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2013 COURSE CATALOG

2015 PAGE 1

2013-2015 Course Catalog

2013 COURSE CATALOG

2015 You can help CTS. Refer students to www.cts.edu/admissions. Donate generously at www.cts.edu/donate.

1000 West 42nd Street Indianapolis, IN 46208 317.924.1331

www.cts.edu

table of CONTENTS WELCOME. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Course & Faculty Information

Field I: Bible. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9

Field II: History of Global Christianity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Mission

Field III: Systematic & Philosophical Theology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

History

Field IV: Christianity and Culture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Relationship to the Church Accreditation Changes to Catalog Information Weapons Policy CTS Policy for a Drug-Free Campus

Academic Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Worship at Sweeney Chapel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Field V: Pastoral Theology and Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Field VI: Christian Ministries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Interfield Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 S.C.U.P.E. Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Special Education Opportunities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66-68

AMERC - (X 731) Jewish Chatauqua Society LifeLong Theological Education

Degree Programs

Overseas Study Options

Master of Divinity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Petticrew

Master of Arts in Multicultural Christian Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Guided Research

Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Supervised Concurrent Field Education (SCOFE)

Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Clinical Pastoral Education

The Master of Theological Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Doctor of Ministry

Doctor of Ministry in Pastoral Care. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Doctor of Ministry in Psychotherapy and Faith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Doctor of Ministry in Marriage and Family Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Lay Certificate Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 DUAL Degrees

MDIV/MAMHC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

CPE Registration (Level 1, Level 11 CPE) Supervisory Clinical Pasotoral Education [CPE] Religion and the Arts Library and Congregational Resource Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Contact The Library and CRC

Bookstore. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Special Orders Discounts and Sales Charge Accounts and Consignments

MDIV/MAMFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 MDIV/MTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 MDIV/MAMCE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

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Table of Contents

OFFICE OF RECRUITMENT and Admissions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75

Procedures and Requirements Application Deadlines

Student Life. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76

Application Review

Housing

Advance Standing

Hospitality House

Transfer Credit

Counseling Services

Conditional Admission International Student Admissions

Student Groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76

Non-Degree and Audit Admissions

Affinity

Non-Baccalaureate Admissions

Black Student Caucus

Tuition at Other Institutions

Hispanic Latino/a Student Association

Special Class Fees Senior Citizens Deferred Payment Payment Policy Veterans Tuition Refund Standard Refund Schedule Refund of Title IV Funds Books Payment of Fees and Graduation Fees for Returned Checks Off-Campus Courses

Tuition and Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

Academic Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77-78

Term Schedule Hourly Load and Schedule Classification Grading System Academic Standing Attendance Incomplete Work Grade Appeals Repeating Classes Auditing

Contact Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

Audit Charges Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82-84 Financial Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

Affiliate Faculty

How To Apply For Financial Aid

Faculty Emeriti

Federal Work Study Program

Board of Trustees

William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

Administration

Other Resources

Maps and Directions

Scholarships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-74

Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Named Endowed Scholarships CTS-Funded Scholarships Special Funds Grants

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

DEAR READER,

In the heart of a continent, a city. In the heart of that city, a school. And in the heart of that school, a catalog: a treasury of knowledge and know-how, skills and ideas, poetics and practices as old – and as eternally new – as the adventure of learning itself. Make no mistake; this is one of the most exciting, potentially life-changing documents you’ll ever read. In fact, once you look at it in the right way, you’ll see it’s less a list of programs and classes and more a kind of cathedral, a mansion with many rooms, chapels, and passageways to search out and explore. In this sense, each course description is a door, a threshold to a world you’ve yet to travel. And accordingly, each faculty bio is an introduction to a personal tour guide, someone who’s been there and can show you around – though be advised, there’s still no telling what the two of you will find around any given corner. On these journeys, even the guides discover something new on every trip. Welcome to CTS. We specialize in thresholds and surprises, new worlds and open doors. When Jesus said, “Follow me,” he didn’t just mean, “Stay close by.” He meant, “Become my disciple” – and the word “disciple” comes down to us from the Latin discipulus, “pupil, student, apprentice, learner.” He meant walking with him and learning from him at every step along the way. Learning, that is, not only about Jesus himself, but also about God’s whole wide world, in all its broken beauty. As the New Testament makes quite clear,

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Jesus is the kind of teacher who often points toward others: to a poor widow, for example, who embodies generosity; or an ancient enemy, who models mercy; or a child, who shows what it means to enter the kingdom of God. And so to do this kind of discipleship well, each one of us needs a community – a circle of fellow disciples, yes, but also a wider place where we can learn from widows and enemies and children and countless others. We need diversity in every sense: racial, cultural, economic, personal, generational, and theological. We need vibrant and challenging worship to put our learning in its proper context. And we need a broad, broken, beautiful society in which to do our work. We need, in other words, a school in the heart of a city, a city in the heart of a continent, and a continent in the heart of God’s good creation, the whole wide world that so desperately needs new leaders: disciples called to be ministers, learners called to be servants.

Welcome to CTS. We’re already looking forward to getting to know you better.

Matthew Myer Boulton

President and Professor of Theology, Christian Theological Seminary

Grace and Peace,

Welcome to this exciting, innovative,

and diverse community of theological education that is Christian Theological Seminary. Through study, prayer, service, and interconnectedness, students at CTS join a dynamic faculty of scholars and teachers to continue an honored history of service to the church and the world. Together we live out the CTS commitment to form “disciples of Jesus Christ for church and community leadership to serve God’s transforming of the world.�

At this crossroads moment in the 21st century we are confronted with many complex challenges in an increasingly pluralistic global community that needs ecumenical, trans-denominational, non-denominational, and interfaith understanding. The world needs the interdisciplinary, multicultural, international, and reconciling perspectives that CTS provides through innovative teaching, creative scholarship, and supervised practical training for ministry, counseling, and other types of Christian service. Focusing on spirituality and mission. CTS nurtures ethical leadership within globalized contexts that encourages students to grow in faith, achieve greater knowledge of their own belief traditions and respect for the spirituality and practices of others, while they develop skills for contextual ministry and live with integrity. All of us at CTS value God-created diversity. Our community embraces people from many paths of life as they prepare to become pastors, chaplains, counselors, community leaders, educators, and to work in all kinds of organizations that contribute to church and society. CTS students represent rich affiliations, commitments, and perspectives. Some students desire to become more accomplished in their practice of ministry while others are just starting a path of discovery. Whether as a degree-seeking student or a life-long learner, CTS is a place where lives are transformed as we encounter God in and through one another. We share an extraordinary history, a rich present, and an exciting future. If you are interested in encountering God, nursing a deeper spiritual life, developing theological imagination, and aiming for excellence in ministry, I invite you to join us. Come visit our campus and share our excitement. In the meantime explore CTS through our website, catalog, and interaction with our faculty and staff through email.

We hope this catalog becomes an invitation to you to be more connected to this seminary community. I personally invite you to explore not only our academic programs and course offerings but also our leaders, our values and our community life. You are most certainly a part of this community from the moment you arrive on campus or depart as a graduate. Your ideas and questions, passion and prayers matter. As Dean of Students I welcome you to visit with me. In addition to this catalog, there is important information found on our website and in our handbooks. All of them and our people are resources and tools to help us journey together. Finally, step boldly through our doors and portals. You are welcome friends!

Be blessed,

Mary L. Harris Associate Dean for Student Services

Grace and peace,

Edwin David Aponte Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty Professor of Christianity and Culture

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

OUR MISSION

The Mission of Christian Theological Seminary is to form disciples of Jesus Christ for church and community leadership to serve God’s transforming of the world. To this end, we Celebrate the presence of the risen Christ in Word and Table; Welcome into partnership all who seek God’s truth, love, and justice; Cultivate the virtues, passions, and practices of Christian leadership; Reflect critically on the sources of Christian understanding in scripture, the traditions of the ecumenical church, cultures, and experience; and Engage the spiritual and moral issues facing the human community.

RELATIONSHIP TO THE CHURCH Christian Theological Seminary has a primary, historical relationship with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). A special relationship exists with that denomination’s regions of Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, the Northeast, Pennsylvania, the Upper Midwest and Canada. The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) also maintains an ecumenical communion in formal partnership with the United Church of Christ. The seminary attempts to provide the coursework necessary to fulfill educational requirements for a number of denominations. Special denominational courses are offered for students seeking ordination in the following: Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

HISTORY OF CTS

United Methodist Church

In 1850, members of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Indiana chartered North Western Christian University in Indianapolis. The school was soon renamed Butler University in recognition of the contributions of Indianapolis church and business leader Ovid Butler. In 1925, Disciples leaders William G. Irwin, Frederick D. Kershner and Z.T. Sweeney led the effort to establish a College of Religion at Butler to prepare students for Christian ministry. The College of Religion separated from Butler in 1958, receiving its independent charter as Christian Theological Seminary.

Presbyterian Church (USA)

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American Baptist Churches USA United Church of Christ African Methodist Episcopal Church

ACCREDITATION CTS is accredited by the Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada, and the following degree programs are approved: Master of Divinity Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy

Equal Opportunity Statement Christian Theological Seminary does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, gender, sexual orientation, age, national origin, handicap, disability or veteran status in employment, admissions, financial aid or in any seminary administered program.

Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling Master of Arts in Multicultural Christian Education Master of Arts in Theological Studies The Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada:

10 Summit Park Dr. Pittsburgh, PA 15275, USA Telephone: 412-788-6505 Fax: 412-788-6510 www.ats.edu

Christian Theological Seminary is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association (NCA). The Higher Learning Commission:

230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500 Chicago, IL 60604, USA Telephone: 800-621-7440 www.ncahlc.org The Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (COAMFTE). Commission on Accreditation of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy:

112 South Alfred Street Alexandria, VA 22314, USA Telephone: 703-838-9808 | Fax: 703-838-9805 www.aamft.org

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The Hispanic Summer Program (HSP) The HSP is held each year at one of several seminaries that sponsor this intensive two-week program. Hispanic/Latino students and bilingual students who are interested in Hispanic ministries may enroll for a maximum of two courses per summer, for two credits each, toward a CTS degree. Instruction is in Spanish and English, covers a wide range of the theological curriculum, and focuses on the Hispanic/Latino church and Hispanic ministries within multicultural settings. Financial assistance for travel, housing, and tuition is provided by sponsoring institutions. For more information on course offerings and registration, please contact Matt Schlimgen, registrar, at mschlimgen@cts.edu.

Changes to Catalog Information Christian Theological Seminary strives to keep faith with students who have entered under a particular catalog. However, CTS reserves the right to revise programs, curriculum requirements, information, regulations or financial charges at any time. When changes occur, an effort will be made to notify students and any other persons who may be affected. This catalog is intended for informational purposes and should not be construed as a contract binding upon the seminary.

2013-2015 Course Catalog

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2013-2014 FALL SEMESTER 2013 Tues - Fri, March 11 - 14

Reading Week (Monday classes meet)

Mon, March 24

Faculty textbook lists due in the Dean’s Office

Mon, MarCH 31

Deadline for submission of D.Min. Projects examination copies for May graduation

Mon, MarCH 31Fri, Apr 11

Summer 2014/fall 2014 registration & spring 2015 pre-registration for returning degree/certificate students

Tues, April 1

2014-2015 Financial Aid Application Priority Deadline

Fri, April 11

Last day for returning degree/ certificate students to register for Fall 2014 without a late fee

Mon, April 14

Registration opens for non-degree students

Mon - FrI, April 14-18

Easter Recess

Last day for all degree, new and certificate students to register for Spring 2013 without a late fee

Mon, April 21

Last day to withdraw from a course, last day to change a credit course to audit

Mon - Fri, NovEMBER 25-29

Reading week / Thanksgiving holiday

Fri, May 2

Last day to file for an incomplete

Fri, November 29

Last day to withdraw from a course, last day to change a credit course to audit

Fri, May 2

Last day 2014 summer graduates can petition the Academic Dean to participate in commencement

Fri, December 13

last day to file for an incomplete

Fri, May 9

Semester ends

Fri, December 20

Semester ends

Mon, May 12

Graduates’ grades due to registrar

Mon, January 6

Grades due to Registrar

Sat, May 17

Commencement activities

Mon, May 26

Grades due to registrar

Fri, June 6

Last day for students to turn in spring 2014 incomplete work to faculty

Fri, June 13

Spring 2014 incomplete grades due to registrar

Mon, August 19

Fall 2013 Payment Deadline

Tues, August 20

Students dropped for non-payment are assessed a $100 termination fee

MON, August 26-28

Orientation for new students

Mon, September 2

Labor Day

Tues, September 3

First day of class

Mon, September 9

Last day to register and drop/add online without penalty & last day to change audit to credit

Tues, October 1

Deadline for practicum admission

Tues - Fri, OctOBER 15-18

Reading Week (Monday classes will meet)

Mon, October 28

Faculty textbook lists due in the Dean’s Office

MON - FRI, NOVEMBER 4 - 15

Spring 2014 registration for new (Fall 2013) and returning degree/ certificate students

Fri, November 15

SPRING SEMESTER 2014 Mon, January 6

Spring 2014 Payment Deadline

Tues, January 7

Students dropped for non-payment are assessed a $100 termination fee

Thur, January 16

Orientation for new students

Summer 2014

Fri, January 17

Last day for students to turn in fall 2013 incomplete work to faculty

Mon, January 20

Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday

Tues, January 21

First day of class

Fri, January 24

Fall 2013 incomplete grades due to registrar

Mon, January 27

Last day to register and drop/add online without penalty & last day to change audit to credit

Summer registration is ongoing from Monday, April 31, 2013 to the first day of class.  Since each class will vary with beginning and ending dates, deadlines will be dependent upon the dates the class meets. The last day to add a class is the second class meeting; the instructor's permission is required. Summer grades are due to the registrar two weeks after the last class meeting.  Summer incomplete work is due to faculty by the fourth Friday after the last class meeting.  Incomplete grades are due to the registrar one week after that. *Incompletes must be resolved before attendance in a course for which the incomplete course is a prerequisite.

Fri, February 28

Deadline for practicum admission

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Academic Calendar

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2014-2015 FALL SEMESTER 2014

Tues - Fri, FebRUARY 24-28

Reading Week (Monday classes meet)

Fri, February 27

Deadline for practicum admission

Mon, MarCH 23

Faculty textbook lists due in the Dean’s Office

Mon, MarCH 30 Fri, Apr 3

Easter Recess

Mon, MarCH 30

Deadline for submission of D.Min. Projects examination copies for May graduation

Mon, MarCH 30 Fri, Apr 10

Summer 2015/fall 2015 registration & spring 2016 pre-registration for returning degree/certificate students

Mon, August 18

Fall 2014 Payment Deadline

Tues, August 29

Students dropped for non-payment are assessed a $100 termination fee

MON, August 25-27

Orientation for new students

Mon, September 1

Labor Day

Tues, September 2

First day of class

Mon, September 8

Last day to register and drop/add online without penalty & last day to change audit to credit

Tues, September 30

Deadline for practicum admission

Tues - Fri, OctOBER 14-17

Reading Week (Monday classes will meet)

Tues, April 1

2015-2016 Financial Aid Application Priority Deadline

Mon, October 27

Faculty textbook lists due in the Dean’s Office

Fri, April 10

Mon, Nov 3 Fri, Nov 14

Spring 2015 registration for new (Fall 2014) and returning degree/ certificate students

Last day for returning degree/certificate students to register for Fall 2015 without a late fee

Mon, April 13

Registration opens for non-degree students

Fri, November 14

Last day for all degree, new and certificate students to register for Spring 2015 without a late fee

Mon, April 20

Last day to withdraw from a course / last day to change a credit course to audit

Mon - Fri, NovEMBER 24-28

Reading week / Thanksgiving holiday

Fri, May 1

Last day to file for an incomplete

Fri, May 1

Fri, November 28

Last day to withdraw from a course, last day to change a credit course to audit

Last day 2015 summer graduates can petition the Academic Dean to participate in commencement

Fri, May 9

last day to file for an incomplete

Semester ends

Fri, December 12

Mon, May 11

Semester ends

Graduates’ grades due to registrar

Fri, December 19

Sat, May 16

Grades due to registrar

Commencement activities

Mon, January 5

Mon, May 25

Grades due to registrar

Fri, June 5

Last day for students to turn in spring 2015 incomplete work to faculty

Fri, June 12

Spring 2015 incomplete grades due to registrar

SPRING SEMESTER 2015 Mon, January 5

Spring 2015 Payment Deadline

Tues, January 6

Students dropped for non-payment are assessed a $100 termination fee

Thur, January 15

Orientation for new students

Summer 2015

Fri, January 16

Last day for students to turn in fall 2014 incomplete work to faculty

Mon, January 19

Martin Luther King Jr. holiday

Tues, January 20

First day of class

Fri, January 23

Fall 2014 incomplete grades due to registrar

Mon, January 26

Last day to register and drop/add online without penalty & last day to change audit to credit

Summer registration is ongoing from Monday, April 30, 2015 to the first day of class.  Since each class will vary with beginning and ending dates, deadlines will be dependent upon the dates the class meets. The last day to add a class is the second class meeting; the instructor’s permission is required. Summer grades are due to the registrar two weeks after the last class meeting.  Summer incomplete work is due to faculty by the fourth Friday after the last class meeting.  Incomplete grades are due to the registrar one week after that. *Incompletes must be resolved before attendance in a course for which the incomplete course is a prerequisite.

Fri, February 13

Last day to file for graduation

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

Worship at Sweeney Chapel

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Worship Opportunities

Worship is central to life at Christian Theological Seminary. Community worship at CTS is shared by students, staff, faculty and off-campus guests serving as preachers, musicians and liturgists. Chapel services are designed to nurture the faith and life of the CTS community and to provide a place for practice and growth in worship leadership. Services from varying traditions are conducted on a regular schedule during the week, and the entire seminary community is encouraged to attend. Other formal and informal worship opportunities take place during the course of the year, including Lessons and Carols, a service for the Blessings of Animals, and services arising from concerns within the seminary community and from the world beyond our walls. The CTS community is composed of a diversity of people with many differing worship styles and traditions. Some among us will worship in silence; some are used to call and response; some make frequent verbal expressions of appreciation to God during worship. This diversity enriches us and invites us to sense God’s greatness in new ways. At CTS, we strive to celebrate the beauty and diversity of God’s family as well as our oneness in Christ. Our prayer is that everyone will find peace, comfort, and uplift in our services. All are appropriate and welcome at Sweeney Chapel.

Worship Opportunities Sweeney Chapel is open for personal prayer and devotions when the seminary building is open. The weekly schedule in Sweeney Chapel includes: Word & Table WEDNESDAYS 11:30 A.M. This service of word, prayer, and table is the fullest gathering of the CTS community at worship each week. Musical leadership may be provided by the CTS Gospel Choir, soloists, pipe organ, piano, drums, or other instruments.

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

DEGREE PROGRAMS

DEGREE PROGRAMS MASTER OF DIVINITY The Master of Divinity degree is a comprehensive program of study designed to prepare students for parish ministry, for graduate study in theology or related disciplines, for various types of chaplaincy, for mission work at home and abroad, and for other forms of church vocation. It is the basic theological degree in preparation for ordination.

REQUIREMENTS The Master of Divinity degree requires 84 semester hours (SH) of required and elective courses, with a cumulative grade point average of 2.5. The time to complete a degree depends on the number of hours taken each semester. Typically, full-time students complete the degree over four years, by enrolling in nine semester hours during each spring and fall semester and six semester hours each of three summers. A few students have completed the degree in three years. Students have seven years in which to complete the Master of Divinity degree unless an extension for special circumstances is granted by the Academic Council. Field I: Bible (12 hours)

B-501: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament (3 SH) B-___: Old Testament Exegesis (3 SH) B-502: Introduction to New Testament (3 SH) B-___: New Testament Exegesis (3 SH) Field II: History of Global Christianity (9 hours)

H-505: History of Global Christianity: Beginnings to 1500 (3 SH) H-506: History of Global Christianity: 1500-1800 (3 SH) H-507: History of Global Christianity: 1800 to Present (3 SH) Field III: Systematic and Philosophical Theology (9 hours)

T-500: Introduction to Theology (3 SH) T-626: Systematic Theology (3 SH) T-___: Theology Elective (3 SH) Field IV: Christianity and Culture (6 hours)

____ C-571: The Church and the Arts (3 SH)* and C-530: Introduction to Christian Ethics (3 SH) or ____ C-540: Social Issues in the Local Parish (3 SH) or ____ C-550: Prophetic and EthicalWitness of the Churches (3 SH) or ____ C-645: Theological Ethics of Martin Luther King Jr. (3 SH)

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Field V: Pastoral Theology and Psychology (3 hrs)

P-500: Basics of Pastoral Care and Counseling (3 SH) Field VI: Christian Ministries (17 or 21 hours)

M-510: Worship and Church Music (3 SH) † M-514 Introduction to Christian Ministry (2SH) (taken with M-516) † M-516 Supervised Concurrent Field Education (1SH)† M-515 Introduction to Christian Ministry (2SH) (taken with M517)† M-517 Supervised Concurrent Field Education (1SH) † M-520: Introduction to Preaching (3 SH)† or ____ M-530: Women in the Pulpit (3 SH) † M-540: Education and Formation in the Church (3 SH) † and M-616, M-617: Supervised Concurrent Field Education – Year II (2 SH) or ____ P-800, P-801: Clinical Pastoral Education I (6 SH) Interfield Courses (4 hours)

X-515: Introduction to Theological Education and Formation (required first semester) (3 SH)* ____ X-516: Peer Learning in Ministry (Required 2nd semester) (1 SH)* X-727: Cross Culture Experience (0 SH) General Electives (20 or 24 hours)

*Courses marked with an asterisk must be taken within the first 49 semester hours of the degree program. †Students are encouraged to take courses marked with a dagger within the first 60 hours.

SUPERVISED CONCURRENT FIELD EDUCATION (SCOFE) Between the completion of 18 and 45 hours of course work, each student must begin work in a teaching congregation and register for M-516, M-517: Supervised Concurrent Field Education (SCOFE) and its companion course, M-514, M-515: Introduction to Christian Ministry. An additional year of SCOFE (M-616, M-617) is required for students who do not choose to complete a unit of Clinical Pastoral Education (P-800, P-801). Degree Programs

CROSS-CULTURAL REQUIREMENT Prior to the completion of 36 hours, each MDiv student must register for X-727 and participate in a cross-cultural experience. In consultation with the Director of Cross-cultural and International Programs, the student chooses the experience, writes a proposal and a contract that describes which of the following options the student will use: An experience-based course, to be counted toward graduation as a field or general elective; A self-assigned experience under the supervision of a faculty member, to be counted toward graduation. Credit is optional. Students seeking credit must register for a guided research. A special event sponsored or approved by the seminary, for which students may choose to receive or not to receive credit. In all options, the student is expected to keep a journal in order to demonstrate that the student has reflected theologically on the experience. See the Director of Cross-cultural and International Programs for more information about the crosscultural requirement.

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

DEGREE PROGRAMS Master of Arts in Multicultural Christian Education The Master of Arts in Multicultural Christian Education is a two year professional degree that integrates theological reflection, congregational studies, supervised field education and cross-cultural experiences for effective educational leadership in culturally diverse settings. It is designed for lay women and men who seek to work professionally in the church, and for those already engaged in ministry who wish to build upon their competencies.

REQUIREMENTS The Master of Arts in Multicultural Christian Education degree requires 49 semester hours (SH) of required and elective courses, with a cumulative grade point average of 2.5. The time to complete a degree depends on the number of hours taken each semester. Typically, full-time students complete the degree over two years, by enrolling in twelve semester hours during each spring and fall semester. Students have four years in which to complete the Master of Arts in Multicultural Christian Education degree unless an extension for special circumstances is granted by the Academic Council.

M-605: Pastoral Leadership from a Black Church Perspective (3SH) M-624: Group Dynamics (3SH) M-630: Contemporary Ministry with Youth (3SH) M-642: Educational Ministry with Children (3SH) M-648: Nurturing faith Across Lifespan (3SH) M-719: Worship, Theology and Culture (3SH) M-801: Issues Affecting Church Leadership (3SH) The electives are taken according to the area of specialization (Christian Education, Youth, Children, Urban Ministry) in consultation with the student’s advisor.

Field I: Bible (6 hours)

B-501: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament (3 SH) B-502: Introduction to New Testament (3 SH) Field II: History (3 SH)

H-506: History of Global Christianity:1500-1800 (3SH)

SUPERVISED CONCURRENT FIELD EDUCATION (SCOFE) After the completion of 18 hours of course work, each student must begin work in a teaching congregation and register for M-516, M-517: Supervised Concurrent Field Education (SCOFE) and its companion course, M-514, M-515: Introduction to Christian Ministry.

Field III: Theology (3 SH)

T-500: Introduction to Theology (3SH) Field IV: Christianity and Culture (6 hours)

C-580: Introduction to World Religions (3SH) C-660: Sociology of Religion (3SH) Field V: Pastoral Theology & Psychology (3 hours

P-531: Personality, Human Development and Faith (3SH) Field VI: Christian Ministries (15 hours)

M-514-515: Intro to Christian Ministry (3SH) M-516-517: Supervised Concurrent Field Ed (3SH) M-540: Education and Formation (3SH) M-625: Pedagogy of Hope: Christian Education and the Politics of Solidarity (3SH) M-748: Christian Education for Public Contexts (3SH) Interfield (4 hourS)

X-727: Cross Cultural Studies (0SH) X-811: Final Project (1 SH) Electives (9 hours)

C-650: The Church and the Urban Poor (3SH) C-754: Living for Peace in a Violent World (3SH) C-550: Prophetic and Ethical Witness of the Church (3SH)

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Cross-Cultural Requirement Prior to the completion of 36 hours, each MAMCE student must register for X-727 and participate in a cross-cultural experience. In consultation with the Director of Cross-cultural and International Programs, the student chooses the experience, writes a proposal and a contract that describes which of the following options the student will use: An experience-based course, to be counted toward graduation as a field or general elective; or A self-assigned experience under the supervision of a faculty member, to be counted toward graduation. Credit is optional. Students seeking credit must register for a guided research; or A special event sponsored or approved by the seminary, for which students may choose to receive or not to receive credit. In all options, the student is expected to keep a journal in order to demonstrate that the student has reflected theologically on the experience. See the director of cross-cultural and international programs for more information about the cross-cultural requirement. MAMCE students are also expected to also attend two cross-cultural or inter-religious events as a part of their degree program.

Degree Programs

Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling The Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling provides professional preparation and theological/spiritual integration for mental health counselors, pastoral psychotherapists and spiritual care specialists. The MAMHC degree meets State of Indiana academic requirements for licensure as a Mental Health Counselor. Accredited by the American Association of Pastoral Counselors (AAPC) as an approved training program, it prepares students for certification as pastoral counselors. This mental health track does not require ordination. (See page 24 for more information on related joint degree programs offered at CTS.) Grounded in a relational understanding of human psychological and interpersonal dynamics, the program enables students through clinical practice and theological/spiritual reflection to facilitate mental health and to effectively engage psychological, socio-cultural and existential concerns. Students seeking in-depth preparation for mental health work with individuals and groups emphasizing theological/spiritual integration in a variety of settings are encouraged to apply to this program.

REQUIREMENTS The Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling requires 75 semester hours (SH) of required and elective courses, with a cumulative grade point average of 2.7. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are prerequisites for practicum. The time to complete a degree depends on the number of hours taken each semester. Typically, full-time students complete the degree over four years, by enrolling in nine semester hours during each spring and fall semester in addition to two terms of summer practicum. A few students have completed the degree in three years. Students have six years in which to complete the Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling degree unless an extension for special circumstances is granted by the Academic Council. Students are required to do a minimum of 500 hours of mental health counseling, including a minimum of 10 hours of group therapy, and receive at least 100 hours of individual and group supervision in practicum. Students conclude their degree by completing a Capstone Presentation as described in section C below. Note: Students are advised that those completing the 124-credit hour combined MDiv/MAMHC degree program will meet educational requirements for ordination (from denominations requiring an MDiv degree), graduate education and clinical requirements for Indiana State MHC licensure (upon completion of practicum) and, after completion of at least 4 units of CPE, requirements for Association of Professional Chaplains (APC) certification. Many chaplaincy positions, particularly in hospital settings, require both APC accreditation and ordination. While CTS makes every effort to be in compliance with the requirements of specific licensure boards (MHC) and professional credentialing bodies (AAPC), students must take individual responsibility for monitoring and meeting licensure and credentialing requirements that may change between admission and graduation.

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A. General Studies in Religion (18 hrs) I. Theological background (12 hours)

B-501: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament (3 SH) B-502: Introduction to New Testament (3 SH) T-500: Introduction to Theology (3 SH) X-___: An elective that focuses on the theological understanding of American culture, modern church history, or social justice from Fields II-IV (3 SH) II. Spiritual Care, Culture and Religion (6 hours) Either Option 1:

P-800, 801: Clinical Pastoral Education (6 SH) (Students electing P-800, 801 must complete this sequence before beginning Counseling Practicum I.) Or Option 2:

P-641: Spirituality and God-Images in Clinical and Cultural Contexts (3 SH) (Students electing P-641 must complete the course by the end of the first year of Counseling Practicum I.) and ONE of the following:

C-580: Introduction to World Religions; C-680: Hinduism and Buddhism; C-682: Islam; C-684: Judaism; P-638: Religion, Medicine and Pastoral Care

B. Therapeutic & Clinical Studies (57 hrs) I. Theoretical and Psychological Foundations of Mental Health Counseling and Spiritually Integrated Psychotherapy (9 hours)

P-510: Practice and Context of Spiritually Integrated Psychotherapy (3 SH)* P-632: Cultural Foundations and Dimensions of Healing (3 SH) P-634: Theological Perspectives on Pastoral & Spiritual Care (3 SH)**

2013-2015 Course Catalog

DEGREE PROGRAMS II. Human Development and Culture (9 hours)

P-531: Personality, Human Development and Faith (3 SH)* P-675: Vocation, Culture and Appraisal (3 SH) One of the following: P-500: Basics of Pastoral Care & Counseling (3 SH) P-520: Introduction to Marriage & Family Therapy (3 SH) P-525: Aging and the Family (3 SH) P-619: Sexuality, Gender and Culture (3 SH) P-626: Loss and Mourning (3 SH) P-641: Spirituality and God-Images in Clinical and Cultural Contexts (3 SH) P-739: Freud, Jung and Religion (3 SH) P-755: Affect in Human Transformation (3 SH) III. Assessment and Treatment in Mental Health Counseling and Spiritually Integrated Psychotherapy (12 hours)

P-637: Psychopathology & Assessment (3 SH)* P-630: Psychoanalytic Theory & Technique (3 SH) One of the following:

P-624: Group Dynamics and Leadership (3 SH) or

P-760: Group Psychotherapy (3 SH) And one of the following:

P-621: Integration of Marriage & Family Therapy Theory (3 SH) P-623: Couples Systems Therapy (3 SH) P-650: Treating Addictive Behaviors (3 SH) P-766: Dissociative Processes in Groups and Systems (3 SH) P-774: Psychodynamic Family Therapy (3 SH) P-775: Short-term Family Therapy (3SH) IV. Ethical and Professional Studies (3 hours)

P-635: Ethical and Professional Issues in Clinical Practice (3 SH) V. Research (3 hours)

P-770: Basic Research Methodology (3 SH)

C. Integration and Competency Assessment Electives (9 hours)

X-999B “Self, Countertransference, and Spirit” culminating in a Capstone Presentation and a 12-15 page integration paper in preparation of the Capstone Presentation Capstone is normally taken the 6th semester of practicum.  Students must have completed 380 hours of client contact hours prior to taking the Capstone. Course authorization is required. * Prerequisite for Supervised Clinical Practice ** Prerequisite for X999B

PERSONAL COUNSELING All students are expected to receive psychotherapy during their program. Weekly personal therapy is a prerequisite for practicum admission. Personal therapy with a gifted clinician assists student therapists in working through problem areas in their own lives that may adversely affect clients and their own participation in an emotionally challenging training program; it provides a unique training experience that helps students understand the process of exploring the depth and interrelationship of intrapsychic and systemic features of human life. Christian Theological Seminary’s Counseling Center provides quality care for clients, students, faculty and staff in a state-of-the-art facility located on the seminary campus. The facility includes: Twenty private counseling rooms Child and Play Therapy area Personal meditation area Viewing rooms for supervision Space for professional and academic conferences Full ADA compliance

VI. Supervised Clinical Practice (18 hours)

Required: 500 client hours of mental health counseling, of which at least 10 hours must be group therapy. Plus at least 100 hours of individual and group supervision in practicum, with at least 50 hours of that supervision based on video tape, audio tape or direct observation. P-820, 821, 822: Counseling Practicum I (9 SH) P-823, 824, 825: Counseling Practicum II (9 SH) VII. Elective (3 hours)

One course from any field

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Degree Programs

Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy The mission of the MAMFT Program is to foster the development of competent marriage and family therapists whose personal and professional selves are formed through the awareness of systemic perspectives, multicultural contextualization, and spirituality. To achieve this mission, the MAMFT program consists of religious studies to help students ground themselves in the Judeo-Christian tradition, as well as clinical techniques and theory to undergird clinical work. This program is recognized nationally for its excellence. Accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education, it received two commendations for excellence in supervision in 2005 from the Commission. It was chosen as one of eight MFT programs nationwide to participate in the 20052007 MFT Core Competencies Beta Test Group sponsored by the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. Participating programs engaged in cutting edge approaches in effective teaching of the core competencies and learning outcomes in marriage and family therapy. The MAMFT degree meets State of Indiana academic requirements for licensing of marriage and family therapist. Students in the program receive at least 100 hours of individual and group supervision in practicum; at least 50 hours of that supervision is based on direct observation, videotape or audio tape. In addition, the MAMFT is an approved training program by the American Association of Pastoral Counselors.

REQUIREMENTS The Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy requires 75 semester hours (SH) of required and elective courses, with a cumulative grade point average of 2.7. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are prerequisites for practicum. The time to complete a degree depends on the number of hours taken each semester. Typically, full-time students complete the Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy degree over four years by enrolling in nine semester hours during each fall and spring semester in addition to participating in two terms of summer practicum. A few students have completed the degree in three years. Students have six years in which to complete the Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy degree unless an extension for special circumstances is granted by the Academic Council. Students must complete 500 hours of marriage and family therapy with clients, of which at least 250 must have more than one other person in the room. Students who matriculated before Fall 2011 must write a satisfactory integrative paper that presents a coherent, constructive statement of the relationship of marriage and family therapy and ministries to Jewish and/or Christian communities. He or she also must pass an oral examination on that paper. Students must enroll in X-999 during the semester in which this work will be completed. Students matriculating in Fall 2011 and after will complete the requirements listed below under VI. C. Integration and Competency Assessment and do not complete X-999.

A. General Studies in Religion (18 hrs) I. Theological background (12 hours)

B-501: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament (3 SH) B-502: Introduction to New Testament (3 SH) T-500: Introduction to Theology (3 SH) X-___: An elective that focuses on the theological understanding of American culture, modern church history, or social justice from Fields II-IV (3 SH) II. Theology and Counseling (6 hours)

**P-510: Introduction to Pastoral Psychotherapy (3 SH) and one of the following:

P-634: Theological Perspectives on Pastoral and Spiritual Care (3 SH) P-641: Spirituality and God-Images in Clinical and Cultural Context (3 SH) P- : Care of Creation: A Pastoral Theology (3SH) need course # OR

*P-800, 801: Clinical Pastoral Education I (CPE) (Students taking the CPE option must take P800, P801, P520, P531 & P637 before enrolling in P820 Practicum.) **Students selecting this option must take P510 before enrolling in P823 the start of Practicum II

Students matriculating before Fall 2011 may elect to complete X-999A “Self, Systems, and Spirit” which culminates in a clinical capstone presentation in place of X-999.

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

DEGREE PROGRAMS B. Marriage and Family Therapy Studies (57 hrs) I. Theoretical Foundations of Marital and Family Therapy (9 hours)

P-621: Integration of Marriage and Family Therapy Theory (3 SH) concurrent with a semester of Practicum II. Assessment and Treatment in Marital and Family Therapy (15 hours)

*P-520: Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy (3 SH)          *P-637: Psychopathology and Assessment (3 SH) *prerequisite for practicum    P-745 Narrative and Collaborative Approaches to Therapy (3 SH) P-623 Couples Systems Therapy (3 SH) One of the following:

P-650: Treating Addictive Behaviors (3 SH) P-711: Children and Adolescents in the Family (3SH) P-774: Psychodynamic Family Therapy (3 SH) P-775: Short Term Family Therapy (3 SH) III. Human Development and Family Studies (15 hours)

*P-531: Personality, Human Development and Faith (3 SH) *prerequisite for practicum P-619: Sexuality, Gender, and Culture (3 SH) One of the following:

P-525: Aging and the Family (3 SH) P-626: Loss and Mourning (3 SH) P-646: Families and Larger Systems (3 SH) P-711: Children and Adolescents in the Family (3SH) P-755: Affect in Human Transformation (3 SH) IV. Ethical and Professional Studies (3 hours)

P-635: Ethical and Professional Issues in Clinical Practice (3 SH) V. Research (3 hours) P-770: Basic Research Methodology (3 SH) VI. Supervised Clinical Practice (18 hours)

Required: 500 client contact hours (250 MFT) plus 100 hours of supervision. P-820, 821, 822: Counseling Practicum I (9 SH) P-823, 824, 825 Counseling Practicum II (9 SH) (Students not electing A.II above must take P510 before enrolling in P823.) VII. Electives (6 hours)

Two courses from any field VIII. Integrative and Competency Assessment

Portfolio of papers from P520, P621 and P623 or P745 (non credit) X-999A: Self, Systems, and Spirit (non-credit) Pre-requisite: T 500

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PRACTICUM APPLICATION & GUIDELINES MAMFT students can apply for admission to practicum after completing P531 Human Development, P637 Psychopathology and Assessment, and P520- Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy.  Students electing the CPE option for completion of course work must complete CPE before entering practicum.  Further, MDiv/MAMFT students must complete one year of SCOFE before applying for practicum. Students are accepted for practicum based upon successful completion of role plays as a screening process.  Concerns that arise during those role plays may be addressed through additional evaluation as determined by the counseling faculty and clinic director.  Entering cohort groups are normally limited to four persons for summer and six students for fall and spring.  Priority is given to students who have the greater number of completed semester hours.  Practicum admission is based on limitation of the cohort group due to available supervision in order to provide a conducive learning environment.  Beginning with the entering counseling classes of spring 2012, all MFT counseling students will normally be required to enter practicum no later than the 4th semester of coursework.  Students in the program will receive at least 100 hours of individual and group supervision in practicum and at least 50 hours of that supervision will be based on direct observation, video tape or audio tape.

Practicum Setting Christian Theological Seminary’s Counseling Center provides quality care for clients, students, faculty and staff in a state-of-the-art facility located on the seminary campus. The facility includes: Twenty private counseling rooms Child and Play Therapy area Personal meditation area Viewing rooms for supervision Space for professional and academic conferences Full ADA compliance

REQUIREMENTS FOR CAPSTONE Capstone, X999A “Self, Systems, and Spirit” is normally taken the 6th semester of practicum.  Students must have completed 380 hours of client contact hours prior to taking the capstone; MFT students must have 180 relational hours of the total 380 hours completed.  A prerequisite of T 500 and course authorization is required from instructor.

Degree Programs

PERSONAL COUNSELING All students are expected to receive psychotherapy during their program. Weekly personal therapy is a prerequisite for practicum admission. Personal therapy with a gifted clinician assists student therapists in working through problem areas in their own lives that may adversely affect clients and their own participation in an emotionally challenging training program; it provides a unique training experience that helps students understand the process of exploring the depth and interrelationship of systemic and intrapsychic aspects of human life.

Postgraduate Residency in Supervised Counseling Indiana licensure laws for Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and/or Licensed Mental Health Counselor require a two-year supervised clinical experience following graduation. A candidate for licensure cannot qualify to sit for the license exam without this experience. CTS offers a postgraduate residency aimed at meeting the state licensure requirements and helping the graduate establish a viable clinical practice. Applicants are accepted from CTS masters programs and from academic programs at other approved universities and graduate schools.

INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD Proposals for research involving human subjects must be reviewed and approved by the CTS Institutional Review Board before the work on the project commences. The Board follows generally recognized protocols for IRBs and reports directly to the academic dean. It comprises the chair of Field V, the directors of the D.Min., Marriage and Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling programs, and a community representative who serves at the invitation of the IRB on a volunteer basis.

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

DEGREE PROGRAMS Master of Theological Studies The Master of Theological Studies program is for persons who want to learn more about the Christian faith but are not preparing for professional ministries in the church or in church institutions. This degree may be taken for personal enrichment purposes or as preparation for doctoral studies. Although it includes courses required in other programs, its colloquia and thesis requirement give this degree a distinct focus.

REQUIREMENTS The Master of Theological Studies requires 48 semester hours (SH) of elective and required courses, with a cumulative grade point average of 2.7. The time to complete a degree depends on the number of hours taken each semester. Students taking twelve credits per semester can complete the degree in two years, while those carrying lighter loads will take longer. International and domestic students who have completed significant prior graduate coursework or equivalent, including research methods, may apply for a twelve month MTS track with two nine hour semesters of course work and a thesis. Students have six years in which to complete the Master of Theological Studies degree unless an extension for special circumstances is granted by the Academic Council.

Colloquia and Thesis (12 SH)

X-820, 821: M.T.S. Colloquium (6 SH) X-825: M.T.S. Thesis (6 SH) Thesis and Oral Examination

The M.T.S. student must write a thesis with a clear focus that demonstrates the student’s capacity to do independent research, to work creatively and discerningly with the major materials relevant to the thesis topic, and to write in an appropriate, scholarly and engaging style. The thesis should be at least 60 and no more than 100 typed double-spaced pages.

General Studies (24 SH)

B-501: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament (3 SH) B-502: Introduction to New Testament (3 SH) T-500: Introduction to Theology (3 SH) X-___: An elective that focuses on the theological understanding of American culture, modern church history, or social justice from Fields II-IV (3 SH) Field I: Bible (6 SH)

Any two courses in Bible Field II: History of Global Christianity (6 SH)

Any two courses in History of Global Christianity Field III: Systematic & Philosophical Theology (6 SH)

Any two courses in Theology Field IV: Christianity & Culture (6 SH)

Any two courses in Christianity and Culture Focused Research (12 SH)

12 hours from Fields I, II, III and/or IV. Such research should be selected from advanced courses with a view towards identifying a thesis topic and pursuing focused thesis research. Courses in Field V and VI can be taken for credit only with the permission of the thesis advisor and the director of the M.T.S. program.

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Degree Programs

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

DEGREE PROGRAMS

DOCTOR OF MINISTRY The Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.) degree offers those experienced in church and community leadership a chance to reflect and build upon their existing ministries. The culminating thesis provides the pastoral leader, chaplain, spiritual director, pastoral counselor or ministry team member with an opportunity to gather their knowledge and experience in tangible form to benefit future generations of leaders. The D.Min. degree requires a prior Master of Divinity degree or its educational equivalent. The stories of our D.Min. students are as diverse as the church itself. From helping refugees, prison ministry, working with pregnant youth, providing grief counseling, addictions counseling, congregational services and a host of other backgrounds, they come to share, learn and serve. Pastoral leaders and caregivers of all ages, from small and large congregations, come to reflect on their experiences, build upon what has worked and explore strategies to pursue their current ministries or add new specializations.

Spiritual Direction

How are the CTS DMin programs different from other DMin programs? A current DMin student writes: “In many other D. Min. programs, the classes are all “distance” oriented and very brief.  I see the semester-long classes at CTS as an advantage.  You actually receive some good, deep education for this D.Min. The faculty has been excellent,

Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE)

and the student body interaction has been priceless.”

The Doctor of Ministry degree offers five distinct areas for specialized study:

D.Min. in Pastoral Care (D.Min. PC) with a concentration in: Supervised Congregational Ministry

D.Min. in Mental Health Counseling (D.Min. MHC) D.Min. in Marriage and Family Therapy (D.Min. MFT)

Highlights The D.Min. in Pastoral Care offers a variety of supervised and specialized ministry foci for those who wish to provide a higher level of pastoral care in congregational and community settings Our D.Min. licensure track provides the opportunity to meet degree and licensure requirements simultaneously. Coursework requirements and clinical training are integrated closely with our degree program through the CTS Counseling Center. This is seldom a possibility elsewhere. Full-time counseling faculty includes noted pastoral theologians Matthias Beier, Suzanne Coyle, Felicity Kelcourse, and K. Bryolf Lyon. Our faculty are international leaders, published authors and active members of the American Association of Pastoral Counselors (AAPC), American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) and the National Board for Certified

Doctor of Ministry in Pastoral Care The Doctor of Ministry in Pastoral Care is a systematic program of advanced professional work and theological study intended for experienced ministers who seek to strengthen their competence as leaders of religious organizations. The Doctor of Ministry in Pastoral Care focuses on specialized ministries in the congregation or in other settings. The clinical component of the degree supports advanced study focusing on chaplaincy, spiritual direction or pastoral care in congregational settings. The CPE concentration can be used to meet requirements for chaplaincy certification or supervisory credentials. The DMin PC requires 42 semester hours (SH) and a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 and at least a B- in all courses applied toward the degree. Prior to completing the project, the student must demonstrate by faculty signature that the Reading Committee has been established, and the Reading Committee has approved the project proposal. The clinical practice component of this track will vary depending upon the clinical alternative chosen (see options below).

Counselors and Affiliates (NBCC). Unlike other D.Min. programs, CTS students work and study with a peer cohort D.Min. community within the larger context of the CTS community. Virtually all required courses are taught by full-time CTS faculty.

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Prerequisites Basics of Pastoral Care and Counseling (P-500) and one unit of CPE (P-800). Prerequisites not completed before admission can be made up after admission with the permission of the director but do not count towards the 48 semester hours required for the degree and must be completed prior to registration for Clinical Practice.

Degree Programs

I. Seminars (6 hours)

Seminars involve one week of intensive study on campus, significant reading before the seminar begins and written work after it ends. D-907: God, Congregations and Contemporary Culture (3 SH) D-909: Practical Theology and Project Development (3 SH) II. Theoretical Foundations (18 hours)

Require the following 3 courses:   P-634: Theological Perspectives on Pastoral and Spiritual Care (3SH) P-635: Ethical and Professional Issues in Clinical Practice (3SH) P-770: Basic Research Methodology (3SH) 3 additional courses from any Field, 600 level or above, as relevant for thesis research with approval of the faculty advisor. III. Clinical Practice (12 hours)

Students choose one of the following three alternatives: Alternative A:

Pastoral Care and Counseling in the Congregation Alternative D-818, 819: Residency in Ministry I, II (6 SH) D-820, 821: Residency in Ministry III, IV (6 SH) Alternative B:

Spiritual Direction Alternative M-751: Art of Spiritual Direction (3 SH) M-752: Spiritual Journey (3 SH) M-753: Psychological Aspects Spiritual Journey (3 SH) M-754: Issues in Spiritual Direction (3 SH)

Personal Counseling and/or Spiritual Direction All students are expected to engage in focused reflection during their program. This may take the form of individual, couple, family or group therapy, and/or spiritual direction. Personal therapy and/ or spiritual direction with a gifted practitioner assists students in working through problem areas in their own lives that may adversely affect both their ministry and their own participation in an emotionally challenging training program; it provides a unique training experience that helps students understand the process of exploring the depth and interrelationship of systemic and intrapsychic features of human life. In addition, for all of the above clinical alternatives it is anticipated that the student will meet weekly with a supervisor and/or supervisory group to reflect on their practice of ministry and clinical learning during the clinical practice portion of the program. Note: Students who do not complete the thesis requirement within the five years that are allowed to complete this degree, but who have completed all other course work, may receive a certificate of advanced professional studies in ministry. Credit may not be conferred for any CTS DMin course work that exceeds the 10 year limit.

Institutional Review Board Proposals for research involving human subjects must be reviewed and approved by the CTS Institutional Review Board before the work on the project commences. The Board follows generally recognized protocols for IRBs and reports directly to the academic dean. It comprises the chair of Field V, the directors of the DMin Marriage and Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling programs, and a community representative who serves at the invitation of the IRB on a volunteer basis.

Alternative C

CPE Alternative P-802, 803: Clinical Pastoral Education II (6 SH) P-804-805: Clinical Pastoral Education III (6 SH) IV. D-999: DMin Project, Written Presentation and Oral Examination (6 SH)

The DMin in Pastoral Care requires students to demonstrate the capacity to engage in advanced reflection in an area of pastoral care through the written presentation of a significant Project in Ministry. The project includes the identification, description and analysis of a segment of pastoral care; clarification of theories that bear on the practice; critical and constructive theology in relationship to that leadership or practice; and development of strategies for more faithful enactment of the gospel. When the written phase of the project is completed, a faculty committee appointed by the director of the DMin program conducts an oral examination. A project handbook is available from the academic dean’s office. A schedule of dates for completion of the project is included in the handbook.

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

DEGREE PROGRAMS Doctor of Ministry in Mental Health Counseling The DMin MHC requires 60 semester hours (SH) and a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 with at least a B- in all courses applied toward the degree. Prior to completing the project, the student must demonstrate by faculty signature that the Reading Committee has been established, and the Reading Committee has approved the project proposal. A minimum of 500 hours of pastoral counseling and 125 hours of interdisciplinary supervision are required.

Prerequisites Personality, Human Development, and Christian Faith (P-531), Introduction to Pastoral Counseling (P-510) and one unit of CPE (P-800). Prerequisites not completed before admission can be made up after admission with the permission of the director but do not count towards the 60 semester hours required for the degree and must be completed prior to registration for Clinical Practice. I. Seminars (6 hours)

Seminars involve one week of intensive study on campus, significant reading before the seminar begins and written work after it ends. D-907: God, Congregations, and Contemporary Culture (3 SH) D-909: Practical Theology and Project Development (3 SH) II. Therapeutic and Clinical Studies (30 hours)

Students must have the following prerequisites: Basic Human Development, Introduction to Pastoral Care and one unit of CPE. *D-810: Practice and Context of Spiritually Integrated Psychotherapy (3SH) OR

*P-646: Families and Larger Systems (3SH) – This course also addresses the content area in terms of health and human services, private and public mental health care systems. P-630: Psychoanalytic Theory and Technique (3SH) P-624: Group Psychotherapy (OR P-760: Group Dynamics) (3SH) P-632: Cultural Foundations and Dimensions of Healing (3SH) P-635: Ethical and Professional Issues in Clinical Practice (3SH) P-770: Basic Research Methodology (3SH) P-634 : Theological Perspectives on Pastoral and Spiritual Care (3SH) P- 675: Vocation, Culture and Appraisal (3SH) P-____: One 600 or 700 level course (3SH) *P-637: Psychopathology and Assessment (*prerequisite for Counseling Practicum) (3SH)

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III. Clinical Practice (18 hours)

P-820, 821, 822: Pastoral Counseling Practicum (9 SH) P-823, 824, 825: Advanced Pastoral Counseling Practicum (9 SH) IV. D-999: DMin Project, Written Presentation and Oral Examination (6 SH)

The DMin in Mental Health Counseling requires students to demonstrate the capacity to engage in advanced reflection in an area of psychodynamically informed pastoral counseling through the written presentation of a significant Project in Ministry. The project includes the identification, description and analysis of a segment of pastoral counseling; clarification of theories that bear on the practice; critical and constructive theology in relationship to clinical work. When the written phase of the project is completed, a faculty committee appointed by the director of the DMin program conducts an oral examination. OR

D-X999B_____“Self, Countertransference, and Spirit” (6SH)

Prerequisite: P-634: Theological Perspectives on Pastoral & Spiritual Care: A one hour weekly practicum seminar integrating use of self, countertransference and spiritual/theological reflection culminates in a Capstone presentation and an integrative thesis. Criteria for evaluation by the thesis advisor, DMin Director, faculty member outside Field V, and current supervisor include 1) advanced understanding of the nature and purposes of counseling ministry, 2) enhanced competencies in pastoral analysis and counseling skills, 3) theologically reflective practice of ministry, 4) new knowledge about the practice of counseling ministry, 5) growth in spiritual maturity visa-vis the self of the counselor.

Personal Counseling All students are expected to receive psychotherapy during their program. Weekly personal therapy is a prerequisite for practicum admission. Personal therapy with a gifted clinician assists student therapists in working through problem areas in their own lives that may adversely affect clients and their own participation in an emotionally challenging training program; it provides a unique training experience that helps students understand the process of exploring the depth and interrelationship of systemic and intrapsychic features of human life. Note: Students who do not complete the project requirement within the five years that are allowed to complete this degree, but who have completed all other course work, may receive a certificate of advanced professional studies in ministry. Students who elect the certificate option will only be eligible for licensure if they have earned a prior MA degree that meets state licensure requirements for an MA in counseling.

Degree Programs

Postgraduate Residency in Supervised Counseling Indiana licensure laws for Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and/or Licensed Mental Health Counselor require a two-year supervised clinical experience following graduation. A candidate for licensure cannot qualify to sit for the license exam without this experience. CTS offers a postgraduate residency aimed at meeting the state licensure requirements and helping the graduate establish a viable clinical practice. Applicants are accepted from CTS counseling masters and DMin programs and from academic programs at other approved universities and graduate schools.

D 909 Practical Theology and Project Development (Kelcourse)

Study of method in practical theology in the development of a Doctor of Ministry project. Prerequisite: D-908. 3 SH

Institutional Review Board Proposals for research involving human subjects must be reviewed and approved by the CTS Institutional Review Board before the work on the project commences. The Board follows generally recognized protocols for IRBs and reports directly to the academic dean. It comprises the chair of Field V, the directors of the DMin Marriage and Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling programs, and a community representative who serves at the invitation of the IRB on a volunteer basis.

Doctor of Ministry Courses D 810 Practice and Context of Spiritually Integrated Psychotherapy (Beier, Kelcourse)

Principles of therapy with individuals, couples, families, groups and larger systems; assessment and evaluation instruments; basic helping skills; dynamics and history of spiritually integrated psychotherapy; administration and management of mental health services in private and public contexts. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. Students taking this course at the DMin level will complete additional course work relevant to their research interests in consultation with the professor. D 818/19 Residency in Ministry I (Kincaid)

Open to students who meet residency requirements. Off-campus work and study in institutions, urban training centers or congregations to include both individual and group supervision. Graded Pass/Fail. D 820/21 Residency in Ministry II (Kincaid)

Open to students who meet residency requirements. Off-campus work and study in institutions, urban training centers or congregations to include both individual and group supervision. Graded Pass/Fail. D 907 God, Congregations and Contemporary Culture (Kelcourse)

Practical theological introduction to Doctor of Ministry studies focusing on the contemporary cultural, social and theological situation of congregational life. Prerequisite: admission to D.Min. program. 3 SH.

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

DEGREE PROGRAMS Doctor of Ministry in Marriage and Family Therapy

IV. D-999: DMin Project, Written Presentation and Oral Examination (6 SH)

The DMin MFT requires 60 semester hours (SH) and a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 with at least a B- in all courses applied toward the degree. Prior to completing the project, the student must demonstrate by faculty signature that the Reading Committee has been established, and the Reading Committee has approved the project proposal. A minimum of 500 hours of pastoral counseling and 125 hours of interdisciplinary supervision are required.

The DMin in Marriage and Family Therapy requires students to demonstrate the capacity to engage in advanced reflection in an area of systemically informed counseling through the written presentation of a significant Project in Ministry. The project includes the identification, description and analysis of a segment of systemically informed counseling; clarification of theories that bear on the practice; critical and constructive theology in relationship to clinical work. When the written phase of the project is completed, a faculty committee appointed by the director of the DMin program conducts an oral examination.

Prerequisites

D-X999A: Self, Systems and Spirit (6SH)

Personality, Human Development, and Christian Faith (P-531), Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy (P-520) and one unit of CPE (P-800). Prerequisites not completed before admission can be made up after admission with the permission of the director but do not count towards the 60 semester hours required for the degree and must be completed prior to registration for Practicum.

Prerequisite: P-634: Theological Perspectives on Pastoral & Spiritual Care: A one hour weekly practicum seminar integrating systemically informed counseling and spiritual/theological reflection culminates in a Capstone presentation and an integrative thesis. Criteria for evaluation by the thesis advisor, DMin Director, faculty member outside Field V, and current supervisor include 1) advanced understanding of the nature and purposes of counseling ministry, 2) enhanced competencies in pastoral analysis and counseling skills, 3) theologically reflective practice of ministry, 4) new knowledge about the practice of counseling ministry, 5) growth in spiritual maturity visà-vis the self of the counselor.

I. Seminars (6 hours)

Seminars involve one week of intensive study on campus, significant reading before the seminar begins and written work after it ends. D-907: God, Congregations, and Contemporary Culture (3 SH) D-909: Practical Theology and Project Development (3 SH) II. Therapeutic and Clinical Studies (30 hours)

P-621: Integration of Marriage and Family Therapy (3SH) P-745: Narrative and Collaborative Approaches to Therapy (3SH) P-646: Family and Larger Systems (3SH) *P-637: Psychopathology and Assessment (*prerequisite for Counseling Practicum)  (3SH) P-619: Sexuality, Gender and Culture (3SH) P-774: Psychodynamic Family Therapy (3 SH) P-635: Ethical and Professional Issues in Clinical Practice (3SH) P-770: Basic Research Methodology (3SH) P-623: Couples Systems Therapy (3SH) P-634: Theological Perspectives on Pastoral & Spiritual Care (3SH) III. Clinical Practice (18 hours)

P-820, 821, 822: Pastoral Counseling Practicum (9 SH) P-823, 824, 825: Advanced Pastoral Counseling Practicum (9 SH)

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Note that a project handbook is available from the Academic Dean’s office. A schedule of dates for completion of projects is included in the handbook.

Postgraduate Residency in Supervised Counseling Indiana licensure laws for Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and/or Licensed Mental Health Counselor require a two-year supervised clinical experience following graduation. A candidate for licensure cannot qualify to sit for the license exam without this experience. CTS offers a postgraduate residency aimed at meeting the state licensure requirements and helping the graduate establish a viable clinical practice. Applicants are accepted from CTS counseling masters and DMin programs and from academic programs at other approved universities and graduate schools.

Institutional Review Board Proposals for research involving human subjects must be reviewed and approved by the CTS Institutional Review Board before the work on the project commences. The Board follows generally recognized protocols for IRBs and reports directly to the academic dean. It comprises the chair of Field V, the directors of the DMin Marriage and Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling programs, and a community representative who serves at the invitation of the IRB on a volunteer basis.

Degree Programs

LAY CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS Christian Theological Seminary offers two certificate programs for lay people who do not necessarily need or want a full academic degree: “Lay Ministerial Studies,” and “Lay Theological Studies”. These certificate programs are open to students who normally would enter as non-degree students. To apply for admission to the certificate programs in Lay Ministerial Studies or Lay Theological Studies, students must submit to the registrar’s office a completed application form, a one-page essay describing their reasons for pursuing the certificate program, and a letter of recommendation from their pastor/rabbi or a college or university professor. Students must hold a baccalaureate or its educational equivalent from a college or university accredited by a regional accrediting association. The seminary will admit only a limited number of students who do not possess a baccalaureate degree. To apply for admission to the certificate program in Spirituality and Psychotherapy, students must submit to the registrar’s office a completed application form, a one-page essay describing their reasons for pursuing the certificate program, and an official transcript certifying that they hold a master’s degree from an accredited counseling program. The certificate program in Spirituality and Psychotherapy can be applied to satisfy graduate theological requirements for clinicians seeking to become Fellows in the American Association of Pastoral Counselors (AAPC). Courses taken for credit under the certificate programs may be eligible for transfer to future degree programs at CTS.

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Certificate in Lay Theological Studies (6 courses, 18 semester hours)

B-501: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament (3SH) B-502: Introduction to the New Testament (3SH) T-___Theology course (3SH) H-___:History of Global Christianity course (3SH) C-___: Christianity and Culture course (3SH) One elective in Bible, Theology, History, or Christianity and Culture (3SH) Certificate in Lay Ministerial Studies (6 courses, 18 semester hours)

B-501: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament (3SH) B-502: Introduction to the New Testament (3SH) T-___: Theology course (3SH) H-___: History of Global Christianity course (3SH) 2 electives in one of the following fields: Christianity and Culture, Christian Ministries, Pastoral Theology and Psychology Certificate in Spirituality and Psychotherapy (6 Courses, 18 Semester hours) *

B-501: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament (3SH) or B-502: Introduction to the New Testament (3SH) P-632: Cultural Foundations and Dimensions of Healing (3SH) P-634: Theological Perspectives on Pastoral and Spiritual Care (3SH) T-___: Systematic and Philosophical Theology course (3SH) C-___: Christianity and Culture course (3SH) P-___: Pastoral Theology and Psychology Course

2013-2015 Course Catalog

DEGREE PROGRAMS

DUAL DEGREES MASTER OF DIVINITY/ Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling

T-500: Introduction to Theology (3 SH) T-626: Systematic Theology (3 SH) T-___: Theology Elective (3 SH) Field IV: Christianity and Culture (6 hours)

MDIV/MAMHC REQUIREMENTS

C-530: Introduction to Christian Ethics (3 SH)

This joint degree program requires 124 semester hours and a cumulative grade point average of 2.7. Students in this degree program will meet educational requirements for ordination (from denominations requiring an MDiv degree). Upon completion, students will meet graduate education and clinical requirements for Indiana State MHC licensure after providing at least 500 hours of counseling and receiving at least 100 hours of individual and group supervision in practicum. Students will also, after completion of a total of at least 4 units of CPE, meet requirements for Association of Professional Chaplains (APC) certification. Many chaplaincy positions, particularly in hospital settings, require both APC accreditation and ordination. While CTS makes every effort to be in compliance with the requirements of specific licensure boards (MHC) and professional credentialing bodies (AAPC, APC), students must take individual responsibility for monitoring and meeting licensure and credentialing requirements that may change between admission and graduation. Students are responsible for such denominational requirements as are required for ordination.

C-540: Social Issues in the Local Parish (3 SH)

Students are eligible for the X-999B after completion of P-634. Students conclude their degree by completing the requirements for practicum and the Capstone presentation listed below under “Supervised Clinical Practice�. Students must enroll in X-999B during the semester in which this work will be completed and pass the Capstone presentation. A criminal background check is required for any student taking the Counseling Practicum. An application fee of $20 is charged to partially offset the cost of the background check. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are prerequisites for practicum. Field I: Bible (12 hours)

B-501: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament (3 SH) B-___: Old Testament Exegesis (3 SH) B-502: Introduction to New Testament (3 SH) B-___: New Testament Exegesis (3 SH) Field II: History of Global Christianity (9 hours)

H-505: History of Global Christianity: Beginnings to 1500 (3 SH) H-506: History of Global Christianity: 1500-1800 (3 SH) H-507: History of Global Christianity: 1800 to Present (3 SH) Field III: Systematic & Philosophical Theology (9 hrs)

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or

or

C-550: Prophetic and Ethical Witness of the Churches (3 SH) or

C-645: Theological Ethics of Martin Luther King Jr. (3 SH) and

C-571: The Church and the Arts (3 SH) Field V: Pastoral Theology and Psychology (30 hrs)

P-510: Practice and Context of Spiritually Integrated Psychotherapy (3 SH)* P-531: Personality, Human Development and Faith (3 SH)* P-632: Cultural Foundations and Dimensions of Healing (3 SH) P-634: Theological Perspectives on Pastoral & Spiritual Care (3 SH)** P-635: Ethical and Professional Issues in Clinical Practice (3 SH) P-637: Psychopathology & Assessment (3 SH) P-630: Psychoanalytic Theory & Technique (3 SH) P-770: Basic Research Methodology (3 SH) P-800, 801: Clinical Pastoral Education I (6 SH) Field VI: Christian Ministries (15 hours)

M-510: Worship and Church Music (3 SH) M-514, M-516: Introduction to Christian Ministry and SCOFE (3 SH) M-515, M-517: Introduction to Christian Ministry and SCOFE (3 SH) M-520: Introduction to Preaching (3 SH) or

M-530: Women in the Pulpit (3 SH) M-540: Education and Formation in the Church (3 SH) Interfield Courses (4 hours)

X-515: Spirituality, Autobiography and Christian Ministry (3 SH) X-516: Peer Learning in Ministry (1 SH) X-727: Cross Cultural Experience (0 SH)

Human Development and Culture (6 hours)

Dual Degrees

P-675: Vocation and Appraisal (3 SH) Choose one course from this group: P-520: Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy (3 SH) P-525: Aging and the Family (3 SH)    P-619: Sexuality, Gender and Culture (3 SH) P-626: Loss and Mourning (3 SH) P-638: Religion, Medicine and Pastoral Care (3 SH) P-641: Spirituality and God-Images in Clinical and Cultural Contexts  (3 SH) P-739: Freud, Jung and Religion (3 SH) P-755: Affect and Human Transformation (3 SH) Assessment and Treatment (6 hours)

P-624: Group Dynamics and Leadership (3 SH) or

P-760: Group Psychotherapy (3 SH) Choose one course from the group:

P-621: Integration of Marriage & Family Therapy Theory (3 SH) P-623: Couples Systems Therapy (3 SH) P-650: Treating Addictive Behaviors (3 SH) P-745: Narrative and Collaborative Approaches to Therapy (3 SH) P-774: Psychodynamic Family Therapy (3 SH) P-775: Short Term Family Therapy (3 SH) Supervised Clinical Practice (18 hours) P-820-825: Counseling Practicum I and II (18 SH) and

X999B “Self, Countertransference, and Spirit” (non-credit) culminating in a Capstone Presentation and a 12-15 page integration paper in preparation of the Capstone Presentation (non-credit)     Capstone is normally taken the 6th semester of practicum.  Students must have completed 380 hours of client contact hours prior to taking the Capstone. Course authorization is required. Electives (9 Hours)

The number of required elective hours is determined from the choice of CPE or counseling practicum. Students who plan to seek licensure as a Mental Health Counselor in the state of Indiana must assure that they take the electives necessary to meet the requirements of the law. * Prerequisite for Supervised Clinical Practice ** Prerequisite for X999B

MASTER OF DIVINITY/ Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy MDiv/MAMFT REQUIREMENTS This joint degree program requires 124 semester hours (SH) and a cumulative GPA of 2.7. Students in this degree program will meet educational requirements for ordination (from denominations requiring an MDiv degree). Students must complete 500 client contact hours of marriage and family therapy, of which 250 hours must have more than one person in the room; plus 100 hours of supervision. Students matriculating before fall 2011 are eligible for the X-999 exam only after the completion of P-634. The X-999 paper must address all rubrics required of the X- 817 seminar, the theological understanding of the student’s marriage and family therapy ministry and demonstrate fulfillment of the cross-cultural requirement. Students matriculating in Fall 2011 and after will complete the requirements listed below under Integration and Competency Assessment and do not complete X-999. Students matriculating before Fall 2011 may elect to complete X-999A “Self, Systems, and Spirit” which culminates in a clinical capstone presentation in place of X-999. Students are responsible for such denominational requirements as are required for ordination. A criminal background check is required for any student taking Counseling Practicum. An application fee of $20 is charged to partially offset the cost of the background check. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are prerequisites for practicum. Field I: Bible (12 hours)

B-501: Introduction to Hebrew Bible/Old Testament (3 SH) B-___:Old Testament Exegesis (3 SH) B-502: Introduction to New Testament (3 SH) B-___:New Testament Exegesis (3 SH) Field II: History of Global Christianity (9 hours)

H-505: History of Global Christianity: Beginnings to 1500 (3 SH) H-506: History of Global Christianity: 1500-1800 (3 SH) H-507: History of Global Christianity: 1800 to Present (3 SH) Field III: Systematic & Philosophical Theology (9 hrs)

T-500: Introduction to Theology (3 SH) T-626: Systematic Theology (3 SH) T-___: Theology Elective (3 SH) Field IV: Christianity and Culture (6 hours)

C-530: Introduction to Christian Ethics (3 SH) or

C-540: Social Issues in the Local Parish (3 SH) or

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

DUAL DEGREES C-550: Prophetic and Ethical Witness of the Churches (3 SH) or

C-645: Theological Ethics of Martin Luther King Jr. (3 SH)

Electives (9 hrs)

Three courses from any field Note: Students may not count the same course in two different groups.

and

C-571: The Church and the Arts (3 SH) Field VI: Christian Ministries (15 hours)

M-510: Worship and Church Music (3 SH) M-514, M-516: Introduction to Christian Ministry and SCOFE (3 SH) M-515, M-517: Introduction to Christian Ministry and SCOFE (3 SH) M-520: Introduction to Preaching or M-530: Women in the Pulpit (3 SH) M-540: Education and Formation in the Church (3 SH) INTERFIELD COURSES (4 hours)

X-515: Spirituality, Autobiography and Christian Ministry (3 SH) X-516: Peer Learning in Ministry (1 SH) X-727: Cross Cultural Experience (0 SH) X-999: Thesis, Project or Paper (non-credit) Field V: Pastoral Theology and Psychology (48 hrs)

P-520: Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy (3 SH)* P-531: Personality, Human Development and Faith (3 SH)* P-619: Sexuality, Gender and Culture (3 SH) P-621: Integration of Marriage and Family Therapy Theory (3 SH)— concurrent with semester of Practicum P-634: Theological Perspectives of Pastoral and Spiritual Care (3 SH) P-635: Ethical and Professional Issues in Clinical Practice (3 SH) P-637: Psychopathology and Assessment (3 SH)* P-770: Basic Research Methodology (3 SH) P-800, P-801: Clinical Pastoral Education I (6 SH) P-820-825: Counseling Practicum I and II (18 SH) Assessment and Treatment in Marriage & Family Therapy (9 hours)

P-623: Couples Systems Therapy (3 SH) P-745: Narrative and Collaborative Approaches to Therapy (3SH) AND Choose one course from the following

P-650: Treating Addictive Behaviors (3 SH) P-711: Children and Adolescents in the Family (3 SH) P-774: Psychodynamic Family Therapy (3 SH) P-775: Short Term Family Therapy (3 SH) Human Development and Family Studies (3 hours) Choose one course from this group:

P-525: Aging and the Family (3 SH) P-626: Loss and Mourning (3 SH) P-646: Families and Larger Systems (3 SH) P-711: Children and Adolescents in the Family (3 SH) P-755: Affect and Human Transformation (3 SH) Integrative and Competency Assessment   Portfolio of papers from P520, P621 and P623 or P745 (non credit) X-999A: Self, Systems, and Spirit (non-credit) Pre-requisite: T 500 PAGE 32

NATIONAL ACCREDITATION & APPROVAL The MAMFT degree of the dual degree is nationally accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education, an accrediting body accredited by the U.S. Department of Education and CHEA. In addition, the MAMFT is an approved training program by the American Association of Pastoral Counselors.

PERSONAL COUNSELING All students are expected to receive psychotherapy during their program. Weekly personal therapy is a prerequisite for practicum admission. Personal therapy with a gifted clinician assists student therapists in working through problem areas in their own lives that may adversely affect clients and their own participation in an emotionally challenging training program; it provides a unique training experience that helps students understand the process of exploring the depth and interrelationship of systemic and intrapsychic features of human life.

Practicum Application & Guidelines MAMFT students can apply for admission to practicum after completing P531 Human Development, P637 Psychopathology and Assessment, and P520- Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy.  Students electing the CPE option for completion of course work must complete CPE before entering practicum.  Further, MDiv/MAMFT students must complete one year of SCOFE before applying for practicum. Students are accepted for practicum based upon successful completion of role plays as a screening process.  Concerns that arise during those role plays may be addressed through additional evaluation as determined by the counseling faculty and clinic director.  Entering cohort groups are normally limited to four persons for summer and six students for fall and spring.  Priority is given to students who have the greater number of completed semester hours.  Practicum admission is based on limitation of the cohort group due to available supervision in order to provide a conducive learning environment.  Beginning with the entering counseling classes of spring 2012, all MFT counseling students will normally be required to enter practicum no later than the 4th semester of coursework.  Students in the program will receive at least 100 hours of individual and group supervision in practicum and at least 50 hours of that supervision will be based on direct observation, video tape or audio tape.

Dual Degrees

Practicum Setting Christian Theological Seminary’s Counseling Center provides quality care for clients, students, faculty and staff in a state-of-the-art facility located on the seminary campus. The facility includes:

MASTER OF DIVINITY/ Master of Theological Studies

Twenty private counseling rooms

MDiv/MTS REQUIREMENTS

Child and Play Therapy area

This joint degree program is designed for ministry students who want to add an academic specialization and thesis to their MDiv work or are thinking of a PhD. It requires 108 semester hours (SH) and a cumulative GPA of 2.7. Included in the 108 hours are 6 SH of thesis research and writing, culminating in an oral examination by the thesis advisor and two other faculty members. Students focusing in Bible need to demonstrate competence in the relevant biblical language.

Personal meditation area Viewing rooms for supervision Space for professional and academic conferences Full ADA compliance

REQUIREMENTS FOR CAPSTONE Capstone, X999A “Self, Systems, and Spirit” is normally taken the sixth semester of practicum.  Students must have completed 380 hours of client contact hours prior to taking the capstone; MFT students must have 180 relational hours of the total 380 hours completed.  A prerequisite of T 500 and course authorization is required from instructor.

Postgraduate Residency in Supervised Counseling Indiana licensure laws for Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and/or Licensed Mental Health Counselor require a two-year supervised clinical experience following graduation. A candidate for licensure cannot qualify to sit for the license exam without this experience. CTS offers a postgraduate residency aimed at meeting the state licensure requirements and helping the graduate establish a viable clinical practice. Applicants are accepted from CTS masters programs and from academic programs at other approved universities and graduate schools.

INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD Proposals for research involving human subjects must be reviewed and approved by the CTS Institutional Review Board before the work on the project commences. The Board follows generally recognized protocols for IRBs and reports directly to the academic dean. It comprises the chair of Field V, the directors of the D.Min., Marriage and Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling programs, and a community representative who serves at the invitation of the IRB on a volunteer basis.

Field I: Bible (12 SH)

B-501: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament (3 SH) B-___: Old Testament Exegesis (3 SH) B-502: Introduction to New Testament (3 SH) B-___: New Testament Exegesis (3 SH) Field II: History of Global Christianity (9 SH)

H-505: History of Global Christianity: Beginnings to 1500* (3SH) H-506: History of Global Christianity: 1500-1800* (3SH) H-507: History of Global Christianity: 1800 to Present* (3SH) Field III: Systematic & Philosophical Theology (9 SH)

T-500: Introduction to Theology* (3SH) T-626: Systematic Theology* (3SH) T-___: Theology elective (3SH) Field IV: Christianity & Culture (6 SH)

C-571: The Church and the Arts* (3SH) and

C-530: Introduction to Christian Ethics (3SH) Social Issues in the Parish (3SH) or C-550: Ethical & Prophetic Witness of the Churches (3SH) or C-645: Theological Ethics of MLK (3SH) or C-540:

Field V: Pastoral Theology & Psychology (30 SH)

P-500: Basics of Pastoral Care and Counseling (3SH) † Filed VI: Christian Ministries (17 or 21 SH) M-510 Worship and Church Music (3SH) † M-514 Introduction to Christian Ministry (2SH) (taken with M-516) † M-516 Supervised Concurrent Field Education (1SH) † M-515 Introduction to Christian Ministry (2SH) (taken with M517) † M-517 Supervised Concurrent Field Education (1SH) † M-520 Introduction to Preaching (3SH) or

M-530 Women in the Pulpit (3SH) † M-540 Education and Formation in the Church (3SH) † M-616, 617 Advanced SCOFE (2SH) or P-800, P-801 Clinical Pastoral Education (6SH) PAGE 33

2013-2015 Course Catalog

DUAL DEGREES Interfield Courses (16 SH)

M-510: Worship and Church Music (3 SH) M-514, M-516: Introduction to Christian Ministry and SCOFE (3 SH) M-515, M-517: Introduction to Christian Ministry and SCOFE (3 SH) M-520: Introduction to Preaching (3 SH)

MASTER OF DIVINITY/ Master of Arts in Multicultural Christian Education

or

M-530: Women in the Pulpit (3 SH) M-540: Education and Formation in the Church (3 SH) Interfield Courses (4 hours)

12 hours from Fields I, II, III and/or IV. Such research should be selected from advanced courses with a view towards identifying a thesis topic and pursuing focused thesis research. Courses in Field V and VI can be taken for credit only with the permission of the thesis advisor and the director of the M.T.S. program. General Electives (20-24 SH)

*Courses marked with an asterisk must be taken within 52 semester hours of the degree program. †Students are encouraged to take courses marked with a dagger within 66 hours.

This joint degree program is designed for ministry students who want to add an educational specialization to their MDiv work. It requires 108 semester hours and a cumulative GPA of 2.5. Included in the 108 hours are the fulfillment of cross-cultural requirements, and the 3SH of thesis/project research and writing, culminating in an oral examination by the thesis/project advisor and one other faculty member. 

MDIV/MAMCE REQUIREMENTS 108 semester hours (SH) and a cumulative GPA of 2.5. Field I: Bible (12 SH)

B-501: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament* (3 SH) B-___: Old Testament Exegesis (3 SH) B-502: Introduction to New Testament* (3 SH) B-___: New Testament Exegesis (3 SH) Field II: History of Global Christianity (9 SH)

H-505: History of Global Christianity: Beginnings to 1500* (3SH) H-506: History of Global Christianity: 1500-1800* (3SH) H-507: History of Global Christianity: 1800 to Present* (3SH) Field III: Systematic & Philosophical Theology (9 SH)

T-500: Introduction to Theology* (3SH) T-626: Systematic Theology* (3SH) T-___: Theology elective (3SH) Field IV: Christianity & Culture (6 SH)

C-571: The Church and the Arts* (3SH) C-580: Introduction to World Religions C-660: Sociology of Religion (3SH) and

C-530: Introduction to Christian Ethics (3 SH) C-540: Social Issues in the Local Parish (3 SH) or ____ C-550: Prophetic and Ethical Witness of the Churches (3 SH) or ____ C-645: Theological Ethics of Martin Luther King Jr. (3 SH) or ____

Field V: Pastoral Theology & Psychology (30 SH)

____ P-500: Basics of Pastoral Care and Counseling (3 SH) † ____ P-531: Personality, Human Development and Faith (3SH) Field VI: Christian Ministries (23-27 SH)

M-510: Worship and Church Music (3 SH) † M-514 Introduction to Christian Ministry (2SH) (taken with M-516) †

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Dual Degrees

M-516 Supervised Concurrent Field Education (1SH)† M-515 Introduction to Christian Ministry (2SH) (taken with M517)† M-517 Supervised Concurrent Field Education (1SH) † M-520: Introduction to Preaching (3 SH)† or ____ M-530: Women in the Pulpit (3 SH) † M-540: Education and Formation in the Church (3 SH) † M-625: Pedagogy of Hope: Christian Ed. and the Politics of Solidarity (3SH) M-748 Christian Education for Public Contexts (3SH) and

M-616, M-617: Supervised Concurrent Field Education – Year II (2 SH) or ____ P-800, P-801: Clinical Pastoral Education I (6 SH) Interfield Courses (8 SH)

X-515: Introduction to Theological Education and Formation (required first semester) (3 SH)* X-516: Peer Learning in Ministry (Required 2nd semester) (1 SH)* X-725 Cross-cultural Studies (3SH) X-811 Final Project (1SH) Elective Courses - Specialized Ministry (Choose 3 = 9 hours)*

These suggested courses are based on our current curriculum and the list could be expanded. The elective courses are taken according to the area of specialization Christian Education, Youth, Children and Urban Ministry in consultation with the student’s advisor. M-642 Educational Ministry with Children (3SH) M-630 Contemporary Ministry with Youth (3SH) M-648 Nurturing Faith across Lifespan (3SH) M-801 Issues Affecting Church Leadership (3SH) M-624 Group Dynamics and Leadership (3SH) M-719 Worship, Theology and Culture (3SH) M-740 Contemporary Issues in Faith Formation (3SH) M-605 Pastoral Leadership from a Black Church Perspective (3SH) C-550 Ethical & Prophetic Witness of the Churches (3SH) C-650The Church and the Urban Poor (3SH) C-754 Living for Peace in a Violent World (3SH) P-774 Psychodynamic Family Therapy (3SH) General Electives (16-20 SH)

Please consult with your denomination about how the denominational requirements fit with the M.Div. requirements. Most denominational courses will count as electives in the M.Div. *Courses marked with an asterisk must be taken within the first 49 semester hours of the degree program. †Students are encouraged to take courses marked with a dagger within the first 60 hours.

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION

COURSE INFORMATION FIELD I: BIBLE Bible study at CTS proceeds from the premise that we can more faithfully draw on the Bible in our theology and practice if we take into account its ancient literary, linguistic, historical, cultural, and religious contexts. The introductory courses in each testament give an overview of biblical content and a taste of the methods of contemporary scholarship. Exegetical courses help students develop the skills needed for in-depth study and interpretation. Students who are really serious about the Bible should learn Greek and Hebrew, which are offered in alternating years. Ron Allen, ordained in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and Professor of Preaching and New Testament has been at CTS since 1982. Previously, he and his spouse, the Reverend Linda McKiernan-Allen, were co-ministers of First Christian Church, Grand Island, Nebraska. Allen received a PhD from Drew University, an MDiv from Union Theological Seminary and an A.B. from Phillips University. In addition to more than 100 articles and chapters, Allen has authored or co-authored more than 35 books, the most recent being Sermon Treks: Trailways to Creative Preaching in the Church, Acts (the first volume issued in the Fortress Biblical Preaching Commentary series), New Testament 101: A Guide for People Reading the New Testament for the First Time. Recently published are the three-volume Preaching God’s Transforming Justice: A Lectionary Commentary Featuring 22 Holy Days for Justice, and A Faith of Your Own: Naming What You Really Believe and Preaching and the Other. Widely used books are Thinking Theologically: The Preacher as Theologian and The Life of Jesus for Today. With Clark M. Williamson he wrote a three volume lectionary commentary, Preaching without Prejudice. He directed one of the first empirical studies of people who listen to sermons that has generated four books, all but one jointly authored: Listening to Listeners: Homiletic Case Studies, Hearing the Sermon: Relationship, Content, and Feeling, Believing in Preaching: What Laity Think about Sermons, and Make the Word Come Alive: Lessons from Laity. Other volumes in print include Preaching Luke-Acts,; Preaching Verse by Verse (coauthor) and One Gospel, Many Ears: Preaching for Different Listeners in the Congregation (co-author), Interpreting the Gospel: An Introduction to Preaching and its popular companion Patterns of Preaching: A Sermon Sampler. Theology for Preaching: Authority, Truth, and Knowledge of God in a Postmodern Ethos. (co-author), The Teaching Sermon, Preaching the Topical Sermon, Contemporary Biblical Interpretation for Preaching, The Storyteller’s Companion to the Bible: The Parables,, Wholly Scripture: Preaching Themes from the Bible, Preaching: An Essential Guide, Preaching is Believing: The Sermon as Theological Reflection, Preaching and Practical Ministry, and Preaching and Its Partners. The Teaching Minister (co-author);

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A Credible and Timely Word: Process Theology and Preaching; Adventures of the Spirit: A Guide to Worship from the Perspective of Process Theology; and Thankful Praise (co-author). He is an active member of West Street Christian Church in Tipton, Indiana, Indiana, where his spouse is the minister. He enjoys bike riding and travel. Allen and McKiernan-Allen have five young adult children: Canaan, Genesis, Moriah, Barek, and Sabbath Holly Hearon, T.J. and Virginia Liggett Professor of Christian Traditions and New Testament, holds a PhD from the Graduate Theological Union, a DMin from Union Presbyterian Seminary, and a BA from Wellesley College. Hearon’s research interests include the roles of media and memory in shaping theology, ethics, and identity, women and Christian origins, and the emergence of Christianity within Formative Judaism. Recent publications include “The Interplay between Written and Spoken Word in the Second Testament as Background to the Emergence of Written Gospels,” in Oral Tradition, 2101 [online journal. http://journal.oraltradition. org/issues/25i/hearon]; “Mapping Written and Spoken Word in the Gospel of Mark.” In The Interface of Orality and Writing: Seeing, Speaking, Writing in the Shaping of New Genres, ed. Annette Weisenrieder and Robert Coote.(Mohr Siebeck, 2010; “Storytelling in Oral and Written Media Contexts of the Ancient Mediterranean World,” in Jesus, the Voice, and the Text, ed. Tom Thatcher (Baylor University Press, 2008); “The Implications of Orality for Studies of the Biblical Text,” in Performing the Gospel: Orality, Memory and Mark, ed. Richard A. Horsley, Jonathan A. Draper, and John Miles Foley (Fortress, 2006); “The Story of ‘the Woman Who Anointed Jesus’ as Social Memory: A Methodological Proposal for the Study of Tradition as Memory,” in Memory, Tradition, and Text: Uses of the Past in Early Christianity, Semeia Studies 52, ed. Alan Kirk and Tom Thatcher (SBL, 2005); “Listen to the Voices of the Women” (with Linda Maloney), in Distant Voices Drawing Near: Essays in Honor of Antoinette Clark Wire, ed. Holly Hearon (Liturgical Press, 2004). Her book “The Mary Magdalene Tradition: Witness and Counter-

Course Information

Witness in Early Christian Communities” (The Liturgical Press, 2004) was awarded first place in the category of “first time author” by the Catholic Press Association; Hearon is a member of the Society of Biblical Literature (currently serving on the steering committee of the Bible in Ancient and Modern Media Section), the Catholic Biblical Association, and is a past President of the Midwest Society of Biblical Literature. She is also a minister of word and sacrament in the Presbyterian Church (USA) and a regular contributor to the Working Preacher. She was also a writer for the Human Rights Campaign’s “Out in Scripture” project. When not in her study or classroom, she enjoys Civic Theatre, gardening, travel, and playing piano fourhand. Marti J. Steussy, MacAllister-

Petticrew Professor of Biblical Interpretation is an ordained minister of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). She has taught at CTS since 1988. Steussy is a member of the Society for Biblical Literature, the Network of Biblical Storytellers and its Seminar, the Association of Disciples for Theological Discussion, Spiritual Directors International, and the Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences. Her scholarly work includes books on David, Samuel, Psalms, and the Greek additions to Daniel. She edited and contributed to the 2003 Chalice Introduction to the Old Testament, and has written poetry and two science fiction novels. In addition to teaching First Testament courses, Steussy directs the MTS program and has taught courses on the Hebrew and Greek languages, mythology, spirituality, environmental issues, process theology, forgiveness, religion and science, and mysticism. Professor Steussy earned her MDiv at Earlham School of Religion and her PhD at Vanderbilt. She has a special interest in the intersection of creativity and spiritual growth and is currently doing clinical training at the Center for Religion and Psychotherapy of Chicago. She explores her interests in science fiction and in animals in articles available from her CTS faculty home page. Wilma Ann Bailey, Minnie

Vautrin Chair of Christian Witness and Professor of Hebrew and Aramaic Scripture, joined the CTS faculty in 2000. Bailey holds an M.A. and Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University, an M.Div. from Goshen Biblical Seminary “A.M.B.S.,” and a B.S. from Herbert H. Lehman College (formerly Hunter College in the Bronx). She studied at the University of Haifa (Hebrew Ulpan) and did independent research at Tantur, Ecumenical Institute for Theological Studies in Jerusalem. She also earned a certificate in French language and civilization from the Center of French Studies for Foreigners at the University of Caen. Prior to joining CTS, she served on the faculties of Messiah College and Goshen College. The Society of Biblical Literature named Bailey a Regional Scholar in 1999. She is a member of the Society of Biblical Literature, and the Catholic Biblical Association and PAGE 37

Bailey has presented scholarly papers in a variety of settings and has published articles, essays, book reviews, book chapters, adult Bible study guides, and recently a book titled “You Shall Not Kill” or “You Shall Not Murder”: The Assault on a Biblical Text. She is a former President of the Eastern Great Lakes Biblical Society (20082009 year). In addition to “Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament,” she teaches Hebrew language and exegetical and topical courses in peace and justice, race and ethnicity and prayer and meditation. Currently, she serves on the Board of Trustees of Eastern Mennonite University. Professor Bailey enjoys reading, hiking, attending lectures, participating in church activities and traveling. She has visited over thirty one countries in Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia, North, South and Central America and the Caribbean in addition to all but five American states.

Bible Courses B-501: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/ Old Testament (Bailey, Steussy)

Overview of the Old Testament’s content, history, and theological themes, with special attention to the conversation between different strands of tradition. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. B-502: Introduction to New Testament (Allen, Hearon)

Survey of the context and content of the New Testament writings with an introduction to interpretation. Special attention to Christianity’s origin as a sect within Judaism and to issues of faith and practice in the early Church. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. B-601, B-602: Introduction to Biblical Hebrew (Bailey)

Elementary course in biblical Hebrew: the alphabet, grammar, syntax, vocabulary building, reading of simple texts. Both semesters must be taken to receive credit. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH each. Not open to auditors. B-603: Hebrew Exegesis (Bailey)

The focus will be on developing skills in translation and exegesis and reading fluency. Prerequisite: B-601, B-602. 3 SH. B-604: Hebrew Readings (Bailey)

Reading of selected texts in the Hebrew Bible and other ancient Hebrew texts. Prerequisite: B-601, B-602. 3 SH B-611, B-612: New Testament Greek (Hearon)

Introduction to vocabulary, grammar and syntax of Koine Greek. Reading of selected texts from the New Testament. Students must take both semesters to receive credit. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH each. Not open to auditors.

2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION B-613: Greek Exegesis (Hearon)

The focus will be on developing skills in translation and exegesis and reading fluency. Prerequisite: B-611, B-612. 1-3 SH. B-700: Genesis (Bailey)

Exegesis of Genesis, focusing on texts that have been used to shape contemporary ideas about creation, faith, and the human community. Prerequisite: B-501. 3 SH. B-710: 1 & 2 Samuel (Steussy)

Exegesis of the books of Samuel, with attention to historical questions, narrative art, and theological issues. Experimentation with methods for contemporary interaction with the story. Prerequisite: B-501. 3 SH.

B-751: Gospel of Matthew (Hearon)

Exploration of how the Gospel shapes identity, character, theology and ethics in social contexts. Exegesis. Prerequisite: B-502. 3 SH. B-752: Gospel of Mark (Allen)

Exegesis and interpretation, with consideration given to the literary character and theological purpose of the gospel. Prerequisite: B-502. 3 SH. B-753: The Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles (Allen)

An analysis of the narrative movement and theology of Luke-Acts. Exegesis. Prerequisite: B-502. 3 SH.

B-715: Job (Steussy)

Exegesis of Job, with special attention to issues of suffering. Explorations of methods for contemporary theological, artistic and pastoral engagement with the book. Prerequisite: B-501. 3 SH.

B-754: Gospel of John (Hearon)

Exploration of how the Gospel shapes identity, character, theology, and ethics in social contexts. Exegesis. Prerequisite: B-502. 3 SH.

B-716: The Psalms (Steussy)

Introduction to the genres, imagery, and overall shape of the Psalter. Exegesis of selected psalms and exploration of methods for contemporary interpretation and appropriation. Prerequisite: B-501. 3 SH. B-720: Isaiah (Bailey)

Exegesis of selected portions of the text with attention to the role of the prophet in society and Christian and Jewish interpretations. Prerequisite: B-501. 3 SH. B-730: The Bible and the Earth (Steussy/Johnston)

Using recent work in Bible and ecotheology, this course attends to earth’s voice in the Bible and also the interpretation of texts that silence it. Does not meet exegesis requirement. Cross-listed with T-830 Prerequisite: B-501, B-502. 3 SH. B-737: Prayer and Meditation in the Hebrew Bible (Bailey)

An exegesis course that examines the structure, content, theology, context, posture, techniques, function, language and semantics of biblical prayer and meditation. Prerequisite: B-501. 3 SH. B-745: Who Do You Say That I Am? Christologies of the Second Testament (Hearon)

B-756: Romans (Allen)

Emphasis on theology of Paul. Exegetical and historical problems studied. Prerequisite: B-502. 3 SH. B-777: The Book of Revelation (Allen)

Exegetical study with attention to religious and social content and the relationship between power and worship. Assessment of contemporary understandings. Prerequisite: B-502. 3 SH. B-791: The Parables of the Gospels (Allen)

Purpose, message and provenance of each parable studied. Effort to detect development in church usage. Exegesis. Prerequisite: B-502. 3 SH. B-792: The Miracle Stories of the Second Testament (Allen)

Exegesis of miracle stories of Second Testament. Attention to Jewish and Hellenistic backgrounds. Critical reflection on contemporary understandings. Students will develop a sermon manuscript. Prerequisite: B-502. 3 SH. B-811: Women and Christian Origins (Hearon)

Study of women in the Second Testament and their roles in the early church with simultaneous exploration of roles of women in congregations today. Exegesis. Prerequisite: B-502. 3 SH.

Explores a variety of Christologies in the Second Testament: how they are shaped by social context and shape our lived responses to Jesus. Exegesis. Prerequisite: B-502. 3 SH.

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Course Information

B-814: Laments in Ancient Israel (Bailey)

A study of the lament genre and its function in rituals of grief and loss with comparative study of the sorrow songs of the AfricanAmerican tradition. Exegesis. Prerequisite: B-501. 3 SH. B-815: Biblical Narrative (Steussy)

Exegesis of selected biblical narratives with special attention to literary art, theological import, and methods for contemporary engagement with the stories. Exegesis. Prerequisite: B-501. 3 SH. B-835 Race and Ethnicity in the Hebrew Bible (BAILEY)

The purpose of this course is to examine issues of race and ethnicity in the Hebrew Bible and in biblical interpretation. It will include exegesis of selected texts. Prerequisite: B-501. 3 SH. B-877: War, Peace and Justice in the Hebrew Bible (Bailey)

An examination of concepts of peace (shalom), war and justice in the Hebrew Bible. Attention to their interrelatedness and to contemporary implications. Exegesis. Prerequisite: B-501. 3 SH. B-896: Guided Research in the Hebrew Bible/ Old Testament (Staff)

Intensive research in a selected topic. Open only to superior, advanced students. 1, 2 or 3 SH. B-899: Guided Research in the New Testament (Staff)

Intensive research on a selected topic. Open only to superior, advanced students. 1, 2 or 3 SH.

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION FIELD II: History of Global Christianity Courses in this field examine the global Christian movement from the origins of Jesus-centered communities through the early twenty-first century. Varieties of practice, thought, doctrine, and spirituality are explored; Christian influences in the social, cultural and political arenas of diverse civilizations are engaged. Attention is given to interactions between Christianity and religious expressions that already existed in the first century C.E. and those that emerged in succeeding centuries; likewise the alliances and conflicts between Christian groups are explored. Courses provide surveys of Christianity in the civilizations of the Middle East, Africa, Asia , Europe, South and North America and Australia. Other courses  focus on specific geographical regions,  topics or periods  All courses stress the place of theologies, polities and spiritualities in actual human environments and are intended to assist students in developing a historical-critical hermeneutic of their own traditions. Carmelo Álvarez is Affiliate

Professor, Church History and Theology, Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis, Indiana. He is a missionaryconsultant (2002-) for Theological Education working with Pentecostal Churches in Latin America and the Caribbean, Common Global Ministries Board, Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in the US and Canada and the United Church of Christ in the US. Carmelo is Professor of Global Christianity at the Center for Theological Studies of the Evangelical Pentecostal Union of Venezuela (CEVET). He is Adjunct Professor at South American Ministerial Seminary (SEMISUD), Quito, Ecuador, Church of God, Cleveland, TN. Carmelo is Visiting Professor for Pentecostal Studies at Evangelical Theological Seminary of Matanzas, Cuba. Carmelo was ordained by the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Puerto Rico. Carmelo has been missionary in Mexico, Costa Rica, Chile and Venezuela, 1974-1992, with his wife Rev. Raquel Rodríguez Álvarez, an ordained pastor in the ELCA. He worked for nine years in the United States as Director of Cross-Cultural Studies, Professor of Church History and Theology and Dean of Students at Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis, Indiana. Carmelo earned his Ph. D. from Free University, The Netherlands. He has published 16 books, one of them in English: People of Hope: the Protestant Movement in Central America, (New York: Friendship Press, 1990). Carmelo has written hundreds of articles in English and Spanish, primarily on Pentecostal issues in encyclopedias, dictionaries, journals and magazines. Edwin David Aponte is Vice

President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Christianity and Culture and has been at CTS since July 2012. Aponte received the PhD and MA degrees in religion and culture from Temple University, MATS in Old Testament/Hebrew Bible from GordonConwell Theological Seminary, and the BA in biblical and theological studies from Gordon College. Previously he was Research Professor of Latina/o and Latin PAGE 40

American Christianity in the Center of World Christianity at New York Theological Seminary (2010-2012), and as the Vice President of Academic Affairs, Dean of the Seminary, and Professor of Religion and Culture at Lancaster Theological Seminary. He also served as Director of Advanced Studies (2004-2006) and as first Assistant and then Associate Professor of Christianity and Culture (1998-2006) at Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. From 1994-1998 Aponte was Director of the Institute for International and Cultural Studies at North Park University in Chicago, Illinois, that included the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, the Center for Korean Studies, the Center for Africana Studies, the Center for Scandinavian Studies, and the Center for Latino Studies, each involved in many intercultural, international, and inter-religious initiatives. Aponte’s scholarship specializes in the intersection of religious faith and culture, Hispanic/Latino religions, African American religions, North American religious history, and congregational studies. He is author of ¡Santo! Varieties of Latino/a Spirituality (Orbis Books, 2012), co-editor of Handbook of Latina/o Theologies (Chalice Press, 2006) and co-author of Introducing Latino/a Theologies (Orbis Books, 2001), in addition to many other writings. He received fellowships and research support from the Fund for Theological Education, the Hispanic Theological Initiative, Temple University, Southern Methodist University, the Pew Charitable Trusts, the Fund for Graduate Education of the Presbyterian Church, (USA), the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion, The Louisville Institute, and Lilly Endowment Inc. Dr. Aponte is an ordained Teaching Elder (Minister of Word and Sacrament) in the Presbyterian Church, (USA). He was a member of the Pastor Initiative Cluster of the Re-Forming Ministry Initiative, a national project of the Office of Theology, Worship, and Education, PCUSA and was active in the Presbytery of Donegal in Pennsylvania serving on the Committee for Ministry as well as in other roles. Previously he served as Parish Associate at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church in Dallas, Texas and in Grace Presbytery as Member, Vicemoderator, and Moderator of the Committee on Examinations; a term on the Presbytery Council; service as a Commissioner to the Synod of the Sun, which included membership on the Synod’s Higher Education Commission; membership on the Call Consultation Task Group of Grace Presbytery; and as a member of the Presbytery’s Administrative Commission for the United African Presbyterian Church.

Course Information

Greg Clapper, Affiliate Professor

of Global Christianity, serves as Professor of Philosophy and Religion at the University of Indianapolis. His teaching interests include Systematic Theology; Christian Spiritual Formation; Wesleyan Studies; Historical Theology, especially the thought of: Augustine, Edwards, Wesley, Schleiermacher and Kierkegaard; Character Ethics; Philosophy of Religion; Christian Political Thought. After studying philosophy and psychology as an undergraduate and Masters degree student, Clapper received his M.Div. degree from Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary and Ph.D. degree from Emory University. His dissertation, directed by Don E. Saliers, was entitled “John Wesley on Religious Affections.” Clapper has also served as Associate Professor in the ChapmanBenson Chair of Christian Faith and Philosophy, Huntingdon College, Montgomery, Alabama, and as Senior Minister of Trinity United Methodist Church, Waverly, IA. Professional Publications include numerous journal articles and three books: When the World Breaks Your Heart: Spiritual Ways of Living With Tragedy (Nashville: Upper Room Books, 1999), As If the Heart Mattered: A Wesleyan Spirituality (Nashville: Upper Room Books, 1997), and John Wesley on Religious Affections: His Views on Experience and Emotion and Their Role in the Christian Life and Theology (Metuchen: Scarecrow Press, 1989). Scott Seay earned an M.Div. degree from CTS in 1996. He returned to his alma mater in 2005 after teaching in upstate New York and northeast Ohio. In addition to his CTS degree, he holds a B.A. from Wabash College, an M.A. from the University of Chicago Divinity School, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in church history from Vanderbilt University. Seay’s primary teaching and research interests include all dimensions of U.S. religious history and modern European church history, including evangelicalism and the Holiness-Pentecostal Movement. He is particularly interested in the relationship between Christian faith and social problems in historical perspective, and the historical relationship between religion and politics. A revision of his dissertation has been published under the title Hanging Between Heaven and Earth: Capital Crime, Execution Preaching, and the Shape of Theology in Early New England (Northern Illinois University Press, 2009).  An ordained Disciple, Seay has keen interests in the global expressions of the Stone-Campbell Movement.  He has just concluded a six-year project with many colleagues across the globe to produce The Stone-Campbell Movement: A Global History (Chalice, 2013).  This work tells the story a world-wide movement in which our shared past, our common interests, and our pursuit of Christian unity are the main themes. His particular contribution to this work focused on the expressions of the Movement in Europe, and its mission work across the globe before World War II. In addition to his teaching and research at the seminary, Seay has served since 2008 as the part-time pastor at Brown County

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Presbyterian Fellowship in Nashville, Indiana, a congregation of the Presbyterian Church (USA). This work in parish ministry enriches his teaching at the seminary and vice versa.  He also serves on the Commission on Ministry for both the Presbytery of Ohio Valley and the Indiana Region of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), the bodies the oversee the education and formation of candidates for ministry in those denominations. Since 2012, Seay has served as the director of a pilot program at CTS called The Discipleship Project.  This innovative program of education and formatting brings to campus cohorts of up to twelve students in the M.Div. and dual degree programs.  TDP students are awarded a full-tuition scholarship plus a stipend, and commit themselves fully to the process of intellectual, spiritual, and relational formation for ministry through peer-group  and experience-based learning as well as the traditional classroom experience.  The program intends to raise up especially creative, inspired, and capable leaders for the church.” Ron Sommerville, William G.

Irwin Associate Professor of Church History, came to CTS in 1994 from Fisk University. Strongly rooted in the African-American church tradition, he approaches church history from a global, ecumenical perspective. A third-generation minister in the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, Sommerville answered the call to ministry in 1975 in Jacksonville, Florida, where he briefly served as an associate minister under his father. Sommerville is a 1980 graduate of Miles College in Birmingham, Alabama. He was awarded a Benjamin E. Mays Fellowship to further his ministerial preparation at Duke University Divinity School; while at Duke, he was appointed to inner-city churches in Durham and Raleigh. He completed a doctoral program in Church History in 1999 at Vanderbilt University, where his dissertation focused on the role of African-American Methodists in the Civil Rights Movement, with a special emphasis on CME Church participation. While in Nashville, he taught three years at Fisk, served as a teaching assistant at Vanderbilt, and worked for the United Methodist Publishing House. His published works include “An Ex-Colored Church: Social Activism in the CME Church” (2002). Sommerville has published articles in Notable Black American Women, Encounter, and the Journal of the Interdenominational Theological Center. Current research projects include a study of Black Methodists in a global perspective, religion and conflict resolution in Africa, and the HIV/AID pandemic. Since coming to CTS, Sommerville has been a visiting professor at Butler University and an associate minister and director of Christian education at Phillips Temple CME Church in Indianapolis. In addition to the Global History of Christianity, he teaches courses on African-American religion, Christianity in Africa, the History of African-American Methodists, anti-racism/pro-reconciliation pastoral leadership, and HIVAIDS education. He helped to launch a series of new courses on the history and growth of Christianity on the Africa continent, supplemented by study tours he led to Ghana, South Africa, and Kenya. In 2008, he was named as the seminary’s Diversity Officer and chair of the Anti-Racism/Pro-Reconciliation Team. He has also represented the CMEC on the Council of Church 2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION Unity and Faith and Order Commission of the National Council of Churches. Sommerville and his wife Sharon McGrew Sommerville are the parents of two adult children and three grandchildren. His outside interests include working with mentoring programs for African American youth, teaching spiritual formation and ministerial leadership, and participating in international travel experiences.

History of Global Christianity Courses H-505: History of Global Christianity: Beginnings to 1500 (Staff)

Traces the spread of Christianity across the globe from Christian origins to the conciliar movement of the 15th century. Special attention is given to the interactions between the church and the surrounding cultures. Prerequisites: none. 3 SH. H-506: History of Global Christianity: 1500-1800 (Sommerville, Seay)

Traces the spread of Christianity across the globe in the early modern era. Special attention is given to the Reformations of the 16th century and to the relationship between the Church and colonialism. Prerequisites: H505. 3 SH. H-507: History of Global Christianity: 1800 to the Present (Sommerville, Seay)

Traces the spread of Christianity across the globe in the modern era. Special attention is given to the Church’s mission work, the ecumenical movement, and the shape of Christianity in a postcolonial world. Prerequisites: H506. 3 SH. H-602: History of Christianity in Africa (Sommerville)

Introduction to the history and impact of Christianity on the continent of Africa from antiquity to the present. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. H-632 Wesley and the 19th Century (Clapper)

The foundational contribution of John Wesley to the history, doctrine, and polity of Methodism. The Methodist tradition in the U.S. through the 19th century. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. H-633: United Methodist History and Theology (Staff)

H-634: Black Methodist History and Polities (Sommerville)

Explores the commonalities and differences in the histories and polities of historically Black Methodist denominations in the U.S., namely, the AME, AMEZ and CME Churches. Particular attention to ongoing ecumenical conversations among these traditions and to their distinctive witness within global Methodism. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. H-635: African-American Church History (Sommerville)

Comprehensive study of the history of African American ecclesial institutions and religious thought. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. H-640: The Global Holiness, and Pentecostal Movements (Sommerville, Seay)

The theology, history and present status. Attention given to social structures, historiography and ecumenical issues. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. H-645: History of Christianity in Latin America and the Caribbean (Alvarez)

A general introduction to Latin American and Caribbean Christianity, with a special emphasis on historic-theological developments from the 16th century until today. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. H-648: Pentecostalism in Latin America and the Caribbean (Alvarez)

An introduction to the different varieties of expression of Latin American and Caribbean Pentecostalism, emphasizing the origins, growth and impact of these churches on society. Prerequisite none. 3 SH. H-655: History and Polity of African-American Baptists (Sommerville)

History, polity, ecclesial life, thought, and witness of African American Baptists in US, including National, Progressive National, National Missionary, and Full Gospel Baptists. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. H-660: History and Theologies of Liberation (Alvarez)

Exploration of the historical roots, different contexts, theological developments, issues and challenges of liberation theologies, in the globalized world of the 21st century. Cross listed with T-650. Prerequisite none. 3 SH.

The historical, theological and socio-economic factors that have contributed to the development of the United Methodist Church, with particular attention to the contemporary issues and resources. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

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Course Information

H-704: Leaders of the Western Church (Staff)

Analysis of the contributions of a selected figure, with emphasis on his/her influence on Christian theology and practice. Such leaders as Aquinas, Luther, Erasmus, Calvin, Knox, Wesley and the Campbells will be studied. Prerequisite: none. 2 or 3 SH. H-705: History of Christianity in West Africa (Sommerville)

Historical and theological examination of Christian traditions in West Africa with emphasis on the interaction with traditional religions and Islam. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

H-812: The Divine Comedy and the Gothic Cathedral (Brown)

A study both of Dante’s epic and of Gothic architecture as forming a comprehensive medieval vision of the soul’s journey toward God, through a whole cosmos of evil and good. Cross-listed with C-870 Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. H-839: Guided Research in Church History (Staff)

Intensive research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: open only to superior, advanced students. 1, 2. or 3 SH.

H-708: History of Christianity in Southern Africa (Sommerville)

Historical and theological exploration of Christian traditions in Southern Africa. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. H-728: Religion in the United States, 1945 to the Present (Seay)

Explores major developments in American religious history since 1945, with emphasis on how the church has negotiated the increasing pluralism of American society. Prerequisite: T-500 and at least one course in Field II. Prerequisites: none. 3 SH. H-751: Literature of Disciples of Christ and Related Groups (Seay)

Study of books and periodicals for appraisal in relation to influence on Disciples thought, doctrine and polity. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. H-780 History and Theology of Evangelicalism in the United States (Seay)

An exploration of the history and theology of Protestant evangelicalism in the United States. Specific attention will be paid to pressing issues of faith and practice. Prerequisite: T-500 and H-506 or H-507. 3 SH. H-802: Issues in Church History (Staff)

Investigation of a selected problem in church history. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. H-810: Black Religious Thought (Sommerville)

An examination of philosophic and religious thought emerging from multiple traditions and thinkers from Africa and the African Diaspora with a focus on their understandings of emancipatory praxis. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION FIELD III: Systematic and Philosophical Theology The theological field emphasizes critical and constructive thinking about the Christian witness of faith.  Students develop critical awareness of their own theological assumptions and construct appropriate, intelligent, and meaningful interpretations of faith within the community of faith. These interpretations provide a plausible basis for action in the contemporary world. Charles Allen is Affiliate Professor,

of Theology at Christian Theological Seminary, holds a Ph.D. from The University of Chicago Divinity School, an M.Div. from The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and a B.A. from the University of Arkansas. While at Chicago, Allen was research assistant to David Tracy and administrative assistant to Stephen E. Toulmin for an international research conference on Continental and Anglo-American philosophy. Allen came to Christian Theological Seminary in 1987 to direct a research project for the Lilly Endowment and was manager of the CTS Bookstore from 1992 until 2004. Allen teaches courses in philosophical and systematic theology. His course “Theology for the Welcoming Church” explores issues around the inclusion of gays and lesbians in the life of Christian communities. His articles have appeared in the Journal of Religion and Encounter. Carmelo Álvarez is Affiliate

Professor, Church History and Theology, Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis, Indiana. He is a missionaryconsultant (2002-) for Theological Education working with Pentecostal Churches in Latin America and the Caribbean, Common Global Ministries Board, Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in the US and Canada and the United Church of Christ in the US. Carmelo is Professor of Global Christianity at the Center for Theological Studies of the Evangelical Pentecostal Union of Venezuela (CEVET). He is Adjunct Professor at South American Ministerial Seminary (SEMISUD), Quito, Ecuador, Church of God, Cleveland, TN. Carmelo is Visiting Professor for Pentecostal Studies at Evangelical Theological Seminary of Matanzas, Cuba. Carmelo was ordained by the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Puerto Rico. Carmelo has been missionary in Mexico, Costa Rica, Chile and Venezuela, 1974-1992, with his wife Rev. Raquel Rodríguez Álvarez, an ordained pastor in the ELCA. He worked for nine years in the United States as Director of Cross-Cultural Studies, Professor of Church History and Theology and Dean of Students at Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis, Indiana. Carmelo earned his Ph. D. from Free University, The Netherlands. He has published 16 books, one of them in English: People of Hope: the Protestant Movement in Central America, (New York: Friendship Press, 1990). Carmelo has written hundreds of articles in English and Spanish, primarily on Pentecostal issues in encyclopedias, dictionaries, journals and magazines. PAGE 44

Michael Miller, a native of Jamaica,

is Associate Professor of Systematic and Philosophical Theology. He previously served as chaplain of Bloomfield College in New Jersey, as lecturer in Theology and Philosophy at the United Theological College of the West Indies and as pastor in the United Church in Jamaica and the Cayman Islands (a union of Presbyterians, Congregationalists, and Disciples of Christ). Miller holds a PhD degree from Claremont Graduate University, a ThM degree from Columbia Theological Seminary, a BA degree from the University of the West Indies, and a Diploma in Ministerial Studies from the United Theological College of the West Indies. Miller has special interest in the revision of classical Christian doctrines as well as discussions on contextuality, religious pluralism, and ecumenism. More recently he has developed a strong interest in ecotheology, emerging trends in spirituality, gender dynamics, and the ongoing conversation between religion and the sciences. Miller has been involved in programs of the Caribbean Conference of Churches, the World Council of Churches, the Council for World Mission, and the World Communion of Reformed Churches. He takes part in many international conferences and workshops and has written and presented papers addressing a variety of theological issues. Most recently he was keynote speaker at the Founders’ Week celebration of the United Theological College of the West Indies. His lectures addressed issues in Ecumenism and Postcolonial thought. Miller is a member of the American Academy of Religion, the American Theological Society in the Midwest, and the Association of Disciples for Theological Discussion. He is author of the text: Reshaping the Contextual Vision in Caribbean Theology: Theoretical Foundations for Theology which is Contextual, Pluralistic, and Dialectical. His second book is titled Freedom in Resistance and Creative Transformation (2013). At present Miller is completing a third full-length project promoting masculinities that renounce a hegemonic disposition and privilege egalitarian partnership. Helene Russell, Associate Professor of Theology, joined the CTS faculty in fall 2002. From 1997 to 2002 she taught religious studies at Allegheny College in Pennsylvania and was previously an instructor at both Albertson College of Idaho and Claremont McKenna College in California. Russell graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a BA in religion and psychology. She received her MA in theological studies from the School of Theology

Course Information

at Claremont, California, and her PhD in the philosophy of religion and theology from the Claremont Graduate School. She serves on the governing body of the Process and Faith Center at Claremont Graduate School, on the board of the Indianapolis Lutheran Episcopal Campus Ministry (Grace Unlimited) for Butler University and IUPUI, and on the vestry for All Saints Episcopal Church.  Russell‘s first book, The Pluralism Within: A Feminist Theological Anthropology of Multiplicity, Relationality and Difference Integrating Luce Irigaray and Søren Kierkegaard, is a constructive analysis of what it means to be a self.  Her second book is a collaboration with Monica Coleman and Nancy Howell. Creating Women’s Theology is on the interface between Process Theology and Feminist Theology. Her articles have been published in the Process Studies Journal, Doxology, Religious Studies Review, Process Perspectives, World Faiths Encounter, and Encounter.  She also has a chapter in the book Religion and Its Relevance in Post-Modernism. In addition she has written for the Human Rights Campaign’s “Out in Scripture Project” (http://www.hrc.org/scripture/). She is currently working on a joint project with colleague K. Brynolf Lyon on God and Otherness. Russell is a certified Yoga Instructor, teaching yoga regularly and has done workshops on Yoga and Grief. She is particularly interested in the interface between Christian theology and this public expression of embodied spirituality. She lives with her beloved Sun Conure, a Brazilian parrot, named Tangelo, and can often be seen riding her bicycle around town.

Systematic & Philosophical Theology Courses T-500: Introduction to Theology (Staff)

Introduction to Theology is an introductory exploration of some major themes and options in Christian theological reflection. Prerequisite (or can be taken concurrently): one of the following: B-501, B-502, or H-505: 3 SH. T-503: Introduction to Philosophical Theology (Staff)

An introduction to philosophical analysis and construction in religion and theology. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. T-506: Contemporary Theology (Staff)

Major persons and movements from World War II to the present. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. T-601: Theologizing in Context (Miller)

Dennis C. Sasso, Affiliate Professor of Jewish Studies is Senior Rabbi of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck in Indianapolis where he has served as spiritual leader since 1977. He earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies at Brandeis University, holds a Master of Arts in Religion from Temple University, Philadelphia, and was ordained by the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Philadelphia. Rabbi Sasso also studied at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and did his doctoral studies at Temple University and at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis, Indiana, where he obtained his Doctor of Ministry degree. He is the recipient of Doctor of Divinity degrees, Honoris Causa, from the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College (Philadelphia, PA), the Jewish Theological Seminary (New York, NY) and Christian Theological Seminary (Indianapolis, IN). Rabbi Sasso has served on numerous interfaith, civic and community boards and agencies. He is Past President of the Indianapolis Board of Rabbis, the Reconstructionist Rabbinical Association and the Indiana Interreligious Commission on Human Equality. Rabbi Sasso was the Co-Chairman of the Citizens Complaint Working Group, a blue-ribbon committee appointed by the Mayor to review and make recommendations to upgrade the Ordinance that regulates the Civilian Police Review Process. He has served on the Board of Directors of the Hispanic Center and on the Board of the Jewish Federation of Greater Indianapolis. Rabbi Sasso currently serves on the Advisory Board of the Lake Family Institute for Faith and Giving of the IUPUI Center on Philanthropy, and on the Boards of the Indianapolis Immigrant Welcome Center, the United Way of Central Indiana, the Greater Indianapolis Progress Committee. Rabbi Sasso is a member of the Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School Board of Advisors.

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Rationale for approaches to the theological task that take context seriously by means of critical reading and evaluation of selected theological works. Prerequisite: T-500 or permission of instructor. 3 SH. T-603: Women and Theology (Russell)

Selected readings relating women and faith, contemporary constructive issues and historical topics will be addressed. Prerequisite: T-500 or permission of instructor. 3 SH. T-615: Seminar on Religious Experience (Lyon, Russell)

Examines the phenomena of and important roles played by religious experience in Christian theology and ministry from theological, psychological, sociological and philosophical perspectives. Cross-listed with M-615. Prerequisite: Intro to Theology 3 SH. T-626: Systematic Theology (Miller, Russell)

Engagement with the church’s central beliefs that prepares students to make constructive statements of their understanding of the content of the Christian faith. Prerequisites: T-500; either B-501 or B-502; and H-505. 3 SH.

2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION T-631: Theology for the Welcoming Church (C. Allen, Russell)

Exploring theological issues involved in the practice of fully welcoming into the church’s life and mission Christians whose commitments and relationships differ from traditionally prevailing modes. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. T-641: Dialogue Between Jews and Christians (Russell, Sasso)

An inquiry into relations between Jews and Christians. Analyzing 1st-century literature, theological issues and the Holocaust. The Jewish Chautauqua Society has made possible the joint teaching of this course in Jewish studies by prominent leaders in the Jewish community who are nominated by the seminary. Prerequisite: T-500 or permission of instructor. 3 SH. T-650: History and Theologies of Liberation (Alvarez)

Exploration of the historical roots, different contexts, theological developments, issues and challenges of liberation theologies, in the globalized world of the 21st century. Cross-listed with H-660. Prerequisite: T-500 or permission of instructor. 3 SH. T-651: Theology and Narrative (C. Allen)

A consideration of narrative as a resource for theological understanding and construction including actual narratives by religious authors. Prerequisite: T-500 or permission of instructor. 3 SH. T-712 God and Human Freedom (Miller) 3 SH

An exploration of historical and contemporary theological discussions on human freedom, assessing their theological and ethical implications, and considering how freedom may be expressed robustly, realistically, and responsibly in our time. Prerequisite: T-500 or permission of instructor.

T727: Theology & the Sciences of Human ExperienceMind, Body, Spirit: Theology and the Sciences of Human Experience (Miller, Steussy)

Introductory exploration of how humans know, feel, and remember, and the implications for thinking about God, humans, and nonhuman creation. Pre-requisite: T-500 or permission of an instructor. 3SH. T-740: Theological Interpretations of Sin (Russell)

Examines theological understandings of sin from throughout the Christian tradition, culminating in contemporary critical and constructive approaches to aid student’s own formulation of this doctrine. Prerequisite: T-500 or permission of instructor. 3 SH. T-745: God and Otherness (Russell and Lyon)

Examines many ways that the concept of the Other functions in Christian belief and practice from theological, ethical and psychodynamic perspectives, seeking an integrative interdisciplinary conversation. Prerequisite: T-500. 3 SH. T 747 Christology and Redemption through Film (Russell)

Employs the pedagogical resource of film to explore, depict and analyze theological conceptualizations of Christology with special attention to redemption. Prerequisite: Intro to Theology 3 SH. T-780/P-780: Christian Anthropology (Lyon, Russell)

Analysis of classic and contemporary theological perspectives on the human person. Cross-listed with P-780. 3 SH. Prerequisite: T-500 strongly recommended. T-805: Studies in Barth (Staff)

Prerequisite: T-500 or permission of instructor. 3 SH. T-806: Studies in Kierkegaard (Russell)

T-721: Christology (Miller) 3 SH

Critical and constructive reflection upon the Christological witness of the church. Prerequisite: T-500 or permission of instructor. 3 SH.

Examines the primary works of this Christian existentialist, addressing topics such as faith, sin, works of love and what it is to become oneself before God. Prerequisite: none, although familiarity with Christian theology will be helpful. 3 SH.

T-722: Doctrine of God (Miller)

Problem of the meaning and truth of the Christian understanding of God. Prerequisite: T-500 or permission of instructor. 3 SH.

T-821: Constructive Theology (Staff)

Specific problems in the development of a constructive theology. Prerequisite: T-500 or permission of instructor. 3 SH.

T-725: The Holy Spirit and the Church (Miller)

The Holy Spirit in the world and in the ministry and mission of the church. Prerequisite: T-500 or permission of instructor. 3 SH.

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Course Information

T-826: Process Theology (Miller, Russell)

A reading and discussion course concentrating on theologians directly influenced by process philosophy. Prerequisite: T-500 or permission of instructor. 3 SH. T-830: The Bible and the Earth (Johnston, Steussy)

Using recent work in Bible and ecotheology, this course attends to earth’s voice in the Bible and also the interpretation of texts that silence it. Does not meet exegesis requirement. Cross-listed with B-830. Prerequisite: B-501, B-502. 3 SH. T-862: Studies and Critical Discussion (Staff)

Prerequisite: T-500 or permission of instructor. 3 SH. T-881: Guided Research in Theology (Staff)

Intensive research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: open only to superior, advanced students. 1, 2 or 3 SH.

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION FIELD IV: Christianity and Culture Studies in this field explore Christianity in relation to culture in the broad sense: the social world and ethical practice, science and economics, the arts and aesthetic expression, and other religions in their similarities and differences.  What does it mean to bring theological and ethical reflection to bear on major issues and institutions shaping our world? What ethical principles and practices need to come into play in addressing racism, sexism, violence, poverty?  In what ways are worship and spirituality embodied or challenged by media and the arts, past and present? Why are there so many religions, and is that a good thing? Those are some of the questions this field pursues.  Matthew Myer Boulton,

President and Professor of Theology, explores in his teaching and research how Christian worship founds and forms Christian life. This exploration draws together his interests in the ideas and practices of Christian liturgy; theology and public life; biblical interpretation and proclamation; Jewish-Christian relations; and the performing arts, including theater, music, and film. He is the author of God Against Religion: Rethinking Christian Theology through Worship (Eerdmans 2008), and Life in God: John Calvin, Practical Formation, and the Future of Protestant Theology (Eerdmans, 2011). He is currently at work on a book on Jesus and divine hiddenness. Boulton received as PhD from the University of Chicago, his MDiv from Harvard Divinity School, and his BA from Northwestern University. An ordained minister in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), he is also a choir director, basketball fanatic, and the father of two exceptionally talented rascals. Frank Burch Brown, Frank

Burch Brown, Frederick Doyle Kershner Professor of Religion and the Arts, is a teacher, author and musician. Brown holds degrees from Georgetown College and the University of Chicago, where he earned a PhD degree in Religion and Literature. He is author of many articles and of five books: Transfiguration: Poetic Metaphor and the Languages of Religious Belief (University of North Carolina Press, 1983); The Evolution of Darwin’s Religious Views (Mercer University Press, 1986); Religious Aesthetics (Princeton University Press, 1993); the award-winning Good Taste, Bad Taste, and Christian Taste: Aesthetics in Religious Life; and Inclusive yet Discerning: Navigating Worship Artfully (Eerdmans, 2009). Brown served for four years as editor in Arts, Media, Culture & Religion for a new edition (German and English) of the eight-volume encyclopedia Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart (Religion Past and Present). A contributor of a chapter on music to the Oxford Handbook of Religion and Emotion, ed. John Corrigan (2008) and another on aesthetics, arts, and natural theology for the Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology, ed. Russell Re Manning et al. (Oxford Univ. Press, 2013), he is editor of, and contributor to, the 600page Oxford Handbook of Religion and the Arts, forthcoming from

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Oxford University Press in both print and online editions in 2013. Brown has been choral director, keyboard artist and composer for various churches. His 20 commissioned works include “Mary with Jesus,” commissioned in 2005 by the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir, and “Ritual Compass” for piano, oboe, violin and cello, commissioned by the American Academy of Religion for its 75th anniversary celebration. His composition Four Loves, for the same instruments, has been performed at Oxford and Cambridge Universities and at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana. Brown was appointed a Henry Luce III Fellow in Theology for 1996-1997 in the area of Theology and the Arts. He was a Visiting Fellow/Scholar in the Faculty of Divinity at Cambridge University for the fall term, 2000. In fall 2003, he was the Henry Luce Visiting Professor of Theology and Art at St. John’s University School of Theology-Seminary in Collegeville, Minnesota. For three of the four spring terms between 2008 and 2011, he was the Alexander Campbell Visiting Professor of Religion and the Arts at the University of Chicago Divinity School. Brown gave the 1993 Walter Hussey Lecture in the Church and the Arts at Oxford University. Since 1987, he has been a Fellow of the Society for the Arts, Religion, and Contemporary Culture and on the Board of the Society for Arts, Religion, and Theological Studies. Fond of travel in the USA and abroad, he also looks for opportunities to hike and fish. Rufus Burrow, Jr., Indiana Professor of Christian Thought and Professor of Theological Social Ethics, came to CTS as a Visiting Professor during the 1983-1984 academic year. Burrow previously was director of the Young Adult Conservation Corps for the Pontiac Area Urban League in Pontiac, Mich. His undergraduate work at Anderson College was in criminal justice. He received his PhD from Boston University. Burrow, an active member in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), also has been an instructor with Project Upward Bound and a probation investigator and counselor. He is a frequent contributor to many publications, including Encounter, The Journal of the ITC, The Personalist Forum, and Western Journal of Black Studies. Burrow is the author of James H. Cone and Black Liberation Theology (McFarland & Co., Inc., 1994); Personalism: A Critical Introduction (Chalice Press,1999); God and Human Responsibility: David Walker and Ethical Prophecy (Mercer University Press, 2003); God and Human Dignity: The Personalism, Theology, and Ethics of Martin

Course Information

Luther King, Jr. (University of Notre Dame Press, 2006); Martin Luther King, Jr. for Armchair Theologians (Westminster John Knox, 2009); and coauthor with Mary Alice Mulligan of Daring to Speak in God’s Name: Ethical Prophecy in Ministry (Pilgrim Press, 2002); Standing in the Margin (Pilgrim Press, 2004); and Holy Word and Holy Work (Northern Illinois Conference of the UMC, 2006). Under Burrow’s direction, students explore the role of the church in the modern world through courses such as “The Church and National Issues” and “Prophetic and Ethical Witness of the Churches.” Currently his primary research and writing emphasis is in ethical prophecy, and Martin Luther King studies. Carol Johnston, Associate Professor of Theology and Culture and Director of Lifelong Theological Education, is ordained in the Presbyterian Church (USA). Johnston holds a PhD from Claremont Graduate School, an MDiv from Union Theological Seminary in New York and an AB from Kalamazoo College. Johnston has worked on environmental issues for the Presbyterian Church (USA), The Episcopal Church and the National Council of Churches of Christ Ecojustice Working Group. She also works on issues of faith and wealth based on a Lilly Endowmentfunded research project. Johnston is the author of The Wealth or Health of Nations: Transforming Capitalism From Within and The Leaves of the Tree Are For the Healing of the Nations: Biblical and Theological Foundations for Ecojustice. She lectures and teaches frequently in churches and at conferences as far afield as Beijing and Wuhan, China, on issues of economics and environment, justice, Bible and nature, faith and wealth, and the public roles of churches. In 2004 she received the William Gibson Award for Lifetime Achievement in Environmental Justice from Presbyterians for Restoring Creation. Johnston’s special interest include helping the churches think theologically about the crucial issues facing society, connecting people across the lines that divide people so that the community fabric is strengthened, and working to shift American culture toward ecology and justice. Her hobbies include reading novels in Spanish, sailing and any kind of boating that does not involve motors, and exploring Indianapolis’ neighborhoods, preferably via bicycle.

Lawrence M. Lindley, Affiliate Professor of Christianity and Culture, received his B.A. from Knox College, M.A. from Indiana University, Ph.D. from the University of Washington, and M. Div. from Christian Theological Seminary. He is an ordained American Baptist Minister and previously was Executive Director of the Edna Martin Christian Center, a home mission of the American Baptist Churches, USA. He is currently a board member of Earth Charter Indiana and is President of Community Outreach Ministry, Eastside. He was a founding board member of the Martindale-Brightwood Community Development Corporation and

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the Martindale-Brightwood Community Resurrection Partnership, was Vice-President of the Community Choice Credit Union and was a member of the Indiana CROP Executive Board. He also has been a lecturer at Martin University in Indianapolis. He has published articles and book reviews in the Encounter. He was featured in the book Voices of Faith, published by the POLIS Center and was a recipient of the Drum Major Award by the Indiana Christian Leadership Conference. He has organized Congressional Forums for Bread for the World of Greater Indianapolis. He has participated in mission trips to the Soviet Union, Nicaragua, Thailand, and Estonia, and sponsored a Laotian refugee family. Mary Alice Mulligan is Affiliate

Professor of Homiletics and Ethics. She received her Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University in homiletics and ethics. She also holds an M.Div. from Christian Theological Seminary and an M.A. in world religions from Drew University. She has taught courses in preaching, world religions, and social ethics at CTS, Bethany Theological Seminary, Vanderbilt University, Lexington Theological Seminary, and Detroit’s Ecumenical Theological Seminary and served as director of Sweeney Chapel 2002-2006. As an ordained member of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) she has served churches in Illinois, Tennessee, and Indiana. Mulligan is lead author of 4 books. Two co-authored with CTS professor, Rufus Burrow, Jr.: Daring to Speak in God’s Name: Ethical Prophecy in Ministry, and Standing in the Margin: How Your Congregation Can Minister with the Poor. The other two books come out of work with CTS professor Ronald Allen from a Lilly Endowment project, “Listening to Listeners of Sermons,” where she served as associate director. Those books are Believing in Preaching: What Listeners Hear in Sermons and Make the Word Come Alive: Lessons from Laity. Additional publications include articles, sermons, worship resources, and book reviews. Her recent interests include helping clergy use their theological education to make a difference in congregational ministry.

Christianity and Culture Courses C-530: Introduction to Christian Ethics (Burrow)

An introductory exploration of basic options in Christian moral reasoning, action and judgment. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-540: Social Issues in the Local Parish (Mulligan)

Investigates basic theological and ethical issues in congregational teaching, preaching and social practices, especially as they connect local congregations, the parish neighborhood and the world. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION C-550: Prophetic and Ethical Witness of the Churches (Burrow)

C-650: The Church and the Urban Poor (Lindley, Burrow)

Analysis of societal influences affecting the churches. Sociological and ethical reflection on the church’s role in social stability and change. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

Reflection on, and observance of, various forms of urban ministries. Including site visits to active urban ministries. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

C-555: Mission in a Global Context (Seay)

C-652: Social Issues from a Systems Perspective (Burrow, Lindley)

Changing perceptions of the church’s nature and mission in the context of other faiths and ideologies. Implications for evangelization, economic globalization, and struggles for justice. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-571: The Church and the Arts (Brown)

An introduction to the arts (e.g., music, architecture, drama, dance, electronic media) and their roles in the church, especially in worship. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-580: Introduction to World Religions (Brown)

An examination of major religions of the world: their beliefs and symbols, as well as their ethical, artistic, and ritual practices. Prerequisites: none. 3 SH C-620: Architecture, Theology and Spirituality (Brown)

Examines the theological, spiritual and practical dimensions of architecture. Considers historical and contemporary examples – primarily, but not exclusively, Christian. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

Examination of issues such as racism, sexism, class inequality and globalization from a sociological and theological point of view, and how the church can respond prophetically. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-656 Ecojustice: Fostering Human Wellbeing on a Thriving Earth (Johnston)

Biblical, theological, scientific, and ethical aspects of “creation care” and ecojustice, and the environmental challenges and opportunities facing faith communities and the world. Prerequisite: none. 3SH. C-660: Sociology of Religion (Burrow)

Description of nature and function of religion and religious institutions as understood by sociologists with emphasis upon the current American situation. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-672: Theology and the Arts (Brown)

Explorations of the theological significance of the arts, with readings in theological aesthetics. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-673: Music, Theology and Spirituality (Brown)

C-641: Womanist and Mujerista Ethics and Personalism (Burrow)

An examination of the elements of personalism in these two types of liberation ethics and what they have to say about the dignity of persons. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

Theological reflection on music (“classical,” popular, and crosscultural) and examination of varieties of musical spirituality. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-674: Visual Arts, Theology and Spirituality (Brown)

C-644: Theology and Ethics of Pastor Niebuhr (Burrow)

Theological reflection on the visual arts and their role in spirituality and Christian worship. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

An examination of the foundations of Pastor Niebuhr’s social Christianity and its continuing influence in socio-political thinking and social action today. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

C-676: Spirituality and Artistic Creation (Brown)

C-645: Theological Ethics of Martin Luther King Jr. (Burrow)

A study of the theological ethics of Martin Luther King Jr., as reflected in his life, work and writings. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-647: Gandhi, King, and Terrorism (Burrow)

An exploration of the theological foundations for nonviolence in Gandhi and King, and its viability in an age of terrorism and intracommunity violence. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

Explores artistic creativity as a spiritual activity and discipline. Involves student artistry as well as the study of historical and contemporary approaches to art. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-677: Religion and Literature (Brown)

Examines literature of particular religious interest. Usually emphasizes modern and contemporary works, with examples from the past. Considers theories of literature and religion. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-680: Hinduism and Buddhism (Brown)

The origins, distinctive beliefs, practices and contemporary status of these major non Christian world religions. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

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Course Information

C-682: Islam (Staff)

C-850: The Church and National Issues (Burrow)

A study of the various historical and contemporary forms of Islamic belief and practice, with special attention to Islam as a contemporary religious and political force in the world. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

Critical examination of one or two major national issues. Relevant exploration of the Christian ethical perspectives on these issues. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

C-684: Judaism (Sasso)

C-858: Guided Research in Social Ethics (Burrow)

A study of selected issues in the history, theology and practice of Judaism. CTS thanks the Jewish Chautauqua Society for sponsorship of this course. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

Intensive research on a selected topic. Open only to superior, advanced students. Prerequisite: none. 1, 2 or 3 SH.

C-710: African-American Women in Religion and Culture (Sommerville)

Historical and contemporary studies of African-American women in religion and culture. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-725 Vocation: Perspectives from Medicine, Law and Divinity (Boulton)

A seminar exploring the question of vocation of “calling” through major works in medicine, law and divinity. Jointly offered by CTS and IUPUI. Prerequisite: none 3 SH. C-750: Ethics and Society in Liberation Theology (Burrow)

A study of the understanding of ethics and society in representative liberation theologies. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-754: Living for Peace in a Violent World (Burrow, Lindley)

Examination of various manifestations of violence, including domestic violence, media violence, crime, capital punishment, terrorism and war. How these issues relate to the local church. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

C-860: Guided Research in Sociology of Religion (Burrow)

Intensive research on a selected topic. Open only to superior, advanced students. Prerequisite: none. 1, 2 or 3 SH. C-870: Advanced Issues in Christianity and the Arts (Brown)

Intensive research on a selected topic. Open only to superior, advanced students. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-870: The Divine Comedy and the Gothic Cathedral (Brown)

A study both of Dante’s epic and of Gothic architecture as forming a comprehensive medieval vision of the soul’s journey toward God, through a whole cosmos of evil and good. Cross-listed with H-812. Prerequisite: varies. 3 SH. C-878: Guided Research in Christianity and the Arts (Brown)

Intensive research on a selected topic. Open only to superior, advanced students. Prerequisite: none. 1, 2 or 3 SH. C-888: Guided Research in World Religions (Staff)

C-757 Faith, Wealth, and Community Leadership (Johnston)

Intensive research on a selected topic. Open only to superior, advanced students. Prerequisite: none. 1, 2 or 3 SH

Theological exploration of how imaginative church and community leaders bring their faith and resources together in vital congregations that serve the common good. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-810: Guided Research in the Theology of Culture (Staff)

Prerequisite: none. 1, 2 or 3 SH. C-840: Advanced Issues in Ethics (Staff)

Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. C-848: Guided Research in Christian Ethics (Staff)

Prerequisite: none. 1, 2 or 3 SH.

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION FIELD V: Pastoral Theology and Psychology The mission of the Pastoral Theology and Psychology Field is to develop caring and competent leaders equipped to contribute a compassionate presence in the world community through personal and professional formation informed by critical reflection and integration of theological, spiritual and psychological disciplines. This field continues the dialogue between theory and practice, church and world. Grounded firmly in the human sciences of psychology and anthropology and in the theological and spiritual interpretation of divine and human existence, this field seeks to conceive and implement counseling practices that are essential to the life and ministry of the church. Pastoral Theology & Psychology includes courses in several related areas — Pastoral Care and Counseling; Spiritually Integrated Psychotherapy; Mental Health Counseling; Marriage and Family Therapy; and Psychology, Theology and Culture. Matthias Beier is Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling, and Director of the Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling (MAMHC) Program. He is the author of Gott ohne Angst: Einfßhrung in das Denken Eugen Drewermanns (Patmos, 2010), A Violent GodImage: An Introduction to the Work of Eugen Drewermann (Continuum, 2004, 2006), and has published book chapters and articles in The Psychoanalytic Review, Pastoral Psychology, Tikkun Magazine, and the Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion. Beier holds the M.Div. from the Theological Seminary of the United Methodist Church, Reutlingen, Germany, and the Ph.D. in Psychology and Religion from Drew University, Madison, New Jersey. A nationally certified and New York state licensed psychoanalyst and a licensed mental health counselor in the state of Indiana, he received his training in psychoanalysis at the National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis, New York, of which he is a member. He is a Fellow in the American Association of Pastoral Counselors, a member of the American Academy of Religion, the Society for Pastoral Theology, the National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis, the Society for Biblical Literature, and serves on the Editorial Boards of The Psychoanalytic Review and The Journal of Pastoral Theology. Clinically, Beier works as a psychoanalyst and pastoral psychotherapist with individuals, couples, and families, and specializes in individual and group supervision. Beier has served as a United Methodist minister in New Jersey, and is currently appointed by the United Methodist Church of Germany for extension ministry as a pastoral counselor and educator. His research interests include: what determines whether religion is psychologically, culturally, and spiritually healthy or unhealthy; how does the idea of God relate to the human quest for love and meaning in the face of our awareness of death; how can therapeutic, sociocultural and prophetic models come together in theology to create effective change of structures of injustice in church and society; and what are the implications of the paradigm shift in theology presented by the therapeutic liberation theology of Eugen Drewermann.

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JACQUELINE Braeger Affiliate Professor of Marriage and Family Counseling, is a dedicated educator, trainer & writer, bringing over 20 years of experience as a catalyst for targeted growth among students, clients, and organizations. Dr. Braeger is an adjunct faculty member, teaching strength-based couple and family systems approaches in counseling at Christian Theological Seminary. As an independent consultant, she has thrived in helping organizations apply current research with best practice models to attain superior clinical outcomes and bolster professional career satisfaction. The memorable experience and privilege of living and working overseas enabled Dr. Braeger to facilitate successful cultural adaptation among military personnel and their family members. Dr. Braeger ardently believes in the marriage of training & experience in helping people consciously target and purposefully move forward in accomplishing their most important goals. She has a particular interest in helping professionals combine career aspirations with a rich relational life. She understands firsthand the challenge of creating meaningful work while juggling the needs of family as she and her husband, Paul, parent their four energetic children. The mother of a special needs child, she is a strong advocate of providing people with the resources needed to boost family resiliency. Dr. Braeger consistently receives positive feedback for her ability to translate complex material into a readily understandable form that creatively leads to successful application. Her engaging teaching style, breadth of knowledge, and strength-based focus repeatedly appeal to diverse audiences. Professional designations include clinical membership and approved supervisor classification with the American Association for Marriage & Family Therapy (AAMFT), Licensed Indiana Marriage and Family Therapist, and extensive executive and empowerment coach training. Current research projects include CTS representative to the AAMFT Beta Test Group to determine effective teaching of marriage & family therapy core competencies, and application of targeted measurement strategies in executive coaching groups. Dr. Braeger earned her Ph.D. from Purdue University in 1998, and M.Ed. in Counseling from Boston University in 1989.

Course Information

Suzanne Coyle brings years of experience as a pastor, counseling center director, and therapist to the challenge of juggling academic and administrative roles at CTS. Her pastoral experience includes ministry in suburban New Jersey, urban Philadelphia, and rural Indiana. In addition she maintains a private counseling practice with individuals, couples, and families. She has completed the Externship and Advanced Core Skills training in emotionally Focused Therapy. Coyle also consults with congregations using systems and narrative approaches. She also leads family life retreats. Coyle holds MDiv and PhD degrees from Princeton Theological Seminary and an AB degree from Centre College. Her doctoral studies included work at the Annenberg School of Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. Coyle also holds a Postgraduate Diploma in Narrative Therapy and Community Work from the Dulwich Centre in Australia, the center co-founded by Michael White, the co-developer of narrative therapy. Coyle blends her commitment to ongoing personal and professional formation through her involvement as President-Elect of the Indiana Association for Marriage and Family Therapy and the Board of Directors for Appalachian Educational Resource Center. Formerly, she has served on the Board of Governors for AAPC and as Chair of AAPC Midwest Region. Coyle is a Diplomate in the American Association of Pastoral Counselors as well as a Clinical Member and Approved Supervisor in American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy having received clinical training at the Ackerman Institute for the Family in New York. In addition, she regularly presents nationally at AAMFT and AAPC conferences and is acknowledged for her experience and expertise in clinical supervision. In addition, she has presented at the International Family Therapy Association World Congress and the American Baptist biennial in global contexts. Coyle’s research interests include ministry and culture in Appalachia, spiritual narratives, and learning outcome measures. During 2005-2007, Dr. Coyle led CTS to its distinction as one of eight programs nationally that participated in the MFT Core Competencies Beta Test Group sponsored by the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. Coyle has published articles and book chapters in peer reviewed publications. Her book Restorying Your Faith which uses spiritual narratives as a spiritual practice is in publication. She is also working on a book for Fortress Press titled Uncovering Spiritual Narratives: Using Story in Pastoral Care and Ministry. An ordained minister with American Baptist Churches, USA, Dr. Coyle is married to Peter Zinn, a Presbyterian pastor of the Old National Road Presbyterian Parish in Knightstown-Lewisville, IN. They are the parents of one son, Joel, who is a graduate of Princeton University. When not in Indianapolis, the family enjoys life on her childhood farm in central Kentucky.

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Felicity Brock Kelcourse is

Associate Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling and Director of the Doctor of Ministry Program. She has published articles in The Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, Encounter, Chaplaincy Today and The Living Pulpit. Her most recent publications include “ Human development and faith, pastoral theology and pastoral care” in Noth, Morgenthaler and Greider, eds. Pastoral Psychology and Psychology of Religion in Dialogue. (Kohlhammer, 2011); “Intersubjective and theological contexts of pastoral counseling supervision: Self, psyche and soul” in Courageous conversations: The teaching and learning of pastoral supervision, DeLong, ed.. (University Press of America, 2010);  Healing wisdom: Depth psychology and the pastoral ministry, co-edited with an introduction by Greider and Hunsinger (Eerdmans, 2010). “A phenomenology of self, psyche, and soul: what can we learn from a name?” web published in the Global Spiral, an e-publication of Metanexus Institute, 2008. Kelcourse is the editor and author of several chapters in Human Development and Faith: Life-cycle stages of body, mind and soul (Chalice Press, 2004). Additional chapters include, “Rape and Redemption” in Kitchen Talk, MacAvoy, ed. (Chalice Press, 2003); and “Discernment: The soul’s eye view” in Out of the Silence: Quakers on Pastoral Care and Counseling, Ratliff, ed. (Pendle Hill, 2001). Kelcourse is a graduate of Oberlin College, Earlham School of Religion, the doctoral program in Psychiatry and Religion at Union Theological Seminary, and Blanton-Peale Graduate Institute in New York. She is currently a member of the American Academy of Religion (AAR), the Society for Pastoral Theology, Spiritual Directors International, and the Association for Doctor of Ministry Education (ADME). She has served on the planning committee for the Psychology, Culture and Religion group of AAR and as a board member for ADME. She is a certified Diplomate of, and Board member for, the American Association of Pastoral Counselors (AAPC), a Supervisor and Clinical Member of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy and a Licensed Mental Health Counselor. Her research considers pastoral theological approaches to healing and personal transformation as aspects of redemption and fruits of discernment. Her ministry includes pastoral psychotherapy and spiritual direction working with individuals, couples, families and groups. Recorded as a Quaker minister (Religious Society of Friends) in 1987, Kelcourse has served congregations in Indiana, Ohio, London and Jamaica. With husband Paul she is parent to three children and enjoys gardening and hiking. K. Brynolf Lyon, Lois and Dale Bright Professor of Christian Ministries and Professor of Practical Theology and Pastoral Care, received his MA and PhD from the University of Chicago Divinity School and a BS from Bethany College. He received his clinical training in pastoral psychotherapy at the Center for Religion and Psychotherapy of Chicago. Lyon is a Licensed Mental

2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION Health Counselor in Indiana, a National Certified Counselor, a Certified Group Psychotherapist, and an Approved Clinical Supervisor through the National Board for Certified Counselors. He previously was an instructor in religion and psychological studies at the University of Chicago Divinity School, adjunct instructor at the College of St. Francis, and lecturer at the Center for Religion and Psychotherapy of Chicago. Lyon is a member of the Chicago Center for the Study of Groups and Organizations/A. K. Rice Institute, American Academy of Religion, and Clinical Member of the American Group Psychotherapy Association and the Division of Psychoanalysis of the American Psychological Association. He serves on the Editorial Board of The International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. His research focuses on practical theological understandings of group dynamics, trauma, and psychoanalysis.. Lyon has contributed numerous chapters to books and published papers in Journal of Pastoral Theology, Pastoral Psychology, Encounter, Group, Journal of Psychology and Christianity, Theology Today, Mid-Stream, and Impact. His books include Toward a Practical Theology of Aging (1985); From Culture Wars to Common Ground: Religion and the Family Debate in America (1997, with Don Browning, Bonnie Miller-McLemore, Pam Couture and Robert Franklin); Tending the Flock: Congregations and Family Ministry (1998, with Archie Smith Jr.) and How to Lead in Church Conflict: Healing Ungrieved Loss (2012, with Dan Moseley). He is currently working on a joint project on God and Otherness with Helene Russell. Steven S. Ivy, Affiliate Professor of

Pastoral Care, received his M.Div., Th.M., and Ph.D. in Psychology of Religion and Pastoral Care from The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky. He serves as Senior Vice President for Values, Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Pastoral Services for Indiana University Health. His administrative responsibilities include hospice, palliative care, chaplaincy, pastoral counseling, and ethics. He is ordained as a Baptist minister, a Supervisor in the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education, a Fellow in the American Association of Pastoral Counselors, a member of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, and a member of the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics. He has served as pastor, counselor, chaplain, CPE Supervisor, and clinical ethicists in a variety of settings since 1977. Previous academic appointments include Vanderbilt Divinity School, Brite Divinity School, and Perkins School of Theology. He has published a book, peer reviewed articles, and book chapters on topics in pastoral care, pastoral supervision, ethics, and spirituality and health.

Pastoral Theology and Psychology Courses P-500: Basics of Pastoral Care and Counseling (Lyon, Kelcourse, Coyle)

Basic principles and skills of pastoral counseling and their application to pastoral situations including crisis, grief, referral, marriage/family, ethical and spiritual issues. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-510: Practice and Context of Spiritually Integrated Psychotherapy (Beier, Kelcourse, Lyon)

Principles of therapy with individuals, couples, families, groups and larger systems; assessment and evaluation instruments; basic helping skills; dynamics and history of spiritually integrated psychotherapy; administration and management of mental health services in private and public contexts. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-520: Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy (Coyle)

Application of family systems concepts from several family therapy theoretical models. Intervention strategies and skills applied to individuals, couples, families. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-525: Aging and the Family (Staff)

Clinical and theological perspectives on developmental, systemic and cultural aspects of aging. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-531: Personality, Human Development and Faith (Kelcourse)

Theories of human development in family, community and societal context. Implications of life-span transitions for faith and vocation. Prerequisite: none. 3SH P601 Care for Creation : A Pastoral Theology (Kelcourse)

Explores pastoral responses to growing environmental concerns vs. denial. Can faithful witness as stewards for God’s creation meet local/global needs for heath and community well being? Prerequisite: none. 3SH P-619: Sexuality, Gender and Culture (Braeger)

Introduction to gender, culture and sexuality and family life in therapy, through integration theoretical research, developmental and practical applications. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-621: Integration of Marriage and Family Therapy Theory (Coyle)

A preparation for marriage and therapy training, focusing on foundations of systems thinking and current trends in philosophical assumptions. Prerequisite: concurrent with a semester of practicum. 3 SH

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Course Information

P-623: Couples System Therapy (Braeger)

P-638: Religion, Medicine and Pastoral Care (Ivy)

Approaches to couple therapy from various family systems models. Focus also includes techniques and assessment tools. A section is devoted to doing therapy with premarital couples. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

Examines theological, research and professional issues faced by religious and healing communities. Attention to medical ethical concerns and pastoral care to the sick. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

P-624: Group Dynamics and Leadership (Lyon)

P-640 Transference and Countertransference (Beier)

Intrapsychic, systemic and spiritual features of group life: leadership, subgrouping, group development, destructiveness and reparation. Gender and racial issues. Also listed as M-624. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

Explores the theoretical evolution and clinical use of transference and counter-transference, including its relevance for diagnosis and assessment of cultural, contextual, and spiritual issues. Prerequisite: none 3 SH.

P-626: Loss and Mourning (Lyon)

P-641: Spirituality and God-Images in Clinical and Cultural Context (Beier)

Systemic, intrapsychic and theological perspectives on the meaning and dynamics of loss and mourning, including death and dying. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-628: Psychoanalysis and Mysticism (Lyon)

Mystical elements in contemporary psychoanalytic object relations theory. Theological and clinical implications. Readings from mystical and analytic traditions. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-630 Psychoanalytic Theory and Technique (Beier)

Introduction to psychoanalytic theory and technique from Freud to relational psychoanalysis. Readings of primary and secondary sources. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH P-632: Cultural Foundations and Dimensions of Healing (Kelcourse)

Healing traditions from ancient to modern cultures as foundations of mental health counseling. Implications for culturally competent approaches including the integration of spirituality and psychotherapy. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH P-633: Healing Through Play and Ritual (Kelcourse)

Explorations of liminality, transitional experience in play therapy and sacred ritual. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-634: Theological Perspectives on Pastoral and Spiritual Care (Lyon)

Analysis of theological perspectives on pastoral and spiritual care understood as spiritual leadership and nurture of individuals and congregations in their faith traditions. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH P-635: Ethical and professional Issues in Clinical Practice (Ivy)

Discussion of moral dimensions of, and the ethical and professional issues relevant to, pastoral care, counseling and marriage and family therapy. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-637: Psychopathology and Assessment (Staff)

Study of psychological problems, aberrant behaviors, psychological assessment instruments, and spiritual assessment instruments, and their implications for mental health counseling and marriage and family therapy. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH

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The creation, nature, maintenance and modification of our largely unconscious god representations and their relationship to human culture, with particular attention to implications for clinical practice and cultural-systemic analysis. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH P-644: Dreams and Discernment (Kelcourse)

Dreams as “God’s forgotten language” considered theoretically, using psychoanalytic and Jungian approaches, and experientially, using dream techniques, with implications for spiritual discernment and individuation. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-646: Families and Larger Systems (Coyle)

Family systems analysis of dynamics and ways of entering and functioning in larger systems such as churches and institutions. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-650: Treating Addictive Behaviors (Staff)

Diagnosis and treatment of addictive behaviors, including substance abuse and process addictions. Attention to underlying spiritual issues and dynamics of healing. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-663: Pastoral Visitation (Coyle)

The course focuses on the history and practice of visitation as a pastoral function with theological reflection upon current models. Pastoral visitation in the home, hospital and institutional settings from a pastoral care perspective as well as evangelism will be addressed. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-675: Vocation, Culture and Appraisal (Staff)

Approaches to choosing one’s life work, including assessment. Assessment of cultural and community needs as these influence career development and related mental health concerns. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH P-680: Play in the Context of Family Therapy (Staff)

Theory and practice of play therapy as practiced in the matrix of family, from Jungian, Freudian and object relations perspective. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH

2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION P-710: Authority and Dependency in Congregational Life (Lyon)

Explores the emotional dynamics of authority and dependency in congregational life and their practical theological implications. Cross-listed as M-738. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-711 Children and Adolescents in Families (Coyle)

Multicultural, developmental, and systemic understandings of the family as foundational for assessment and treatment of children and adolescents in a family context. Prerequisites: Concurrent with Practicum/SCOFE or permission of instructor. 3 SH. P-739: Freud, Jung and Religion (Kelcourse)

P-774 Psychodynamic Family Therapy (Coyle)

Clinical application of object relations, Bowen, intergenerational and contextual theories to the assessment and treatment of individual, couples, and families. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-775: Short Term Family Therapy (Braeger, Coyle)

Family therapies derived from work of Bateson, Erickson and Minuchin. Attention to feedback loops, paradoxical methods, reframing, positive connotation, enactment and constraint of change. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH P-776 Dissociative Processes in Groups and Systems (Lyon)

Considers the works of Freud and Jung with implications for the intrapsychic, interpersonal and societal dialogue between psyche and soul. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

Study of relational dissociation theory and its implications for Christian understandings of persons and groups. The work of Donnel Stern, Philip Bromberg, Elizabeth Howell and others will be addressed. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH

P-745: Narrative and Collaborative Approaches to Therapy (Coyle)

P-780/T-780: Christian Anthropology (Lyon/Russell)

Philosophical and theoretical foundations of postmodern therapies including solution-focused, narrative and collaborative family therapy, and implications for other family therapies. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH P-755: Affect in Human Transformation (Lyon)

Emotional Development and its implications for clinical and theological perspectives on change processes. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-760: Group Psychotherapy (Lyon)

Basic principles of group therapy, including therapeutic factors, client selection, formation and conducting of groups, exploration of common themes arising in groups, and experiential practice. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

Analysis of classic and contemporary theological perspectives on the human person. Cross-listed with T-780. Prerequisite: T-500 strongly recommended. 3 SH. P-800, 801: Clinical Pastoral Education I (Staff)

Intensive six credit course in accredited training center introducing the student to emotional and spiritual factors in illness and health, inter-professional ethics and experience in pastoral care. Billed as an off-campus course. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH each. P-802, 803: Clinical Pastoral Education II (Staff)

An intensive six credit course designed for students advancing in clinical pastoral education. Billed as an off-campus course. Prerequisite: P-801. 3 SH each. P-804, 805: Clinical Pastoral Education III (Staff)

P-762: Contemporary Psychoanalytical Pastoral Psychotherapy (Staff)

Third-level advanced work in clinical pastoral education. Billed as an off-campus course. Prerequisite: P-803. 3 SH each.

Current advances in psychoanalytic technique, with an emphasis on object relations theory, intersubjective and relational psychoanalytic thought. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH

P-808: Special Issues in Counseling and Therapy (Staff)

P-770: Basic Research Methodology (Beier, staff)

A study of the basic research methodologies in individual and marriage and family therapy. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-773: Feminist Family Therapy (Staff)

Explores the gendered reproduction of power and equity distortions in intrapsychic and systemic forms as well as the role and limitations of psychotherapy as political agent for justice and social transformation. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

A series of workshops addressing major emerging questions in mental health and counseling therapy. Prerequisite: none. 1, 2 or 3 SH. P-810, 811: Internship in Pastoral Care (Staff)

Intended primarily for those considering the hospital or other institutional ministry. Opportunity is provided for intensive study of pastoral care within the institutional context. Billed as an off-campus course. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH each. P-818, 819: Residency in Ministry (Staff)

Open to students who meet residency requirements. Off-campus work and study in institutions, urban training centers or congregations to include both individual and group supervision. Billed as an of-campus course. Prerequisites: none. 6 SH each.

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Course Information

P-820, 821, 822: Counseling Practicum I (Staff)

X-999A Self, Systems, and Spirit (Coyle)

Basic experience in individual, marriage and family counseling. Student carries at least six cases. Intense supervisory experience in counseling service. Supervision can apply toward licensure requirements for pastoral counselors and marriage and family therapists. Prerequisites: P-510 or P-520, P-531, P-637. P-800/801 is also required for M.A.M.H.C. 3 SH each; P-820 can be taken for 1.5 or 3 SH.

A one hour weekly practicum seminar integrating self of therapist issues, systems thinking and spiritual/theological reflection culminating in a clinical Capstone presentation and an integrative paper in preparation for the Capstone presentation. Prerequisite: T-500. 0 SH

P-823, 824, 825: Counseling Practicum II (Staff)

A one hour weekly practicum seminar integrating use of self, countertransference and spiritual/theological reflection culminating in a capstone presentation and an integrative paper in preparation for the Capstone presentation. Prerequisite: P-634. 0 SH

Continues the training described in P-820, 821, 822. Student carries case load in counseling center and is supervised by mental-health professionals. Supervision can apply toward licensure requirements for pastoral counselors and marriage and family therapists. 3 SH each; P-825 can be taken for 1, 1.5 or 3 SH.

X-999B Self, Countertransference, and Spirit (Beier, Kelcourse)

P-826, 827, 828: Counseling Practicum III (Staff)

Continues the clinical training described in P-823, 824, 825. Student carries case load in counseling center and is supervised by mental health professionals. Supervision can apply to AAPC/AAMFT requirements. Variable credit. P-829, 831, 832: Counseling Practicum IV (Staff)

Continuation of clinical training. Variable credit. P-830: Directed Clinical Studies (Staff)

Integrating theory, practice and research in clinical pastoral education. For candidates who are qualified to engage in individual or group research projects. Can be repeated. 3 SH. P-839: Guided Research in Pastoral Care and Counseling (Staff)

Intensive research in the interrelationship of theology and studies of personality. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. P-840: Guided Research in Spiritually Integrated Psychotherapy (Staff)

Intensive research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: open only to superior, advanced students. 1, 2 or 3 SH. P-841: Guided Research in Marriage and Family Therapy (Staff)

Intensive research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: open only to superior, advanced students. 1, 2 or 3 SH. P-842: Guided Research in Psychology Theology and Culture (Staff)

Intensive research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: open only to superior, advanced students. 1, 2 or 3 SH. P-843: Guided Research in Mental Health Counseling (Staff)

Intensive research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: open only to superior, advanced students. 1, 2 or 3 SH. PAGE 57

2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION FIELD VI: Christian Ministries The studies in this field are planned to help students develop leadership capacities and skills in the ministry of the church, both in terms of its varied operational forms and also in relation to the wholeness of Christian ministry as the expression of the church’s mission. The areas of emphasis within the field provide special concentration in the forms of ministry in leadership and polity, worship, preaching, Christian education and church music.

Ron Allen, ordained in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and Professor of Preaching and New Testament has been at CTS since 1982. Previously, he and his spouse, the Reverend Linda McKiernan-Allen, were co-ministers of First Christian Church, Grand Island, Nebraska. Allen received a PhD from Drew University, an MDiv from Union Theological Seminary and an A.B. from Phillips University. In addition to more than 100 articles and chapters, Allen has authored or co-authored more than 35 books, the most recent being Sermon Treks: Trailways to Creative Preaching in the Church, Acts (the first volume issued in the Fortress Biblical Preaching Commentary series), New Testament 101: A Guide for People Reading the New Testament for the First Time. Recently published are the three-volume Preaching God’s Transforming Justice: A Lectionary Commentary Featuring 22 Holy Days for Justice, and A Faith of Your Own: Naming What You Really Believe and Preaching and the Other. Widely used books are Thinking Theologically: The Preacher as Theologian and The Life of Jesus for Today. With Clark M. Williamson he wrote a three volume lectionary commentary, Preaching without Prejudice. He directed one of the first empirical studies of people who listen to sermons that has generated four books, all but one jointly authored: Listening to Listeners: Homiletic Case Studies, Hearing the Sermon: Relationship, Content, and Feeling, Believing in Preaching: What Laity Think about Sermons, and Make the Word Come Alive: Lessons from Laity. Other volumes in print include Preaching Luke-Acts,; Preaching Verse by Verse (coauthor) and One Gospel, Many Ears: Preaching for Different Listeners in the Congregation (co-author), Interpreting the Gospel: An Introduction to Preaching and its popular companion Patterns of Preaching: A Sermon Sampler. Theology for Preaching: Authority, Truth, and Knowledge of God in a Postmodern Ethos. (co-author), The Teaching Sermon, Preaching the Topical Sermon, Contemporary Biblical Interpretation for Preaching, The Storyteller’s Companion to the Bible: The Parables,, Wholly Scripture: Preaching Themes from the Bible, Preaching: An Essential Guide, Preaching is Believing: The Sermon as Theological Reflection, Preaching and Practical Ministry, and Preaching and Its Partners. The Teaching Minister (co-author); A Credible and Timely Word: Process Theology and Preaching; Adventures of the Spirit: A Guide to Worship from the Perspective of Process Theology; and Thankful Praise (co-author). He is an active member of West Street Christian Church in Tipton, Indiana, Indiana, where his spouse is the minister. He enjoys bike riding and travel. Allen and McKiernan-Allen have five young adult children: Canaan, Genesis, Moriah, Barek, and Sabbath

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Débora Barbosa Agra Junker,

a native of Brazil, is Assistant Professor of Christian Education and Director of Master of Arts Degree in Multicultural Christian Education at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis, IN. Prior to joining the CTS faculty, Junker taught at the Methodist School of Theology in São Paulo, Brazil, and coordinated a certificate program for religious education teachers sponsored by the National Methodist Church at the Methodist University of São Paulo. Junker holds a PhD degree in Education and Congregational Studies from GarrettEvangelical Theological Seminary, Evanston, IL, a Master of Arts in Christian Education from Christian Theological Seminary, and a Master in Religious Science with emphasis in Practical Theology from the Methodist University of São Paulo, Brazil. Débora also has a Specialization in Psycho-pedagogy in Early Childhood and Adolescence, and a Licentiate in Brazilian-Portuguese Literature both from the Methodist University of São Paulo, Brazil. She brings to her scholarship her former studies and cultural experiences lived in Brazil, Argentina, and the USA. Her educational approach is informed and inspired mainly by the work of Paulo Freire, Lev Vygotsky, and feminist scholars from Latin America and the USA. Through her educational praxis, she seeks to embrace the ethical attitudes necessary to collectively imagine new ways of living in solidarity as God’s children. As a Freirean scholar, she is committed to a liberating pedagogy that engages participants in critical thinking and in the quest for mutual humanization. In her teaching, she strives to invite students to reflect upon the act of educating as a communal effort where learners’ experiences are respected, where socio-cultural realities are reflected upon, and where dialogue becomes the channel through which such reality comes alive. Dr. Junker is a member of Association of Professors and Researchers in Religious Education – APRRE (USA) and the United Methodist Association of Scholars in Christian Education – UMASCE (USA). She is an International Theological Advisor for the Center for Spiritual Development in Childhood & Adolescence (USA). Dr. Junker is also a member of International Society for Cultural and Activity Research – ISCAR, and a founding member of Society of Race, Ethnicity, and Religion – SRER (USA). She is currently writing a book exploring the concept of global citizenship and is co-authoring a book on James for Wisdom Commentary Series by the Liturgical Press with her colleague Holly Hearon. Outside her seminary life, Dr. Junker enjoys being in the company of family and friends, attending music events, travelling, and being connected to nature.

Course Information

Tércio B. Junker, Assistant Professor of Worship and the Director of Sweeney Chapel at CTS. Both a CTS alumnus and an ordained elder of the Brazilian Methodist Church, Junker joined the CTS faculty in 2006 after serving as the head of the Liturgy and Arts department at the Methodist School of Theology of the Methodist University of São Paulo, Brazil, where he received his bachelor degree in Theology in 1985. Junker received his MA degree in Theology and Ecclesiastical Music from the Protestant Institute for Higher Theological Studies in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Junker earned his MA of Sacred Theology from CTS and his PhD in Liturgical Studies from Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary in Evanston, IL. Junker has articles in Mosáico Apoio Pastoral, Caminhando, Anuário Litúrgico, and Anuário Coral published in Brazil, and has contributed to Primary Sources of Liturgical Theology: A Reader, ed. Dwight W. Vogel, The Book of Daily Prayer: Morning and Evening 2002, ed. Kim Martin Sadler, and Encounter, a theological journal published by CTS. Junker’s musical contributions include publication of his songs in several languages in different denominational songbooks. He has also conducted several recorded vocal ensembles. Junker has also served on the Board of Editors for the Book of Liturgical Resources and on the Review Committee for the Book of Worship of the Brazilian Methodist Church. Junker was General Editor of the song book Cantos de Fé for the III Ecclesiastical Conference of the Brazilian Methodist Church. As worship leader and composer, Junker has led workshops in North America, South America, and Europe. Junker and has been on the Editorial Boards of two theological journals: Doxology: A Journal of Worship, and Caminhando – the theological journal of the Methodist School of Theology of the Methodist University of São Paulo, Brazil. He served on the Worship Planning Committee, as Assistant Music Director, for the worship of the 9th World Council of Churches Assembly held in 2006 in Porto Alegre, Brazil, where some of his compositions appeared in the Assembly’s book of worship. Junker is the Music Director for the 10th World Council of Churches Assembly, 2013 in Busan – South Korea.

Bill Kincaid holds the Herald

B. Monroe Chair in Practical Parish Ministry and serves as Director of Field Education. He teaches courses that focus on pastoral leadership and congregational life and mission, such as Introduction to Christian Ministry, Life and Ministry after Seminary, Issues Affecting Church Leadership, The Pastor and Congregational Transformation, and Congregational Administration. As Director of Field Education, Kincaid works with the Field Education staff and supervisors to provide supervised, contextual experiences in ministry that confirm, clarify and often challenge the way students think about pastoral work and calling. Kincaid is the author of Finding Voice: How Theological Field Education Shapes Pastoral Identity. Designed as a textbook for the field education, contextual education and supervised ministry experiences of seminary students and others preparing for PAGE 59

congregational leadership, Finding Voice contends that a lively and compelling pastoral voice arises not only from rigorous engagement with context, faith tradition, pastoral roles, personal story, systemic dynamics, but especially from the conflicts that surface from among these five constituent aspects of pastoral voice. In the absence of any one of these or the imbalance of them, pastoral voice gets skewed and vibrant, effective ministry is undermined. Finding Voice urges students to begin now, with field education, to engage a practice of ministry that is imaginative, courageous, nimble and faithful. Prior to coming to CTS in 2008, Kincaid served for eleven years as the Senior Minister of Woodland Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Lexington, Kentucky, where he received that city’s 2008 Fairness Award and was a founding member and later President of The Interfaith Alliance of the Bluegrass. In addition to extensive pastoral leadership with congregations, he also worked as part of the regional ministry team of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Kentucky with responsibility for candidates seeking ordination, commissioned, or licensed ministry. Along with the Master of Divinity and Doctor of Ministry degrees from Lexington Seminary, Kincaid also holds a Masters of Science degree in Higher Education from the University of Kentucky. K. Brynolf Lyon, Lois and Dale Bright Professor of Christian Ministries and Professor of Practical Theology and Pastoral Care, received his MA and PhD from the University of Chicago Divinity School and a B.S. from Bethany College. He received his clinical training in pastoral psychotherapy at the Center for Religion and Psychotherapy of Chicago. Lyon is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Indiana, a National Certified Counselor, a Certified Group Psychotherapist, and an Approved Clinical Supervisor through the National Board for Certified Counselors. He previously was an instructor in religion and psychological studies at the University of Chicago Divinity School, adjunct instructor at the College of St. Francis, and lecturer at the Center for Religion and Psychotherapy of Chicago. Lyon is a member of the Chicago Center for the Study of Groups and Organizations/A. K. Rice Institute, American Academy of Religion, and Clinical Member of the American Group Psychotherapy Association and the Division of Psychoanalysis of the American Psychological Association. He serves on the Editorial Board of The International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. His research focuses on practical theological understandings of group dynamics, trauma, and psychoanalysis.. Lyon has contributed numerous chapters to books and published papers in Journal of Pastoral Theology, Pastoral Psychology, Encounter, Group, Journal of Psychology and Christianity, Theology Today, Mid-Stream, and Impact. His books include Toward a Practical Theology of Aging (1985); From Culture Wars to Common Ground: Religion and the Family Debate in America (1997, with Don Browning, Bonnie Miller-McLemore, Pam Couture and Robert Franklin); Tending the Flock: Congregations and Family Ministry (1998, with Archie Smith Jr.) and How to Lead in Church Conflict: Healing Ungrieved Loss (2012, with Dan Moseley). He is currently working on a joint project on God and Otherness with Helene Russell.

2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION Christian Ministries Courses M-510: Worship and Church Music (T. Junker)

Overview of basic issues, histories and theologies in planning and leading worship: hymnody, sacraments, the Christian year, pastoral offices (weddings, funerals, healing services). Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

M-566: Gospel Choir (Staff)

A choral group dedicated to learning and performing the history of African-American sacred music and contributing in chapel. Pass-fail. Limit 4 SH between M-566 and M-662. Prerequisite: none. 1 SH. M-567: Voice Instruction

Thirty-minute weekly lesson per semester hour. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 1 or 2 SH. Not open to auditors. M-569: Introductory Instruction in Organ

M-514, M-515: Introduction to Christian Ministry (Kincaid)

Resources for congregational analysis, leadership and administration. Focus on developing a practical theology for discernment and decision-making. To be taken concurrently with SCOFE. Two semesters must be successfully completed for credit. The double sequence M-514, 515, 516, 517 is to be taken in one year. Prerequisite: none. 2 SH each. M-516, M-517: Supervised Concurrent Field Education– Year I (Kincaid)

A supervised experience in congregational ministry focusing on development of learning goals, theological reflection and professional assessment. Two semesters must be successfully completed for credit. Co-requisites: M-514, 515 or M-580, X-809. 1 SH each.

Thirty-minute weekly lesson per semester hour. By arrangement. Not open to auditors. Prerequisite: MAMCE Church Music students or permission of the instructor. 1 or 2 SH. M-600 Parish Ministry (Kincaid)

Focuses on the pastoral role in renewing a congregation’s ministry by assessing its current dynamics, discerning its mission, and structuring congregational life to embody that mission. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-605: Pastoral Leadership from a Black Church Perspective (Sommerville)

Introduction to ministry from a black perspective, including preaching, pastoral care, administration, evangelism, social action and religious education. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

M-520: Introduction to Preaching (R. Allen)

Exploration of basic issues: Theology of preaching, biblical exegesis, hermeneutics, sermonic movement, delivery, in relationship to particular contexts. Limited to 24 students. Prerequisites: X-515, B-501, B-502, and H-505. 3 SH. M-530: Women in the Pulpit (Mulligan)

An introductory preaching class for women and men which teaches through the voices, eyes, resources, gifts, scholarship, and biblical narratives of women. May be substituted for M-520. Prerequisites: X-515, B-501, B-502 and H-505. 3 SH. M-540: Education and Formation in the Church (D. Junker)

Explores the theological foundations for Christian education and cultivates the skills necessary to nurture faith in a variety of congregational settings and life situations. Prerequisites: T-500 and B-501 or B-502. 3 SH. M-560: Hymnody (Staff)

Historical survey of Christian hymns and hymn writers. Analysis of hymn texts and the use of hymns in worship services. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH M-561: Music and the Church (Staff)

Introductory survey of church music, past and present. Consideration of music outside the church insofar as it interprets or influences Christian faith. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH

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M-606 Rural Ministry (Coyle)

Explores the sociological, psychological, theological and pastoral uniqueness of ministry in rural and small town communities with practical applications for ministry. Prerequisite: none 3 SH M-607: Denominational Polity (Staff)

Polity to be specified by needs of students. Prerequisite: none. 2 or 3 SH. M-607a: History and Polity of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) (Seay/Staff)

An introduction to the history and current state of the StoneCampbell Movement. Key thinkers, recurrent themes, and institutional developments that define the denomination are considered. Prerequisite: none. (May not be taken with either H-651 or the former M-607a.) 3 SH. M-607b: Presbyterian Sacrament, Polity and Administration (Staff)

Sacraments, church government and discipline, structure and organization of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-607c: United Methodist Ecclesiology and Polity (Staff)

Nature and functioning of the institutional structures of the United Methodist Church in relation to its historical development and theological assumptions. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

Course Information

M-607d: The Polity of the Episcopal Church (Staff)

The Episcopal Church’s way of ordering its life for mission and ministry; its way of understanding questions of authority and responsibility. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-607e: American Baptist Polity (Staff)

Nature and functioning of the institutional structures of the American Baptist Churches, U.S.A. in relation to its historical development and theological assumptions. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-607f: Missionary Baptist Polity (Staff)

Structure and organization of the Missionary Baptist Church. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-607g: Polity of the United Church of Christ (Staff)

Structure and organization of the United Church of Christ. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-607h: History and Polity of the AME Church (Staff)

A critical exploration of the nature and functioning of the institutional structures including church discipline, government, sacraments and history of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-610: The Pastor and Congregational Transformation (Kincaid)

Focus on pastoral role in renewing a congregation’s ministry by assessing its current dynamics, discerning its mission, and structuring congregational life to embody that mission. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-612: Word and Table (T. Junker)

Examines the basic shape of Christian worship with particular attention to the relationship of Word and Table and to theologies and practices of the Lord’s Supper/Eucharist. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-613: Baptism and Confirmation (T. Junker)

M-616, M-617: Supervised Concurrent Field Education – Year II (Kincaid)

The focus of this second year of SCOFE is on the student’s developing skills in self-supervision in a ministry context. Two semesters must be successfully completed for credit; grades are recorded at the end of the second semester for both classes. Prerequisite: M-517. 1 SH each. M-618: Worship and Spirituality (T. Junker)

An exploration of the relationship between communal liturgical practices of our lives with God and the interior dimensions of our lives. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-622: Preaching in an Hispanic Context (Jiménez)

Exploration of basic issues: Theology of preaching, biblical exegesis, hermeneutics, sermonic movement, delivery in relation to Hispanic context. (Some students may preach in Spanish or Spanglish.) May be substituted for M-520. Prerequisite: X-515, B-501, B-502, H-505, T-500, and 15 additional hours. 3 SH. M-624: Group Dynamics (Lyon)

Intrapsychic, systemic and spiritual features of group life: leadership, sub-grouping, group development, destructiveness and reparation. Gender and racial issues. This course is cross-listed with P-624. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-625: Pedagogy of Hope: Christian Education and the Politics of Solidarity (D. Junker)

Seeks to articulate challenges and possibilities for Christian education in multicultural contexts. Explores personal, cultural, and political dynamics of churches as they engage diversity. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-630: Contemporary Ministries with Youth (D. Junker)

This course explores diverse aspects that shape today’s youth culture and the implications for developing and leading an effective youth ministry. It considers both theological and educational dimensions of this ministry necessary to critically reflect on the practices that promote a transformative youth ministry.   Prerequisite: M-540. 3 SH.

Explores the histories, theologies and practices of baptism and confirmation as these frame ecumenical discussions of Christian initiation and the retrieval of baptismal spirituality. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

M-635: Hispanics/Latinas in Dialogue: Educational and Theological Insights from Latin American Perspectives (D. Junker)

M-615: Seminar on Religious Experience (Lyon and Russell)

Readings on Latina Feminist and Mujerista theologies focusing on ecclesiological and educational implications for ministry settings. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

Examines the phenomena of and important roles played by religious experience in Christian theology and ministry from theological, psychological, sociological and philosophical perspectives. Cross-listed with T-615. Prerequisite: Intro to Theology 3 SH

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M-642 Ministry with Children

This course explores theological and theoretical foundations relevant understanding the complexities that pertain to children in contemporary society and how faith communities can better understand and educate them. In addition, this course seeks to raise awareness of the needs of children beyond local communities. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH 2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION M-648: Nurturing Faith Across the Lifespan (D. Junker)

Explores the ways in which the church can encourage and support the faith formation of persons at various ages and stages of human development. Prerequisite: M-540. 3 SH. M-668: Organ Literature (Staff)

Survey of organ literature and its relationship to worship. Prerequisite: none. 1, 2 or 3 SH.

M-732: Sexuality and Spirituality (Lyon)

Exploration of the relationship between human sexuality and spirituality in Christian Life. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-740: Contemporary Studies in Faith Formation (Staff)

An exploration of theological perspectives, methods and resources for teaching in relation to a contemporary issue or particular educational setting. Prerequisite: M-540. Can be repeated for credit. 3 SH.

M-669: Advanced Instruction in Organ (Staff)

Thirty-minute weekly lesson per semester hour. Prerequisite: M-569 or permission. Not open to auditors. 1 or 2 SH. M-705: Theology and Practice of Evangelism (Staff)

In-depth examination of the meaning and methods of evangelism in contemporary American society. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH M-708: The Theology and Practice of Congregational Administration (Staff)

Exploration of the theology of church administration; how particular skills and systems of congregational life best embody the practice of Christian faith. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-711: Liturgy and Learning (T. Junker and D. Junker)

Examination of ways in which liturgy helps form and express Christian community. Focus on how ritual helps Christian communities know God, world and themselves. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-716, M-717: Supervised Concurrent Field Education – Year III (Kincaid)

An opportunity for continuation of supervised experience in ministry for the advanced student. Two semesters must be successfully completed for credit. Prerequisite: M-617. 1 SH each. M-719: Worship, Theology and Culture (T. Junker)

Explores issues and themes in contemporary liturgical theology as these engage particular social, cultural and ethnic contexts. Prerequisite: M-510. 3 SH

M-745: God and Otherness (Russell and Lyon)

Examines many ways that the concept of the Other functions in Christian belief and practice from theological, ethical and psychodynamic perspectives, seeking an integrative interdisciplinary conversation. Prerequisite: T-500. 3 SH. M748 Christian Education within Public Contexts (D. Junker)

This course explores the relationship of the church’s educational ministry and faithful action in the public contexts. Particular attention will be given to determining what factors support or impede the public witness of the church, and the necessary inter-cultural skills necessary to minister in today’s public contexts. Prerequiste: none. 3 SH.

M-751-754: Spiritual Direction Internship (Staff) A two-year sequence of courses in spiritual direction taught at the Benedictine Inn Retreat and Conference Center. Pass-fail. Billed as an off-campus course. 3 SH. M-751: Spiritual Direction Internship 1:

Art of Spiritual Direction 3 SH

M-752: Spiritual Direction Internship II:

Spiritual Journey 3 SH

M-753: Spiritual Direction Internship III:

Psychological Aspects of Spiritual Journey 3 SH

M-754: Spiritual Direction Internship IV:

Issues in Spiritual Direction 3 SH

M-761: History of Sacred Music (Staff) M-722: Conflict and Reconciliation (Lyon/Moseley)

Practical theological perspectives on the meanings and dynamics of conflict and reconciliation in group life, with special attention to congregations. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-725 Life and Ministry After Church (Kincaid)

Focus on transition from seminary with emphasis on beginning, serving and finishing well in church and community ministry. Prerequisite: one year of SCOFE 3 SH

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Historical survey of sacred choral repertoire, both large and small forms. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-770: Theology of Adaptive Leadership (Lyon)

Critical correlation of the concepts and practices of “adaptive leadership” and theological perspectives on Christian life. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. M-801: Issues Affecting Church Leadership (Kincaid)

Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

Course Information

M-809: Guided Research in Leadership and Polity (Staff)

Prerequisite: none. 1, 2 or 3 SH.

M-810: Guided Research in Worship (T. Junker)

Individualized programs of research in the history, theology and practice of Christian worship Prerequisite: none. 1, 2 or 3 SH. M-816, 817: Supervised Concurrent Field Education – Supervised Internship (Kincaid)

An opportunity for approved students to develop skills of supervision by working with a trained supervisor facilitating an M-516, 517 SCOFE group. Two semesters must be successfully completed for credit; grades are recorded at the end of the second semester for both classes. Prerequisite: M-717 and permission. 1 SH each. M-823: Contemporary Studies in Preaching (R. Allen, Staff)

Consideration of a selected contemporary topic in preaching. Investigation of background issues, theological analysis, practical implications for the conception and development of sermons. Can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: M-520. 3 SH. M-827: Guided Research in Preaching (Staff)

Prerequisite: M-520. 1, 2 or 3 SH.

M-849: Guided Research in Christian Education (D. Junker)

Prerequisite: M-540. 1, 2 or 3 SH.

M-869: Guided Research in Church Music (Staff)

Prerequisite: none. 1, 2 or 3 SH.

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

COURSE INFORMATION INTERFIELD Courses X-515: Introduction to Theological Education and Formation (Staff)

Theological examination and practice of spiritual disciplines that nurture and support vocational identity and Christian leadership. Required for entering M.Div.and MAMCE students in their first semester. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. X-516: Peer Learning for Ministry (Staff)

Teaches integrative modes of learning about ministry, vocation, pastoral identity, and communal practice. Reinforces the values of collegiality and of peer learning for future work in ministry. Prerequisite: X-515. 3 SH.

X-825: MTS Thesis (Staff)

For MTS students. To be taken for credit during the semester in which the student begins thesis research. An oral examination is included; a grade of B- or better is required for credit. Credit may be split into two semesters. Prerequisite: none: 6 SH. X-826: MTS Continuation

Students must register as continuing during all semesters that MTS program work is continuing while no classes are being taken. Non-credit. X-839: Interfield Guided Research (Staff)

Intensive research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: open only to superior, advanced students. 1, 2 or 3 SH.

X-725: Cross Cultural Studies (Staff)

X-901: Cross-Registration at Earlham

Travel seminar. Will meet the MDiv requirement for cross-cultural encounter. Includes theological reflection. Billed at off-campus rate. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH.

Students who are taking a course through Earlham School of Religion in accordance with the cross-registration policy should register for this course. After completion, the course title will be changed to reflect the title of the actual course. The grade will be posted and will count in the CTS grade point average. Prerequisite: approval of advisor and registrar. 1-3 SH.

X-726: Travel Seminar: Religion in Africa (Sommerville)

Intensive study and observation of the diverse religious and cultural traditions of Africa. Will meet the MDiv requirement for crosscultural encounter. Billed at off-campus rate. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. X-727: MDiv Cross Cultural Experience (Miller)

Theological reflection on an intensive cross-cultural experience as approved by the director of cross-cultural and international programs. Prerequisite: none. 0 SH. X-811 Final Research Project (D. Junker)

As a requirement for the completion of the Master of Arts degree in Multicultural Christian Education, each student must write a satisfactory integrative paper focusing on a topic or area related to the student’s interest. The paper should document appropriate use of educational theories and theological reflection articulating the student’s multicultural competences. The student must then pass an oral cross-disciplinary examination on that paper, enrolling in X-811 in the semester during which the paper and exam will be completed.     Prerequisite: Student must have completed at least 42 hours before enrolling in this course. 1 SH

X-902: Cross-Registration at Bethany

Students who are taking a course through Bethany Theological Seminary in accordance with the cross-registration policy should register for this course. After completion, the course title will be changed to reflect the title of the actual course. The grade will be posted and will count in the CTS grade point average. Prerequisite: approval of advisor and registrar. 1-3 SH. X-998: DMin Continuation

Students must register as continuing during all semesters that DMin program work is continuing. Non-credit. X-999A Self, Systems, and Spirit (Coyle)

A one hour weekly practicum seminar integrating self of therapist issues, systems thinking and spiritual/theological reflection culminating in a clinical Capstone presentation and an integrative paper in preparation for the Capstone presentation. Prerequisite: T-500. 0 SH

X-820: MTS Colloquium (Staff)

X-999B Self, Countertransference, and Spirit (Beier, Kelcourse)

A topic will be selected and pursued in common by MTS students from various perspectives of their special interests. One colloquium will normally be offered each year. Only MTS students may participate. This course is taken twice. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH each.

A one hour weekly practicum seminar integrating use of self, countertransference and spiritual/theological reflection culminating in a capstone presentation and an integrative paper in preparation for the Capstone presentation. Prerequisite: P-634. 0 SH

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Course Information

SCUPE CTS is a member of the Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education (SCUPE), which provides a variety of opportunities for students to experience urban life in Chicago in a context of theological reflection and sociological analysis. Students who participate in one of SCUPE’s intensive courses (S-302 and S-309) may earn academic credit and fulfill the cross-cultural requirement for the M.Div. Students can fulfill the second year of their SCOFE requirement with the completion of SCUPE’s Supervised Ministry Practicum, S-601.

SCUPE Courses S-300: Urban Principalities and the Spirit of the City (Wylie-Kellermann)

Drawing from the ground-breaking theological work of Wink and Stringfellow on the biblical language of “principalities and powers,” this course examines the profound spiritual realities foundational to understanding and transforming the social, economic and political structures of our urban world. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. SCUPE B-TH-302. Counts as an elective at CTS.

and practices of congregational-based community development. It examines the relationship between biblical faith and community development practice through site visits to exceptional Chicago development models, and identifies the leadership competencies, organizing principles, skills and resources necessary for an asset-based approach to sustainable community building Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. SCUPE S-H-305. Counts as an elective at CTS. S-309: Cross-Cultural Ministry Intensive (Milsap)

The world has come to the city. Using the city as a global classroom, this two-week intensive provides students with a practical theology for ministry in a multicultural context, engages biblical study of the early church’s struggle with cultural barriers, encourages respect and appreciation of world-views and value systems different from one’s own, offers anti-racism training, builds skills in movement and communication across cultural divides, and exposes students directly to a wide variety of ministries in diverse cultural settings. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. SCUPE M-302. Counts as an elective at CTS. Meets the M.Div. cross-cultural requirement. S-311 Eco-Justice: A Vision for a Sustainable City (Stockwell; Pam and Lan Richert)

Employing a narrative hermeneutic, this course explores Christology from a global, cultural and liberation perspective – and its significance for urban ministry. The course cultivates an understanding and appreciation of the diversity of cultural images and models used to elaborate the meaning of Jesus throughout history. Through theological and historical analysis, students engage in an in-depth study of the meaning of Christ’s life-death-resurrection for his contemporaries, the early church and specifically for this present time in history Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. SCUPE M-304. Counts as a Theology elective at CTS.

The church has a significant role in developing a holistic vision for a sustainable city as an outworking of the concept of shalom, a just peace.  The course will evaluate the three components of sustainable community development: the three E’s of economics, environment and equity (or social justice).  Participants will explore the course topic via readings, panel discussions and site visits.  Students will have the option of developing a project or ministry proposal that explores a key issue such as energy policy, food production, environmental justice or pollution, and how these challenges relate to the central course themes.  Central to the course is the question, “What does it mean to be a sustainable urban community?” Prerequisite: none 3 SH. SCUPE S-H 307. Counts as an elective at CTS.

S-302: Dimensions and Dynamics of Urban Ministry: The Gospel in the City (Delk)

S-316 The Art of Prophetic Preaching in the Urban Context (Frenchak and Moss III)

S-301: Christology and Culture (Perkinson)

Organized as a sequence of city-wide experiential learning opportunities, the course introduces students to congregations and faith-based organizations that bring good news through prophetic ministry. Students have the opportunity to engage in dialogue with urban ministry leaders who offer vision, courage and hope. Course methodology includes contextual experience, theological reflection, social analysis and dialogue with significant church leaders and the instructor. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. SCUPE M-305. Counts as an elective at CTS. Meets the MDiv cross-cultural requirement. S-304: Public Issues in Urban Ministry (Frenchak)

Examines the critical issues affecting the quality of life for those living in major metropolitan areas. An in-depth examination of the contributions of faith communities to social analysis, public theology and transformation in relation to issues such as welfare reform, racism, poverty, violence, gentrification and the like. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH. SCUPE S-H-303. Counts as an elective at CTS. S-306: Restoring Urban Communities (Nelson)

Field-based in one of the nationally renowned Christian community development organizations, this course introduces the principles PAGE 65

Freedom to preach in the spirit of the prophets requires preaching with the mind, body and spirit. Prophetic preaching in the city is an invitation to enter into the redemptive story of the gospel as it is evidenced in our urban world and requires not only a biblical and theological framework but also prophetic imagination, evidenced in a kind of playful energy that has the potential to both delight and shock the listener out of stuck thinking and stuck places while, at the same time, kindling and strengthening hope. We will apply the language and homiletic tools and resources of the arts, theater, and popular culture, to describe both the social context of urban life and the preached word. Prerequisite: none. 3 SH SCUPE M 306. Counts as M-520 at CTS. S-601: Supervised Ministry Practicum (Foster)

Required for students actively engaged in a ministry internship, the practicum focuses on personal formation for ministry by integrating work in the ministry setting with SCUPE’s academic curriculum. Using a case study approach, it provides a forum for faith sharing, personal self-awareness of gifts and skills for ministry, theological reflection on experience, and peer group reflection on actual ministry in response to the Gospel. It is also the course vehicle for SCUPE’s full-time internship field education/ministry credit. Credit varies by seminary. Prerequisite: none. Credit varies. Counts as M-616, 617 Advanced SCOFE at CTS. 2013-2015 Course Catalog

SPECIAL EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES & RESOURCES

SPECIAL EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES & RESOURCES AMERC - (X 731)

Petticrew

CTS is a member of the Appalachian Ministries Educational Resource Center Consortium (AMERC). AMERC provides specialized training for students preparing for ministry in the Appalachian church and other mission settings, with particular attention to small town and rural congregations. Students who participate in an AMERC seminar may receive academic credit and fulfill the cross-cultural requirement for the M.Div.

The Petticrew Faith-in-Action Program was established in 1986 by C. Richard Petticrew to help church and community leaders, including pastors, to understand one another better and dialogue together about some of the pressing ethical and moral issues affecting American society today.  Past participants have included Governor Mitch Daniels, business leaders such as Dr. John Lechleiter of Eli Lilly and Mr. J. Irwin Miller of Cummins Engine.  Religious leaders have included Dr. Martin E. Marty of the University of Chicago and Dr. William May of the University of Virginia. 

THE HISPANIC SUMMER PROGRAM The Hispanic Summer Program (HSP) is held each year at one of several seminaries that sponsor this intensive two-week program. Hispanic/Latino students and bilingual students who are interested in Hispanic ministries may enroll for a maximum of two courses per summer, for two credits each, toward a CTS degree. Instruction is in Spanish and English, covers a wide range of the theological curriculum, and focuses on the Hispanic/Latino church and Hispanic ministries within multicultural settings. Financial assistance for travel, housing, and tuition is provided by sponsoring institutions. For more information on course offerings and registration, please contact Matt Schlimgen, registrar.

Jewish Chautauqua Society The Jewish Chautauqua Society helps make possible the teaching of courses in Jewish studies by prominent leaders from the Indianapolis Jewish community.

Lifelong Theological Education Christian Theological Seminary sponsors an education program to encourage lifelong learning and professional development. It offers regular short-term, non-degree opportunities for theological study to ordained and lay leaders, including summer weeks for commissioned and licensed ministers and Hispanic pastoral leaders.  In addition, many programs are offered in partnership with community and interfaith organizations.  Lifelong Theological Education offerings are usually available free to CTS students, staff and faculty.

Guided Research Credit for guided research on degree programs is limited as follows: Students who wish to pursue advanced, special interests not covered in the curriculum may undertake guided research. Such research is not meant as a solution to a student’s scheduling difficulties or as a substitute for a regularly offered required course. Up to nine hours may be applied toward the 84-hour Master of Divinity program. Permission to exceed these limits may be granted only by the Academic Dean. Up to 6 hours of guided research may be applied to other degree programs. A student may enroll for a maximum of three hours of guided research in any given semester or summer. A proposal and signed, guided research cover sheet are required at registration.

Supervised Concurrent Field Education (SCOFE)

Overseas Study Options

SCOFE combines a breadth of student ministry experiences with rigorous reflection so that those preparing for church and community leadership can develop their pastoral identity and claim their pastoral voice. These ministry experiences, which occur alongside seasoned pastors in congregations and agencies in interesting and diverse settings, foster effective and imaginative leadership. In most cases, a different student serves each congregation or agency, but a new program called Learning Ministry Together emphasizes a peer group approach that allows a group of students to be at a single congregation or agency together.

CTS students have the opportunity to spend one semester at United Theological Seminary-West Indies (Jamaica). In addition, CTS occasionally offers study trips abroad for credit and cross-cultural experiences. Recent trips have included Jamaica, India, Ethiopia, Brazil and Kenya. Contact the Director of Cross-cultural and International Programs for more information.

The cultivation of pastoral voice includes developing a lively and thorough grasp of context, faith story, pastoral roles, personal journey and system dynamics, as well as the interplay between these five areas. Students use the concrete realities of their structured supervised internship as the venue for developing the perspectives and skills required to become practical theologians: ministers

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Special Education Opportunities & Resources

who continuously ask themselves and their congregations, “What ministry is appropriate in this context?” SCOFE seeks to introduce students to a lifetime of reflective ministry practice. Master of Divinity students are required to complete two years of supervised ministry experience for credit, and are expected to begin their first year of SCOFE (M-516, M-517) between the completion of 18 and 45 credit hours. Full-time students typically will be enrolled in SCOFE during their second year of seminary. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in Advanced SCOFE (M-616, M-617) and continue either at the same ministry site or at a new one during that second year, though the second year of the SCOFE requirement can be met by completing one unit of Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE). SCOFE starts at the beginning of the fall semester each year and concludes at the close of the spring semester. Master of Arts in Multicultural Christian Education students are required to complete one year of SCOFE. SCOFE employs four circles of conversations in which students have the opportunity to reflect on their ministry experiences and how those experiences are clarifying and deepening their call to ministry. First, student peer groups meet weekly during the academic year with trained supervisors to reflect pastorally and theologically on issues and events that have arisen from each student’s ministry of teaching, leading worship, facilitating groups, preaching, caring for the congregation, planning congregational life, and engaging the wider community. Second, students meet with the pastor where they are serving (or another local pastor if the student is a solo pastor) for regular supervision and theological reflection. Third, students meet with a ministry support committee in order to receive timely, direct, constructive feedback on their work in the congregation or agency. Ministry support committees offer support and monitor the progress students are making toward their learning objectives. Students, site supervisors and MSCs are required to receive training for supervision. Fourth, MDiv students

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enrolled in their first year of SCOFE also enroll in Introduction to Christian Ministry. This year-long course guides students in developing a practical theology for discernment and decisionmaking in ministerial leadership. It provides resources for increased self-understanding, tools by which to understand contexts and congregations, and opportunities to develop strategies that strengthen congregational life and witness.

Clinical Pastoral Education Christian Theological Seminary is affiliated with the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education. Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) offers supervised experience in pastoral care. CPE experience is highly recommended in preparation for careers in congregational ministry, chaplaincy and counseling and is generally offered in hospital settings, though outpatient and congregational settings are also available. CPE programs are offered in conjunction with accredited training centers including IU Health Partners (IU Health Methodist,Riley Hospital for Children, IU Health West); St. Vincent Hospital; Deaconess Hospital, Evansville; Lutheran Hospital and Parkview Memorial Hospital, Fort Wayne; and Saint Joseph Care Group, South Bend. The student may receive certification by the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education as well as academic credit from the seminary for this work. In addition to preparing students for parish or specialized ministry, CPE is recommended for ministers seeking continuing education. Registration may be on a non-academic basis or for academic credit. Duly registered special students may later request transfer of academic credit to a degree program. Counseling students are encouraged to take CPE before applying to the counseling practicum. Contact the Field Education office for CPE information.

2013-2015 Course Catalog

SPECIAL EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES & RESOURCES Level I, Level II CPE A clinical pastoral education unit may be taken as a standard 10- to 12-week summer program, as an extended one-and-a-half day to two-day per week program for 30 weeks during the school year, or as negotiated. The unit introduces the student to emotional and spiritual factors in illness and health as well as interprofessional ethics. It affords supervised experience in pastoral care. Specific outcomes for completion of Level I and Level II CPE are available in the field education office. Prerequisites: Completion of at least one academic year of theological education, fulfillment of requirements set by the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education and consent of the chaplain supervisor. Note: One unit of CPE entitles currently enrolled students to 6 semester hours of credit with payment of tuition at the off-campus rate. Students who want to receive academic credit must register for P-800, 801; P-802, 803; or P-804, 805, as appropriate. To issue academic credit for CPE, the registrar must receive written evaluations from the student and the CPE supervisor and an issued letter grade from the supervisor. Students must sign an authorization, available online (www.cts.edu under “registrar”) or in the registrar’s office, for the CPE supervisor to provide such an evaluation and grade.

Supervisory Clinical Pastoral Education Advanced Clinical Pastoral Training opportunities are available in the Indianapolis area for a student to pursue supervisory CPE training. Chaplaincy internships and residencies are also available. Further information about these programs is available from the Field Education office or the Association of Clinical Pastoral Education (www.acpe.edu).

Religion and the Arts CTS is known for its commitment to religion and the arts. In 1994, CTS created the Frederick Doyle Kershner Chair in Religion and the Arts, establishing this subject as an integral part of the curriculum. Religion and the Arts is one of the focus areas that may be pursued by students enrolled in the MDiv or MTS degree programs. Through coursework, special arts events, and cooperative efforts, CTS seeks to cultivate a fuller theological understanding of, and active creative engagement with, the ways in which Christian faith and worship are expressed and shaped through the arts and to interpret the spiritual and moral dimensions of artistic media in culture at large. Exploration of the role of artistry in non-Christian religious traditions and in multiple cultural contexts is, in addition, one of many ways in which CTS encourages cross-cultural and interreligious dialogue and understanding. The seminary setting is enhanced by displays of many donated works of art in the form of sculpture, oil and acrylic paintings, fabric and mixed-media pieces.

Library and Congregational Resource Center The CTS Library and its professional staff are dedicated to providing the materials, reference assistance and research guidance students want and need to succeed in their academic goals. Staff members are available to provide one-on one and group learning sessions on all phases of library-based research. Arrangements can be made for class sessions in the Library focused on materials and strategies particularly relevant to specific topics and fields. Any student may make an appointment through the Public Services Librarian for individual consultations on library skills, software, digital resources and reference techniques. The Library holds a wide range of media – print, digital, online, audio and visual - supporting the biblical, historical, theological, cultural and psychotherapeutic disciplines that contribute to all CTS degree programs. The collections contain approximately 210,000 items, including nearly 1,000 periodicals and theological journals. We also maintain and partner with Information Technologies Services to support educational technologies including video and computer projectors, audio tapes, CD ROMs and image scanners. The Media Center, located in the lower level of the Library, and other work spaces are equipped with computers for email, Internet browsing, word processing and DVD/CD use. Electronic catalogues, e-books, online data bases, as well as an interlibrary loan program, provide access to most materials in academic libraries in the United States. Our catalogue of materials is available anywhere in the world via the CTS web site (www.cts.edu/Library) and InsideCTS (under Academics). The Library also contains the Heritage Collection of books, manuscripts, photographs, tracts, periodicals and artifacts dealing with the history of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and the Stone-Campbell or Restoration Movement, including copies of all known PhD theses on relevant historical and theological topics. This is one of the principal collections of such materials in the world and is available to students of Discipliana studying at CTS and visiting scholars from across the United States who wish consult it. The Heritage Collection has a resident curator who is available to assist with research projects. The Congregational Resource Center (CRC), an ecumenical resource center serving local and regional clergy and lay leaders is located on the lower level of the CTS Library. It is supported through the cooperative efforts of ecclesiastical judicatories, individual congregations and CTS. The supporting partners are the Episcopal Diocese of Indianapolis, the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Indiana, the Indiana-Kentucky Conference of the United Church of Christ, Indiana-Kentucky Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the Pentecostal Assemblies of the World, and the Presbyteries of Whitewater Valley and Wabash, These denominations and CTS share in sustaining and promoting the CRC. The materials at the CRC are available to congregations and individuals at no charge. Because the CTS Library is a charter member of the Private Academic Library Network of Indiana (PALNI), CTS students have access to the Irwin Library of Butler University and 24 other private

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Special Education Opportunities & Resources

BOOKSTORE The CTS Bookstore is far more than a source for textbooks. Serving central Indiana and further afield as an educational resource for living and thinking about the Christian faith in today’s world, its inventory of nearly 8,000 titles reflects a wide spectrum of viewpoints. Traditional areas of concentration, such as theology, biblical studies, church history, ethics, pastoral care, homiletics, worship, leadership, education, and spirituality are kept up to date as are works in philosophy, gender studies, psychology, Judaica, Africana, Latino/Latina, religion and the arts, and world religions. This full-service bookstore tries to be responsive to the needs of all customers. Students and visitors are welcome to stop in with questions or to browse during store hours.

Special Orders If the bookstore does not carry a book, staff can tell you promptly if the book is still in print. It usually can be ordered without an advance deposit. Most orders are filled within two weeks. Overnight or second-day delivery incurs additional shipping costs.

Discounts and Sales

Contact the Library and CRC: Circulation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (317) 931-2361 Congregational Resource Center . . . . . . . . . (317) 931-2360 Director. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (317) 931-2365 Office Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (317) 931-2370 Public Services Librarian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (317) 931-2367 Serials/Archives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (317) 931-2368 Technical Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (317) 931-2366

Visit the library on the web at www.cts.edu/academics/library-page

Among the bookstore’s variety of discounts, the most popular is the frequent buyer discount. Buyers who spend more than $200 at the bookstore qualify for a 30% discount on a future purchase. Collectors receive a 30% set discount on an entire set of commentaries or other reference works.

Charge Accounts and Consignments Churches and other nonprofit organizations may set up tax-exempt charge accounts. In most cases, the account can be used on the same day. Faculty, staff and students enrolled in any CTS degree program are assigned an account number that may be used for book purchases. It must be paid off by the end of each semester. The bookstore also accepts almost all credit and debit cards, checks, and cash. Organizations with an account are welcome to take books out on consignment to sell or display at events away from the seminary and are not charged for any books returned in salable condition. With advance notice, bookstore staff can put together a consignment order. They are glad to order extra books, given a fair likelihood that the returned books can be sold. Contact the bookstore by telephone at (317) 9312377, by e-mail at bookstore@cts.edu

university and seminary libraries in Indiana. Student ID cards (which function as CTS Library cards) allow CTS students to have borrowing privileges at these institutions. CTS also participates in Academic Libraries of Indiana (ALI). Students may obtain a special identification card from the CTS Public Services Librarian that permits borrowing for all Indiana academic libraries that are not a part of PALNI. PAGE 69

2013-2015 Course Catalog

OFFICE OF RECRUITMENT & ADMISSIONS Procedures and Requirements A person applying for a degree program at CTS should contact the Office of Recruitment and Admissions, where staff can discuss goals for seminary study, provide application materials and guide the application process. Student services also offers information about financial aid and seminary housing, and can arrange a campus visit that allows the applicant to become more familiar with the features and benefits of CTS. All applicants must submit a completed application, personal statement of purpose, $30 application fee and two recent photographs to the student services office. All official academic transcripts and letters of reference must be sent directly to the student services office by the appropriate institutions or individuals. Additional application requirements are listed below for each degree program.

application deadlines The application deadlines for all degrees programs; Master of Divinity, (including TDP applicants) Master of Arts in Multicultural Christian Education Master of Theological Studies

recommendations are made to the Admissions Committee, which makes the final decision concerning which applicants to admit to the degree programs. Applications to the Doctor of Ministry degree program are reviewed by faculty in that program area. After review, recommendations are made to the Admissions Committee, which makes the final decision concerning admission. Decisions are generally available within four weeks.

ADVANCE STANDING Undergraduate coursework cannot be transferred into any graduate degree program. However, students who have achieved a solid foundation in a particular field of study through recent undergraduate coursework may petition for advanced standing in that field. The awarding of advanced standing allows the student to substitute an advanced course for the introductory course in that field, but does not decrease the number of hours in a particular field or subject that must be taken for the degree. Advanced standing is granted at the discretion of the Academic Dean in consultation with the field. Students seeking advanced standing should submit a letter of petition to the dean who may request additional documentation from the student, such as course syllabi. The decision of the academic dean may be appealed to the Academic Council.

Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling; are February 15 for fall admission and October 15 for spring admission. Doctor of Ministry degree program is March 1 of each year for summer admission. Applicants who wish to receive first consideration for merit scholarships should complete their application files by January 15. To qualify for other financial aid, applicants should complete their application files by April 1. Applicants completing their files after those dates will be considered for financial aid according to availability of funds. Applications made after the specified date may be considered at the committee’s discretion.

Application Review Applications for all degree programs are reviewed by the Admissions Committee. Admissions decisions are made on rolling bases. Selected applicants for the Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy and Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling programs are invited to participate in a mandatory group interview process with the counseling faculty. Following those interviews, PAGE 70

TRANSFER CREDIT Christian Theological Seminary accepts credits for work completed at other institutions toward the Master’s degrees it grants. The courses in which the credits were earned must be graduate level and completed at an institution accredited by a recognized accrediting body. The student should submit a transfer credit portfolio packet to the Office of the Registrar. This packet should include a list of the courses to be considered for transfer credit. Each course for which a student is seeking transfer credit must be demonstrably related in subject matter to the work required for the CTS degree. At minimum, a course description is required for each course to be considered for transfer credit. A syllabus for each course is preferred. Coursework must be less than 10 years old and have received a grade of B (3.0) or better to be considered for transfer. Acting as an advocate, the Registrar submits the transfer credit portfolio packet to the Academic Dean. The Academic Dean, in consultation with the appropriate field when necessary, makes the final determination of what transfer credit is accepted. Decisions by the Academic Dean related to transfer credit may be appealed to the Academic Council. No more than 50 percent of the hours from a completed degree program in a related field may be transferred. No limit exists on Student Services & Admissions

the number of credits that may be transferred from one CTS degree program to another if the first degree program has not been completed and the coursework is less than 10 years old. DMin students may transfer six semester hours of CTS non-degree work. DMin work from other ATS approved seminaries may be transferred in, if the work is no more than 10 years old and subject to the approval of the Academic Dean in consultation with the Director of the DMin Program. Requests for transfer should be made at time of matriculation.

Conditional Admission When a student is granted “conditional admission” to a degree program, the student may enroll for a maximum of 9 credit hours per semester. Upon the student’s completion of 9 graded hours, the Academic Dean decides whether the student can be fully admitted to the degree program. The student must have maintained a gradepoint average of at least 2.3. Work satisfactorily completed during the period of conditional admission automatically applies toward the degree once the Academic Dean has confirmed full admission status.

International Student Admissions Christian Theological Seminary welcomes international applicants and encourages them to apply as early as possible. An earlier application will also allow sufficient time to arrange for visa, travel and financial planning.

Non-Baccalaureate Admissions CTS occasionally admits applicants to degree programs who do not hold a baccalaureate or its educational equivalent. In lieu of the baccalaureate, an applicant must complete a series of requirements before being considered for admission. Those requirements are available from the Office of Student Services. Prospective students may apply online at our web site: www.cts.edu.

Tuition at other Institutions Students taking work at Butler University or other approved educational institutions in conjunction with a CTS degree register and pay tuition through that institution. The student must have pre-approval from his or her faculty advisor and the academic dean. Students receiving financial aid from CTS who are required to complete coursework at the other institutions receive assistance towards that tuition equal to their CTS financial aid. Students on full-tuition scholarships from CTS who are required to complete coursework at the other institution receive assistance equal to the CTS hourly tuition rate. Students must bring the invoice to the business office. Any difference in tuition charges between CTS and the other institution is paid by the student.

Special Class Fees Cantors and Gospel Choir (per semester hour). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75

International students admitted to a degree program are required to begin their studies in the fall semester. Applications must be submitted by February 1 for the following fall semester.

Senior Citizens

International student must be proficient in the English language as indicate by the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)

Senior citizens (62 years and older) are charged one-half of the normal tuition or audit rate.

The TOEFL minimum scores required by CTS are:

550 (paper based exam) 213 (computer based exam) 80 (internet based exam) The TOEFL minimum scores required for the MTS and D.Min. degree programs are:

Deferred Payment Payment of at least 25 percent of the net fees due, after financial aid has been deducted, is required. A promissory note containing an arranged schedule of payments during the semester may be signed in the business office for the remaining 75 percent. The fee for this payment plan is $75.

600 (paper based exam)

Payment Policy

250 (computer based exam)

All tuition, fees, bookstore, housing and other charges must be paid in full during the semester in which they are incurred. If a student fails to meet this requirement:

100 (internet based exam) Exemption from the above requirements could include extensive ministerial experience in an English speaking context, a bilingual family of origin where English was one of the domestic languages, or extensive education instruction apart from college or university in English.

Non-Degree and Audit Admissions Admissions as a non-degree or auditing student requires a one-page application, which is signed by the Academic Dean. Classes taken for credit require that the student hold a baccalaureate or its educational equivalent from a college or university accredited by a regional accrediting association.

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The student may not enroll in a subsequent semester until the balance is paid in full. Beginning the first month after the end of the semester, interest at the rate of 1 percent per month (12 percent annually) will be charged on the unpaid balance. If a student’s past-due account has to be sent to a collection agency, he or she may not defer payment on any new tuition, fees or other charges. All expenses must be paid at the time they are incurred.

Veterans Christian Theological Seminary is approved for veterans’ benefits. 2013-2015 Course Catalog

OFFICE OF RECRUITMENT & ADMISSIONS Tuition refund

Fees For Returned Checks

The business office may issue a refund only after a student has officially reduced the number of hours taken or officially withdrawn from the seminary. The last day of attendance is the date the completed form is received in the business office and determines the applicable percent of refund in the schedule below. The refund schedule is applied to the total amount of tuition assessed and not to the actual cash paid at the time of registration. Therefore, it is possible to reduce the number of hours taken or to withdraw and still be obligated to make payments until the adjusted tuition balance is paid. The first week of school is considered to be the week in which seminary classes begin; it ends at 4:30 p.m. on Friday of that week.

The following fees will be charged for personal checks returned by the bank to the business office because of insufficient funds:

Standard Refund Schedule

First occurrence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40 Second occurrence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50

After a second occurrence, the business office will no longer accept personal checks from the student.

OFF-CAMPUS COURSES Academic registration and credit for off-campus courses including CPE and travel seminars, e.g., P-800-805, X-725, X-726, P-810, 811, 818, 819, M-650, M-751, 752, 753, 754, (per semester hour). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50

Week Percent of Refund 1st week. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100% 2nd week. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80% 3rd week. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60% 4th and 5th weeks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20% After 5th week. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0%

Refunds for summer session courses are made on the basis of one day equals one week in the above schedule.

Tuition and Fees Tuition per hour. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $582 Application fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Deferred-payment fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Late registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Incomplete. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Student Association fee (per semester). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Refund of Title IV Funds

Technology fee (per semester). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75

The Higher Education Amendments of 1998 established a policy for the return of unearned Title IV aid Funds. CTS is required to return a portion of a student’s Title IV aid funds if the student:

Graduation fee**. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Binding thesis, two copies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 (each additional copy). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Officially withdraws from all classes

Registration for X-999A, X999B:

Stops attending all classes

Thesis, Project (no credit). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Is expelled

Registration for D-999: D.Min. Project (6 SH). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300

Takes leave of absence

DMIN Project Fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

The amount of Title IV funds earned is based on the number of days of attendance. The amount of earned aid will be determined by dividing the number of days attended by the total number of days in the enrollment period. If a student attends at least 60 percent of the enrollment period, the student earned 100 percent of awarded Title IV aid. (See CTS Financial Aid Web Page for full policy.)

Counseling practicum training fee***. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500 D.Min. continuation fee (X-998, per semester). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 M.T.S. continuation fee (X-826, per semester). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

*2013–2014 year

Books

**Includes fee for cap, gown and hood.

Book costs vary each semester and are often dependent on the course. A discount is offered if you preorder from the bookstore.

***The counseling practicum training fee for 2013–2014. The fee is billed each semester there is practicum registration. The fee is adjusted if the practicum registration is for less than 3 semester hours.

Payment of Fees and Graduation A student may not graduate or receive a final official transcript unless all balances due to the seminary are paid.

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Audit Charges Audit fee per course. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $290

Students who are full time (9 semester hours or more) and/or their spouses may audit additional hours during the same semester without paying an audit fee. Office of Recruitment & Admissions

Financial Assistance

Scholarships

The mission of the financial aid office is to provide access to qualified students who, without assistance, would be unable to attend Christian Theological Seminary. While you are responsible for gathering the financial resources necessary to pay for your education and living expenses, CTS is delighted to be a partner in making your education possible. Financial assistance is available through a variety of resources consisting of scholarships, stipends, grants, parttime employment and loans.

Scholarships are awarded through the Student Services Office.

You are encouraged to contact the financial aid office whenever questions arise concerning the financial aid process. You can contact us by telephone at (317) 931-2318 or by email at jdetamore@aol.com

How To Apply For Financial Aid Upon admission to your first degree program, you will be considered for all CTS Scholarships for which you meet the minimum requirements. Your Admission for Admissions will serve as your scholarship application. Additional information is required to be considered for The Discipleship Project. You must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) if you wish to be considered for assistance from CTS Grants, Federal Work-Study and/or William D. Ford Federal Direct Stafford Loans. The FAFSA may be completed on-line at www.fafsa.gov.

Federal Work Study Program The Federal Work-Study Program provides jobs for students with financial need, allowing you to earn money to help pay educational expenses. Employers arrange work schedules around your academic schedule. You must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to be considered for the Federal Work- Study Program. Additional information regarding the Federal Work-Study Program can be found at the Federal Work-Study section of the CTS Financial Aid website.

William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

Students are considered for scholarships only at the time of admission to their first degree program. Students seeking a Master of Divinity degree who do not receive a scholarship have an opportunity later in their program to apply for a Saltsburg Second Chance Scholarship. The number of scholarships is limited and recipients are selected on a competitive basis.

Name Endowed Scholarships Clementine Miller Tangeman Scholarship

Award: Full tuition and $5,000 annual stipend. Criteria: GPA of 3.5 on previous coursework. Outstanding promise for Christian leadership as evaluated through records, references and interviews with CTS staff. Degree program eligibility: MDiv and MAMCE applicants. Grover L. and Annabel S. Hartman Endowed Scholarship

Award: Full tuition and $4,000 annual stipend. Criteria: GPA of 3.5 on previous coursework. Unusual promise for Christian leadership as evaluated through records, references and interviews with CTS staff. Demonstrated passion for communicating the gospel of Jesus Christ, as proclaimed and witnessed to in the Scriptures. Degree program eligibility: MDiv and MAMCE applicants Olberta Noble Scholarship

Award: Full tuition and $3,000 annual stipend. Criteria: GPA of 3.5 on previous coursework. Promise for Christian leadership as evaluated through records, references and interviews with CTS staff. Member of Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) or United Church of Christ, as confirmed by letter of recommendation from pastor. Degree program eligibility: MDiv and MAMCE applicants.

The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program (DL) provides Federal Stafford Loans to help cover the costs of educational expenses.  Federal Direct Stafford Loans have a fixed interest rate and repayment of principal is not required until six months after you cease enrollment on at least a half-time basis.  You may qualify to borrow up to a maximum of $20,500.00 each year.  You must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)  to be considered for these loans. Additional information regarding the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program can be found at the Federal Loans section of the CTS Financial Aid website.

W. Brooks and Wanda Y. Fortune Scholarship

Other Resources

Award: Full tuition and annual stipend. Criteria: GPA of 3.5 on previous coursework. Extraordinary promise for ministry as evaluated through records, references and interviews with CTS staff. Degree program eligibility: MDiv, MAMCE, MAMHC and MAMFT applicants.

Links to additional assistance programs and free scholarship search data bases can be found at the Denominational and Private Scholarship section of the CTS Financial Aid Website.

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Award: Full tuition and $2,000 annual stipend. Criteria: GPA of 3.5 on previous coursework. Exceptional promise for ministry as evaluated through records, references and |interviews with CTS staff. Degree program eligibility: MDiv and MAMCE applicants.

CTS-Funded Scholarships Trustee Scholarship

2013-2015 Course Catalog

OFFICE OF RECRUITMENT & ADMISSIONS Presidential Scholarship

Award: Full tuition and annual stipend. Criteria: GPA of 3.3 on previous coursework. Distinctive promise for ministry as |evaluated through records, references and interviews with CTS staff. Degree program eligibility: MDiv, MAMCE, MTS, MAMFT and MAMHC applicants. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Scholarship

Award: Full tuition and annual stipend. Criteria: Racial minority (U.S. citizen or resident alien). GPA of 3.0 on previous coursework. Promise for ministry as evaluated through records, references and interviews with CTS staff. Degree program eligibility: MDiv, MAMHC, MAMFT, MAMCE and MTS applicants. Thomas J. and Virginia M. Liggett Scholarship

Award: Full tuition. Criteria: Member of Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) or United Church of Christ, as confirmed by letter of recommendation from pastor. GPA of 3.1 on previous coursework. Notable promise for ministry as evaluated through records, references and interviews with CTS staff. Degree program eligibility: MDiv, MAMCE and MTS applicants. Ecumenical Scholarship

Award: Varying amounts. Criteria: Member of denomination or Christian communion other than Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) or United Church of Christ, as confirmed by letter of recommendation from pastor. GPA of 3.1 on previous work. Notable promise for ministry as evaluated through records, references and interviews with CTS staff. Degree program eligibility: MDiv, MAMHC, MAMFT, MAMCE and MTS. applicants. Scholarship for Daughters and Sons of Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) Ministers

Award: Full tuition. Criteria: Daughter or son of ordained Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) minister serving in or retired from one of the church’s manifestations. Promise for ministry as evaluated through records and references. Duration: Through completion of basic hourly requirements for one degree program. Conditions for Continuance: Steady progress toward degree by completing a minimum of 9 credit hours per semester and maintaining a cumulative GPA of 2.5. Degree program eligibility: MDiv, MAMHC, MAMFT, MAMCE and MTS Saltsburg Second Chance Scholarship

Award: Full tuition. Criteria: Full-time M.Div. students who have completed at least 30 hours of coursework toward their degree; have an cumulative GPA of 3.3 or higher; and who did not receive a named merit scholarship when they entered CTS. PAGE 74

Duration: Two years maximum, if the student maintains a minimum 3.0 GPA during the first year the scholarship is awarded. Students must enroll for and complete at least 9 hours per semester while receiving the scholarship. Degree program eligibility: M.Div. students.

Special Funds Financial assistance is provided by many individuals and churches who provide endowment income to undergird student costs. Literally hundreds of individuals and churches have endowed scholarships that make tuition assistance available for students.

Grants Denominational Tuition Grant

Award: Half tuition. Criteria: Member of Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and United Church of Christ as confirmed by letter of recommendation from pastor. Duration: Award made on a semester basis through completion of basic hourly requirements for degree program. Candidate must complete a minimum of 6 credit hours per semester and maintain a 2.5 cumulative GPA. Degree program eligibility: MDiv, MAMCE, MAMHC, MAMFT and MTS applicants. Frederick D. Kershner Tuition Grant

Award: One quarter tuition. Criteria: Available to applicants ineligible for Denominational Tuition Grant. Duration: Award made on a semester basis through completion of basic hourly requirements for degree program. Candidate must complete a minimum of 6 credit hours per semester and maintain a 2.5 cumulative GPA. Degree program eligibility: MDiv, MTS, MAMCE, MAMFT and MAMHC applicants. Grant in Aid

Award: Varying amounts. Criteria: Financial need as determined by the seminary based on information submitted on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Duration: Candidate must apply annually. Candidate must complete a minimum of 6 credit hours per semester and maintain a 2.5 cumulative GPA. Degree program eligibility: MDiv, MAMCE, MTS, MAMFT and MAMHC applicants. Information about these resources is available in the Applying for Private Scholarships section of the CTS Financial Aid Website at www.cts.edu/admissions/financial-aid.

Office of Recruitment & Admissions

Orientation The Dean of Students Office and the Office of Recruitment and Admissions work together each semester to launch our new students on a path of success. A full orientation program is offered before the beginning of each semester and each new degree-seeking student is required to participate in this three day intensive. Non-degree and auditing students are welcome to participate at their choosing. Shorter, supplemental orientations are also offered for our international/ESL students and for our Doctor of Ministry students. Details of student life including current student testimonials, faculty expectations, and helpful tips on where to go for assistance are all included along with issuance of student ID/library cards.

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

STUDENT LIFE

STUDENT LIFE Housing CTS CAMPUS APARTMENTS Christian Theological Seminary owns apartment units across the street from the seminary’s main building. Student apartments are available to full-time students enrolled in a degree program and members of their immediate families. We welcome students without regard to race, gender, national origin, sexual orientation or veteran status. The apartments are fully electric and have central heating and air conditioning. The upstairs units have balconies, and the downstairs units have patios. The apartments are open twelve months a year. Each renovated unit includes washer, dryer and wireless Internet access. There is also a community room for resident’s use. Please note: All tenants are required to obtain renters insurance at the tenant’s expense.

Campus Policies Smoke-Free Campus In an effort to help protect the health of the CTS community CTS became a “Smoke Free” campus as of July 1, 2006. Smoking is banned in the main building, the Hospitality House and the Counseling Center and on the grounds of theses properties. The ban does not include the student apartments although we encourage person who smoke to seriously and prayerfully consider the health consequences of smoking and refrain from smoking in public spaces in the apartments.

Drug and Weapons Policies CTS maintains a drug free campus environment. In addition , no fireworks, firearms or other dangerous weapons are permitted on seminary property.

Buckingham Management manages our student apartments. For information please contact them at 800-287-6992.

Student Groups

Hospitality House

Affinity

Housing is available for commuter students on weekday nights in the seminary’s Hospitality House. For additional information and an application form, students should contact the Office of Student Services. All others should contact the Administrative Assistant in Seminary Advancement at (317) 931-2319.

Affinity is a group for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and affirming students, staff, and faculty who meet on a regular basis to offer a safe place where sanctuary and fellowship are extended to all people.  Affinity meets each semester at different times depending on the schedules of its members.  It is the intention of Affinity to be in active participation within CTS community life, sharing together in what it means to live and serve together as people of God.  Contact the Affinity faculty advisor (Holly Hearon), the Office of Recruitment and Admissions or the Dean of Students.

Counseling Services The Seminary contracts with licensed therapist to provide limited therapy services for CTS students at the Counseling Center (1050 W. 42nd Street). Students should call 924-5205 for an intake and identify themselves as a CTS student to assure they are assigned to the appropriate staff therapist. (Practicum students do not receive these clients in order to maintain confidentiality.) A limited special subsidy program provides for co-pays as low as $15 per session for students currently enrolled in a CTS program if they need to access it. Students referred by the Committee on Discipline, the Committee on Counsel or the Academic Dean have priority access to the subsidy program. If demand exceeds the contracted 25 hours per week, students may be referred to therapists in the community.

Black Student Caucus This group provides mentoring and fellowship for African-American students and intends to offer a forum for African-American voices within the CTS community. The Caucus meets once a month or as needed, elects officers, and invites all CTS students, faculty, and staff to participate in meetings and special programs. Contact BSC faculty advisor Ron Sommerville.

Hispanic Latino/a Student Association The CTS Hispanic Latino/a Student Association (HLSA) is dedicated to promote academic support, cultural identity, and fellowship providing resources and services for Hispanic Latino/a and international students, thus exploring multicultural and diverse awareness on campus. Contact HLSA faculty advisors Débora Junker and Tércio Junker.

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Student Life

Alumni Opportunities The seminary counts its alumni/ae as one of its great blessings. Their diverse ministries, as pastors, chaplains, missionaries, counselors, educators, administrators and authors, have transformed communities around the world. With more than 2,000 alumni/ae, CTS has ties throughout the United States and many countries. Our efforts to stay close to the alumni/ae allow the seminary to share in their ministries. CTS offers a number of opportunities for alumni/ae to continue in their learning. Bonds are formed with faculty members that last a lifetime. Alumni draw upon their faculty connections throughout their lives. More formalized opportunities are arranged through Lifelong Theological Education (LTE) events and independent studies. LTE programs include seminars, workshops, lecture series and courses. They bring old and new friends to campus to enhance their knowledge and dialogue about praxis. All graduates, former students and honorary degree recipients are automatically members of the Alumni/ae Association. The association’s purpose is to participate in the mission of the school by supporting professional education, recruiting potential students, giving financial support and encouraging alumni/ae participation in seminary life. The association elects a board of directors who work with the seminary. Meetings are held each fall and spring. Alumni/ae are welcomed to visit the campus and to use various facilities of the seminary, including the library, archives, Bookstore and Congregational Resource Center.

Classification M.Div. and M.A. degree students are classified as follows: Master of Divinity and Joint Degree Programs 0 - 30 hours completed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Junior 31 - 60 hours completed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Middler 61 - 90 hours completed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Senior Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling 0 - 30 hours completed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Junior 31 -75 hours completed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Senior Master of Arts in Multicultural Christian Education 0 - 30 hours completed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Junior 31 - 48 hours completed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Senior

CTS requires the following grade point averages: Master of Theological Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7 Master of Divinity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5

Academic Policies

Master of Multi-cultural Christian Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5

Term Schedule

Master of Marriage and Family Therapy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7

Christian Theological Seminary operates on a 16-week semester academic calendar in fall and spring. Summer courses are short intensives and vary in dates.

Dual degrees:

Hourly Load and Schedule

Master of Mental Health Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7

Master of Divinity and Marriage and Family Therapy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7 Master of Divinity and Mental Health Counseling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7

9 semester hours is the minimum requirement for certification as a full-time student. (3 hours is full time in the summer.) X-999 is considered 3 hours toward a full-time load, although no credits are issued toward a degree program for this class.

Doctorate of Ministry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0

For each semester hour of credit, students can expect to spend at least three hours of intensive study each week, including class sessions.

A student is found to be in good standing when he or she is making continuous progress toward the degree program of choice and is achieving at least the minimum grade point average for his or her program each semester. A student whose cumulative GPA falls below the minimum for his or her degree will be placed on academic probation and the Academic Dean will become the students’ advisor. While he/she is on probation the student may not enroll in any courses without the permission of the Academic Dean. The student may enroll for a maximum of 9 semester hours while on probation. Each semester while on probation, the students’ GPA for the semester must not fall below the minimum for the program. Failure to achieve the minimum GPA for the program while on probation will result in dismissal. Probation will be lifted when the cumulative GPA reaches the minimum for the program.

16 semester hours is the maximum number of hours for which a student may enroll. A load of 15 hours or more requires a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. 12 semester hours is the maximum enrollment ordinarily permitted for any student whose field-education commitment or outside employment obligates him or her for more than 20 hours a week. No more than a total of 4 semester hours of credit may be accumulated toward a basic degree from any combination of the following courses: M-566 Gospel Choir (1 hour). PAGE 77

Academic standing

2013-2015 Course Catalog

STUDENT LIFE Grading System CTS operates on a 4.0 grading system: A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0

C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0

P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pass

A-. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.7

C-. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.7

PG. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Progress

B+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3

D+. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3

S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Satisfactory

B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0

D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0

I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Incomplete

B-. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7

D-. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.7

AU. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Audits

C+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3

F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0

NG. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No Grade W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Withdraw

Attendance Students enrolled in classes are expected to attend. A student who misses more than 25 percent of the class sessions does not receive credit for that course. For more information on attendance policies, contact the Office of Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Incomplete work Students may request a temporary incomplete grade for work not completed by the end of the semester due to serious illness or major emergencies. Incompletes must be submitted and approved before the last day of regular instruction, according to the date established on the academic calendar.

Grade Appeals Any student has the right to appeal a grade to the Academic Dean. Such an appeal should be made in writing and must state clearly why the student believes the grade is unfair. A student dissatisfied with the dean’s decision may appeal that decision to the Academic Council.

Auditing Christian Theological Seminary welcomes and encourages lifelong learners to audit classes at a steeply discounted rate (see tuition and fees). CTS students who are full time (9 semester hours or more) and/or their spouses may audit additional hours during the same semester without paying an audit fee. The instructor’s permission is required in order to audit a course. The number of auditors will not normally exceed 10 percent of a course’s enrollment. Auditing status means that a student enrolls for the course, attends class and accepts the professor’s requirements for the audit. Audits are listed on transcripts, but credits are not issued toward a degree. To discontinue the audit, the student must officially withdraw from the course. A shift from audit to credit normally cannot be made after the second week of class and requires the professor’s and the academic dean’s permission, along with the payment of additional tuition. Credit status may be changed to audit status at any time within the first 12 weeks of classes. When a student changes status from credit to audit, credit fees are refunded according to the refund schedule and the audit fee is applicable for students dropping under nine semester hours.

Repeating Classes A student may retake any class for which he or she earned a grade of C (2.0) or lower. Once retaken, the original grade no longer calculates into the GPA but is retained on the transcript as a record of the class being attempted.

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Student Life

CONTACTING THE SEMINARY

CHRISTIAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 1000 West 42nd Street Indianapolis, Indiana 46208-3301 (800) 585-0108 toll-free or (317) 924-1331 Fax: (317) 923-1961 E-mail: communications@cts.edu

www.cts.edu

Dial area code (317) and the prefix 931 - before the following extensions, except where indicated: Admissions/Recruitment and Enrollment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2300 or (800) 585-0117 Advancement Office. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2319 Alumni Affairs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2310 Bookstore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2377 Business Affairs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2320 Communications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2316 Congregational Resource Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2360

Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2318 Field Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2330 Hospitality House Admin. Asst.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4416 Human Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2303 Library – Circulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2361 Library – Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2367 Lifelong Theological Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4224 President’s Office. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2303

Counseling Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 924-5205

Registrar -

Dean of Academic Affairs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2308

Student Records, Registration and Transcripts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2382

Dean of Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4440

SCOFE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2330

Editorial Matters for Encounter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2370

Student Accounts and Payments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2320

Faculty Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2350

OPERATING HOURS Seminary offices are open from 8 a.m. to noon and from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, unless otherwise posted. The Bookstore is 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Friday. The Bookstore does close from 12-1 for lunch and on Wednesday it is closed for Chapel Services from 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. The Library is open from 8 a.m. to 9:45 p.m. Monday through Thursday; from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday; and from 9 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. on Saturday. Hours likely will change when classes are not in session.

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

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CAMPUS MAP A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interchurch Center B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1050 Counseling Center C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1040 Hospitality House D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shelton Auditorium Entrance E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Room 122 F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Common Room G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTS Building

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H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Main Entrance I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapel Bookstore, Library & CRC

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DIRECTIONS AND MAPS

Directions and Maps

31 MERIDIAN ST.

RD. AN HIG MI C

465

42ND ST. 38TH ST.

From I-65 [NORTH]:

From East of Indianapolis:

Follow I-65 southbound to the 38th Street Exit. Follow 38th Street east to Michigan Road/Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. Turn left (north) on Michigan Road/Martin Luther King Jr. 1 block to 42nd Stret. Turn right onto 42nd Street. Follow for half a block. The seminary is on the north side of 42nd Street.

From I-74: Follow I-74 westbound to I-465. Take I-465 south to I-65 north. Then follow the directions from the south of Indianapiolis located below.

From I-70 [EAST OR WEST]

From I-74: Follow I-74 eastbound to I-465. Take I-465 north to 38th Street. Follow 38th Street east spproximately 5 miles to Michigan Road/Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. Turn left (north) on Michigan Road/Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. Follow Michigan Road/Martin Luther King Jr. 1 block to 42nd Street. Follow for half a block. The seminary is on the north side of 42nd Street.

Follow I-70 to I-65 North. Then follow the directions from the south of Indianapolis located below.

From North of Indianapolis: From I-69: Follow I-69 southbound to Indianapolis. I-69 becomes Binford Boulevard. Stay on Binford Boulevard to 38th Street. Turn west (right) onto 38th and follow to Michigan Road/Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. Turn north (right) onto Michigan Road and follow one block to 42nd Street. Follow for half a block. The seminary is on the north side of 42nd Street.

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From West of Indianapolis:

From South of Indianapolis: From I-65 [SOUTH]: Follow I-65 northbound through downtown Indianapolis. Take the 29th/30th Street exit. Follow the signs to 30th Street and turn left at 30th Street. Follow 30th Street to Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. Turn right, follow north to 42nd Street. Turn right onto 42nd Street. Follow for half a block. The seminary is on the north side of 42nd Street.

2013-2015 Course Catalog

FACULTY Ron Allen

Professor of Preaching and New Testament

Michael Miller

Associate Professor of Systematic and Philosophical Theology

Edwin David Aponte

Professor of Christianity and Culture

Helene Russell

Associate Professor of Theology

Wilma Bailey

Professor of Hebrew and Aramaic Scripture Matthias Beier

Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling Matthew Myer Boulton

Scott Seay

Associate Professor of the History of Global Christianity Raymond “Ron” Sommerville

Associate Professor of the History of Global Christianity

Professor of Theology Marti Steussy Frank Burch Brown

Professor of Biblical Interpretation

Professor of Religion and the Arts Frank Thomas Rufus Burrow, Jr.

Professor of Christian Thought and Professor of Theological Social Ethics

Professor of Homiletics

Affiliate Faculty

Suzanne Coyle

Faculty Emeriti Sue W. Cardwell, 1979-1988

Professor of Psychology and Counseling Brian W. Grant, 1969-2009

Professor of Pastoral Care and Marriage and Family Therapy J. Gerald Janzen, 1968-2000

Professor of Old Testament Joe R. Jones, 1988-2000

Professor of Theology and Ethics Dan P. Moseley, 1997-2009

Herald B. Monroe Professor of Practical Parish Ministry Calvin L. Porter, 1962-1999

Nettie Sweeney and Hugh Th. Miller Professor of New Testament D. Bruce Roberts, 1981-2007

Assistant Professor of Pastoral Theology and Marriage and Family Therapy

Charles W. Allen

Affiliate Professor of Theology

Professor of Congregational Education and Leadership

Holly Hearon

Carmelo E. Álvarez

Nelle G. Slater, 1980-1999

Affiliate Professor of Church History and Theology

Professor of Christian Education

Jacqueline Braeger

Professor of Theology

Professor of Christian Traditions and New Testament Carol Johnston

Associate Professor of Theology and Culture Débora Junker

Assistant Professor of Christian Education

Edgar A. Towne, 1975-1993

Affiliate Professor of Marriage and Family Therapy

Harold Keith Watkins, 1961-1995

Professor of Practical Parish Ministry Gregory S. Clapper

Affiliate Professor of United Methodist Studies

Tércio B. Junker

Assistant Professor of Worship

Steve Ivy

Felicity Kelcourse

Affiliate Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling

Associate Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling

Lawrence M. Lindley

Edward L. Wheeler 1997-2012

Professor of Church History, President Emeritus Clark M. Williamson, 1966–2002

Indiana Professor of Christian Thought

Affiliate Professor of Church and Society William Kincaid

Professor of Practical Parish Ministry

Mary Alice Mulligan

Affiliate Professor of Homiletics and Ethics K. Byrnolf Lyon

Professor of Practical Theology and Pastoral Care PAGE 82

Dennis C. Sasso

Affiliate Professor of Jewish Studies Faculty

ADMINISTRATION Edwin David Aponte

TĂŠrcio B. Junker

Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty

Director of the Chapel Felicity Kelcourse

Matthew Myer Boulton

Director of D.Min Program

President Bill Kincaid Kathleen Bell

Director of Field Education

Executive Administrator/Director of Human Resources

Alison Kothe

Major Gift Officer Dick Davis

Director of Facilities

Barbara Lee

Ed Detamore

Director for Strategic Advancement Initiatives

Student Services Manager Cheryl Miller Maddox

Bookstore Manager

Public Services Librarian and Interim Director of CTS Library

Hope Hampton

Robert Saler

Sarah Evans

CTS Director of Church & Community Relations Mary Harris

Dean of Students Don Haymes

Serials Librarian and Archivist Melissa Hickman

Vice President for Seminary Advancement Karen Horsman

Gift Officer Chao Huang

Technical Service Librarian Carol Johnston

Director, Lifelong Theological Education

Research Fellow Director of the Lilly Endowment Clergy Renewal Programs Matt Schlimgen

Registrar Julie Shewmaker

Chief Operating Officer Frank Thomas

Director, Institute for Preaching and Worship Joyce Thomas

Associate Director, Institute for Preaching and Worship Pamela Thomas

Director of Recruitment and Admissions

Verity Jones

Executive Director, Center for Pastoral Excellence

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

Board of Trustees 2013 Rev. Dr. Preston T. Adams, III

Ms. Anita Harden

Mr. M. Kent Newton

Senior Pastor Amazing Grace Christian Church Indianapolis, IN

President Interim Executives, LLC Indianapolis, IN

Attorney Newton Becker Bouwkamp LLC Indianapolis, IN

Ms. Ellen Annala

Mr. David K. Herzog

Rev. Teresa D. Owens

President & CEO, Retired United Way of Central Indiana Indianapolis, IN

Attorney Faegre Baker Daniels LLC Indianapolis, IN

Dean of Students University of Chicago Divinity School Chicago, IL

Mr. Timothy J. Beloat

Dr. William C. Hine

Mr. Bart Peterson

Investment Advisor The Baker Group Indianapolis, IN Dr. Matthew Myer Boulton

President Christian Theological Seminary Indianapolis, IN Mr. Daniel F. Evans, Jr.

President & CEO Indiana University Health Indianapolis, IN Mr. Michael Evans

CEO & Founder AIT Bioscience & AIT Labs Indianapolis, IN Mr. Keith Gambrel, CPA

Partner Katz, Sapper & Miller Indianapolis, IN Dr. Richard Hamm

Consultant The Columbia Partnership Indianapolis, IN

PAGE 84

Dean, Retired The School of Continuing Education Eastern Illinois University Charleston, IL

VP, Corporate Affairs & Communications Eli Lilly and Company Indianapolis, IN Dr. Linda Spencer

Mr. Thomas Hinshaw

President/CEO HRC Roofing & Sheet Metal Co. Columbus, IN

Physician Crawfordsville, IN Dr. Jerry Roberts

Rev. Dr. CarolyN Scanlan Holmes

Ophthalmologist, Retired Seymour, IN

Senior Pastor Avon Christian Church Avon, IN

Rev. Richard L. Spleth

Rev. Dr. John Koppitch

Regional Minister Christian Church in Indiana Indianapolis, IN

Associate Pastor Second Presbyterian Church Indianapolis, IN

Mr. John Tanselle

Mr. Craig W. Mullins

Attorney Krieg DeVault LLP Indianapolis, IN 46204

Partner Browning, Day, Mullins, Dierdorf Architects Indianapolis, IN

Dr. Raymond B. Williams

Mr. J. Mark Mutz

Dean, Retired Wabash College, Crawfordsville, IN

Partner Mosaic Consulting Indianapolis, IN

Trustees

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

INDEX A Academic Calendar 10, 11 Academic Policies 77 Academic Standing 77 Attendance 78 Auditing 78 Classification 77 GPA Requirements 77 Grade Appeals 78 Grading System 78 Hourly Load 77 Incomplete work 78 Repeating Classes 78 Term Schedule 77 Accreditation 9 Address and Phone Numbers 79 Administration 83 Admissions 74 Advanced Standing 70 Application Deadlines 70 Application Review 70 Conditional Admission 71 International Students 71 Non-Baccalaureate Admissions 71 Procedures and Requirements 70 Senior Citizens 71 Transfer Credit 70 Veterans 71 Affiliate Faculty 82 Affinity 76 Allen, Charles 44, 82 Allen, Ronald J. 36, 58, 82 Alumni Opportunities 77 Alvarez, Carmelo 40, 44, 82 Aponte, Edwin David 7, 40, 82 Application Deadlines 70 Application Review 70 Attendance 78 Audit Charges 72 Auditing 78

B Bailey, Wilma Ann 37, 82 Beier, Matthias 52, 82 Black Student Caucus 76 Board of Trustees 2013 84 Books Fees 72 Bookstore 69

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Charge Accounts and Consignments 69 Discounts and Sales 69 Special Orders 69 Boulton, Matthew Myer 6, 48, 82 Braeger, Jacqueline 52, 82 Brown, Frank Burch 48, 82 Buckingham Management 76 Burrow, Rufus Jr. 48, 82

C Campus Map 80 Campus Policies 76 Drug and Weapons Policies 76 Smoke-Free Campus 76 Changes to Catalog Information 4, 9 Christianity & Culture Field 7, 14, 16, 22, 29, 30, 31, 40, 48, 49, 82 Christian Ministries Field 14, 16, 29, 30, 32, 33, 34, 53, 58–63 Clapper, Greg 41, 82 Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) 67–68 Commencement 10–11 Conditional Admission 71 Congregational Resource Center 68, 69 Contacting the Seminary 79 Counseling Services 76 Course Descriptions 36–65 Bible 36–39 Christianity & Culture 48–51 Christian Ministries 58–63 History of Global Christianity 40–43 Interfield Courses 64 Pastoral Theology and Psychology 52–57 SCUPE 65 Systematic & Philosophical Theology 44–47 Coyle, Suzanne M. 53, 82 Cross-Cultural Requirement 15, 16 CTS Campus Apartments 76 Buckingham Management 76 CTS Funded Scholarships 73

D Deferred Payment 71 Degree Programs 14–28 Denominational Courses. Under Section Entitled Relationship To The Church Directions and Maps 79–80 Doctor of Ministry Degree 24–28 Doctor of Ministry in Marriage and Family Therapy 28 Doctor of Ministry in Mental Health Counseling 26–27

Index

Doctor of Ministry in Pastoral Care 24–25 Drug and Weapons Policies 76 Dual Degree Programs 30–35 MDIV/MAMCE 34–35 MDiv/MAMFT 20, 31–32 MDIV/MAMHC 30–31 MDiv/MTS 33–34

I

E

J

Equal Opportunity Statement 9

Jewish Chautauqua Society 66 Johnston, Carol 49, 82 Junker, Débora Barbosa Agra 58, 82 Junker, Tércio B. 59, 76, 82, 83

F Faculty 82 Faculty, Affiliate 82 Faculty Emeriti 82 Fax Number 79 Fees For Returned Checks 72 Financial Assistance 73–74 Federal Work Study Program 73 How To Apply For Financial Aid 73 Scholarships 73–74

G GPA Requirements 77 Grade Appeals 78 Grading System 78 Grants 73, 74 Guided Research 66

H Harris, Mary L. 7 Hearon, Holly 36, 82 Hispanic Latino/a Student Association (HLSA) 76, 80 Hispanic Summer Program (HSP) 9, 66 History of CTS 8 History of Global Christianity 14, 16, 22, 29, 30, 31, 33, 34, 40, 42, 82 Hospitality House 76, 80 Hourly Load 77 Housing 76, 80 CTS Campus Apartments 76

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Incomplete Work 78 Institutional Review Board 21, 33 Interfield Courses 64 International Students 71 Ivy, Steven S. 54, 82

K Kelcourse, Felicity Brock 53, 82 Kincaid, Bill 59, 82

L Lay Certificate Programs 29 Leave of Absence 72 Library 68 Lifelong Theological Education 66 Lindley, Lawrence M. 49, 82 Lyon, K. Brynolf 53, 59, 82

M Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy Degree 19 Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling Degree 17 Master of Arts in Multicultural Christian Education Degree 16 Master of Divinity Degree 14 Master of Theological Studies 22 Miller, Michael 44, 82 Mulligan, Mary Alice 49, 82

N Name Endowed Scholarships 73 Clementine Miller Tangeman Scholarship 73 Grover L. and Annabel S. Hartman Scholarship 73 Olberta Noble Scholarship 73 W. Brooks and Wanda Y. Fortune Scholarship 73 Non-Degree Admissions 71

2013-2015 Course Catalog

INDEX O Off-Campus Courses 72 Operating Hours 79 Ordination 8, 14, 17, 30, 31, 59 Orientation 75 Overseas Studies 66

P Pastoral Theology and Psychology Field 52–57 Payment of Fees and Graduation 72 Payment Policy 71 Personal Counseling 18, 21, 25, 26, 32 Petticrew Faith-in-Action Program 66 Phone Directory 79 Probation 77

R Recruitment & Admissions 74 Refund of Title IV Funds 72 Registration 72, 79 Relationship to the Church 8 Religion and the Arts 48, 50, 68, 82 Repeating Classes 78 Russell, Helene 44, 82

S Sasso, Dennis C. 45, 82 Scholarships 73–74 Seay, Scott 41, 82 Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education (SCUPE) 65 Smoke-Free Campus 76 Sommerville, Ron 41, 82 Special Class Fees 71 Special Funds 74

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Standard Refund Schedule 72 Steussy, Marti J. 37, 82 Student Groups 76, 80 Affinity 76 Black Student Caucus 76 Hispanic Latino/a Student Association 76 Supervised Concurrent Field Education (SCOFE) 16, 66 Systematic and Philosophical Theology 14, 29, 44–45, 82

T Thomas, Frank 82 Transcripts 70, 78, 79 Transfer Credit 5, 70 Trustees 84 Tuition 71–72 Tuition and Fees 72 Tuition Refund 72

V Veterans 71

W Weapons Policies 76 Web Address 79 Withdrawal 78 Word & Table 13 Work-Study 73 Worship 13

Index

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2013-2015 Course Catalog

2013-2015 Course Catalog

1000 West 42nd Street Indianapolis, IN 46208

www.cts.edu

Visit Us For a personal tour or to learn more about how you can help to maintain CTS’s momentum, contact Seminary

Advancement at (317) 931-2311 or visit us at www.cts.edu. PAGE 92

Table of Contents


Catalog 2013-15