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covet garden

inspiration grows here

cody

The cabinet of curiosity covetgarden.com

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AVAILABLE AT A STORE NEAR YOU! If you haven’t already pre-ordered our print edition, you can find it at select booksellers and gift stores across Canada this month—peruse the pages of beautiful pictures of your favourite spaces, plus brand-new places, inspiration, DIY projects and more! Click here for a complete list of stockists.

Covet Garden Home will be in stores in the U.S. in the fall, but in the meantime, you can visit our online shop and order your copy today!

contributors

Visit our blog for even more inspiration!

DONNA GRIFFITH photographer

LEEANNE WRIGHT food stylist/recipes

We’re so happy to have Donna shooting for Covet Garden. You may have seen her work in magazines such as House and Home, Chatelaine and Better Homes and Gardens.

LeeAnne has been leveraging her culinary training to prep mouth-watering food for editorial and commercial photography for almost a decade. Her work has appeared in Canadian Family and Food & Drink magazines, among others.

donnagriffith.com

leeannewright.ca

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contents 4

the space

Romantic style

26 Q & A 28 the style

Fine vintage

30 the project

Green cuisine

35 the drink

Gin and juice

38 inspiration

welcome

Paper cuts

A trip through Cody’s live work/space illustrates just how closely knit we all are. We’d been hearing about Cody’s home through friends and had been poking around her shop since it opened, but for some reason never made the connection until this year. Now, through Cody’s collections, we feel a kinship with the people of the past but have also been introduced to a generation of shopkeepers, collectors and makers. We’re so happy that Cody invited us into her world and we know you’ll love making your own connection to everything in it.

On the cover and this page: photography by Donna Griffith

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THE SHOP AROUND THE CORNER Cody’s world of objets trouvés and semi-gothic delights would make any romantic swoon photography by Donna Griffith

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the space

‘I’M A VISUAL/ AUDITORY PERSON. I LOVE LOOKING AT THINGS AND HEARING THE STORIES’

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he Chief Salvage Co. is a curiosity shop in Toronto’s Little Portugal neighbourhood. For decades, the storefront was home to an eclectic smoke shop that also stocked odd sundries like ukuleles and imported British chocolates. We always liked to stop by whenever we found ourselves waiting to transfer from the Dufferin bus onto the Dundas streetcar.

area, the smoke shop was gone one day. But we were happy when a shop stocked with late-19thcentury ephemera and early-20th-century oddities popped up in its place. Like the tobacconist that came before it, this store has a singular point of view.

This was our introduction to Cody and her collections. Just as a visit to the store made us crazy with curiosity about what other treasures lay in store, we As was the case for many establishments in the also knew we wanted to get to know the proprietor. covetgarden.com

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ody is a free spirit. Born and raised in and around Toronto, she dropped out of school and moved to Glasgow, Scotland, where she discovered a classic antique shop called Relics in that city’s west end. “It’s not a fancy place,” she says. “It’s crammed with stuff, and you have to navigate all kinds of weird corners to see anything.” Cody immediately felt a connection to the old bric-a-brac.

kind of second-hand shop, a cavernous collection of dealers assembled in a space called Uncommon Objects. “It’s rad,” she says. “I kept thinking that we didn’t have shops like this in Toronto. I was in transition at the time and I thought, I could do that.”

The next challenge was doing the legwork and travelling across the continent to find things to stock the store. She personally collects funerary and mourning art, models of hands, old photos In the meantime, her parents had moved to Austin, and anything to do with fraternal organizations. Texas, and on a visit she discovered a different The shop is an extension of those passions.

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the space

her attracAOn selection wooden oftion theto everobjects, changing castJen says, “I’m interof characters ested in the layin the shop

ering of things.” covetgarden.com

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Taking a peek behind the curtain: the view from storefront into the kitchen conjures up a sense of mystery.

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‘THIS IS THE ORIGINAL SMOKE SHOP KITCHEN. IT’S SCRAPPY, BUT IT ENDED UP BEING THE HEART OF THE PLACE’

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he next step was finding a location. “When I was hunting,” says Cody, “I thought it was a pipe dream to find a shop that was also a living space.” She kept her eye on the former smoke shop. After 50 years in business, the owner passed away and the building was sold. Cody noticed the Sold sign and called the real estate company to see who brokered the sale.

Chief Salvage Co. was open for business. At the time, her particular strip of Dundas was a dead zone, but curious locals were compelled to come in to explore the store. Even though the shop is not Texas size or crammed Scottish style, there are more than enough curios to keep the customers browsing for hours.

And as we said before, there is a cohesiveness and a uniqueness to the store that only left us She struck a deal to rent from the new owner and wanting to know more. Specifically, what was moved into her live/work space. By 2010, the behind the door marked Private.

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opposite: Some favourites from Cody’s collections of funeral cards and Masonic miscellany, including an incomplete encyclopedia of fraternal organizations.

the space

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ody maintains a clear distinction between the shop and her living quarters. While the two spaces share a certain shabby chic romanticism, the store is all about display, while the private spaces feel more introverted. Not that Cody is shy. We sat at her kitchen table and talked about living with collections and running a shop. The store makes it easier for her to keep her living spaces uncluttered. “I get to have the things that catch my eye, appreciate them for a

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while and then find them a new home,� she says. Context is a word that comes up a lot in our conversation. Cody loves to learn about the history of particular pieces. For example, during the late 1800s, complex mourning rituals were ingrained in society. We see objects associated with such ceremonies as morbid, but at the time they were a celebration of love and life (however short it may have been). Context is a reason that she got her landlord to agree to keep the kitchen’s 1950s-era tile and sky-high cabinetry. A little bit of wear and tear shows that the space was lived in and loved.

the space

In the bathroom, there’s an ongoing dialogue between natural honeycombs and birchbark, handmade folk art and American Indian jewellery and mass-produced tchotchkes. covetgarden.com

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ody’s apartment is small. But she likes it that way. “One day I would like to build my own place, outside of the city,” she says. “I’m really into the tiny homes movement.

able future, she felt more of a connection to the past, to a time when people knew where things came from and what went into creating them. Which is another reason that she loves to reuse vintage objects. And even while she contemplates a tiny house in the countryside, she’s also excited “I noticed when I started collecting that there’s a by the idea of reclaiming urban spaces such as backlash to our heavily disposable lifestyle,” says storefronts. “It’s one way forward. There are a lot Cody. When it came to thinking about a sustain- of new, innovative ideas on how to live in the city.”

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the space One of Cody’s favourite finds is this Texans, Inc., Howard Kron– designed ceramic owl TV lamp from the 1950s.

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In the office/living room hang two 18th-century handmade paper flower wreaths brought back from a picking trip in Texas.

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‘I FEEL EXTRA- CONNECTED TO WEIRD BITS OF OTHER PEOPLE’S LIVES’

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arther on down the hallway is Cody’s office/living room. With its creamy walls and earthy accents of rich browns, faded reds and pinks and earthy greens, the space is warm and welcoming. “I wish I hung out in here more,” says Cody. Friends tend to congregate in the kitchen, and in her quiet times she prefers to cocoon in her room. “It’s all-consuming when you first open a shop, as you’re both the buyer and the merchandiser,” she says. These responsibilities cut into

the time that she spent working on her art, “but I’ve started to pick up the pace.” Cody is a lady who gets things done, but in a laid-back way. As her space demonstrates, she likes a lifestyle that encourages mindfulness and thoughtfulness. Hers is a home that engages all of the senses—it even smells fantastic, thanks to the aroma of chocolate granola that she just baked in the kitchen or the Province Apothecary lavender-scented incense that she sells in the shop (and uses at home). covetgarden.com

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he visual high point of the office is the glass-fronted curio cabinet. Inspired by the Renaissance-era Wunderkammer, or cabinet of curiosity, this case contains examples of almost every category in Cody’s collections. Back in the 16th century, there were said to be three types of items that every Wunderkammer had to contain: first, sculptures and paintings; second, “curious items from home or abroad”; and third, “antlers, horns, claws, feathers and other things belonging to strange and curious animals.” Cody’s cabinet

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certainly checks off those boxes. She likens her interior aesthetic to places like Masonic lodges or old Victorian museums. “I like things in clusters,” she says. Which got us to thinking of one of the things we love most about the story of Cody’s space—all throughout the apartment, the juxtaposition of objects encourages comparisons. While there may not be a whole museum’s worth of relics, the way objects relate to one another makes you see each one in a whole new light every time you look at it.

the space opposite: Cody is definitely attracted to symbolism. Her ink pays homage to her mom (rose) and dad (a bomber plane). Her parents must be pretty awesome.

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‘I USED TO WONDER WHAT IT WOULD BE LIKE TO LIVE INSIDE A CURIO CABINET’

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he last room in the apartment is a former mudroom that serves as a closet for her collection of vintage clothes and accessories. The contrast between the sombre mourning pieces in the other rooms and the floral prints of the curtains and frocks underscores just how unique and personal Cody’s rooms are.

Gothic meets Stevie Nicks Romanticism (kimonos, oversized Navajo rings), there’s also a Left Bank Parisienne bohemian bonhomie that fills each and every room with wonder. And while there are many elements of her space that we would definitely borrow for our own interiors, Cody’s shop and apartment could not belong to anybody but Cody, in the context of this time and place in her life.

While her style is reminiscent of Byronesque It is, in a word, rad! covetgarden.com

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who? Cody Deane Cochrane is an artist and founder of the Chief Salvage Co. Born and raised mostly in Toronto (with some time spent in Oakville), she studied art at OCADU for a short spell before moving to Glasgow, Scotland. After returning to Canada, she opened the Chief Salvage in 2010. The shop specializes in objects sourced in the Deep South, such as religious ephemera, Masonic paraphernalia and other Americana. Recently, she was invited to speak about her collections at the Design Exchange’s “Cool & Collected” panel discussion.

link • The Chief Salvage Co. website

what are you reading?

favourite vintage clothing shops in Toronto 1. Penny Arcade 2. Chosen Vintage 3. Silver Falls Vintage

If you could live in a book, what book w 26

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the profile

what are you listening to? 1. Rough Travel for a Rare Thing by Bill Callahan 2. Storytelling by Belle and Sebastian 3. The Masterworks of Satyajit Ray 4. Wakin on a Pretty Daze by Kurt Vile 5. Castlemusic by Jennifer Castle 6. Lost the Plot by Fiver

What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? CODY: Give away your ideas freely. The more you give of yourself and share openly, the more comes back to you. It’s the law of creativity. And don’t be stingy with support and positive encouragement. We all need it to survive. What’s your favourite city? CODY: I have the best group of people around me that I have ever known here in Toronto, but as an actual place, my heart belongs to Glasgow, Scotland—so many shades of green. It’s a rainy, ancient, Tolkien paradise.   What’s your secret superpower? CODY: Seeing. Forced to choose between tea and coffee, which would you give up forever? CODY: This is the easiest question I have ever been asked! Coffee. Don’t drink it. Never have. I live for tea, though.   What’s your Achilles heel? CODY: Lavender Earl Grey hand-made gelato from Boreal Gelato company on Queen Street West in Parkdale.

would it be? CODY: A Moveable Feast covetgarden.com

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FREE STYLE

These finds, inspired by Cody’s bohemian groove, will look as spring fresh in the city as they would at an outdoor arts festival

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the style

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11 1. Park and Young silk scarf in black and grey, $41 2. Annika Inez Orbital ring, $100 3. Zara Woman printed top, $60 4. Bosabo clogs, $150 5. Scout and Catalogue Oaxaca Tote in grey, $162 6. Scotch and Soda Printed Silky Feel Jumpsuit, $195 7. ACB by Annie Costello Brown Mini Zigzag Bronze Cuff, $108 8. RVCA McMurphy Coverup in Bronze, $49 9. Borsalino raffia hat, $395 10. RVCA Lush Deserts skirt, $58 11. Vintage Haori in Chirimen silk, $164 12. Species by the Thousands Moon Phases earring set in bronze, $150 covetgarden.com

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kale to the chief

Cody made us some kale chips and now we’re converts recipes and food styling by LeeAnne Wright photography by Donna Griffith

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kale pound cake

1 bunch kale (5 oz when stems removed = 1 cup after blanching and chopping) 1 medium zucchini, shredded and then squeezed of excess liquid 1/3 cup plain yogurt 6 tbsp butter, melted 2 eggs 3/4 cup granulated sugar 1 tsp vanilla extract 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tsp baking soda 1 tsp baking powder

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½ tsp salt 1 tsp ground cardamom ¼ tsp ground ginger ¼ tsp ground allspice Cooking spray 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. Remove stems from kale. Blanche in boiling water for 30 seconds (leaves will become bright green), drain and rinse immediately in cold running water to stop the cooking. Squeeze out liquid and chop finely.

the project 3. Combine zucchini, yogurt, butter and eggs in a mixer on medium speed.  Add the sugar and vanilla, then mix until just blended. 4. Combine flour, baking soda, salt and spices. Add flour mixture to wet ingredients, just until blended. Pour into a greased 9-inch loaf pan. 5. Bake for 55 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes, then remove to a rack for complete cooling.

kale, quinoa and pomegranate salad

1/2 bunch kale, stems removed and cut into bite-sized pieces or 2½ oz baby kale (1/2 box), about 2 cups packed 1 cup cooked quinoa 1/3 cup pomegranate seeds 1/2 cucumber, cut into half moons 3 green onions 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice 2 tbsp candied walnuts,* chopped 1. Toss all ingredients together and serve. Makes 4 servings *candied walnuts 1/4 cup sugar 1 tbsp butter 1 pinch chili flakes 3/4 cup whole walnuts 1. Heat butter and sugar together over medium heat until sugar melts and starts to darken. Stir in chili flakes and nuts, then remove from heat. Stir to coat nuts completely.

2. Pour mixture onto a parchment-lined pan, separating individual nuts. Let cool. You will have more than you need for salad but they are really delicious to snack on too.

kale almond pesto

1/2 box baby kale (21/2 oz, about 2 cups packed) 2 tbsp basil leaves (about 12 leaves) 3 cloves garlic 1/4 cup ground almonds 1/2 cup olive oil 1/4 cup finely grated Parmesan 1. Combine kale, basil and garlic in a food processor and pulse until well chopped but not purĂŠed. Pulse in almonds and oil, and pulse once to combine. Stir in grated cheese, and season with salt and pepper as needed. Makes enough pesto for 1 lb pasta.

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GET YOURS NOW!

covet garden

HOME decor inspiration for telling your own story

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COVET GARDEN IN PRINT THE PRINT EDITION OF COVET GARDEN HITS SELECT STORES ACROSS CANADA THIS MONTH! (AND U.S. RETAILERS IN FALL). IT’S BURSTING AT THE SEAMS WITH BEAUTIFUL PICTURES OF YOUR FAVOURITE SPACES PLUS BRAND-NEW PLACES, INSPIRATION, DIY AND MORE! DON’T MISS OUT ON THIS KEEPSAKE EDITION. CLICK HERE FOR A LIST OF STOCKISTS OR VISIT OUR ONLINE SHOP TO ORDER.

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the drink

QUEEN OF GREENS Drink to your health with this kale-infused cocktail recipe and food styling by LeeAnne Wright photograph by Donna Griffith

KALE COCKTAIL 1½ oz gin ½ oz Cynar (Italian artichoke liqueur) ½ oz fresh-squeezed lime juice 1½ oz kale syrup* Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker. Add ice, shake and pour into glass. *Check out our blog for the kale syrup recipe!

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THE PAPER CHASE We took a page from Cody’s collection of antique ephemera to assemble this mix of modern paper-based arts and crafts

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1. Papertuli Custom Laser-cut wedding gift (sold unframed), $97 2. IKEA Solfint paper napkins (p Wiggle Side Chair by Frank Gehry, $1,140 5. Mel’s Creative Designs Jellyfish Hanging Lamp Sha Magic Fruit papercut print, $28 8. Crank Bunny Magic Perpetual Calendar, $17 9. Molo Softseating with Nautical Octopus (set of 24), $26 11. Chief Salvage Phases of the Moon Bunting, $25 12. Ka Curious Paper Artist by Emily Martin, $17 14. Vintage Geometric Wallpaper, $18/yard 15. Isabella

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inspiration

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pack of 30), $3 3. Paul & Joe Limited Edition Lipstick Case 009 and refill, $20 4. Frank Gehry Vitra ade, $111 6. Kara Walker: After the Deluge by Kara Walker, $24 7. Elsita by Elsa Mora Girl With a ng Natural Kraft Paper Fanning Stool (12”x 16”), $220 10. Nancy Nikko Design Custom Bookplates arton Eco Bull, $60 13. The Black Apple’s Paper Doll Primer: Activities and Amusements for the a’s Art The Little Prince Laser-cut Shadow Puppet, $18 covetgarden.com

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in the next issue... Follow us on Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and Facebook

He’s a DJ. He’s a gallerist. Paul is super cool and so is his contemporary townhouse.

Can’t wait until next month for the new issue of Covet Garden? Check out our blog for more ideas and inspiration! 40

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