Issuu on Google+

daniel j nelson architecture + design portfolio

contents undergraduate student work sketching + drawing addition to the farnsworth house library for the 21st century journey chapel transit oriented development

04 - 05 06 - 07 08 - 09 10 - 13 14 - 17

personal competition entries urban transducer operable seating

20 - 23 24 - 25

professional work tmc orthopedic institute hfhs ambulatory care center greenleaf residential 555 tower black + veatch corporate headquarters jcc bert walker hall renovation sau student services building

28 29 30 31 32 33 34 - 35

graduate student work aPLY ecological relationalism creative arts academy vulnerability seat

38 - 41 42 - 49 50 - 57 58

01

02 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

undergraduate student work judson university [fall 2006 - spring 2010]

sketching + drawing addition to the farnsworth house library for the 21st century journey chapel transit oriented development

04 - 05 06 - 07 08 - 09 10 - 13 14 - 17

03

sketching+drawing european study tour summer 2009 architectural drawing studio spring 2010

erechtheion athens

colosseum rome

04 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

ruins rome

rolling huts olson kundig

iit dorms helmut jahn

undergraduate student work

05

addition to the

farnsworth house an

project brief

sophomore_spring 2008 This project focused on designing a guest house for the historic Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois. Remaining primarily conceptual, concentration remained on the theory behind the original design: modernist aesthetics, function, materiality, and contextual relationships. The proposed design is meant to function as if an artist were living in the Farnsworth House and an addition was needed to house guests and a public art gallery, requiring a unique separation between private and public functions. Although not required to attach to the Farnsworth House, this design required at least close proximity.

10 07 06

04

01

05 03

01primary entrance 02art gallery [public space] 03exterior patio 04kitchen + dining 05living 06bedroom 07bathroom 08vehicular approach 09sculpture garden 10farnsworth house

transverse elevation

09

02 08

transverse section

06 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

design approach

Adding on to the Farnsworth House is in essence a destruction of its ideas; the simple modern house was placed in a wooded field in order to draw attention outside of itself and onto nature. Even placing another building on the site diminishes its power. So the placement of the proposed design is separated from the existing architecture, positioned sensitive to the prominent views of the surrounding nature. Providing correlation between the two, the proposed design is elevated and clad in glass in order to maintain focus on the natural environment. The proposed design further explores the simplified separation of spaces characteristic of the Farnsworth House. Dissolution of public and private spaces around an open courtyard and elevation changes are explored, with the most private space [bedroom] still set apart by a core. Louvers are also utilized for visual separation: maintaining openness to the exterior, they provide a greater sense of enclosure than just glass. The louvers are made of wood in order to unify nature with architecture, providing greater visual coherence than the original Farnsworth House.

section model

full model

longitudinal elevation

farnsworth house

sculpture garden

entry / art gallery

kitchen + dining

core

bedroom

longitudinal section

undergraduate student work

07

aias

library

for the

21st century

project brief

northwest perspective

As an entry for an AIAS national design competition, this project aimed to develop an innovative library design formally, functionally, and sustainably. The library has transformed into a community-oriented building type over the past years, and coupled with the increasing prominence of technology, it requires a new look. This design is sited in Geneva Illinois, replacing an old library. Requiring around 50,000 total square feet, this library functions as more than a resource center, but as a community gathering place.

southeast perspective

junior_fall 2008

west perspective

01

physical models

community auditorium

A

B 02

03

04

13

12

05 06

07

C

08

17

15

E 11

08 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

07main restrooms 08main stacks 09circulation to a/v stacks 10auditorium/lecture hall 11circulation to conference rooms

B 12children’s reading area 13children’s stacks

D 16

14

09

10

A 01primary entrance 02circulation desk 03cafe 04cafe lounge 05children’s play area 06circulation to children’s stacks

22

23

18

19

C 14couch reading area 15study rooms 16desk reading area 17a/v stacks

20 21

D 18administration conference rooms 19administration lounge 20administration offices 21administration restrooms

E 22multi-purpose meeting 23conference rooms

design approach

This design’s intentions are simple: bring a new excitement to the library building type as well as to the city of Geneva. Explored through the use of large cantilevered forms, a sense of wonder is invoked as the structural walking trusses are masked from the exterior observer by perforated screen systems that additionally control the amount of sunlight admitted to the interior spaces. The large cantilevers accomplish more than just creating visual excitement: they separate functions of the library. The large mass rising from the ground houses the primary library functions, while the intersecting ‘bars’ house additional functions. The two highest ‘bars’ require access after normal library hours; one accommodates administration and the other includes the community meeting and conference spaces. These spaces are provided with their own means of access in order to facilitate the extended access times.

southwest perspective

west elevation

south elevation

undergraduate student work

09

journey chapel air force village

project brief senior_fall 2009

This chapel was designed as an entry for a national design competition for San Antonio’s Air Force Village II. Located outside the city, this community functions as a retired air force base. The average age in the Air Force Village is 78 years, necessitating special consideration in both the functional design [accessibility on a single level] and acoustic considerations [providing clarity of sound in the sanctuary]. Additionally, the chapel is intended to house many different forms of worship, so it is designed in a way to not favor any one religion, although the main sanctuary houses primarily protestant and catholic services. Required to connect to an existing health care center, the new chapel should additionally become an architectural monument on the site, signifying the importance of faith and religion within the community.

awards

honorable mention

2009 afv chapel competition

second place

2010 aias chicago design award

chapel at night

10 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

primary entry courtyard

north elevation

design approach

the focal point defined Derived from the crossaxial vehicular approaches onto the site, an existing focal point centers the existing site design.

design process 01

02

03

04

05

the array Initial building form emerged from a radial array around the focal point, creating a north-facing fan shape that utilized northern daylighting and embraced the radial drive. the shifted focal point The design diverged from the existing conditions, shifting the focal point into the new chapel narthex. This signifies the architectural importance of the new chapel while partially maintaining the existing focal point in the planning. Locating the focus in the chapel fellowship area also symbolizes the centrality of community within the church. the journey The path to and through the chapel was inspired by the idea of a spiritual journey. Although all buildings incorporate some sort of journey, this chapel incorporates a path that is uniquely indirect so as to resemble a lielong religious journey: twists and turns exist that are meant to be taken slowly as they lead to religious community [narthex], and then to worship [sanctuary]. the heavenly focus The journey is architecturally defined by a series of skylights diffused by wood veneer panels that provide warm, soft light in the narthex and sanctuary spaces that focus each person’s attention upwards.

14 10

13 12

09

11

15

04 05

03 06

suburban context

07

08

air force village II

02

18 01

16

17

19

20

21

a multifaith chapel designed to deepen spiritual journeys from all walks of faith

01primary entrance 02administration 03catholic office 04senior chaplain’s office 05protestant office 06administrative restroom 07general storage 08narthex

site plan

22

09exterior courtyard 10secondary entrance 11audio visual room 12blessed sacrament 13multi-faith worship space 14exterior meditation space 15sanctuary 16health center connection

17men’s restroom 18women’s restroom 19catholic sacristy 20protestant sacristy 21mechanical room 22vehicular drop-off total building footprint:

12,500 sf

undergraduate student work

11

wood veneer light diffusers

Laminated wood panels emit a soft glow to provide warm daylighting throughout the entire chapel. Gaps between panels and ceiling trap solar heat gains transmitted through the skylights, maintaining cooler temperatures in the habitable spaces.

entrance ventilation

direct air supply ventilation system

Stack ventilation strategy for secondary entrance area immediately relieves heat gains that infiltrate through both the entrance doors and the skylights.

Under-floor system supplies fresh, cool air directly to occupants’ seats. Minimizes energy use and hvac noise [under-floor ductwork directly connects building spaces to mechanical room below chapel].

12 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

sanctuary worship space

sanctuary connection to health center

narthex

connection to existing building

narthex

primary entrance

administration

secondary entrance

luminaire design

acoustics analysis first order reflections

parametric solar study summer

Designed for the church narthex space, this luminaire mimics the architectural concepts: obscuring the light and throwing it vertically complements the heavenly focus. The materials also relate to the screen systems on the building exterior; the shared material palette incorporates both wood and rusted metal slats.

winter

7:00 am

position 01

9:00 am

12:00 pm

position 02

3:00 pm

narthex community space

undergraduate student work

13

transit development oriented

design process

01

02

03

04

project brief

senior_spring 2010 As sustainable living in American cities becomes an increasingly relevant issue, so increases the need for mixed-use buildings focused around public transit. Intended to create dense hubs around transit stops, Transit Oriented Developments incorporate many vital functions for city life in ways that encourage pedestrian interaction with the city streets. This T.O.D. [located in Chicago] is comprised of retail, office and residential functions, all focused around a CTA stop.

14 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

northeast perspective

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

12

13 final design

design approach This project is about connections. A conglomeration of retail, commercial, residential and public transit, this tower seeks to integrate + rejuvenate the city of Chicago. A direct link with the Chicago Transit Authority [CTA Blue Line] provides the city access to the retail shops and commercial spaces while providing residents access to the city. Each function is integrated, yet separated by green space, developing a relationship between nature + city and public + private in a natural, organic sense.

01 02

03

04

05 06

07

01typical retail unit 02typical live/work unit 03office lobby space 04greenspace + hardscaping 05residential lobby space 06cta blue line stop 07automated parking system

roof plan perspective

undergraduate student work

15

design components

01 cores

structural exoskeleton

vertical circulation

Constructed out of Ductal Concrete, a new type of concrete that utilizes metallic and organic fibers for unprecedented strength, this web-like exoskeleton carries structural loads on the building exterior, freeing the floor plates from columns.

rooftop greenspace

02

floor plates habitable spaces

03

glass enclosure building form

retail + office + residential + greenspace

residential

office greenspaces + blue line retail + live/work units

04

structural exoskeleton primary structural system

05

louver sunscreens shading system

06

building assemblage tower design

carries loads on building exterior

16 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

northeast elevation

southeast elevation

courtyard perspective

western approach

southwest perspective

west faรงade

northwest perspective

undergraduate student work

17

18 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

personal competition entries urban transducer operable seating

20 - 23 24 - 25

19

urban transducer evolo skyscraper competition 2010

design narrative winter 2009

All cities suffer from pollution that tarnishes not only their own quality but that of the planet. One pollutant often overlooked and rarely considered harmful is noise. Sound is simply energy, and as concluded from Newton’s law of the conservation of energy, this energy is not lost to nothingness upon absorption. It is instead transformed into different forms of energy, the most prevalent resultant being heat: a process potentially contributing to our planet’s rising temperatures as cities continue to grow and leak more sound. Why lose sound energy to unwanted heat gains when it can provide energy for essential building functions? The urban transducer utilizes noise pollution in Chicago by capturing airborne sound, converting it into usable energy, and using that energy to help power the skyscraper. This is achieved by acoustic panels that perceive present frequencies and tune metallic ‘bands’ to match the extant wavelengths, creating resonance through which energy is harvested from the noise. Each panel also remembers the most recurrent frequencies at its location, allowing preemptive adjustment to maximize efficiency. Noise also influenced the tower’s form and appearance. Sound is pure when created, but human perception is distorted by contextual influences. Reflecting this condition, the habitable spaces [public hubs and private pods] are pure, simple forms that are perceptually altered and distorted by the screen systems [sound + wind] that obscure their simple forms. Wind panels accompany the sound panels to optimize energy collection. Composed of miniature turbines, they harness all available wind power, even the most minute. Integrated throughout the entire tower, the wind panels are concentrated high [where wind forces are strongest and most consistent] and along the train tracks and roads [where transit creates airflow].

20 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

printed publication 2011

michigan avenue

south wabash avenue

cta green line

core

pods

hubs

structure

screens

Vertical circulation element that connects all the hubs and the private pods.

Two-story cubes function as private residences suspended between the public hubs. Arranged on a grid, they abut directly to each other in some spaces, providing flexibility for expansion.

Six large elements contain various public spaces. Open green space is located on the roofs and exterior areas of each. Functional spaces accommodated include: shops, restaurants, community recreation areas, and many other communityoriented functions. The lowest of the hubs provides a direct connection to the rail line to connect to the regional site. This hub also creates a tunnel around the train line for reverberation and wind collection.

Thin vertical structural elements support the entire screen system.

A screen system consists of two panel types: acoustic reverberation transducers and wind turbine converters. Each panel type transforms natural energy into electricity to help reduce the building’s utility expenses.

vertical circulation

private living

public spaces

screen support

energy collection

urban transducer

assembled tower Assembled building components: the core, public hubs, private pods, structural support and screens.

personal competition entries

21

concept sketch public hub aerial

private residential public retail

private residential

michigan avenue aerial

22 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

northwest street view

michigan avenue

building height 1200 ft

private residential public retail

acoustic panel

As the tower’s skin, the acoustic panels are provided maximum exposure to city noise. Contextual frequencies vary greatly in this urban environment, encompassing people [pedestrians + building inhabitants], vehicles, trains, and even aircraft. Each 15’ x 30’ panel contains multiple metal bands with individual tuners, allowing the bands to resonate at different frequencies. Tuning the bands requires sensors to be located throughout the building that constantly perceive present frequencies and inform the tuners how to appropriately adjust. The tuners function as clamps: they slide into position and compress, changing the

bands’ effective lengths and therein their resonant frequency [Coalescing the bands with the contextual frequencies maximizes vibration amplitudes, improving the efficiency of sound collection]. A magnetic rod wrapped in a copper coil runs the length of the metal strap, creating a magnetic field altered by every movement of the metal bands: a process called electrostriction. A piezoelectric transducer transforms the magnetic movements into an electrical current that is stored in a unit at the end of each band and then transferred to a building storage compartment that regulates the tower’s electrical needs.

wind panel

private residential

public commercial

private residential public dining

Also integrated into the skyscraper’s skin, wind panels are located in areas of greatest intensity. The densest collection occupies the top of the tower where wind forces are strongest and most consistent, and they are also located over the roads and train line to take advantage of airflow created by busy city transportation. To accommodate the sporadic nature of transit-produced wind, the turbines used are small and multi-directional: every small wind force helps create energy for the tower.

private residential

public commercial

private residential public retail

private residential public green space

personal competition entries

23

operable seating becker contest 2011

design narrative spring 2011

Versatility and simplicity are the drivers of this furniture design. Minimal pieces are provided that can resolve in a multiplicity of combinations; they can either create space or be created by a space. versatility The side track provides versatility for the units, acting as both a transforming and connecting element. The track may be utilized by cushions to provide comfort or shelves to provide functionality: both fully adjustable for greatest flexibility and personalization. The track can also connect separate units: connector pieces allow units to either stack or expand. simplicity The simple form provides many benefits: it aids the versatility by allowing repeated modules to stack and join while allowing the users to define its function[s], results in a greater ease of production, and is transportable to different environments.

printed publication 2011

24 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

units short unit

long unit

components connectors

shelf

cushion

personal competition entries

25

26 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

professional work

hobbs + black architects [july 2010 - may 2011]

tmc orthopedic institute hfhs ambulatory care center greenleaf residential 555 tower black + veatch corporate headquarters jcc bert walker hall renovation sau student services building

28 29 30 31 32 33 34 - 35

27

tucson medical center

orthopedic institute location tucson, arizona contribution design development / modeling / renderings

primary approach

west entrance

28 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

north gardens

entrance lobby

henry ford health system

ambulatory care center location riyadh, saudi arabia contribution scheme design / modeling /

renderings / graphics

takhassuisi street perspective

entry courtyard

vehicular dropoff

professional work

29

interior design competition

greenleaf residential location birmingham, michigan contribution planning / interior design / modeling / renderings / presentation

main living space

fifth level plan

30 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

kitchen

bedroom

555 tower

mixed-use renovation location birmingham, michigan contribution scheme design / modeling /

renderings / presentation

south perspective

northeast perspective

renovated retail

southeast perspective

professional work

31

black + veatch

corporate headquarters location ann arbor, michigan contribution planning / scheme design /

modeling / renderings / graphics / presentation

south faรงade Whitehall Drive Maintaining Existing Trees

rain

Green Roof

ga

rde

n

3 Levels

Covered Walkway 1 Level

Existing Pond

+ ing g ad din Lo nloa U

Storm Water Detention

Outdoor Patio Space

32 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

main entry

N

site plan

jackson community college

bert walker hall renovation location jackson, michigan contribution scheme design / modeling /

renderings / graphics

southern renovation

ground plan

northern expansion

northern expansion

professional work

33

spring arbor university

student services building location spring arbor, michigan contribution programming / planning / schematic design / design development / modeling / renderings / graphics / presentations / construction document review + coordination

current construction

northern expansion

main level plan

34 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

northern expansion

renovated south entry

dining renovation

dining expansion

dining expansion

dining expansion

student lounge addition

professional work

35

36 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

graduate student work judson university [summer 2011 - spring 2012]

aPLY ecological relationalism creative arts academy vulnerability seat

38 - 41 42 - 49 50 - 57 58

37

aPLY

USGBC 2011

natural talent design competition

project brief summer 2011

As an entry for the fourth annual Minnesota USGBC Natural Talent Design Competition, this project sought innovative ideas for sustainable living that not only stimulate green design development, but better communities. Required to stay within 1,800 square feet, this house could not exceed $150,000 for both material and labor [some volunteer], but also necessitated LEED Platinum requirements. Although desired to be transportable, the competition entries were sited on a small lot in Proctor, Minnesota; the winning designs helped serve as models for future residential construction in the region.

building layers

site analysis

38 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

concept diagrams

ply [n]:

A thickness or a layer. One of the veneer sheets forming plywood.

planning strategies

ply [v]:

To use or wield diligently. To practice or perform diligently. To bend, fold, or mold.

aPLY aims to achieve an affordable, sustainable

house. While utilizing features of the specific site, it remains transportable. Just as the seasons change, so do the building’s needs, consequently requiring acclamation. Like a snake sheds its skin, a tree loses its leaves, and a man shaves his beard, so the building adapts. This is achieved through layers of building systems [ply: n_layer] operated by the inhabitant [ply: v_to perform]. ground level

site plan + section upper level

graduate student work

39

southwest perspective

street approach

40 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

extended living space

budget analysis

solar strategies

ventilation strategies

kitchen + living space

thermal control

circulation space

south elevation

private spaces

west elevation

east elevation

longitudinal section

north elevation

graduate student work

41

urban analysis + urban design proposal

ecological relationalism project brief fall 2011

Comprised of both analysis and a design proposal, this project focused on a redevelopment of the Logan Square neighborhood of Chicago. The analytical phase comprised of a historical morphology analysis along with a wide range of examinations of existing conditions. Conclusions were drawn from these analyses, and concepts [“action plans�] were developed. The urban proposal that followed was intended to not only fix existing issues within the city infrastructure, but to explore innovative urban planning and living concepts.

proposed pedestrian street

current condition

42 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

ecological relationalism This urban design proposal intends to foster a multiplicity of relationships of various forms, all focused around an ecological renewal of an urban environment. Justified relationships include people/nature, nature/urban density, and people/ people. Achieved through differing implementations of nature, three strategies are explored: community agriculture, community corridors, and green infrastructure - phased in that order.

urban analysis

cold mapping

hot mapping

analytical conclusions

action plan

graduate student work

43

44 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

current condition community vertical agriculture structure

current condition

temporary agriculture infil

graduate student work

45

46 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

current condition natural prairie planting zone

community corridor + green infrastructure intersection

typical community corridor

graduate student work

47

48 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

current condition co2 cleanup street canopy

western street section

milwaukee street section

graduate student work

49

toronto wellness community

creative arts academy project brief spring 2012

Focused on revitalizing downtown Toronto’s disparate waterfront, this project comprised of a collaborative urban proposal and a building proposal from each of the eleven members of the studio.

03

02

The process began with an analysis of fresh water at the global, regional and local levels, followed by a visit to Toronto from which a specific region of the waterfront was selected to redevelop. Within the redeveloped area, eleven different building types were strategically located to be designed by each student to bolster the overarching intentions of the community while allowing room for creative liberty and personal exploration within the architecture.

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

07

04

01

06

05

09

08

10

11

existing conditions

50 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

100’

250’

500’

1000’

toronto wellness community

site selection As available fresh water diminishes as a precious commodity, maintaining the purity of its sources becomes imperative. Many cities along the Great Lakes’ coasts pollute this global resource [Great Lakes Basin contains 20% of the world’s fresh water supply], including the city of Toronto. In an effort to assist in counteracting the current detriment, this urban proposal is sited where it can help cleanse Lake Ontario’s largest tributary at its point of impact: the mouth of the Don River.

current view from site

Currently a nearly-barren industrial zone, the chosen site provides ample space for redirecting the mouth of the river to flow more naturally into Lake Ontario, eliminating the debris build-up that currently occurs while also minimizing the extent of demolition required to construct the new community. Selected by the city as one of the potential sites for future redevelopment, access to the downtown core is readily available by public and personal transit: an amenity reinforced by views of the core from the site’s waterfront. design approach Focused on the broad concept of wellness, this urban proposal addresses more than just ecological wellness in water filtration. Personal wellness is advocated on the individual and community levels through utilizing the river as an amenity that functions as an interstitial area between a dense urban fabric and a rural, pastoral landscape. Individual building proposals help define and unify this dichotomy both functionally and aesthetically.

current proposals

A dtah central waterfront B hines west precinct C mvva keating channel precinct D dtah pan am athlete village E judson lower donlands

commercial + retail offices

wellness division

residential greenspace

proposed urban zones

watercraft pedestrian

vehicular vehicular highway

proposed circulation

graduate student work

51

program breakdown

creative spaces //

34,000

general academics // residential //

sf

27,000 sf

30,000 sf

central courtyard

interior intersections

52 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

visual arts 10,000 sf

2d studios 3d studio open studio wood + metal shop photography lab digital studio faculty studios

[02] [01] [01] [01] [01] [01] [07]

music 7,000 sf

band studio choir studio md. rehearsal studio sm. rehearsal studio practice rooms faculty offices

[01] [01] [01] [02] [10] [05]

dance sf

3,500

lg. movement studio md. movement studio locker rooms faculty offices

[01] [01] [02] [03]

culinary arts 4,500 sf

demonstration lab production kitchen cafe + dining

[01] [01] [01]

creative arts academy

educational restructuring Stemming from a critique on current high school public education systems modeled after industrialized methods of learning that promote standardization and disconnection of subject matters, this revised education system intends to revitalize education with a focus on creative exploration of varying methods. relational overlapping Focused on creating and fostering relationships of differing forms on many levels, the programmatic pieces of this design were interrelated and overlapped with the overarching goal of embedding creative inspirations within the architectural design. Cultivated relationships include students to the urban community, people to nature, and the interplay of multi-sensory experience.

community relationships

overlap spaces

graduate student work

53

students + community overlap building exterior + street frontage

Addressing how the building functionally and architecturally meets the community.

southeast aerial view

southeast elevation

54 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

southwest elevation

northwest elevation

northeast elevation

design process

01

03

02

04

05

07

08

09

10

11

12

06

southeast corner plaza

southwest street approach

southwest streetfronts

northeast residential

graduate student work

55

people + nature overlap central courtyard space

Addressing how the building draws people in and incorporates natural elements through greenery and water.

informal creative presentations

56 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

approach to central courtyard

entry into central courtyard

sensory experience overlap interior creative intersected spaces

Addressing how the creative spaces overlap and create collaborative spaces for inspiration.

interior creative intersected space

section through central courtyard

building section through overlap space

graduate student work

57

vulnerability seat project brief fall 2011

Produced for a conceptual object design studio, this project explored the transition from concept design to full scale production. It entailed conceptual exploration, designing a functional chair around that concept, and fabricating the final product in full scale as if it were ready to be sold.

design approach This seat explores the concept of vulnerability in functionality, structure and aesthetics. In functionality, two people are brought into uncomfortably close contact with one another as they sit face-to-face. The structural vulnerability enhances this function as each individual chair supports itself as an individual object but fails in supporting a person, therefore requiring the other seat [and person] to function properly. The aesthetics also appear vulnerable in that participants’ backs are exposed due to minimal use of material and the material is left bare and unadulterated.

design process

58 d.nelson | architecture + design portfolio

final built product


2012 graduate architecture + design portfolio