Hills-Miller Road, Delaware Troy B . . . . . . . . . . . Delaware Grace Brethren Church, 375 Hills-Miller Road, Delaware Westerville A . . . . Westerville Community Center, 350 Cleveland Ave., Westerville Westerville B . . . . Westerville Community UCC, 770 County Line Road, Westerville Westerville C . . . . Westerville Community UCC, 770 County Line Road, Westerville Westerville D . . . . Heritage Middle School, 390 N Spring Road, Westerville Westerville E . . . . Westerville Community UCC, 770 County Line Road, Westerville Westerville F . . . . Heritage Middle School, 390 N Spring Road, Westerville Westerville G . . . . Westerville Community Center, 350 Cleveland Ave., Westerville

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2012 Voters Guide