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62 CHINESE highlighted. Three class periods per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 341 – Organic Chemistry I or consent of instructor CHEM 351 – Physical Chemistry I, 4 credits. E1. The first of two courses that explore the fundamental physical principles of chemistry. The course progresses from a microscopic to a macroscopic point of view moving from quantum mechanics to statistical mechanics and finally to thermodynamics. Topics include one-dimensional quantum models, atoms and molecules, the Boltzmann distribution, the laws of thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, and electrochemistry. Three class periods and one four-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 128 – General Chemistry II (or CHEM 138 – Honors General Chemistry II) and MATH 121 – Calculus I. Recommended: MATH 122 – Calculus II, and either PHYS 111-112 – General College Physics I and II or PHYS 128-211 – Physics for Scientists and Engineers I and II. CHEM 352 – Physical Chemistry II, 4 credits. E2. The second of two courses that explore the fundamental physical principles of chemistry. The course builds on the fundamentals of quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, and thermodynamics introduced in CHEM 351 – Physical Chemistry I. Additionally, physical and chemical kinetics are discussed. Topics include: two and three dimensional quantum models, operator formalism, angular momentum, group theory, lasers, kinetics, and thermodynamics of solutions. Three class periods, and one four-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 351 – Physical Chemistry I

with modern concepts of bonding, coordination chemistry, acid-base behavior, reaction mechanisms and properties of less familiar elements. Three class periods, and one four-hour lab period per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 351 – Physical Chemistry I; co-enrollment in CHEM 352 – Physical Chemistry II is encouraged. CHEM 475, NEU 475 Z – Neurochemistry, 4 credits. E2. This junior/senior level course studies the chemical and biochemical aspect of neuroscience including ligand binding, pharmacokinetics and second messenger cascades. Three class periods per week. Prerequisites: NEU 109 – Introduction to Neuroscience and CHEM 373 – Biochemistry I or CHEM 142 – Biochemistry I CHEM 480 – Independent Study, 1 to 4 credits. D. This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct in-depth study of a particular topic under the supervision of a faculty member. Contact the department or program chair for more information. CHEM 487 – Directed Research, 1 to 4 credits. D. This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct research in a specific area of study, completed under the direction of a faculty mentor. Specific expectations of the research experience to be determined by the faculty. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor

CHEM 373 – Biochemistry I, 4 credits. E1. A survey of the chemistry and biology of the fundamental molecules of life: carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, amino acids, proteins, enzymes, vitamins and cofactors. The metabolic pathways for producing energy by degradation of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins are also a major component of the course. Three class periods plus one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 342 – Organic Chemistry II CHEM 374 – Biochemistry II, 4 credits. E2. Building on the content of Biochemistry I, this course surveys selected biochemical pathways for synthesizing the molecules of life such as fatty acids, triglycerides, cholesterol, heme, starch and glycogen. A second major focus of the course is the transfer of biological information as it flows from DNA to RNA to proteins. Three class periods plus one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 373 – Biochemistry I CHEM 380 – Special Topics, 2 to 4 credits. D. Courses covering various topics of interest in this particular discipline are offered regularly. Contact department or program chair for more information. CHEM 390 – Cooperative Education, 1 to 4 credits. D. CHEM 403 – Senior Seminar I, 1 credit. B1. The fundamentals of scientific presentation and basic literature searching techniques are discussed. Chemical Abstracts, Science Citation, and Internet database searching skills are developed. ACS style guidelines for both oral and written presentations are discussed. The student chooses a topic and faculty mentor for the CHEM 404 – Senior Seminar II presentation. CHEM 404 – Senior Seminar II, 1 credit. E2. Oral and written presentation of a topic of interest to the chemistry department. The student works with a chosen faculty mentor to apply the skills learned in CHEM 403 – Senior Seminar I. Prerequisite: CHEM 403 – Senior Seminar I CHEM 431 – Analytical Chemistry II, 4 credits. E2. A continuation of the topics introduced in CHEM 330, with an emphasis on instrumental methods of chemical analysis. In addition to the instrumental techniques introduced In the previous course, this course includes computer-to-instrument interfaces, electronics, electrochemical techniques, capillary electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and surface analysis methods. Three class periods and one four-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 330 – Analytical Chemistry I CHEM 445 – Organic Chemistry III, 4 credits. D. A study of modern concepts of organic reaction mechanisms and the relationship of spectroscopic properties to molecular structure. Three class periods and one four-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 342 – Organic Chemistry II CHEM 462 – Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 4 credits. E2. A study of theoretical inorganic chemistry at an advanced level. The primary concerns are

Chinese – also see Global Studies – also see World Languages and Cultures

Programs offered

• Major in Chinese (32 credits) • Minor in Chinese (20 credits) The mission of the Chinese program at Concordia College is to enable students to gain a global vision and sensitivity to other cultures by promoting enjoyment of learning Chinese and nurturing students’ knowledge of Chinese culture and civilization. The Chinese program provides learning experiences that prepare students to achieve the following outcomes: • to develop communication skills in the Mandarin Chinese language • to gain knowledge and understanding of Chinese culture • to make connections between Chinese and other disciplines and acquire information in a liberal arts context • to develop comparisons based on insight into the nature of the language and culture • to participate in multilingual communities at home and around the world The Chinese program offers students the opportunity to participate in regular activities of the Chinese Club and to interact with Chinese international students and the local Chinese community. Students are encouraged to participate in immersion weekends at Concordia Language Villages, which also offer opportunities for summer employment in the language. Students are strongly encouraged to study abroad and majors may find it necessary to do so in order to complete a sufficient number of upper-level courses. Students should consult with the department about semester and summer opportunities to study in China.


Academic Catalog 2013-14