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The Daily Free Press

Year xlii. Volume lxxxiii. Issue LV

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Wednesday, December 12, 2012 The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

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Frank leaves behind legacy of liberalism as term ends GNH petition gets hundreds of student signatures, support

PHOTO BY ABIGAIL LIN/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

U.S. Rep. Barney Frank, pictured here speaking at the Boston Freedom Rally on Sep. 15, leaves behind a strong liberal legacy in Massachussetts. By Sydney L. Shea Daily Free Press Staff

When Barney Frank joined Congress in 1981, he had still not openly come out as a gay man. In fact, equal marriage rights for LGBT citizens during the Reagan administration, or what political scientists call a conservative revolution, would not even begin to pass until after the turn of the century. Although there are still obstacles for liberal views on legal issues such as reproductive rights, marriage equality and equal-pay laws, Frank said people opposed to equal rights are dwindling. “I think we will establish complete equality for people,” he said in an interview with The

Daily Free Press. “I believe strongly in personal freedom.” The U.S. Congressman, who represents Massachusetts’ fourth district, said he had first been inspired to enter the political arena as a young adult. “My civil rights activism started when I was in college,” Frank said. “I was supportive of all reproductive rights, gay rights and free speech.” He said he began his political career as an assistant to former Boston Mayor Kevin White, but when he entered Congress he became “very, very active again.” During his time on Capitol Hill, Frank’s accomplishments as a Democratic representative

included his repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” economic policies such as the 2008 bailout during the U.S. financial crisis and the founding of the National Stonewall Democrats, an organization that advocates for LGBT rights. Although not all states agree on equal marriage rights, Frank said the U.S. has still been improving in terms of support for civil rights, noting the reelection of President Barack Obama, who endorsed such rights as same-sex marriage in May. “I’m very pleased with the progress we’ve made,” he said. Frank, who married his partner Jim Ready in July, will be succeeded by another newlywed, Joe Kennedy III, in 2013. “For over three decades, Congressman Barney Frank has represented the fourth district of Massachusetts with skill, tenacity and an unparalleled commitment to his constituents,” he said in a statement to the Free Press. “He is a crusader for social justice, a tireless advocate for the people and businesses of this district, and a dear friend and mentor. I am honored to follow in his footsteps.” Political science professors at Boston University said that after Frank leaves Congress, certain liberal public sentiments will continue to increase among young voters, but challenges remain for equality in civil rights. Douglas Kriner, who teaches political science, said one of the most significant differences between Frank’s 1981 debut in Congress and 2012 has been a major nationwide shift toward LGBT support. “In the 1980s when Congressman Frank entered Congress, I can’t imagine anyone would really wonder about gay marriage or gay members of the military openly serving as such,” he

awards. If the NIH cut its grants to BU by even a significant portion of the 8.2 percent cut it faces, BU would lose millions of dollars in research grant money. Leaders of various universities, hospitals, advocacy groups and other potentially affected parties are advocating a compromise be reached in D.C. BU President Robert Brown co-signed a letter to U.S. Sen. Scott Brown with other Massachusetts university presidents and medical center leaders on Nov. 14. In the letter, the leaders said it was important to the Commonwealth’s economy that research funding not be cut. “The federal dollars we receive have a return far beyond their initial investment, acting as a significant magnet for private sector dollars that spur job creation in Massachusetts and beyond,” the leaders wrote. Leaders cited statistics from the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Hundreds of Boston University students are rallying behind Gender Neutral BU’s efforts to make gender-neutral housing a top priority for the administration for the 2012–13 academic year. More than 1,600 students signed an online petition on Change.org posted by Gender Neutral BU, an advocacy group recently created by students, as of Tuesday night. The petition implores the administration to make genderneutral housing an option for fall 2013. Student Government officials announced Sunday the BU administration indefinitely halted the gender-neutral housing initiative after it was approved for an unspecified future date. “This action represents a deliberate violation of the commitments made by administration officials to implement Gender Neutral Housing as an option for students by fall 2013,” the petition stated. Swanson Ninan, a representative of Gender Neutral BU, said the petition is a collaborative effort. “The petition came about Monday night at the open action planning meeting hosted by the CGSA,” Ninan, a College of Arts and Sciences sophomore, said in an email. “Members of the CGSA, Student Government and many other non-affiliated students came together to write the petition as a way to demonstrate to the BU administration why the issue of Gender Neutral Housing should be a priority.” BU spokesman Colin Riley said there is great demand for proximity to campus and that housing for transfer students. These concerns are taking precedent over phasing in genderinclusive housing options for the 2012–13 academic year. Dean of Students Kenneth Elmore said in an interview Monday with The Daily Free Press that the gender-neutral housing proposal remains under review by the administration and that BU has to address a number of more pressing housing issues, including keeping freshmen out of Danielsen Hall, offering more housing options for transfer students and establishing Kilachand Hall. “What we had decided to do is to look at the important aspects about how we assign students here on campus and the room selection process,” Elmore said. Elmore said the administration’s support of the LGBTQA’s student population and the administration’s housing priorities are different issues. “We look a those in different ways,” he said. “We have to think of how we support our students. LGBTQA has one separate [set of] stu-

Fiscal Cliff, see page 4

GNH, see page 4

Frank, see page 4

Looming ‘fiscal cliff’ threatens BU’s research funding, officials say By Chris Lisinski Daily Free Press Staff

Should Congress fail to avoid going over the looming “fiscal cliff,” Boston University and other research institutions around the country will see significant negative repercussions, from cuts to federal research funding, BU officials said. The fiscal cliff threatens federal research funding, as this funding is discretionary spending, said Jennifer Grodsky, vice president for BU Federal Relations in D.C. “The way sequestration [scheduled funding cuts] works, financial aid funding like [Federal] Pell Grants are protected,” she said. “It’s discretionary funding that’s being threatened … The concern by BU and all research universities is that this fiscal cliff, which would have an across the board cut of about 8.2 percent, is going to impact all of those research grants as well.” A number of tax cuts are due to expire on Dec. 31, the same time spending cuts are to take place. If the government were to fail in reaching a compromise on new legislation, taxes would

raise about $500 billion and spending would be cut about $200 billion. Grodsky said all federal agencies for discretionary funding, including those that give research grants to universities such as BU, would see an 8.2 percent cut were Congress not to reach a compromise by the Dec. 31 deadline. “The NIH [National Institutes of Health] itself, for example, its budget would drop by 8.2 percent and they’d have to decide how they’re going to do that,” Grodsky said. “Do they cut intramural programs out of the NIH, do they cut grants that have already gone out to universities, do they cut grants they intended to put out but haven’t yet? It’s unclear but those agencies will see an 8.2-percent cut.” BU receives research grants from a number of federal organizations, most notably the NIH, the National Science Foundation, NASA and the U.S. Department of Energy, Grodsky said. For the 2012 fiscal year, BU received $44,580,745 from 121 awards from NIH, according to NIH statistics. The BU Medical Campus received $116,030,729 from 241

By Chris Lisinski Daily Free Press Staff

City officials, bike advocates seek increased bike safety throughout Boston By Zoe Roos Daily Free Press Staff

PHOTO BY HEATHER GOLDIN/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

A number of advocates and city officials are calling for a safer biking environment in Boston.

In response to a series of biking accidents that have taken place in 2012, city officials and local advocates seek to improve bike safety and education as Boston’s biking culture grows with initiatives such as Hubway and an increasing number of bike lanes. Dec. 6 marked the fifth biking fatality in the city, after 23-year-old Boston University first-year graduate student Christopher Weigl was struck and killed on the corner of Commonwealth Avenue and Saint Paul’s Street by a tractor-trailer truck. The accident follows another fatality in the BU community, in which BU student ChungWei Yang was killed in the Nov. 12 incident involving a Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority bus. Both incidents are still under investigation, said Boston Police Department officer James Kenneally. City Councilor At-Large Felix Arroyo, of

Jamaica Plain, expressed his condolences for the victims of accidents, and the need to improve the biking infrastructure throughout the city. “My thoughts and prayers have been with the family and friends of this young man [Christopher Weigl],” Arroyo said. “This tragedy re-emphasizes the importance of making our streets safe for cyclists. I look forward to continuing to work with Councilor Pressley and the administration to improve our infrastructure and make our streets safer.” City councilors discussed the tragedy at a previously scheduled bike safety hearing in city hall later on the same day Weigl was killed. City Councilors At-Large Ayanna Pressley, of Dorchester, and Arroyo called the hearing. During the hearing, Pressley said she has high hopes for improving biking in Boston. “We want Boston to be the safest bicycling city in the country,” she said in a recording “We

SEE FULL STORY ONLINE

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Wednesday, December 12, 2012

The Daily Free Press Fall 2012 Staff

Can you guess who’s who?

1. Kenshin Okubo - Staff Photographer 2. Abigail Lin - Photo Editor 3. Divya Shankar - Features Editor 4. Emily Overholt - Campus Editor 5. Lauren Dezenski - Online Editor 6. Steph Solis - Editor-in-Chief 7. Sydney Shea - Managing Editor 8. Amelia Pak-Harvey - City Editor 9. Meaghan Kilroy - Opinion Page Editor 10. Rachel Riley - Staff Writer 11. Megan Kirk - Staff Writer 12. Alex Diantgikis - Staff Writer 13. Abraham Kalaoun - Staff Writer 14. Sarah Fisher - Staff Photographer 15. Neel Dhanesha - Staff Photographer 16. Regine Sarah Capungan - Staff Writer 18. Kiera Blessing - Staff Photographer 19. Margaret Waterman - Staff Writer 20. Kaylee Hill - Spotlight Editor 21. Nora Philbin - Staff Writer 22. Taylor Burke - Staff Writer 23. Gina Curreri - Blog Editor 24. Katherine Lynn - Staff Writer 25. Zoe Roos - Staff Writer 26. Elvin Wong - Video Editor

27. Clinton Nguyen - Layout Editor 28. Sam Sarkisian - Staff Videographer 29. Sofiya Mahdi - Social Media Editor 30. Heather Goldin - Staff phographer, Videographer, Blogger 31. Sanah Faroke - Features Staff Writer 32. Amy Gorel - Associate Campus Editor 33. Jackie Robertson - Associate Photo Editor 34. Alex Caffentzsis - Staff Photographer 35. Brian Latimer - Staff Writer 36. Melissa Adan - Online Staff 37. Hilary Ribons - Blogger 38. Madeleine Atkinson - Staff Photographer 39. Seline Jung - Online Staff 40. Christina Janasky - Features Staff Writer 41. Chris Lisinski - Associate Campus Editor 42. Tyler Lay - Associate City Editor 43. Greg Davis - Associate Sports Editor 44. Jasper Craven - Associate City Editor

inclusive housing options despite the administration’s decision. My term as editor-in-chief had an early and unforeseen start, to say the least, but it enabled me and many others at The FreeP to reexamine our coverage and our relationship with students. Despite the challenges I’ve encountered, I’m glad that the opportunity to reassess things and work to build a better future for the publication so many of us have come to love. And we’ve had a number of high points too, from improving breaking news coverage, to the expansion of our online section. I leave

the office today feeling grateful for everyone who has contributed to the publication, from the writers who file three stories a week, to those at the forefront of the online team. I’m grateful for associates who push their other commitments aside for the sake of accurate and compelling reporting, for those who sacrifice summer vacation, class time and sleep. I leave the office today with the reassurance that every semester will bring new improvements. It’s been a fun semester, but it’s time that I take a good long look at my quotes on the wall and enjoy one last roll from Bertucci’s. Happy FreePend.

Letter from the Editor: Final Word

PHOTO BY ABBY LIN/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Part of me refuses to believe it’s been nearly two years since I first stepped foot into the office in the corner of 648 Beacon St. As a freshman, I was eager to get my stories on the front page in hopes that one day I would join the ranks of those quoted on the walls of The Daily Free Press’ newsroom. Fast forward a few semesters and I have a desk to call my own. In this short time I’ve called FreeP my home, I feel as though I’ve seen it all. I was lucky enough to witness The FreeP’s coverage of Occupy Boston, the Men’s Ice Hockey Task Force and a number of developments this year, including the New

Zealand accident, the Brookline armed robberies and most recently the fatal bicycle accidents and Boston University students’ push for gender-neutral housing options on campus. I’ve had the pleasure of seeing passionate reporters rise to the occasion when news breaks, no matter how difficult or time consuming. We’ve all had our fair share of Bertucci’s rolls and, some would argue, more than our fair share of sleepless nights. But I find that it’s all worth it when I witness the BU community come together in times of adversity and loss, or when we report on students’ push for more

The Daily Free Press Crossword

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C ampus & City BUSI, SJP give

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

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Study period can raise grades, profs. say SG pushes more both sides of changes through Israel-Palestine than past terms conflict at BU By Abraham Kalaoun Daily Free Press Staff

By Amy Gorel Daily Free Press Staff

The American community interested in solving the problems in the Israeli and Palestinian territories is key to an eventual solution, said Boston University professor Charles Dunbar. “I think it’s very important,” he said. “This is somewhat controversial, but I think that the Palestine problem will be solved and a state created physically, as well as politically as soon as the American community decides that it’s time.” Among the many cultural groups on campus, BU Students for Israel and BU’s chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine have been very vocal as issues in the Middle East continue. In light of the recent conflict in Israel and the Palestinian territories, SJP organized a die-in to display the idea that there are not two equal parties fighting against each other in this conflict, said Zena Ozeir, SJP president. “People are dying so the die-in was a peaceful way of protesting and bringing attention to the situation in Gaza,” Ozeir, a College of Arts and Sciences senior, said. Rachel DuShey, co-president of BUSI, said the war has been difficult

Israel-Palestine, see page 4

As finals week approaches at Boston University, a number of students said they use the time between the last day of classes and the start of final exams for purposes other than studying. “Study period is a time not only for study, but also to calm down after final papers and projects,” said Trisha Serquina, a College of Engineering sophomore. “It gives people a few days to clear their minds and focus on upcoming final exams.” However, Serquina said she does think study period can increase students’ performance on final exams. “For me personally, if I have a lot going on at once, I freak out and I do it all at the last minute,” she said. “But with study period, there is nothing to do but study. I don’t have any problem sets or papers. So study period helps me focus on what I have to do in order to be successful.” During study period, Serquina said she takes advantage of Mugar Memorial Library’s 24-hour sevices. “A bunch of friends and I often stake out a corner in Mugar,” she said. “Whenever one of us wants to go in, as it does get crowded, we save seats early. We also bring pillows and blankets because we spend a lot of time there. A lot of us are night owls anyway, so if we’re going to be up that late, Mugar is a good environment to be in.” There is a noticeable increase in the number of students usimg Mugar to study for finals, said Tom Casserly, director of undergraduate librarian

Warren’s political future debated By Nicole Leonard Daily Free Press Staff

Facing a partisan Congress and a campaign debt, U.S. Sen.-elect Elizabeth Warren will take her Massachusetts seat for the 113th session in January as a politician who students and experts describe as an outspoken voice for the left. Boston University assistant professor of political science Katherine Levine Einstein said since Warren has been involved with Washington, D.C., politics in the past, such as helping to form the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in 2010, she expects the senator-elect to continue focusing on consumer protection in the financial industry with left-leaning policies. “I wouldn’t be surprised to see her stake out positions as a senator, particularly on consumer protection, her signature issue, that place her at the left-most flank of the U.S. Senate alongside legislators like Vermont’s Bernie Sanders,” she said. Some politically active Boston University students said Warren would be an outspoken voice for the people, although others criticized her on her campaign’s debt. Derek Maka, a Boston University College of Arts and Sciences junior who interned with Warren’s 2012 senatorial campaign, said in an email that he voted for her because he supported the work she had accomplished regarding bank regulations prior to her candidacy for the U.S. Senate. “Seeing Warren question them from an official seat of authority will be very interesting and, I believe, satisfying,” he said. Rumors have appeared over whether Warren would be appointed to the Senate Banking Committee. Maka said Warren now faces the challenge of winning over Brown voters and earning a respected posi-

tion in Congress among the Senate veterans. “Having heard her speak on many different occasions, she has a very warm personality and will win over some Scott Brown voters,” he said. “With the Senate having a tradition of placing a great deal of respect in seniority, I could see Warren being scoffed at and ignored by more senior and conservative senators.” Warren released a letter to supporters on Dec. 5 asking for help in erasing her campaign debt that officials estimated to be around $400,000. Despite raising $42 million, the senator asked supporters for donations. This campaign debt is just one of the problems CAS junior and BU College Republicans vice chair Mara Mellstrom has with Warren. Mellstrom said she is worried Warren will not be willing to step over the line during voting in Congress. “To think that she plans to have any sway in talks of where our country is going economically when she is $400,000 in debt from her campaign is utterly abhorrent,” she said. “Elizabeth Warren will only act as a catalyst to the polarizing forces in Congress, voting with her party and being unwilling to pass bipartisan or Republican legislation.” Warren’s campaign had incurred a $35.7-million expense amount by mid-October, according to reports from the Federal Election Commission. CAS senior Josh Howard, who worked as an intern for Brown in the past and is a registered Independent, said he wanted to see how the campaigns measured up against each other in 2012’s election. He said he had never heard of the campaign debt as a major issue, SEE FULL STORY ONLINE

By Margaret Waterman Daily Free Press Staff

goes to Mugar to avoid poor study habits. “If I study in my room, there’s the bed and everything, so you tend to slack off at times,” Lee said. “At Mugar, everyone else is studying, so positive peer pressure influences you to study harder.” Although Lee said she has enough time to study for her exams, her friends in different schools might benefit from a longer study period. “When I see my friends in other schools, I feel that their exams are so close to each other,” she said. “They often get stressed out a lot. But some people also have assignments and projects until the last day of school, like me. So maybe study period could be longer.”

Boston University Student Government officials said they are pleased with their accomplishments during the fall 2012 term, including bus advertising, break busing and 24-hour study spaces. “Early in the year, we had a leadership symposium and got a bunch of underclassmen interested in Student Government,” said SG Executive Vice President and President-Elect Aditya Rudra. Since September, SG has approved vacation buses that will run in the spring 2013 semester, implemented student group advertising on the BU Shuttle, created 24-hour study spaces on campus, primarily in Shelton Hall, and built up student interest in SG, Rudra, a School of Management junior, said. “This semester we’ve accomplished, it has been said, more than many administrations have accomplished in an entire year,” said SG President and College of Communication junior Dexter McCoy at the last SG meeting of the semester on Sunday. Over the

SEE FULL STORY ONLINE

SEE FULL STORY ONLINE

PHOTO BY JACKIE ROBERTSON/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Some Boston University professors say the study period before finals can help students raise their grades as long as they stay motivated and focused.

services. “Most students are writing papers until the end of classes, so printing is always a popular resource,” Casserly said. “The building itself gets intensively used for student studying. It basically becomes an undergrad studying environment.” He said the social element affects the number of undergraduates who study for finals at Mugar. “Study, especially undergrad study, is much more focused on group study now, and this is an older building so it doesn’t always accommodate that well,” Casserly said. “So I’ve noticed that graduate students tend to be a little more solitary when they study. They prefer quieter, more intense study space.” Judy Lee, a College of Communication junior, said she sometimes

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Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Political science prof.: Liberalism ‘waning’ in 1980s Prof. recalls former peace group at BU Frank: From Page 1

said. He said nationwide equal marriage laws would have to come on a federal level, and would therefore need a favorable Supreme Court decision. University students, even those who identify as conservative, Kriner said, are widely in favor of LGBT rights. “Most conservatives that I talk to, it’s not where they are — they tend to be more socially liberal, but fiscally conservative — that’s why they still identify as conservative,” he said. Regarding Frank’s career, Kriner called him a “liberal lion” during a “conservative revolution.” “Liberalism was sort of waning as a political force in the early 1980s,” he said. “How interesting [it is] that Congressman Frank is elected during the Reagan revolution. He’s elected as a liberal lion at a time when conservatism is on the rise.” During Frank’s early days in Washington, D.C., he said, LGBT

advocates were still a minority. “With Congressman Frank, you end up with this very interesting liberal voice who cut his political teeth during the time of a conservative revolution,” he said, “and then has been there for this dramatic change in civil rights for gays and lesbians that I don’t think you could have anticipated in 1981.” Tim Buckley, spokesman for the Massachusetts Republican Party, would not speak directly to LGBT rights, but said party members are open-minded on many issues. “The MassGOP has always been a party of big ideas, encompassing a wide variety of opinions on social and fiscal issues,” he said in an email. As far as Congressional runs, he said the platform of Richard Tisei, of the sixth district, was notable. “One of the biggest races for the GOP last cycle here was Tisei for Congress — an openly gay man,” he said. “He also had the party’s nomination for lieutenant governor in 2010.” Katherine Levine Einstein, an-

other BU political science professor, said liberalism is largely a generational concept, and political change comes with the generational transition, with Millennials at the forefront. “If you look at public opinion data, Millennials are more liberal than Gen X–ers, who are generally more liberal than Baby Boomers, who are generally more liberal than the Silent Generation on certain issues,” she said. She said young adults born after the 1980s are “overwhelmingly, by most public opinion surveys, in support of gay marriage and LGBT rights more broadly.” Looking ahead to the future of LGBT rights, Levine Einstein and Kriner said youth voters are becoming increasingly liberal on same-sex marriage ideas. As far as his future, Frank said he plans on writing two books on liberalism and LGBT rights. But as far as his impact he left behind in Congress, Frank would say one thing. “When people start to talk about legacy, it sounds arrogant,” he said.

Petition: Students’ voices ‘silenced’ by GNH halt GNH: From Page 1

dent issues.” Gender Neutral BU’s petition stated the administration’s excuses are not sufficient. “The collective voice of the student body has been silenced,” the petition stated. “We understand the importance of other initiatives being undertaken by the university but it is unacceptable to disregard student priorities.” Gender Neutral BU created a

Facebook event Monday night for students to demand gender-neutral housing in person at BU President Robert Brown’s office. “The petition will be peacefully delivered, along with the original proposal written by Student Government, to President Brown on Friday at 12 p.m.,” Ninan said. “This is a demonstration to show the administration visibility of the group and the importance of Gender Neutral Housing to the BU community.” Elmore said administration must

still consider the possibility of gender-neutral housing. “Part of what we’ve got to do is make a decision whether or not it [gender-neutral housing] is possible,” he said. “Then we’ve got to have a conversation about whether or not we want to do it. I don’t think we’re even at a point where we’ve had that conversation ... we’ve got to make sure we look at feasibility.” Steph Solis contributed to the reporting of this article.

Israel-Palestine: From Page 3

for a lot of members of BUSI who had family and friends in the region. “It’s hard for us to deal with emotionally,” DuShey, a College of Communication junior, said. “While we’re dealing with that and trying to think of a proactive way to confront that on campus, SJP is doing everything they could to demonize Israel and their attempt to protect themselves.” Despite the political issues these groups are often associated with, both groups consider their goals to be more focused on the culture and history of their respective represented peoples. BUSI, a pro-Israel voice on campus, is a resource for the students on campus who are connected to Israel as well as the students who are interested in Israel culturally and politically, DuShey said. BU’s chapter of SJP was created to change the discourse on campus about Palestinian issues as well as humanize the Palestinian population, said Kareem Chehayeb, an SJP member. “The goal of our group is to raise awareness about the plight of the Palestinian people,” Ozeir said. Ozeir said SJP, which opened its chapter at BU four years ago, does not aim to act as a counterweight to BUSI. “We work not to combat any other group, but we work from our own position that the Palestinian people have their own rights that we hope to raise awareness about,” Ozeir said. Leora Kaufman, co-president of BUSI, said there has not been much dialogue between BUSI and SJP. “How are we supposed to accomplish anything in the real world

if people won’t sit down together and talk about things,” Kaufman, a COM junior, said. But Chehayeb, a CAS senior, said SJP does not have much interest in opening dialogues with BUSI. “For me, I don’t care so much about whether we talk or not, because I care about talking to people who are suffering,” Chehayeb said. “Our issue is not that they disagree with us or that we disagree with them, it’s to help people abroad.” Though Dunbar has not had much interaction with BUSI or BU’s chapter of SJP, he said he remembers in 2004 a Palestine Israel Peace Alliance group. “They were trying very hard to understand one another’s point of view, but it became eventually that the Palestinian woman quit with the view that the programming of things that they do was not balanced, there was too many pro-Israel events,” Dunbar said. In recent years, the Arab-Israel Peace Alliance, with a similar goal as PIPA, formed on campus to create a dialogue about topics concerning peace in the region. However, the group closed discussion in 2011 because students grew disinterested, said Gabriel Begun, a College of Engineering junior who joined AIPA in 2009. In light of the violence and ensuing ceasefire in Gaza, Begun organized a dialogue on Nov. 29. Begun said there was a reason now to have an open forum for discussion of these topics and welcomed both the BUSI and SJP students, from which students of both groups came. “I definitely agree that having this SEE FULL STORY ONLINE

Riley: Cuts detrimental, but BU to compensate loss through grants Fiscal Cliff: From Page 1

demonstrating federal research funding in Massachusetts could be cut up to $3.1 billion dollars for longer than five years. “This [cuts] would have severe consequences for research institutions in Massachusetts,” they wrote. “The effects of this drastic ‘reset’ of research support may drive a generation of young talent to other fields as they seek to establish reliable career paths.” While Brown and other university and hospital leaders are advocating the importance of federal research funding, officials understand the depth of the issue, said BU spokesman Colin Riley. “This is the biggest single issue in government today,” he said. “Every single sector of business, nonprofit, retirees, everyone is weighing in and our organizations, the higher education organizations are weighing in.” Riley said while the cuts will be unfortunate, BU will adjust and there will be increased competition for research grants. Richard Doherty, president of the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities in Massachusetts, said schools cannot be expected to easily adjust to a decrease in funding. “The problem is schools can’t

simply take up the full slack of the federal government walking away from their commitment or investment in research or financial aid or other programs,” he said. Doherty said while Federal Pell Grants are protected from the fiscal cliff, the wider effects of a failure to compromise could have implications for student enrollment. “I think the thing folks are scared about is that a non-resolution prescribes a level of economic uncertainty and potential downturn that would then cause families to have to reassess whether they are in a position to continue to support their student who is in college,” he said. Despite the political nuances, Doherty said he is optimistic lawmakers can reach a compromise. Massachusetts college and hospital leaders wrote in their letter research funding must be protected and prioritized. “We hope you will work together with your colleagues to adopt balanced deficit reduction strategies that view investment in research as a part of the budget solution rather than simply as an expenditure,” they wrote. “Support for federal research funding helps to ensure our nation’s health, prosperity, and international competitiveness. It has never been more important.”

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SPOTLIGHT Babysitting jobs Not just for high schoolers anymore By Alex Diantgikis Features Staff

PHOTOS BY SARAH SIEGEL/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Babysitter Mara Berg reads to Katherine, a four year old, who is eager to learn at the library. This is one of their regular activities they enjoy.

Katherine, you can’t do that!” said College of Communication senior Mara Berg, as 4-year-old Katherine reached a hand out toward a windowsill display of empty wine bottles. This is the struggle of a babysitter working out of her dorm room. Across Boston University, students try to find flexible jobs that fit into their schedules, pay the bills, but do not detract from study time. It seems like a daunting task, but many students find that babysitting positions offer the perfect solution. Typical schedule Berg said she babysits Katherine two days a week for a total of six hours and makes $15 an hour. She babysat in high school for a little while, but it was not the experience that drove her to the job. The combination of the financial benefits and the Berg said she typically brings Katherine to the park or the Boston Public Library after picking her up from school, but now that it is getting colder, she frequently brings Katherine back to her dorm room in the Student Village I. “When it was nice out in the beginning of the year, it was easy to just kill three hours at the park with her,” Berg said. “But now, it’s really cold out and I’m not going to stay out in the cold with her for three hours. It’s just easier to take her home. I can’t just wander around Boston with her.” BU helps babysitters The BU Student Employment Office posts more than 5,000 jobs each year and about 12 percent of those jobs are in the childcare category, said Bethany Sheldon, student job service manager. “We receive a total of at least 30 childcare positions per month and sometimes as many as 120 childcare positions in a month,” Sheldon said. “Over the past year, 27 students reported that they were placed into Quickie Jobs in the childcare category, but multiple students may show interest in and take out a referral on the same job.” She said that based on the number of repeat employer and new employers received each

year, employers are successfully able to fill their childcare needs through BU. “We post childcare positions for employers across the Greater Boston area,” Sheldon said. “We believe employers choose to list their childcare positions with us because we have a wide pool of candidates to choose from and the chances of them finding a student who fits their requirements are great.” Getting past security Berg said she had never heard of other students bringing kids to their dorms to babysit and that she did it mainly for convenience. “It’s always funny bringing her back to StuVi though because nobody is used to seeing a little 4-year-old walking around,” Berg said. “But the security guards always smile and people always look at me in the elevator like, ‘Is this your kid? What is she doing? Does she live in StuVi?’ But, it’s funny.” Berg said it is easy to watch Katherine in her dorm because it is close to her school and Katherine can play with her computer or watch television. Sometimes, however, it is tricky to have a 4-year-old in a 20-year-old’s world. “My roommates love it. They think it’s so funny,” Berg said. “Well, they did love it and then she accidently peed on my couch once.” Parents perspective Wellesley resident Tara Ventura, mother of Katherine, 4, and Nicholas, 6, said she first posted for a babysitter on Sittercity.com. “I was looking for a part-time afterschool babysitter to pick up my son at school,” Ventura said. “A BU student answered the post and she ended up working for us for about a year. When she moved on to do an internship, she referred me to her fellow sorority sisters, which eventually led to Mara.” She said her main criteria for a sitter was having someone who lived close to her children so there would never be any transportation issues picking them up. Since she only needed part-time help, it was beneficial that local Boston students are looking for part-time work. “Katherine loves Mara,” Ventura said. “I like her energy and they have a good relation-

ship. We will need Mara until Katherine finishes up kindergarten.” Ventura said she does not mind Katherine spending time in Mara’s apartment as long as she does not spend too much time playing video games. “Katherine loves Mara and asks me if we can have her over to our house to play,” Ventura said. “She always tells me what they do together during their time. She really does like spending time with Mara.” Another student view Coleen McCarthy, a Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences junior, also works as a babysitter. She currently works with two families. One makes appointments when they need a sitter and the other is a regular oncea-week job, she said. McCarthy said she found both jobs through friends who could no longer work for the families and referred her to them. She said she is looking to work with children in future as a

part of her career field, so the job was a perfect match. “I really love working with kids and I’m also studying occupational therapy,” McCarthy said. “It’s a good job to have because it’s not very demanding. I only have to work a couple of hours and still make a good amount of money. It’s kind of nice to have a job that is very flexible and it’s pretty easy for me.” McCarthy said she does not want to work a lot of hours because she has a demanding class schedule and would not have time to work a lot. She said it is convenient that her weekly babysitting job is located close to campus so that she can go straight from class to the family’s apartment. Playtime with kids Berg said before she took this babysitting job, she mainly babysat middle school kids and never spent much time with young children. She took the job primarily because it was a good way to make money while still in school. However, she has found it is enjoyable as well. “It actually serves as a really nice break from my week,” Berg said. ”I always have a trillion projects that I’m working on and things to do, but when I’m with her, I’m just with her. All she wants to do is ‘play!’ and ‘pet dogs!’ Literally, it can take me up to 30 minutes to walk one block with her because she wants to pet every single dog she sees. Walking to the park, she literally stops and needs to pet every single one and I’m totally chill with just spending an hour petting dogs.” Berg said Katherine is creative and imaginative. She said Katherine often makes games up to play and entertains herself. “Yesterday she was eating Goldfish and was playing with them, giving them all names and making them swim,” Berg said. “It’s a whole different world, because for me, I think of Boston as my college town and only surround myself with people my age, but there’s just this whole other world and community with her.” McCarthy said she tries to have lots of activities to keep the children entertained while their mother is at work. She said she loves playing with the children and especially painting their nails. “I guess just hanging out with a 3-year-old kid is funny because they say funny things,” McCarthy said. “They’re just so hyper and excited. It’s kind of refreshing to just hang out with a 3-year-old because I’m around 20-yearolds all the time and all their drama and stuff, so it’s kind of nice for things to be simple.”

PHOTOS BY SARAH SIEGEL/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Mara Berg takes Katherine for an eye-opening walk through Boston after picking her up from school.

6W

ednesday,

December 12, 2012

Opinion Beantown bliss

The Daily Free Press

The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University 42nd year F Volume 84 F Issue 55

Steph Solis, Editor-in-Chief Sydney L. Shea, Managing Editor Lauren Dezenski Online Editor

Emily Overholt, Campus Editor

Amelia Pak-Harvey, City Editor

Kevin Dillon, Sports Editor

Meaghan Kilroy, Opinion Page Editor

Divya Shankar, Features Editor

Abigail Lin Photo Editor

A

Cheryl Seah, Advertising Manager Clinton Nguyen, Layout Editor Shakti Rovner, Office Manager The Daily Free Press (ISSN 1094-7337) is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year except during vacation and exam periods by Back Bay Publishing Co.,Inc., a nonprofit corporation operated by Boston University students. No content can be reproduced without the permission of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. Copyright © 2010 Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

Essay causes stir A teacher in France was suspended after he allegedly asked students to “write an essay from the viewpoint of a suicidal teenager,” according to an article from the BBC Monday. The controversial assignment was distributed to two classes of 13and 14-year-old students back in October, but it was not until after the students and their parents complained that the teacher was suspended. Some members of the community where the incident took place said the teacher presented the subject well, according to an article in The Huffington Post Tuesday. We disagree — while some of us might experience feelings of self-loathing or disgust from time to time, asking anyone, especially young teenagers, to recall those feelings for the sake of a grade or experimentation seems highly inappropriate. To say that the teenage years are challenging is no overstatement. By the end of their teen years, about 20 percent of young people will have struggled with depression, according to a statement on the Fami-

lies for Depression Awareness website. Suicide is the third leading cause of death of people between 15 and 24 years old, according to the Center for Disease Control. To ask young students who might be struggling with these issues to rehash them in class seems callous, at best, and could have major psychological consequences. It is also worth looking into what the teacher’s motivations were. How did the teacher intend to use the assignment? Was it something that was going to be distributed among classmates? One would hope not, as it would seem like a serious breach of privacy. Also, how was the teacher going to calculate grades? By how harshly students addressed themselves? That seems severe. Teenage depression and suicide are serious issues that need to be discussed. However, asking students to write their own suicide notes is not an appropriate way to address these issues.

Constitutionality of pro-life plates

A federal judge has deemed North Carolina’s Choose Life license plates unconstitutional, according to an article in CNN Tuesday. Since the state does not offer alternative, pro-choice plates, the Choose Life plates “constitute viewpoint discrimination in violation of the First Amendment,” the judge wrote in the court ruling Friday, according to CNN. Choose Life is a nonprofit that assists states that want to sell the specialty plates and currently, 29 states sell Choose Life plates. In 2011, the bill making Choose Life license plates available in North Carolina was passed. At the same time, amendments to create alternative pro-choice license plates were shut down. The judge’s ruling makes sense. License plates are distributed by the state. By passing out plates that represent only one side of an issue, the state gives members of that side an unfair advantage. If license plates addressing the abortion issue are going to be offered at all, they should be designed to reflect all sides of the issue. Residents should have equal opportunities to express themselves. Denying

some residents that opportunity is unconstitutional. The effectiveness of these plates is also something that should be addressed. Are these plates worth the hassle? Perhaps not. If the initiative behind the plates is to sway other drivers to adopt a pro-life or pro-choice stance, this seems like an ineffective way of doing so. A few words on a piece of metal hardly seem convincing. Initiating talks on the subject seem like a more effective way to encouragesomeone to take one side over another. Also, who says pro-life or pro-choice messages can only be displayed on license plates? If residents are intent on displaying these messages on their cars, they can purchase on bumper stickers or other items that are not issued by the state and are subject to their restrictions. The state seems to have shot itself in the foot here. Measures to provide alternative pro-choice license plates were proposed and shut down. While the court has confirmed their error, it is something that the state should have realized earlier on.

RACHEL CHISTYAKOV

fter I take my last final on Dec. 18, I’ll be boarding a plane to spend about a month at home in California. For a while I have been counting down to this day, and I thought I would never be able to contain my excitement. I believed that finals week was going to go by smoothly soon because soon I would be traveling back to my family and back to the comfort of my own house. But my excitement has completely disappeared. I don’t want to go home as eagerly as I used to. I find myself wishing that I had more time here to spend with my friends before I start second semester. Once I come back, I start sorority recruitment, and my schedule will become so hectic. I’ll have to start taking brand new classes (like many other unlucky freshmen, I got stuck with an 8 a.m.) and get to know new teachers. It’s scary to think that the schedule that I am so used to following this semester, both for my classes and for my social life, will change completely. I don’t want it to change. I don’t want to start all over again with a new semester. And mostly, I don’t want to go home. Going home is the affirmation that second semester is around the corner. It also means that I have to face all of the people I tried to avoid in Los Angeles. If I had a hard time going back for Thanksgiving break, which was less than a week, then I will definitely have a difficult time going back for three weeks. I had planned to visit so many different locations with my friends, spots that we used to go to when we were all together in high school. But the excitement of revisiting these places has worn off, and I no longer look forward to it. Of course I’m still looking forward to seeing my friends, but just like Thanksgiving break, I know that every time we hang out, things will be awkward. We have all pretty much found our place in college and have settled in to a new home with new friends. Going back home to the people and places that hold old memories might seem exciting for most people, but to me, it just makes me scared. Looking back, I am so surprised that I did not fall in love with Boston earlier.

It’s as if I did a complete 180. For a while, I felt that my sadness about being so far away from home would never disappear. I thought it would lead me to transferring to a school back home, something I never thought I would want to do. I was stuck in a negative mindset and no one could get me out of it, especially not myself. But I was finally able to pull myself out of this depression. I was able to see all the wonderful things that Boston and Boston University could offer me. My negative mindset completely dropped, and I was looking at everything with a new, positive perspective. I didn’t have to follow any mantra or read any self-help book about getting adjusted into college. It just occurred to me that the place that I’m living in is not as bad as I thought it was. In fact, it’s much better than the place I grew up in originally — cleaner air, less traffic (hard to believe but it’s true) and friendlier people. Although I will always love L.A. (because who doesn’t instantly fall in love with our lovely weather and laidback lifestyle?), I now have a new love for Boston. In many ways, it’s the polar opposite of my hometown. For a while, I thought I could never love a place that is so different from what I’m used to. I would obsess over my old pictures of my favorite places in L.A. I would listen to my Cali playlist all day, making my self upset that I wasn’t there anymore. I would try to ignore the cold weather and pull off tank tops and sandals and would then get disappointed that it was so freezing outside. But I knew that these habits would have to stop because no matter what I did, I would be in Boston for the year. So I did make myself stop. I made myself appreciate the new beauty around me. And now, I never want to leave this new place. My first semester at BU has been a hectic one, but it will definitely be one that I will always remember. Rachel Chistyakov is a freshman in the College of Arts and Sciences a weekly columnist for The Daily Free Press. She can be reached at rachelch@bu.edu.

Want your voice heard? Submit a letter to the editor to: letters@dailyfreepress.com

Terrier Talk Reflections

The Daily Free Press asked students for their take on Boston University’s pre-finals study period. Here’s what some of them said. INTERVIEWS AND PHOTOS BY SARAH FISHER

KATIE VOLKER

“The study period is really beneficial. It’s nice to have a break before exams start. - COM freshman

JOSH BRACKET

“I think it’s helpful. I wish it was longer though. We only have two days off plus the weekend.” - CAS junior

ADAM NYE

“Since we have a break, I’m going home, so it doesn’t make a difference.” - CAS freshman

ANNA SIMON

“I’m really happy about the days off. It allows me to sit down and look over all the stuff I missed during the semester.” - CAS sophomore

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

7

Marasco: Bowl selection system outdated, rewards easy schedules Marasco: From Page 8

What a mess. In society, we hold in regard those who go don’t actively seek the easy way out, who accept and meet challenges. Taking the easy road doesn’t get you anywhere. In college football? Just schedule the saddest, most pathetic array of 12 teams you can find and be awarded with a BCS bowl berth. The biggest head-scratcher of all is why the FBS insists on watering-down its own product. Everyone wants to see top teams clash. Duh. So what does the FBS do? It employs a system where we get a matchup between Northern Illinois and Florida State in the Orange Bowl. Next. That’s a blowout. That’s

awful television. I went to the Orange Bowl official website. It’s too embarrassed to even mention the matchup on their own homepage. Seriously. Ok, what about Florida? It narrowly missed a spot in the title game. You could make a case that it’s the best team in the country. Who’s Florida playing in the Sugar Bowl? Louisville? Really? Another blowout. Another joke matchup. Another potential great game lost in the muck of college football mediocrity. I think it’s time to nuke this pathetic excuse for a postseason. The biggest problem is how archaic, and quite frankly stupid, the “automatic bid” system is. Why does the Big East even get an automatic BCS spot? The Big East stinks. None of

those teams should be in a BCS game this year. Look at Louisville’s schedule. It beat 3–8 Missouri State. It beat 3–9 Florida International. It beat 0–12 Southern Miss — barely. It beat 3–9 South Florida by two points. It lost to Syracuse and UConn. Does that sound like a BCS team? 8–5 Wisconsin is in the Rose Bowl because they won the Big Ten. Sure, the Big Ten is a historically relevant conference, but who cares about 1953 when you’re slotting teams in 2012 postseason matchups? The Big Ten stunk this year. Sorry, Big Ten fans, it stunk. That doesn’t mean it always will, or even that it will next season, but this year it was lousy. Your champion is 8–5. There

doesn’t need to be a Big Ten team in the Rose Bowl this season. We abandoned dial-up Internet. We abandoned 8-track players and rotary phones. Why do we still cling to these “traditional” conference matchups? Don’t we want really good teams playing other really good teams? Georgia, LSU, South Carolina — all left out of the BCS picture. To make room for Louisville, Northern Illinois and Wisconsin? Would you rather see Stanford play Wisconsin or Stanford play LSU? Or Georgia? Would you rather see FSU play Northern Illinois or play South Carolina? Why do 6–7 teams need to play in bowl games, and why do BCS games need to include every conference? It’s like we’re in kindergarten.

Every kid has to get a ribbon. Duke, Rice, Air Force — these teams are mediocre (at best). They don’t merit postseason games. And crappy conferences don’t deserve automatic passes to clog up spots in BCS games. A bowl game is no longer something that carries any relevance. We’re just told it is by ESPN. A meaningless game between two marginal teams doesn’t become something relevant just because we call it the “Little Caesar Bowl.” Some hokey trophy for the winning team doesn’t make the “Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl” any less pathetic. Just because your girlfriend likes “Twilight” doesn’t mean it’s good. “Bowl season” is a joke.

BU enters Irving, Terriers fall short of winter break Crimson on last-second shot on hot streak Men’s basketball: From Page 8

was failing to extend the lead by capitalizing on the other end. Once again, Chambers came up big for the Crimson as he pulled up for three in front of Maurice Watson Jr., converted on a four-point play and brought the quiet Crimson crowd to its feet. Harvard made quick use of the bit of energy from the crowd and took the lead with 14 minutes remaining, capping off an 18–9 run with a 3-pointer from Webster. “We knew they were gonna go on a run,” said BU coach Joe Jones. “They’re a good team. They’ve got good players … I was proud of the way we were resilient, able to hold them off and put ourselves in a position to win.” From that point on, the two went back and forth exchanging baskets, as well as the lead. Each team had big plays, such as Irving’s four-point play to give BU a 52–50 lead 11:20 into the second half.

Women’s hockey: From Page 8

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Junior goalie Kerrin Sperry was named Hockey East Co-Defensive Player of the Week for her performance against the Minnesota-Duluth.

the Terriers do not play another game until after the New Year. The team will head into the break on a six-game undefeated streak. When BU returns to the ice on Jan. 8, it will face off against the University of Connecticut for the first of three meetings this season before it heads into a weekend series in Orono, Maine, against the University of Maine. The game against UConn (2– 14–2) will serve as the first time the two teams have met since the end of the regular season last year, when BU completed a series sweep of the Huskies. In the final weekend before the Hockey East Tournament, the Terriers took a home-and-home series from UConn, taking the first game in a 3–2 overtime duel before winning a 2–1 decision at Walter Brown Arena.

“He played terrific. I was very proud of the guy’s effort,” Jones said. Things remained close until the final buzzer, as BU trailed by one with five seconds remaining and no timeouts. Irving, who had been BU’s go-to guy all game, took the ball down court, found some space and attempted one last shot, which did not go in. Irving finished the contest as the Terriers’ top scorer, adding 24 points and two rebounds. Morris posted his secondcareer double-double, recording 15 points and 12 rebounds in the effort. The 6-foot-7 forward also blocked two shots and earned a steal. The tough loss for the Terriers was their fourth loss by three points or fewer on the season. “I thought it was a great college game. Both teams played hard, just a great college game and we came up short,” Jones said. “We’ve lost three games now at the buzzer, it’s been unfortunate.”

Men’s basketball loses 4th game by 3 points or fewer in non-conference play Adjustments: From Page 8

on Dec. 1, BU was able to get its second win of the season with a 74–66 victory over the Peacocks (4–5). The Terriers led the entire game and freshman guard Maurice Watson Jr. was able to put up 21 points while also tallying seven assists. Watson was honored later that week with America East Rookie of the Week honors. The streak continued when BU was able to defeat Coastal Carolina for the second time on Dec. 6 on the road, 69–63. Senior forward Dom Morris scored 18

points in the victory. BU faced its toughest test Tuesday at Harvard University at Lavietes Pavilion. The first half started sloppily with both teams having numerous turnovers and missing wide-open shots. BU also got into foul trouble early with nine fouls in the first half and two for sophomore guard Malik Thomas within the first 90 seconds of play. Even with the less than spectacular play, BU was able to lead, 32–25, at half. The second half was a different story. Harvard came out firing

and got out to a lead to start the half. It seemed this would be Harvard’s half. “In the second half we couldn’t stop them as much,” said BU coach Joe Jones. “Defensively we just weren’t as good and that really hurt us. In the first half I thought we controlled the game, but in the second half I think they were in control.” BU climbed back, tied the game and went on a run of its own. But minutes later, Harvard, feeding off energy from the home crowd, was able to tie the game

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and keep the contest close until 65–64, leaving BU at 3–6 on the the very end. season. “The game started to be con“We come up with three stops trolled by their tempo because we late this year we are having a didn’t get stops,” Jones said. good year,” Jones said after the In the last minutes, Irving game, referring to the season drained a two-point field goal to opener against Northeastern and put the Terriers up, 64–63, but the game against George Mason there was time left on the clock. (7–3), both of which came down Harvard scored with five seconds to a last possession in which the left thanks to guard Siyani Cham- Terriers could not get a stop. bers. Irving, determined to not let If the Terriers could have the streak die, hustled down the gotten those stops we would be court, had a good look,Puzzle but the Maker looking at a Terrier team that is Sudoku ball did not fall for the Terriers 6–3 and on a four-game winning and Harvard pulled out the win, streak.

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Quotable

We come up with three stops late this year, we are having a good year. -BU coach Joe Jones on his team’s close losses so far this season.

Page 8

The Empty Net

Bowl cut

Sports The Daily Free Press

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Close

The Boston University men’s basketball team fell one basket short of topping Harvard, losing 65–64 on the road. P.8.

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Men’s basketball falls short to Crimson 65–64 Terriers fall to Harvard on road

BU suffers 3rd buzzerbeater loss

By Christopher Dela Rosa Daily Free Press Staff

Frank Marasco An old friend of mine contacted me recently to see if I wanted to compete with him and a few other comrades in ESPN’s “College Bowl Mania”. Admittedly, “Bowl Season” does not excite me at all — it’s a watered-down mess of teams I could care less about — but I accepted the offer, as I thought it’d be a fun way to keep in touch with those guys. But good lord … when I scrolled through that list of matchups I could not believe what I was looking at. It was like when my girlfriend made me watch “Twilight” with her in high school. I mean I expected it to be awful, but it was so much worse than I could’ve ever imagined. 6–6 Rice vs. 6–6 Air Force. That’s a postseason game? East Carolina vs. LouisianaLafayette is a postseason game? Ohio vs. Louisiana Monroe? 6–6 Pitt vs. 6–6 Ole Miss? Duke vs. Cincinnati? Does being in a “bowl game” mean anything at all at this point? Georgia Tech is in the Sun Bowl. It has a losing record! Why should anyone care about “bowl season?” It’s an absolute and utter sham. In fact, the entire bowl selection system has become that bad joke you wish your dad would stop telling every Christmas Eve. Northern Illinois is playing in BCS bowl — a “bowl championship” game. Northern Illinois. The team that lost to the 4-8, powerhouse, Iowa. The team that beat juggernaut, 2–10, Army by one point. Here are some other elite squads that NIU beat this year: 1–11 Kansas — barely, 1–11 UMass, 4–8 Buffalo, 1–11 Akron, 2–10 Eastern Michigan, 4–8 Western Michigan … NIU’s “signature win”? They beat Kent State in double OT. Kent State got routed by Kentucky. Kentucky went 2–10 this year. NIU beating Kent St. is one con-man out-frauding another. Now they’re part of the “bowl championship.”

Marasco, see page 7

The Boston University men’s basketball team took the short trip over to Lavietes Pavilion in Allston to take on Harvard University Tuesday, and fell to the Crimson 65–64. The Terriers (3–6) entered the game looking to pick up their fourth victory in a row and continue their hot streak as the first half of the season nears its end. Meanwhile, the Crimson (5–4) were trying to rebound following a tough 57–49 loss against the University of Connecticut. The Crimson scored after winning the tip with a tough shot from senior guard Christian Webster. The Terriers followed with a score of their own as junior forward Dom Morris backed his way into the paint to tie up the game. With a little less than 13 minutes remaining in the first half, both teams were knotted up at eight, due to a high amount of turnovers and simple mistakes. From then, the teams went into a stalemate, missing shot after shot on top of fouls and traveling violations, which ultimately led to a three-minute scoring drought. Harvard guard Syani Chambers gave Harvard a 10–8 lead, which BU followed again with a score by none other than Morris. The two continued exchanging scores. Leading the offensive charge for BU was junior guard and co-captain D.J. Irving, who made an early 3–pointer and then took it upon himself to keep BU knotted with Harvard. For the most part, the first half for these two teams consisted of defense, turnovers and missed shots.

No Events Scheduled Andrew Bynum made news despite his injury when he was seen sitting courtside sporting his newest hair style...

By Michael Bagarella Daily Free Press Staff

clock and waiting until the best shot arose. That shot came when Chambers pulled up from deep to bring Harvard within four. BU responded with a layup from Travis Robinson. At the 3:42 mark of the second half, BU seemed as if it was going to start extending its lead, as it continuously forced Harvard to miss shots on the other end and it

Since its home loss against George Washington University on Nov. 17, the Boston University men’s basketball team was only a last-second bucket from senior guard D.J. Irving away from a four-game win streak. Instead, the Terriers fell to Harvard University on the road Tuesday night and lost after its three-game winning streak. The strong play from BU came after their loss to George Washington University, in which the Terriers were embarrassed in front of their home fans. BU traveled to New Brunswick, N.J., to take on Rutgers University and fought until the last possession. After a flagrant foul on BU, the Scarlet Knights (7–2) pulled out the close game, 81–79. Four days later on Nov. 24, BU lost another close game at George Mason University, 48–45. Even after an 0–5 start, the first win for the Terriers was imminent. In their second home game of the season, the Terriers played host to a very good Coastal Carolina University team. Eager for the first win of the season, the Terriers defended the Chanticleers (2–5) to the brink and held the high scoring team to only 44 points. The Terriers were able to put up 74 points and defeated Coastal Carolina to get their first win of the season. It was surprising that the win ended up starting a four-game winning streak for a Terrier team that seemed destined for a lackluster season, starting 0–5. Against St. Peter’s University

Men’s basketball, see page 7

Close games, see page 7

JACKIE ROBERTSON/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Junior forward Dom Morris posted a double-double with 15 points and 12 rebounds in BU’s 65–64 loss to Harvard.

BU’s defense was all over the place. It kept Harvard to a 33 percent field goal percentage in the first half, but could not play clean defense as it finished the half with nine fouls. Meanwhile, each team committed seven turnovers by the end of the first half, but BU led the Crimson by a score of 32–25. Harvard opened up the second half by playing deep into the shot

Notebook: Despite injuries, Poulin fastest to centennial mark By Meredith Perri Daily Free Press Staff

As the No. 6/7 Boston University women’s hockey team skated to a tie with the University of Minnesota-Duluth on Saturday, junior co-captain Marie-Philip Poulin had two assists in what would become a historic night for both her and the Terriers (11–3–3, 6–2–1 Hockey East). As senior defenseman Kathryn Miller tallied her first goal of the season, tying the game just a minute and a half after the Bulldogs had taken the lead, Poulin earned her 100th career point. Unlike any other Terrier before her, Poulin took just 58 games to reach the milestone, making her the fastest person to reach 100 points in the program’s history. “It’s great for her, and it’s an-

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other accomplishment that she has in her great hockey resume,” said BU coach Brian Durocher after the game. “I’m sure she deflects some of the credit to [senior forward Jenelle Kohanchuk] and [freshman forward] Sarah Lefort and her teammates here, but we all know she’s an outstanding player that helped us [Saturday] night to get a tie there in the first game of the series.” The Beauceville, Quebec, native could have reached this point even earlier in her career. However, several injuries over the course of her first two years with BU have sidelined her for extended periods of time. So far this season, Poulin has scored nine goals, which has her tied for second on the team, and she also has 19 assists. Poulin’s totals make

her second in point scoring in the Hockey East conference.

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Saturday, Dec. 15

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Super Sperry After a week where she gave up only two goals in the span of two games that went into overtime, junior goaltender Kerrin Sperry earned the title of Hockey East Co-Defensive Player of the Week. Over the weekend, Sperry stood in net for both ties against Duluth, giving up just two goals in the first game, and holding the Bulldogs scoreless in the second game. The shutout was her second of the semester, and the game featured Sperry tying a seasonhigh record of 38 saves during the game. “We needed Kerrin to make every one of the 38 or 39 saves

No Events Scheduled ... Rumor has it Justin Bieber influenced the hair-do, as well.

she made [on Sunday] and she was spot on strong,” Durocher said after Sunday’s game. After this past weekend, Sperry lowered her goals-against average to 2.30 and bolstered her save percentage, pushing it up to .916. Furthermore, the North Reading native will finish the first semester with a record of 10–2–3 and will have earned wins over three of the top-five teams in the country. Sperry has earned this honor from the conference two other times this season, taking home the title on Oct. 22 and Nov. 19. Take a Break After playing 17 games in the past two and a half months, BU will take off for winter break, as

Women’s hockey, see page 7

Sunday, Dec. 16 M. Basketball vs. Quinnipiac, 1 p.m.


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