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homes design SPRING 2013

E D M O N TO N J O U R N A L . C O M

the new

neutrals Perfect backdrops

editor’s note

SPRING 2013

Editor

HELEN METELLA

Welcome to the Spring 2013 edition of

hmetella@edmontonjournal.com Managing Editor

SASHA ROEDER MAH sroedermah@edmontonjournal.com

Homes & Design!

Contributing Writers

LEANNE BROWNOFF JANE CARDILLO DAVID RYNING ANN SUTHERLAND Photography

JASON FRANSON Designer

CHRISTINE PEARCE Advertising Lead

RHONDA VICKERS rvickers@edmontonjournal.com

For advertising opportunities in the next issue of HOMES & DESIGN online magazine please call 780-429-5553

PUBLISHED BY THE EDMONTON JOURNAL, A DIVISION OF POSTMEDIA NETWORK INC., AT THE JOURNAL BUILDING, P.O. BOX 2421, EDMONTON, ALBERTA T5J 2S6

E D M O N TO N J O U R N A L . C O M

Now’s the perfect time to refresh and revitalize, inside and out

Helen Metella

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S WINTER RECEDES, every Edmontonian begins planning for warmer weather and longer, cheerier days. This issue contains all the ingredients to create plans that pay off in your home. A great start is to lavish paint on rooms that are washed-out. Yet facing the wall of colour swatches at your home-improvement store may have you bailing before you begin. What goes with the furniture? What’s too intense? What’s the alternative to blah whites and beiges? Happily, the “new neutrals” now in vogue solve those dilemmas. Our cover story on exactly which colours those new neutrals include will make your painting projects simple successes. If you’re refreshing the furniture, too, you may encounter baffling new labels for hot new trends. So we’ve asked designer Leanne Brownoff to do some explaining in a new column titled Decoding Décor. This month, she defines the term, “Mid-century Industrial,” and shows us how to achieve the look. Spring is a time to sweep up, so we’ve got plenty on that, too. This vs. That demonstrates how to organize your back-door storage, whether you’re blessed with a modern mudroom or a cramped closet. We also show you how to declutter your home office, and which flooring is best for hardworking entryways. Finally, if all you have time for this spring is dreaming of your garden, then check out the simple steps to growing tomatoes from seed. Get your fingers into some potting soil in March and April and you’ll be eating juicy fruits of your labour in July!

ein this issue SPRING 2013

features 6 THE NEW NEUTRALS

Discover the season’s paint trends.

12 DECODING DECOR

What in the world is Mid-Century Industrial?

20 THIS VS. THAT

Hall closet or spacious mudroom, organization is key to maximizing your storage space.

22 WANT PRIZE-WINNING TOMATOES?

Our step-by-step guide for a season of good eating.

12 advertisers

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27 JOB WELL DONE

Declutter your home office.

30 FLOOR ’EM!

Practical and pretty options for a tidy entryway.

on the cover Retreat to a serene bedroom painted Benjamin Moore coral, one of the season’s new neutrals.

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The new

neutrals Soft hues cradle hot accent colours

ANN SUTHERLAND | Edmonton Journal PHOTOS SUPPLIED

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rom tangy yellows to vibrant blues and lush greens, home décor colours for 2013 are an eclectic palette with something for everyone, but each of these fresh touches requires a neutral base. Edmonton interior designer, Lori Elms of Lori Elms Design Group, is seeing lots of warm greys with brown undertones for wall colours. The neutral palette creates the perfect backdrop for a wide array of fashionable colours. “We’re moving away from painting a room in an intense colour such as red,” says Elms. “Instead, we’re gravitating toward using a neutral colour such as grey or soft yellow to create a blank canvas.” It’s against this clean slate that you can add pops of colour with home décor accessories in turquoise, emerald green, red or deep blue. Elms says personal preference determines which robust colour to go with as an accent. Accessorize with vases, cushions, drapes and bedding. Also consider painting a side table or bench in one of these hues to complement the neutral walls.

Benjamin Moore’s colour of the year is this soft, understated Lemon Sorbet. It can be beautifully complemented by grey with brown undertones for a neutral palette, or accented with deep emerald for a punch of dramatic colour.

We’re moving away from painting a room in an intense colour such as red. Grey is a favourite neutral in this year’s paint colours. Pair it with soft yellow accessories for a mellow look, or add a splash of colour with deep red accent pieces.

Even a colour can function as a neutral. Pale coral walls bring a feeling of serenity to this bedroom, while soft creams are punctuated by bold blue in the room’s furnishings and accents.

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1

ADD SPICE TO THE BASE COLOUR with your home décor accessories. “Mixing juicy colours with softer hues, balanced with neutrals, brings a high-fashion feel to the home,” says Benjamin Moore colour expert Sharon Grech.

WHAT Modern crystal lamp with punchy red lampshade; would stand out beautifully in a study or den painted in soft greys WHERE Henry’s Purveyor of Fine Things, 10216 124th St., 780-454-6660 HOW MUCH? $249

WHAT Emerald green platter; makes a dramatic contrast to soft yellow walls WHERE Henry’s Purveyor of Fine Things, 10216 124th St., 780-4546660 HOW MUCH? Large, $63.50; Small, $56

change

WHAT Turquoise vase. Set against a soft-yellow wall, a piece like this makes a powerful impact. WHERE Henry’s Purveyor of Fine Things, 10216 124th St., 780-454-6660 WHAT DecorRest accent chair and cushion; combines two of this year’s trending colours, grey and yellow

HOW MUCH? $17

WHERE Henry’s Purveyor of Fine Things, 10216 124th St., 780-454-6660 HOW MUCH? Chair starts at $815; custom-made cushion in yellow geometric fabric starts at $59 8

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ADD A DASH OF WHIMSY and surprise with vivid colours and surprising lines.

WHAT Montigny Paris vintage chest in black and fuchsia WHERE Chintz and Co., 10502 105th Ave., 780-428-8181 HOW MUCH? $1,098

of accent Give neutral backgrounds a lively voice

PHOTOS: JASON FRANSON | Edmonton Journal

WHAT Four-piece glazed clay Astier de Villate place setting; matching accent pieces; custom made napkins, tablecloth, placemats, runner made from polyester, linen or silk fabric

3

YOU CAN ALSO REVERSE ROLES by making bold shades the backdrop for soft, neutral accessories. Invigorate the dining table with creamy-toned china set against colourful napkins, tablecloth and placemats.

WHERE Chintz and Co., 10502 105th Ave., 780-428-8181 HOW MUCH? Four-piece place set, $300; teapot, $322; candlesticks, $189; water pitcher, $298. Fabric $19.99 to $39.98/metre

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Decoding decor What is Mid-Century Modern Industrial Interior Design? LEANNE BROWNOFF | Edmonton Journal Photos by JASON FRANSON

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Mid-Century

modern industrial

Interior Design

WHAT IS IT?

It’s design based on the idea that form follows function. Heavily influenced by the Bauhaus style (German architecture and design circa 1919 to 1933 that was based on function and industrial materials), this design goes one step further: it highlights industrial materials which celebrate individual craftsmanship.

WHICH MATERIALS DOES IT USE?

It marries natural materials such as wood, iron, glass, stone, leather and natural fibres such as canvas, to architectural elements commonly used in industrial machinery, such as pulleys, gears, wheels and levers. PHOTOS SUPPLIED

WHY IS IT SO HOT?

Because it is highly relevant — it’s the grandfather of today’s Repurpose, Reuse and Recycle ideology. As a responsible generation, we see the value of reducing our carbon foot print and revitalizing materials.

HOW IS IT BEING USED?

When historical buildings and warehouses are refurbished to provide affordably chic living and office spaces, Mid-century Modern Industrial design complements their soaring ceilings, original wood floors and brick walls. Recently, the design’s popularity has expanded from the urban core and historic districts to the suburban edges of cities.

great accents:

Bold wall clocks

Retro phones and office items Black and white photography Hammered metal accessories Retro suitcases Reclaimed wood flooring

As a responsible generation, we see the value of reducing our carbon foot print and revitalizing materials. 14

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NO NEED TO IMMERSE YOURSELF COMPLETELY. A few wellselected anchor items can bring personality to your space. “These items can work in any décor because they are statement pieces,” explains Carmel Orthner, of Crate and Barrel. “They are the story behind the story.” A great example is Crate and Barrel’s Phoenix Table, created from recycled telephone poles.

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Main elements for creating this look:

Reclaimed wood, combined with cast iron or steel

USE THE DÉCOR TO ACTUALLY RECLAIM HISTORY. District Eight Design, offered at F2 Furnishings, combines cast-iron machine parts from refurbished antique Japanese looms with reclaimed exotic woods, to create tables and book shelves.

Retro, photo studioinspired lighting, with metal globes, oversized glass diffusers

Historical industrial or trade pieces Streamlined seating with metal support

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DON’T BE A PURIST. Embrace modern methods which bring refurbished pieces in line with today’s furniture standards. Sealed edges and new finishes secure the integrity and safety of reclaimed materials, points out Barbara de Visser of Ethan Allen.

Where

to find the look:

CRATE AND BARREL: 5015 111th St., 780-436-1454 ETHAN ALLEN: 10507 109th St., 780-444-8855 F2: 2950 Calgary Trail, 780-450-0897 POTTERY BARN: Upper Level, West Edmonton Mall Phase 1, 780-486-0349

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This vs. That Must-haves for a modern mud room or cosy coat closet ANN SUTHERLAND | Edmonton Journal

I

s your home’s entryway a messy mountain of boots and shoes? A jumble of mitts and tuques, jackets, knapsacks, sports bags and totes? And with spring in the air, mud, too?

Poor design encourages mess and leads to frustration. Good

thing there are solutions for the closet catastrophe.

THE MODERN MUD ROOM The mud room is de rigueur in today’s new suburban family home. Getting the most out of it depends on family dynamics, lifestyle and space, says Cameron Johnson of California Closets. “Ideally you should have bench seating with storage, adjustable hooks, drawers, shelving above for storage, and a closet,” says PHOTOS: SUPPLIED Johnson. TOP: Savvy storage If you have a young family, adjustable hooks that can be lowspaces and enough room ered or raised depending on the kids’ heights are necessary, for the whole family to pull on coats and boots make because hangers are difficult for them to use. mud rooms marvellous. For sports-crazy families, the individual locker-style system is a good bet. “Each family member has a locker ABOVE RIGHT: Strategically with different-height shelves,” says Johnson. “It’s great for placed hooks make tidying up keeping their sports equipment organized.” easy for even the littlest members of the family. Pricing varies for a mudroom unit depending on the size, number of drawers, doors, hardware and colour. Expect to RIGHT: A generous mud room pay anywhere between $1,200 and $7,000. offers space for drawers, shelves, and even a mirror.

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Getting the most of your small closet means reconfiguring the space.

THE COSY COAT CLOSET If you’re making do with a small front-hall or back-door closet, you may have only a single rod and shelf, which renders it more or less useless. Getting the most of your small closet means reconfiguring the space, says Charmaine Symborski, owner of Creative Closets. “You are limited by space, but you can do quite a bit within that space to make it more functional.” Use the space more vertically. With the removal of the single rod and shelf, functional units can be installed. These consist of double

TOP LEFT: If properly organized, the small hall closet can be an efficient storage space for hanging rods, multiple shelvoutdoor gear. ing at the top and bottom, TOP RIGHT: This ingenious cubby system baskets, and even units with makes excellent use of the side of a drawers. A simple hall-closet wide entrance stairwell. retrofit will cost between $350 and $500. In the case of the squishy backdoor closet, use the staircase that leads downstairs to harvest extra space. California Closets sells staircase cubbies that fit over the steps and are perfect for mitts, shoes, knapsacks or any other item you want tucked away. A unit like the one shown in the photo is about $1,300.

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Want

t mat es? prize-winning Start now. JANE CARDILLO | Edmonton Journal

JASON FRANSON / EDMONTON JOURNAL

First, choose your seeds. Every year, there are more delicious varieties of tomato to choose from.

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F

orget the wind rattling your windows and the snowflakes camped out on your doorstep. Spring is coming and it’s time to plant tomatoes — indoors. There are hundreds of varieties of the plump, juicy fruit (yes, tomatoes are fruit that masquerade as vegetables), says Rob Sproule of Salisbury Greenhouse. The pear-shaped Romas are lovely in salsas and pasta sauces, the burly Beefmaster makes a sandwich a feast, and the wee, Tumbling Toms in their yellow skins are great for snacking straight from the garden, says Sproule. Varieties created for container growing have a shorter maturation date, sometimes enabling gardeners to enjoy the fruits of their labour by June, says Sproule, whose latest book, Edible Container Gardening, is out this spring. From seed to harvest, Sproule offers a how-to guide on making your tomatoes the talk of the neighbourhood.

JASON FRANSON / EDMONTON JOURNAL

Second, select a good quality soil and set up your indoor planting tray.

2

tomatoTIPS

Start seeds indoors in early March. Sow seeds about three millimetres deep in a moist seedling mix, either in separate cells or together.

JASON FRANSON / EDMONTON JOURNAL

Third, get ready to plant.

JASON FRANSON / EDMONTON JOURNAL

Keep the tender seeds well watered, but fertilize only sparingly.

Water, fertilizer and heat.

Let there be light. Not a lot of light is needed during germination, but once seedlings emerge, they do best with 16 hours under a grow light. If that’s not possible, put them in your brightest window.

3 5

Keep the soil moist and give only diluted fertilizer sparingly, if at all. Seedlings grow best at about 18 C.

JASON FRANSON / EDMONTON JOURNAL

Seedlings should be planted about three millimetres deep.

JASON FRANSON / EDMONTON JOURNAL

Covering the tray helps retain the warmth the seeds need to thrive.

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tomatoTIPS Time to transplant. When seedlings reach a height of three to four inches (8-10 cm), move them into separate, small pots, where they’ll remain until they’re in the garden.

When to plant outdoors. Wait at least a week after the first frost. Move ‘em out. A sheltered, southfacing location is Once the weather gentles, move the ideal. Tomatoes also pots outdoors to a partially sheltered love containers area. Bring them in at night. This process where their roots hardens the plants, so the bright sun and stay warm. cold nights don’t send them into shock.

SUPPLIED / ROB SPROULE

Seedlings begin to sprout.

SUPPLIED / ROB SPROULE

And voila! The fruits of your labour, a rainbow of beautiful tomatoes.

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SUPPLIED / ROB SPROULE

Harvest. With only about 130 frost-free days in Alberta, choose tomatoes that mature within 80 days or less. The Early Girl variety is ready to eat in 52 days. Maturity dates are listed on most seed packages.

8

After mid-May, your plants are ready to go outside to a sheltered, warm spot. Some are even ready to harvest after only 52 days.

SUPPLIED / ROB SPROULE

10

After all that work, treat yourself to homemade salsa, with tomatoes straight from your garden.

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Job well done Work better in a streamlined home office JANE CARDILLO | Edmonton Journal Photos by JASON FRANSON

Y

our home office: It’s there in that cluttered spare room, buried beneath the kids’ old art projects, junk mail destined for the shredder and the piles of household receipts crying out for a file folder to call their own. Wresting order from chaos is easier than you think, say Maureen Wright and Johanne Lewis, owners of Mojo Design, who took a room in a client’s home and turned it into a pleasant work space where style and function happily co-exist. The interior designers share their tips on tackling a home-office project.

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Think of what you’ll be using it for and plan accordingly.

before

JOHANNE LEWIS | MOJO DESIGN

PHOTO SUPPLIED

A mess of files, books stacked haphazardly on shelves, and a desktop too covered in stuff to use.

Empty the room and measure the space. “Sometimes people go and buy organizing things before they’ve actually measured,” says Lewis. Think of what you’ll be using it for and plan accordingly. “Am I just going to be doing my paperwork in there, am I going to be working on different projects? They need to understand what the use of the room is first.”

Decide what stays, what goes. “You have to be tough,” says Wright. “Don’t put back in what you really don’t need.” Get rid of clutter electronically – transfer ballet recitals and soccer games from videotape to disc; photograph fingerpaintings and school projects and put the pictures in an album.

The Asian-look chest – one of the homeowner’s favourite pieces – brings character into the room.

Work with what you’ve got. A battered chair was painted and re-upholstered, turning it into a charming seat for the desk. An old dining table found new life as an office desk, and a striking Asian-inspired cabinet (a favourite of the homeowner) became beautifully functional with the addition of office trays on top. “Everybody’s looking at recycling and re-purposing, so if we don’t have to throw everything out, we try to re-use it,” says Wright.

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PHOTO SUPPLIED

before

The closet was a mess of files, binders and art just waiting for a home.

Inexpensive shelving makes a quick fix of this previously cluttered space.

Storage needn’t be costly. The designers outfitted the room’s closet with shelving, storage boxes and cabinets they picked up from places including Ikea, Canadian Tire and Walmart. They added an inexpensive bulletin board to the wall and a stylish but moderately priced lamp to the desk top. “You can buy any kind of general storage from anywhere,” says Lewis.

Treat yourself to a little luxury. The designers softened the room and created an inviting reading niche with a new easy chair. Silk drapes on the window give the space an opulent feel. The finished room was just what the homeowner had wanted. “She loved it,” says Lewis. And, Wright points out, it’s functional, too. “It’s a space that you want to go in and use.”

Silk curtains add a touch of luxury to this otherwise highly practical space.

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Floor ’em! Every entrance is grand when flooring is pretty and practical

DAVID RYNING | Edmonton Journal PHOTOS SUPPLIED

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e all know the importance of a good first impression, right? For your house to make a great first impression, start with the first element guests touch when they enter. Your entryway floor is your home’s multi-tasker. It takes a lot of abuse, but it must look good, too. “The entrance should be a material that isn’t going to absorb water — therefore, not carpet, laminate or hardwood,” says Paul Di Marcello of Vinton Centre Carpets Ltd. “Tiles and vinyl products are popular choices.” Options to consider when choosing the floor:

CERAMIC OR PORCELAIN TILE: n Advantages: Tile is durable and attractive. It resists scratches and staining, and won’t fade in sunlight. Installed properly, it can last a lifetime. Professional installation is recommended.

The entrance should be a material that isn’t going to absorb water – therefore, not carpet, laminate or hardwood.

n Maintenance: Tile is easy to clean — a damp mop is usually sufficient. n Price: Prices for tile range widely, reflecting the variety of styles and patterns, and grades from builder to exotic. Most run between $8 to $16 per square foot, including installation. “In the case of tiles, the difference in price is strictly a matter of esthetics, not durability,” says Di Marcello.

PAUL DI MARCELLO | VINTON CENTRE CARPETS LTD.

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LUXURY VINYL: n Advantages: Luxury vinyl — sold as tiles and planks — is a hot trend in flooring. With its wide range of colours and patterns, it can recreate the look of wood or stone at a fraction of the price. It is also warmer and softer underfoot than most other hard floors. Another huge advantage of luxury tile is its ease of installation. It is well within the capability of most do-it-yourselfers. “If you know how to operate a knife, you’re good to go,” says Di Marcello. n Maintenance: Luxury vinyl is easy to clean and impermeable to water, making it a great choice for the entryway. A broom or a wet mop is all you need. n Price: There is a wide range of price for vinyl products, but most range from $2 to $7 per square foot.

LINOLEUM:

(not illustrated)

n Advantages: Linoleum is available in a wide variety of colours and patterns. It lends an authentic feel to heritage houses, and can bring a funky vibe to new construction. Made with recycled and rapidly renewable natural products such as linseed oil and pine rosin, linoleum is one of the more environmentally friendly flooring choices. It is durable and long-lasting when installed and maintained properly. Professional installation is recommended. n Maintenance: Linoleum requires a bit more care than vinyl products, and should be cleaned with lowacid cleaners, with a pH of less than seven. n Price: Linoleum runs about $2 to $3 per square foot, not including installation. 32

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Homes & Design Spring 2013