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The Winter Sale 2013 January 21 | 980 Park Avenue | New York, New York

copleyart.com |

COPLEY FINE ART AUCTIONS | 617.536.0030

Welcome I recently had the chance to sit down with noted Americana collector and Classic New Jersey Decoys author Jim Doherty. Aside from the chance to once again view an impressive collection that covers numerous fields, it was also an opportunity to engage in a thought-provoking conversation about collecting. Several points that Jim brought up really struck chords with me. While our discussion revolved around decoy collecting, the conversation could be applied to collecting folk art or paintings. As I started my six hour drive back to Boston I had time to reflect upon Jim’s comments about the experience of collecting. We discussed the enjoyment of researching objects, living with and handling these objects, and the importance of sharing knowledge with the next generation of collectors. His enthusiasm was infectious and reaffirmed my belief that collecting Americana truly is a gift. I began to think about how we as collectors and historians are indebted to the early collectors: Joel Barber, Adele Earnest, Joe French, Malcolm Fleming, William J. Mackey, Jr., Donal C. O’Brien, Jr., Bill Purnell, Carter Smith, Dr. George Ross Starr, Jr., M.D., Hal Sorenson, and Winsor White along with many others. Taken a step further, our indebtedness extends to the early makers that captured the imaginations of these pioneer collectors: A.E. Crowell, the Folger family of Nantucket, Ira Hudson, Charles Schoenheider, Harry V. Shourds, Gus Wilson, the Ward Brothers, and the Veritys of Long Island created objects that ignited the passion of the “old guard.” Crowell’s animated curlew (lot 216) preens, Hudson’s wooden bluebill (lot 268) dances, Wilson’s bold eider (lot 201) rides above the waves, and the Ward Brothers’ broadbill (lot 260) scoots to an unknown destination. The collectors of yesteryear sought to acquire, study, and preserve these incredible carvings as sculpture. They physically removed waterfowl and shorebird decoys from the barns and boat sheds where they had been previously stored as utility objects and prominently displayed them in their homes as pieces of folk art. Why did they do this? Somewhere around Hartford I came to realize that it was about connectivity. Collecting is about connecting. The early carvers were connected to the wild birds and sought to fashion creations in the likeness of the birds they hunted. The early collectors honed in on the artistry of these makers and saw something extraordinary in their work that demanded preserving. Today’s collectors have picked up the ball and run with it, elevating decoy collecting to a whole new level. Today there are nearly one hundred hard bound publications dedicated to the art of the decoy and the ranks of decoy collectors now runs into the thousands. With historians, authors, and decoy collectors, like Jim Doherty, continuing to connect with new acquisitors, the field can only grow. We hope that you will be able to attend our Scotch and Smoked Salmon preview on Saturday, January 19th, from 5:30 pm-7:30 pm. This event, held in conjunction with Keno Auctions, will be kicking off Americana week and brings out hundreds of the country’s top curators, collectors, dealers and art enthusiasts. It is a great time to preview both auctions, visit with friends, and plug into the exciting connectivity of the American collecting scene.

Sincerely,

Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. Chairman

The Winter Sale Schedule of Events

AUCTION to be held at wallace hall at the church of St. Ignatius loyola 980 park avenue | new york, new york

saturday january 19 Auction Preview

10am - 8pm

sunday january

20

Auction Preview

10am - 5pm

monday january

21

Auction Preview Auction

8am - 10:30am 11 am

Contacts the day of the sale On Site: 617.536.0030 Cinnie O’Brien: 617.501.7544

Absentee and telephone bids Please visit copleyart.com to leave absentee or telephone bids or use the bid forms on page 181 of this catalog.

ONLINE bidDING This auction features live online bidding at Liveauctioneers.com Please review the Terms and Conditions of Sale on page 182 of this catalog. For further information please contact us at 617.536.0030.

268 Newbury Street | Boston, Massachusetts 02116 | 617.536.0030 | copleyart.com

Front Cover: Lot 201 Inside Front Cover: Lot 47 Left Table of Contents: Lot 10 Title Page: Lot 44 Left Properties: Lot 36 Inside Back Cover: Lot 268

CATALOG Stephen B. O’Brien Jr., Chairman Cinnie O’Brien, Chief Financial Officer Aimee Stashak-Moore, Auction Coordinator Kathryn Robinson, Fine Art Specialist Jim Parker, Decoy Specialist Colin McNair, Decoy Specialist Nancy Hershberg, Executive Assistant Molly Quill, Intern Tess Gumbin, Intern PHOTOGRAPHY David Allen DESIGN Spire WEBSITE Smallfish Design, smallfish-design.com Printed in the USA on recycled paper by Spire Boston, MA

© Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC 2013. All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents

2

Chairman’s Welcome

3

Schedule of Events

6

Important Notices

10

Session 1: Paintings, Works on Paper, Bronzes, Fishing related items, and Folk Art

84

Session 2: Decoys and Folk Art

176

Index of Artists and Makers

178

Bibliography

180

Buyer Pre-Registration Form

181

Absentee/Telephone Bid Form

182

Terms and Conditions of Sale

183

Authorized Shipping Release Form

The Winter Sale Important Notices 1. Consign to our next sale Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC is accepting consignments for our upcoming Sporting Sale. Please contact us by phone at 617.536.0030, or by email at consignments@copleyart.com 2. Please be advised that all persons wishing to bid at this auction should read, and be familiar with the Terms and Conditions of Sale on page 182 of this catalog prior to bidding. 3. Pre-registration Although you may register at the time of sale, we strongly encourage pre-registration to save you time at check-in. Preregistration forms are available online, as well as in this catalog. If you wish to pre-register, please be certain that we receive your registration form no later than 5 pm EST, Saturday, January 19, 2013. 4. Absentee and telephone bidding If you plan to place absentee bids or to bid by telephone, please make sure that we receive your absentee/telephone bid form by 5 pm EST, Saturday, January 19, 2013. Any bids received after this date cannot be guaranteed. You will receive confirmation of your absentee bid(s) within 24 hours of receipt. If you do not receive confirmation, please call our office at 617.536.0030. This form is located on page 181 of the catalog. 5. Sales Tax Purchases picked up at the auction will be subject to the New York State and local tax of 8.875%. Buyers claiming exemption from sales tax must have the appropriate documentation on file with Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC prior to the release of property. Purchases delivered to New York after the auction will be subject to the applicable New York state and local taxes and purchases picked up or delivered to Massachusetts after the sale will be subject to the 6.25% Massachusetts Sales Tax unless exempted by applicable law. 6. Inspection of items offered at this auction All items are sold as is and should be inspected either personally or by agent before a bid is placed. Prospective buyers should satisfy themselves by personal inspection as to the condition of each lot. Although condition reports may be given on request, such reports are statements of opinion only. Regardless of whether or not a condition report is given, all property is sold as is. The absence of a condition report does not imply that the property is in good condition. All dimensions are approximate. Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC reserves the right at its sole discretion to refuse condition requests.

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7. Buyer’s premium A buyer’s premium of 15% (18% for online bidding) of the final bid price up to and including $1,000,000, plus 10% of the final bid price over $1,000,000, will be applied to each lot sold, to be paid by the Buyer to Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC as part of the purchase price. 8. Decoy stands Please be aware that decoy stands are not included with items purchased. 9. Flat Art Dimensions Please be aware that all flat art dimensions are rounded to the nearest quarter inch. 10. Condition Description of Gunning Wear Gunning wear may include all types of wear and damage that can be inflicted and is to be expected on a decoy that has been used in the field. This may include, but is not limited to, paint wear, flaking, dings, scratches, checks, cracks, craquelure, age lines, dents, chips, rubs, blunts, cracked eyes, shot scars, seam separations, popped grain, rust, and discoloration. 11. Item Pick Up Buyers wishing to pick up items at the sale must do so by 6 pm EST, Monday, January 21, 2013. All internet bidders wishing to pick up items at the sale must notify Copley before 6 pm EST, Monday, January 21, 2013. Buyers wishing to pick up items after the auction may do so only by appointment after Wednesday, January 30, 2013 and as per schedule announced by the auction house at the conclusion of the sale. 12. Auction results Unofficial auction results will be available online approximately one week after the auction at copleyart.com. 13. Auction day contact numbers Onsite: 617.536.0030 Cinnie O’Brien: 617.501.7544 Auctioneer: Peter J. Coccoluto, NY License #1378503

268 Newbury Street | Boston, Massachusetts 02116 | 617.536.0030 | copleyart.com

The Winter Sale January 21,

2013

New york, new york

Properties from

A Great-Grandson of Frank W. Benson Jon Carthay Collection Betsey Burhams Fowler Collection A Granddaughter of Charles H. Hart Paul W. Masengarb Collection Donal C. O’Brien, Jr. Collection William H. Purnell, Jr. Collection A Descendant of Malcom Burnham Rowe A Descendant of Joseph F. Sherer, Jr. The Tuckerton Seaport Collection A Descendant of Milton C. Weiler Private Collection, Florida Private Collection, Midwest Private Collection, Massachusetts Private Collection, Rhode Island Private Collection South Carolina Private Collection, Virginia

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SESSION I Paintings, Works On Paper, Bronzes, Fishing Related Items, and Folk Art

1

1 Richard E. Bishop (1887-1975) Map of Well-Known Saltwater Gamefish, 1935 signed “R.E. Bishop� lower center color print on board, 27 by 35 in. edition # 1 of 1000 provenance : Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner

$400 - $600

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2 Richard E. Bishop (1887-1975) Map of Surface Feeding Ducks, 1934 color print on board, 31 by 27 in. edition # 44 of 2000

2

provenance :

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $100 - $200

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3 Richard E. Bishop (1887-1975) Map of Diving Ducks, 1934 color print on board, 31 by 27 in. edition # 1 of 1000 provenance :

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $400 - $600

12

4 Richard E. Bishop (1887-1975) Decoy Patterns pencil and ink drawings, each 6 by 9 in.

4

provenance :

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $800 - $1,200

5 Richard E. Bishop (1887-1975) Decoy Patterns two hand-colored prints, each 17 by 11 in.

5

provenance :

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $400 - $600

6 Richard E. Bishop (1887-1975) Nine Metal Dies (four illustrated)

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Hunting and fishing club dies were used to create membership pins. Plimhimmon, 2 in. Stealaway, 2 in. Holly Springs, 2½ in. O.R.T.C., 1¾ in. Kings Grant Farm, 2 in. Castalia, 1¾ in. Grand Lieu, 2 in. E.S.S.F.T.A, 15⁄8 in. Sunny Hill, 23⁄8 in. provenance :

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $300 - $500

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7 Richard E. Bishop (1887-1975) Sixteen Hunting and Fishing Club Pins with Thirteen Metal Dies

8 Richard E. Bishop (1887-1975) Sixteen Hunting and Fishing Club Pins with Thirteen Metal Dies

Pins: Allapattah Cabo Blanco Fishing Club Peru Castalia Ducks Unlimited Emar Farm Green Briar High Point Holly Hill Hope Loveridge Mallard Bay Mayhaw Milestone Plantation Pebble Hill Peckerwood Santee Club

Pins: Chesapeake Duck Club Flanders Gardiners Island Lion Lodge Manorville Havens Point Mississippi Valley Kennel Club St. Louis Mud Lake Club Oak Grove Rainbow Fly Fishing Club of Chile Ristigouche Salmon Club Canada Sheldons Folly Spring Island Valley Farm Water Oak Trophy G.F.R.T. Whitehouse Farm Wingmead

Each pin measures approximately one inch in diameter.

Each pin measures approximately one inch in diameter.

Dies: Cabo Blanco Peru, 2 in. Castalia, 1¼ in. Castalia, 2 in. Green Briar, 15⁄8 in. Green Briar (2), 2¼ in. Green Briar (3), 15⁄8 in. High Point, 2 in. Lover Ridge, 2 in. Mallard Bay, 2½ in. Mayhaw, 2 in. Milestone Plantation, 2¹⁄8 in. Pebble Hill, 2¹⁄8 in. Peckerwood, 23⁄8 in.

Dies: Chesapeake Duck Club Bear River Marsh, Utah, 2 in. Flanders 1880, 2 in. Gardners Island, 2 in. G.F.R.T. Water Oak Trophy, 2 in. Lion Lodge, 23⁄8 in. Manorville Havens Point, 2¹⁄8 in. Mississippi Valley Kennel Club, 2¼ in. Mud Lake Club, 23⁄8 in. Oak Grove, 2 in. Sheldons Folly, 2¹⁄8 in. Spring Island, 2 in. Valley Farm, 2 in. White House Farm, 2 in.

provenance :

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner

provenance :

$1,000 - $2,000

$1,000 - $2,000

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Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner

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9 David Maass (b. 1929) Canvasbacks Coming In signed “Maass” lower right oil on board, 26 by 42 in. “Each new painting that comes to us from this artist is a delight, for his range is vast and change is always evident. In some you can feel the approaching storm; in others, the soft fall of leaves coaxed by autumn breezes. His are scenes you’ve witnessed and with which you want to live.” – The Crossroads of Sport An avid sportsman and ardent contributor to conservation organizations, David Maass has been actively painting game birds for more than thirty years. In the past twenty years he has designed more than thirty conservation stamps and prints, a distinction few artists can claim. Over the last several years, Ducks Unlimited, the National Wild Turkey Federation, and the Minnesota Wildlife Heritage Foundation have each named David Maass their Artist of the Year.

Maass’ originals and limited edition prints have been exhibited in galleries and shows throughout the country, including the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C., the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum in Wausau, Wisconsin, and the annual Minnesota Wildlife Heritage Foundation Show in Minneapolis. An original Canada goose painting by David Maass is also part of the permanent collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. provenance :

The Finnell Family Trust

literature : The Crossroads of Sport, Inc., New York, NY, 1977-78, p. 2.

$8,000 - $12,000

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10

10 Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969) Black Ducks Coming In signed “A. Lassell Ripley” lower left watercolor, 19½ by 24¼ in. Sporting Gallery & Bookshop Inc., New York, New York label on back Born in Wakefield, Massachusetts, Aiden Lassell Ripley was the son of a Boston Symphony Orchestra musician. From an early age he excelled at music, but he soon discovered a deeper interest in painting. By his mid-teens, Ripley was committed to a career in art, commuting into Boston to take classes. After returning from service in World War I, he attended the Boston Museum School where he studied with the country’s top artists, including Philip Leslie Hale (1865-1934) and Frank W. Benson (1862-1951). Ripley was awarded a Paige Traveling Fellowship to study in Europe. While abroad, he painted watercolors en plein air in North Africa, France, and Holland. On his return, in 1925, he was elected to the prestigious Guild of Boston Artists. His work focused on the New England countryside as well as depictions of city life and railroad commuting scenes. The Great Depression, however, limited the sales potential for these works, and following a successful one-man show in 1930 of his sporting art Ripley decided to change his tack and specialize in hunting, fishing, and outdoor scenes as subjects. 16

Along with his contemporary, Ogden Pleissner (1905-1983), Ripley exemplified the life of a successful sporting artist. Collectors of Ripley’s sporting art endorsed his numerous trips to the salmon rivers of New Brunswick and the quail plantations of Georgia, where the artist indulged his passion for hunting and fishing while recording material he would use in his art. Considered the most cunning of ducks, black ducks can be difficult to observe in nature. Black Ducks Coming In demonstrates Ripley’s exceptional skill at depicting waterfowl, giving us a rare peek at this elusive species. He has expertly captured the bird in all of its poses: flying, swimming, preening, landing, and turning, demonstrating not only the grace of the bird, but his skill as an artist. provenance :

The Sporting Gallery & Bookshop Inc., New York, New York The Estate of John Kingsley, Greenwich, Connecticut Acquired from the above by the current owner $25,000 - $35,000

11 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974) Putting Out Decoys signed “M. C. Weiler” lower right watercolor, 7¾ by 9¼ in.

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$600 - $900

12 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974) Collecting a Duck signed “M. C. Weiler” lower right watercolor, 5¼ by 7¼ in.

12

$500 - $700

13 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974) Snipe signed “M.C. Weiler” lower right watercolor, 6 by 9¾ in. inscribed “to Jean Paul- Many thanks for everything! Sincerely, Milt” lower left

13

$400 - $600

17

14

14 Chet Reneson (b. 1934) Days End signed “Reneson” lower left watercolor, 19 by 28 in. $3,500 - $5,500

15

Δ

15 Chet Reneson (b. 1934) Matching the Hatch signed “Reneson” lower left watercolor, 17 by 27 in. $3,500 - $5,500

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16

16 Fred McCaleb (20th century) Peter Rinski Pointer signed “F. McCaleb� lower right oil on canvas, 24 by 32 in. The subject of this painting, Peter Rinski, was a champion pointer, owned by the Waugh family. He was declared the 1948 National Bird Dog Champion after he ran a near perfect course, turning up nine out of a possible ten points. $2,000 - $4,000

Peter Rinski shown after winning the 1948 National Bird Dog championship in Grand Juction, Tennessee.

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17 David Hagerbaumer (b. 1921) Woodlot Quail, 1965 signed and dated “David Hagerbaumer 1965” lower right watercolor, 16 by 22 in.

17

$600 - $900

18.1

18.2

18.3

18.4

18 David Hagerbaumer (b. 1921) Four Watercolors, each 8 by 10 in. 18.1 Blue-Winged Teal signed and dated “David Hagerbaumer 1962” lower left 18.2 Pintails signed and dated “David Hagerbaumer 1962” lower right

18.3 Bobwhite Quail signed and dated “David Hagerbaumer 1962” lower left 18.4 Mallards signed and dated “David Hagerbaumer 1962” lower right $800 - $1,200

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19 David Hagerbaumer (b. 1921) Mallards, 1964 signed and dated “David Hagerbaumer 1964” lower right watercolor, 25 by 39 in. $2,000 - $4,000

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20 David Hagerbaumer (b. 1921) Black Ducks, 1964 signed and dated “David Hagerbaumer 1964” lower left watercolor, 25 by 39 in. $2,000 - $4,000

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21 Lynn Bogue Hunt (1878-1960) Ruffed Grouse in the Wild Grapes signed “Lynn Bogue Hunt” lower right oil on canvas, 18 by 19¾ in. Lynn Bogue Hunt was born in rural Honeoye Falls, New York into a family that ran a small sawmill operation. He grew up with modest means, but spent hours outside exploring the natural surroundings in the woods near his home. He often collected birds and practiced taxidermy, a hobby that led to his accurate portrayal of his wildlife subjects. Hunt contributed illustrations to his own articles, as well as cover illustrations to magazines such as Field and Stream, Sports Afield, and Free Press. In his lifetime he painted for private collectors, companies, such as DuPont, illustrated over forty books, and produced roughly two hundred and fifty magazine covers. Though he spent much of his life in New York City, far from nature, Hunt had a strong foundation as a knowledgeable outdoorsman, bird hunter, and fisherman, enabling him to accurately capture the essence of the outdoors. provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

$8,000 - $12,000

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22

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22 Lynn Bogue Hunt (1878-1960) Big Buck signed “Lynn Bogue Hunt” lower right oil on canvas, 14 by 16 in. $2,000 - $4,000

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23 Lynn Bogue Hunt (1878-1960) Grapes and Grain, 1950 signed and dated “Lynn Bogue Hunt 1950” lower right oil on canvas, 26½ by 30 in. The Grand Central Art Galleries, Inc., New York, New York label inscribed “To: Mr. Harry R. LePoidevin, The Journal-Times Company, 212 Forth Street, Racine, Wisc., Grapes and Grain by Lynn Bogue Hunt” on back provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

$10,000 - $20,000

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24 Luke Frazier (b. 1970) Pointer with Quail signed “L. Frazier” upper right oil on board, 11 by 14 in. $3,000 - $5,000

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25 M. B. Higginson Hanging Game signed “M.B. Higginson” lower right oil on board, 18 by 11¾ in. $400 - $600

26 John C. Harrison (1898-1985) Woodcock signed “J C Harrison” lower right watercolor, 14 by 18½ in. $600 - $900

25

27

27 Maynard Reece (b. 1920) Early Arrivals signed “Maynard Reece” lower right oil on canvas, 20 by 25¼ in. $2,000 - $4,000 28

28 Maynard Reece (b. 1920) Mallard Pair signed “Maynard Reece” lower right watercolor and gouache, 18 by 15 in. $600 - $900

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29 Harry Curieux Adamson (b. 1916) Medina County Impressions, 1975 signed “Harry Curieux Adamson” lower right oil on board, 26 by 40 in. Harry Adamson was one of the premier waterfowl painters of the last fifty years. Born in Seattle in 1916, he studied under Paul J. Fair who is best known for his wildlife photography. He began painting after serving in World War II, selling a painting to the president of Mexico within the first decade of his career. His success continued and he was given the honor of being the first California Waterfowl Association Artist of the Year, as well as the 1979 Ducks Unlimited Artist of the Year. His works have been included in shows at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the British Museum, and the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. Admired by his fellow artists, Adamson had a knack for capturing birds in their natural habitats. His thoroughly detailed landscapes are the perfect backdrop for his accurately painted waterfowl.

Adamson recounted the experience that served as the inspiration for this work in Diane Inman’s book From Marsh to Mountain. Inman writes, “Eventually, Harry painted Medina County Impressions, a large canvas featuring what he called a ‘Woolworth’s window’ of green-wing teal, widgeon, gadwall, blue-wing teal, pintails, mallards, and even some moor hens.” Adamson explains, “‘I actually think there were about nine species, and that’s exactly what we saw as we walked up that creek.’” provenance:

Private Collection, Virginia

literature:

Diane K. Inman, From Marsh to Mountain: The Art of Harry Curieux Adamson, San Francisco, CA, 1999, p. 107, illustrated. $20,000 - $25,000

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30 Roger S. Cruwys (b. 1938) Geese Coming In signed “Cruwys” lower right oil on board, 24 by 36 in. $2,000 - $4,000 31

31 Harry Curieux Adamson (b. 1916) Flight to the Backwaters signed “Harry Curieux Adamson” lower right oil on canvas, 18 by 24 in. $4,000 - $6,000

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John James Audubon (1785-1851) Audubon’s single greatest passion was the observation and description of birds. The illegitimate son of a French sea captain and a Creole chambermaid, he spent most of his time observing and drawing birds in the Ohio Valley region, as well as the swamps and bayous of the Mississippi Valley. Audubon drew, painted, and wrote, while he hunted, trapped, and even tried domesticating some of the hundreds of birds he studied. Audubon decided to publish a great ornithological treatise describing with text and life-size illustrations every known North American bird in their natural habitat. To finance his endeavor Audubon offered his Birds of America by subscription, issuing the illustrated plates and accompanying text in groups of five. Unable to find an American publishing house that could take on a project of this magnitude, he traveled to England to find an engraver who was able to translate his great vision onto paper. The first ten plates (Plates 1-10) were engraved by William Lizars of Scotland (1788-1859). However, his colorists went on strike and Lizars was unable to continue. Audubon found another

equally talented and like-minded engraver in Robert Havell, Jr. of London (1793-1878), whose meticulous workmanship, attention to detail, and artistic sensibility was pivotal to Audubon’s great success. Havell reproduced Audubon’s drawings on sheets of Whatman paper (known as double elephant folio–a reference to their size) using aquatint engraving, a labor intensive process reserved for all but the most expensive publications. The Birds of America took twelve years to complete. The four volume work included four hundred and thirty-five hand-colored illustrations, with text issued separately in an octavo-sized publication of five volumes entitled Ornithological Biography. It is estimated that between one hundred and seventy-five and two hundred copies were made in all.

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33 after John James Audubon (1785-1851) Common Gull, 1834 hand-colored engraving, 21 by 24¾ in. inscribed in plate “Engraved, Printed, & Colored by R. Havell, 1834” lower right, “Common Gull Larus Canus 1. Adult 2. Young” lower center, “No. 43” upper left and “Plate CCXII” upper right

32 after John James Audubon (1785-1851) Sooty Tern, 1834 hand-colored engraving, 18 by 24 in. inscribed in plate “Engraved, colored, and printed by R. Havell 1834” lower right, “Sooty Tern Sterna Fuliginosa” lower center, “No. 47” upper left, and “Plate CCXXXV” upper right $2,000 - $3,000

provenance:

Private Collection, Rhode Island

$2,500 - $5,000 34

34 after John Woodhouse Audubon (1812-1862) Hare Indian Dog, 1848 colored lithograph, 20¾ by 26 in. inscribed in plate “Printed and colored by J. T. Bowen, Philadelphia” lower right, “Canis Familiaris, Linn (Var Lagopus)” and “Hare Indian Dog, Male” lower center, “No. 27” upper left, and “Plate CXXXII” upper right provenance:

The Tuckerton Seaport Collection

$2,500 - $3,500 29

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35 Percival Leonard Rosseau (1859-1937) Irish Setters on Point, 1918 signed and dated “Rosseau 1918” lower left oil on canvas, 20¼ by 28 in. Percival Rosseau was born near Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Considered a premier painter of sporting dogs, Rosseau did not pick up a paintbrush until the age of thirty-five. After leaving an eclectic business career including stints as a cowboy and a lumberjack, he sailed to Paris to attend the Académie Julian. There he studied under Jules Lefebvre (1836-1911), whose other students included Frank W. Benson (1862-1952), Childe Hassam (1859-1935), and Edmund C. Tarbell (1862-1938). His entry at the 1904 Paris Salon, a painting of a pair of Irish wolfhounds, gained him pivotal acclaim. He returned to the United States where he found a ready market for his work among wealthy sportsmen and received many commissions from first-rate breeders of pointers and setters. Rosseau’s best works capture the tense action of hunting dogs and depict them in romantic landscapes. His style is loose and painterly, suggesting the influence of the French Barbizon School. Irish Setters on Point shows Rosseau at his best. His expertise is apparent in the finely depicted dogs that are staunch on point. The tension of dogs is set off nicely against the atmospheric background, a trademark of the artist’s work. provenance:

John Levy Galleries, New York The Estate of John R. Jaqua Christie’s, New York, June 8, 1984, Lot # 194 The Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel, California Acquired from the above by the current owner $30,000 - $40,000

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36 after John James Audubon (1785-1851) Dusky Duck, 1836 hand-colored engraving, 35 by 43 in. inscribed in plate “Engraved, colored, and printed by R. Havell. 1836” lower right, “Anas obscura. One male, one female” lower center, “No. 61” upper left, and “Plate CCCII” upper right Depicting black ducks, this elegant Audubon work is considered one of the artist’s best waterfowl renderings. $18,000 - $24,000

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37 Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait (1819-1905) American Speckled Brook Trout chromolithograph, 16 by 21¾ in. published by Currier (1813-1888) & Ives (1824-1895) $1,500 - $2,000

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38 Ansel Adams (1902-1984) Grand Tetons and the Snake River, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, 1942 signed “Ansel Adams” lower right on mount gelatin silver print, 15½ by 19½ in. Ansel Adams captured some of the most iconic and beloved images of the North American continent. Often using the natural landscape as his subject, Adams documented these majestic landforms at a time when human expansion was fast overtaking the frontier wilderness. Born in San Francisco at the turn of the century, he spent as much time out-of-doors as possible. At the age of fourteen, after reading In the Heart of the Sierras, a book about Yosemite by renowned conservationist J.M. Hutchings, Adams convinced his father to take him to visit the park in person. When they arrived Adams’ father gave him a Kodak No. 1 Box Brownie camera, which he used to capture every detail of the landscape. Frustrated by his inability to convey the majesty of nature in his pictures, Adams set out to learn every step of the photographic process so that he would be able to improve his finished product. In 1925 he committed himself to photography, giving up on a fledging career as a concert pianist to pursue the endeavor. Taking frequent hikes with the Sierra Club and living in Yosemite with his wife, Virginia, he continued to document his excursions, refining his photographic process throughout the decade. For Adams, photography was deeply tied to his love of nature and the outdoors. His works capture the transcendental qualities of mountain summits, plunging valleys, and morning sunlight glittering across blue waters. They do not, however, achieve this effect without a significant amount of effort on the artist’s part. Adams learned quickly that simply positioning the lens in front of his subject would not yield his desired results, and throughout his career he played with filters, attempting to visualize how a finished print would look before taking the photograph. Although increasingly becoming known for his artistic work, Adams was forced to take on commercial work to support himself. He was recognized for his unparalleled understanding of the technical process of photography and developing film, and was even taken on as a consultant at Polaroid and Hasselblad.

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In addition to creating a large body of artistic work, Adams was also an active conservationist. He fought to protect all American wilderness, but especially Yosemite and the other national parks. Managing director of the Ansel Adams Trust, William Turnage, commented: “I can’t think of any artist in our history who was more American than Ansel Adams...He grew up in a city that was only fifty years old....his subject matter was as quintessentially American as it possibly could be. The thing that separates us from the Old World, more than anything I think, is that we have all of...these extraordinary great pieces of wild land which Ansel of course devoted much of his life’s energy to saving. So his cause was American. His work was about America...” More than simply documenting America, Adams’ photographs evoke a certain kind of patriotism. He so successfully instilled his love of the American landscape in his photos that the viewer of his works cannot help but feel the same way. Grand Tetons and the Snake River is one of Adams’ seminal works. He has expertly captured the majesty of the peaks, the winding river, and the dramatic clouds. The remarkable angle of the photo simultaneously conveys a sense of space and closeness. The viewer can recognize the enormity of the landforms in the image, but feels as though they are right there in the middle of the landscape, and not standing back looking at it from afar. Grand Tetons and the Snake River represents the best of Ansel Adams: iconic subject matter, dramatic composition, and expert technical skill. provenance:

Private Collection, Massachusetts

literature:

Ansel Adams A Documentary Film American Experience, PBS, 2002. $40,000 - $60,000

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39 William F.M. Kay (1891-1983) Sierra Mountains signed “Wm. F. M. Kay” lower left oil on canvasboard, 24 by 30 inches $600 - $900

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40 Orestes Nicholas de Grandmaison (1932-1985) Rain Cloud Over Premier Lake, 1965 signed “ON Grandmaison Y” lower left oil on canvasboard, 22 by 30 in. inscribed “Title- Rain Cloud Over Premier Lake August 1965 ArtistO. N. Grandmaison 539-48th Ave. S.W. Calgary, Alta. ©” on back This image is believed to depict the Finnell family ranch in Calagary, Alberta and was a gift of the artist. provenance:

The Finnell Family Trust

$800 - $1,200 34

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41 Nicholas de Grandmaison (1892-1978) Chief signed “N. de Grandmaison� lower right pastel, 18 by 14 in. Nicholas de Grandmaison spent most of his artistic career in Banff, Alberta. He traveled extensively throughout the region, befriending native tribes and producing pastel portraits of the people he met. His works are marked by the dignity and personality that he bestowed on each of his subjects. provenance:

The Finnell Family Trust

$10,000 - $15,000

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42 Carl Clemens Moritz Rungius (1869-1959) Mountain Landscape signed “C Rungius” lower right oil on canvas, 8½ by 10¼ in. provenance:

The Finnell Family Trust

$8,000 - $12,000

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43 Carl Clemens Moritz Rungius (1869-1959) Lake and Mountain Landscape signed “C Rungius” lower right oil on canvas, 8½ by 10¼ in. Based on the presence of tacking holes in each corner of the painting, this work is likely a plein-air oil sketch. When he worked in and around Banff in the summers, Rungius would set up his outdoor easel to capture the splendor of the mountains, trees, and sunlight. Since his primary studio was in New York City, he made these works for reference, allowing him to paint far away from the North American wilderness during the winter months. provenance:

The Finnell Family Trust

$8,000 - $12,000

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44 William J. Koelpin (1938-1996) Bear Country, 1994 signed and dated “Wm. J. Koelpin © ‘94” on back bronze, 30 by 6 by 12 in. inscribed “Bear Country 1/24” on back edition # 1 of 24 William Koelpin was an avid hunter and fisherman from Wisconsin. He went on to become a celebrated sporting artist who excelled in a number of mediums including: bronze, paint, and wood. Throughout his career he displayed his passion for the outdoors through his accurate and detailed works. His first sold-out exhibit was at the Midwest Decoy Collectors’ annual show in the mid-1970s. Koelpin enjoyed many honors in his time, including the “Best in World” award from the Ward Museum in Salisbury, Maryland, and he was also named “One of America’s Premier Artists” by the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum in Wausau, Wisconsin. This is the first time this important work has come to auction, made all the more significant given that it is the number one casting. provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

$10,000 - $15,000

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45 Alan Wolton (b. 1934) Green Stone Lake- Sierra signed “Alan Wolton� lower right oil on canvas, 40 by 60 in. provenance:

Private Collection, Massachusetts

$5,000 - $7,000

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46 James E. Fraser (1876-1953) Buffalo Herd, 1968 signed “J.E. Fraser © S.U. no 1” on top of base bronze, 38 by 16 by 16 in. James E. Fraser is best known as the designer of the Buffalo nickel. Born in Minnesota, Fraser spent much of his childhood traveling throughout North and South Dakota. His father worked as an engineer, supervising the laying down of railroad tracks and he brought his family with him as the railroad expanded across the Dakotas. Fraser’s exposure to cowboys, Native Americans, and the culture of the plains, lends a sense of authenticity to his work. He studied at the Chicago Institute of Art and the École des Beaux Arts, Académie Julian, and Académie Colarossi in Paris. While studying abroad he completed End of the Trail, which won him $1,000 from the American Art Association and launched his career. His success caught the attention of famed sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens (1848-1907) who hired him as an assistant in his studio.

A few years later Fraser opened his own studio and began teaching at the Art Students League in New York. It was there that he met his future wife, and fellow sculptor, Laura Gardin. The two had illustrious careers, both receiving numerous public commissions. Among Fraser’s most notable works are Alexander Hamilton for the Treasury in Washington, D. C. and two figures of Law and Justice for the front of the Supreme Court Building. Upon his death, all of Fraser’s papers were donated to Syracuse University. In 1968 the Kennedy Galleries of New York, New York hosted a show featuring the artists’ work, which is most likely when this work was cast. Although the edition size was intended to be twelve, it is believed that the full edition was never cast. provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

$15,000 - $20,000

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47 Philip R. Goodwin (1882-1935) October Hunting, 1911 signed “Philip R. Goodwin” lower right oil on canvas, 25 by 36 in. Artistically inclined from a young age, Philip Goodwin began his career at the age of eleven when he sold an illustration to Collier’s magazine. In light of their son’s obvious talent, his parents sent him to the Rhode Island School of Design, and later to the Art Students League in New York City, to further his artistic ability. Realizing, however, that illustration was his passion, Goodwin traveled to Pennsylvania to study under famed draftsman Howard Pyle (1853-1911). Impressed by the young artist’s abilities Pyle invited Goodwin to join him in Wilmington, Delaware to continue his studies. Perhaps his most significant contribution to Goodwin’s work was Pyle’s insistence that all good illustration came from first hand knowledge of the subject. He not only encouraged Goodwin to envision models in costume, but to visit locations before depicting them. The artist traveled to the West several times throughout his career, often to visit his friend Charles Russell (1864-1926), who he met while working in New York. In his definitive publication Philip R. Goodwin, America’s Sporting & Wildlife Artist, Larry Peterson comments on Goodwin’s good fortune of befriending two of the world’s most skilled wildlife artists. He writes, “During a seven-year span, Philip R. Goodwin was given the opportunity to study painting techniques alongside Charles M. Russell, Carl Rungius, and other respected artists of the time. As a result, Goodwin developed a style that with maturity became uniquely his. From Russell he learned compositional themes of humans surprised by animals that often demonstrated anthropomorphic behavior. Rungius instilled confidence to pursue wildlife painting in a time when few artists attempted this particular genre. In combination, Goodwin’s paintings explored matchless natural predicaments.” Russell owned a cabin in Montana, which he built in 1906, on property that four years later would become Glacier National Park. The property, affectionately referred to as “Bull Head Lodge,” was situated on Lake McDonald and offered Goodwin a lush backdrop of raw vegetation, sumptuous forests, and imposing mountain peaks. Goodwin, much like the other great outdoorsmen artists of his time, would paint sketches of landscapes, big game animals, and scenes of daily life on the frontier throughout his travels. Carefully recording every detail from the light, to the vivid colors, to the dress of the local cowboys and Native Americans, he used

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these vignettes to create large scale works back at his studio in New York. Goodwin managed to earn a living illustrating, publishing works in Everybody’s, Harper’s Monthly, Harper’s Weekly, Outing, Persimmon Hill Magazine, and Scribner’s. Goodwin’s illustrations were also used by Brown and Bigelow for their calendars, as well as in advertisements for several major firearms dealers. These commissions brought about more opportunities for Goodwin, among them, illustrating books by some of the most celebrated authors of the day, including Jack London’s Call of the Wild and Theodore Roosevelt’s African Game Trails. This latter commission was especially notable for the artist, who was hand-picked by Roosevelt to illustrate his book. Goodwin continued to scrape by illustrating, and eventually built up a clientele for his oil paintings as well. The Great Depression, however, hit him hard and he spent the last several years of his life in somewhat perilous financial straits. He passed away of pneumonia on December 14, 1935, but his art continued to be published through Sports Afield, Brown & Bigelow, and by companies such as Kemper Thomas Company and Standard Oil. October Hunting was featured as the frontispiece in Scribner’s October 1911 issue. An expertly rendered painting, this pinnacle work has the dynamic elements that Goodwin collectors covet: a strong composition with boldly-painted main figures returning from a successful hunt, and a secondary story with a welcoming party filled with anticipation back at the camp. This knack for telling a story in his paintings lies at the heart of why Goodwin remains so revered by collectors. Though rarely given the accolades of his renowned teacher Howard Pyle or his friend Charles Russell, Goodwin in October Hunting shows the ability of the student to become the master. provenance:

Private Collection, Virginia

literature:

Scribner’s, October 1911, frontispiece. Larry Len Peterson, Philip R. Goodwin: America’s Sporting & Wildlife Artist, Hayden, ID, 2001, p. 75. $125,000 - $175,000

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48 Oliver Kemp (1887-1934) Portage, 1909 signed “Oliver Kemp” lower right oil on canvas, 24 by 18 in. inscribed “Kemp canoe cover return to M * Kemp p. 31041” on back

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This work served as a June 1909 cover of the Saturday Evening Post, a copy of which accompanies this lot. A student of Howard Pyle (1853-1911) and William Merritt Chase (1849-1916), Kemp was an extremely popular illustrator. He worked out of both New York and Detroit, Michigan, but like many of his contemporaries, made yearly pilgrimages to the West, traveling extensively through the Rocky Mountains. provenance:

Private Collection, Virginia

literature: Saturday Evening Post, June 1909, cover illustration.

$10,000 - $12,000

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49 Tim Tanner (20th century) Taken by Surprise, 2006 signed “Tanner” lower right oil on board, 16 by 31 in. $1,500 - $2,500 42

50 Brett J. Smith (b. 1958) Western Trout Fishing signed “Brett J Smith” lower right oil on canvas, 24 by 36 in.

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$5,000 - $7,000

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51 John Whorf (1903-1959) Running the Rapids signed “John Whorf” lower left oil on canvas, 30 by 38 in. Born in Winthrop, Massachusetts, John Whorf spent many years painting the seascapes around Provincetown, Massachusetts. As a young man, he studied in Boston at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts and the St. Botolph Studio under Philip Leslie Hale (1865-1931) and Sherman Kidd (b. 1877). In 1919, after recovering from a paralyzing accident, Whorf traveled to Europe. He painted throughout France, Portugal, and Morocco, gradually shifting to painting watercolors as well as oils. Whorf held his first one-man show in 1921, and continued to hold them twice a year for the next thirty-five years. Upon returning to America, Whorf continued his studies with famed American painter John Singer Sargent (1903-1959) in Boston. Whorf married Vivienne Wing in 1925 and fathered four children. He and his family lived in Brookline spending summers in Provincetown until 1937 when they relocated permanently to the

lower Cape. In 1938, Harvard College conferred on Whorf an Honorary Master of Fine Arts. His work is in major collections including the Metropolitan Museum and the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. A rare oil painting by the artist, Running the Rapids captures the dynamic movement of the canoe through the choppy waters of the river. The composition of the image lends a sense of immediacy to the canvas, allowing the viewer to feel the push and pull between the man in his canoe and the rushing current. Whorf’s loosely handled paint and fluid brush strokes make this lively, impressionistic, outdoors scene one of his best. provenance:

Private Collection, Massachusetts

$8,000 - $12,000 43

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52 John Whorf (1903-1959) Snubbing the Canoe, 1932 signed “John Whorf” lower right watercolor, 22 by 30 in. inscribed “Title- Snubbing the Canoe” and “32” on back provenance:

Private Collection, Massachusetts

$4,000 - $6,000 53

53 John Whorf (1903-1959) Beached Fishing Boats signed “John Whorf” lower right watercolor, 21¾ by 28¼ in. watercolor sketch, 19¼ by 26½ in. on back Doll & Richards, Inc., Boston, Massachusetts label on back provenance:

Private Collection, Massachusetts

$4,000 - $6,000 44

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54 John Whorf (1903-1959) Poling the River signed “John Whorf” lower right watercolor, 20¾ by 28 in. provenance:

Private Collection, Massachusetts

$4,000 - $6,000

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55 John Whorf (1903-1959) Hunter in the Dunes signed “John Whorf” lower right watercolor, 14¾ by 21½ in. $1,000 - $2,000

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56 Alexander Pope, Jr. (1849-1924) Three Dog Heads, 1886 signed “AP” lower right white metal, 8 by 18½ in. inscribed “Copyright F**** & Co. 1886” lower right $800 - $1,200

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57 Harry H. Wickey (1892-1968) Baseball Player signed “Wickey” on top of base bronze, 9 by 5 by 18 in. $2,500 - $3,500

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58 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) Swans signed “F.W. Benson” lower left inkwash, 24½ by 18¾ in. Frank Weston Benson, one of the “Ten American Painters” and a leading influence in the Boston school of American Impressionism, was born in Salem, Massachusetts on March 24, 1862. In his youth, Benson was a gifted athlete and excelled at boxing, sailing, and tennis. Growing up along the extensive marshes surrounding his native Salem, Benson learned to hunt and fish at an early age. Benson loved nature, and birds in particular. He wanted to combine his love for birds and his love for art by pursuing a career as an ornithological illustrator in the manner of John James Audubon (1785-1851). As a child he spent many hours at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard and Benson’s mother, who was herself a painter, encouraged him in this pursuit. In 1880, Benson enrolled at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. He studied with the school’s founding teachers, Otto Grundmann (1844-1890) and Frederick Crowninshield (1845-1918). Among his classmates were Willard Metcalf (18581925), William Bicknell (1860-1947), Edmund C. Tarbell (18621938), and Joseph Lindon Smith (1863-1950). Benson learned quickly and was recognized as a particularly gifted student.

In 1882, while still attending classes at the Museum School, Benson began to teach free evening drawing classes in Salem. In 1885 Benson rented a painting studio in Salem. He began to exhibit at the Boston Art Club and the National Academy of Design in New York, receiving much critical acclaim and numerous awards. After his marriage to Ellen Peirson in 1888, he taught at the Boston Museum School with his friend Edmund Tarbell intermittently until 1930. The year 1898 was the turning point in Benson’s career. He joined a number of other leading painters from New York and Boston, including Tarbell, Childe Hassam (1859-1935), and J. Alden Weir (1852-1919) to form the “Ten American Painters.” This group of radical avantgarde painters, mostly working in the French Impressionist style, rejected and resigned from the National Academy and the Society of American Artists to exhibit independently and without juries. Benson exhibited in all of the “Ten’s” annual exhibitions, which were held for twenty years, to critical acclaim. provenance:

Private Collection, Massachusetts

$8,000 - $12,000 47

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59 William J. Koelpin (1938-1996) The Market Hunter, 1976 signed and dated “Wm. Koelpin 76 ©��� on top of barrel bronze, 8¼ by 9¼ by 17 in. inscribed “10/24” on side of base edition # 10 of 24 provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

literature:

Hal Sorensen ed., Decoy Collector’s Guide: 1977 Annual, Burlington, IA, p. 120, illustrated.

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$3,000 - $5,000

60 William J. Koelpin (1938-1996) Nimrod, 1976 signed and dated “Wm. J. Koelpin 76” on top of base bronze, 9 by 5½ by 16½ in. inscribed “AP 1/3 ©” on top of base edition # 1 of 3 provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

literature: Hal Sorensen ed., Decoy Collector’s Guide: 1977 Annual, Burlington, IA, p. 118, illustrated.

$3,000 - $5,000

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61 William J. Koelpin (1938-1996) Mark Left- The Rail Hunter, 1975 signed and dated “Koelpin 75” on side of base bronze, 20 by 6½ by 13 in. inscribed “© 4/15” on side of base edition # 4 of 15 provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

$3,000 - $5,000

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62 Galen Mercer (b. 1962) Crossing the Rapids – The Salmon Guide Richard Adams on the Matapedia, 2006 signed and dated “Mercer 06” upper left oil on canvas, 20 by 26 in.

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Known as the dean of the Matapedia, Richard Adams was a guide for more than eighty years. Considered the best salmon guide on the river, he worked for numerous salmon clubs guiding famous actors, businessmen, and politicians. Among his friends, however, he is remembered for his love of women and gin, and his wealth of stories. Adams was also a conservationist. He was heavily involved with the Atlantic Salmon Federation and he founded the Richard Adams Foundation. $3,000 - $5,000

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63 Three Miniature Trout Plaques Roberts, c. 1950

64 Two Miniature Big Game Fish Plaques Roberts, c. 1950

Five-inch-long cut-throat, brook, and rainbow trout carvings mounted on oval mahogany plaques measuring five by eight inches. Signed “Roberts” on the back and each retains a paper label identifying the species and maker. Original paint with missing pelvic and pectoral fins.

Seven-inch-long sailfish and marlin carvings mounted on oval mahogany plaques measuring five by eight inches. Signed “Roberts” on the back and each retains a paper label identifying the species and maker. Original condition, with flakes to gill plates and marlin’s bill.

$100 - $300

$100 - $300

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65 Important Atlantic Salmon Carving This wood-carved salmon was made as a trophy for the largest fly-caught salmon ever taken on the Wye river. It weighed a pound for every inch of length. Below the carving, in hand-painted lettering, is the following information: “Salmon 52½ lbs., Caught By R.G. Devereux. April 14th, 1928, The Nyth, Wye.” The Nyth is an area of the Wye River in Wales. The river which is located along the border between Wales and England had a major salmon run in the early twentieth century. The carving displays glass eyes, carved mouth, gills, and accurately carved scales and fins. The painted detail is accentuated by the base coating of silver colored leaf. The plaque measures sixty inches by twenty and one-half inches, has a raised molding on the edge, and brass fasteners on either end. Remnants of a “John Forrest, Fishing and Tackle Maker, Oxford Street, London,” label on the back of the plaque. Original paint with touch-up to the dorsal and adipose fins which have been reset. There is also a tight age crack in tail. literature: Ronald S. Swanson, Fish Models, Plaques and Effigies, Far Hills, NJ, 2009, p. 162, plate 273, exact carving illustrated.

$10,000 - $15,000

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66 Brown Trout Peter Duncan Malloch (1853-1921) Perth, Scotland, c. 1980 A plaster-based fish sculpture with exceptional blue painted surface displayed in an antique curved-glass wall cabinet. PD Mallochs on Old High Street in Perth was Scotland’s foremost sporting shop for over a century. Above the carving is the signature “P.D. Malloch, Perth” and below the carving is written “Trout 4¾ lbs. Caught in Loch Sheil by Dr. Orton, London. Sept. 1890.” Original condition with minimal wear from handling. $3,000 - $5,000 51

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67 Trout Vase William J. Walley (1852-1919) W. Sterling, MA, c. 1910 An exceptional, twelve-inch-high, red clay stoneware vase with raised trout motifs. The handles are worm motifs. Signed “W. J. W.� on the bottom. One piece of the handle is missing. A thin one-inch-long area of glaze loss below one dorsal fin, small glaze chips to the upper jaw of each trout and to the edge of one pectoral fin. provenance:

Private Collection, Rhode Island

$2,000 - $4,000

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68 Brown Trout Lawrence C. Irvine (1918-1998) Winthrop, ME A rare sixteen-inch-long brook trout carving on a faux birch bark painted beveled edge plaque. Signed by the maker on the back of the plaque. Original Paint.

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$2,000 - $3,000

69 Brook Trout Lawrence C. Irvine (1918-1998) Winthrop, ME, c. 1960 A fourteen-inch-long brook trout carving on a faux birch bark painted beveled edge plaque. Original paint.

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$2,000 - $3,000

70 Smallmouth Bass Lawrence C. Irvine (1918-1998) Winthrop, ME, c. 1952

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A fourteen-inch-long smallmouth bass carving on a faux birch bark painted beveled edge plaque. Signed and dated by the maker on the back. Original paint. $2,000 - $3,000

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71 Lake Trout Lawrence C. Irvine (1918-1998) Winthrop, ME, c. 1960 A thirty-inch-long lake trout carving on a naturally stained beveled edge plaque. Outstanding original paint. $3,000 - $4,000

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72 Land-Locked Salmon Lawrence C. Irvine (1918-1998) Winthrop, ME, c. 1960 A fifteen-inch-long salmon carving on a naturally stained plywood beveled edge plaque. “Salmon” is written on the back of the plaque. Original paint. $1,000 - $2,000

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73 Brook Trout Lawrence C. Irvine (1918-1998) Winthrop, ME, c. 1960 A ten-inch-long trout carving on a naturally stained plywood beveled edge plaque. Signed by the maker on the back. Original paint. $1,000 - $2,000

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74 Four Reels and Three Accessories A two-inch-diameter Abercrombie & Fitch German silver reel made by Montague Rod and Reel Co. (1899-1933), Montague City, MA (missing its jeweled end nuts). A size three-and-one-half Hardy Bros Ltd., Alnwick, England, the “Perfect” fly reel. An unknown maker’s four-inch raised post reel, marked on one side “light” and “heavy.” An old two-and-one-half-inch, heavy gauge, crudely pinned brass reel. A Hardy Bros. “The Driflydresser.” A Chesterman Sheffield, England made for Hardy Bros. salmon gauge tool. A William Mills and Son, NY fishing gauge tool. As found. $150 - $300

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77 Hardy Bros. Ltd. Reel Alnwick, England The “Longstone” metal sea reel, size 6”, and bearing Pat. No. 24245. As found. $100 - $200 78 Edward Vom Hofe (1846-1920) Reel New York, NY A two and one-half-inch-diameter Edw. Vom Hofe N.Y. #3 reel with a January 23rd, 1883 patent date. As found. $100 - $200

75 Two Bamboo Fly Rods Hardy Brothers Ltd. Alnwick, England A two-piece rod, with each piece measuring forty-six inches, bearing serial # E28410 and that appears to be marked “The No. 0 Victor Rod” and “Palakona Regd. Trade Mark.” A rod consisting of three pieces with an extra tip with the serial # E14278. The two main pieces measure thirty-nine-and-onehalf inches, the two tips measure approximately thirty-nine inches. There is also a five-and-one-half-inch handle extension. The rod appears to be marked “Palakona Regd. No. 246436,” “The Deluxe Salmon Rod” and “Rewind 3 - 70 NMH.” As found. $100 - $200 76 Two Bamboo Fly Rods H. L. Leonard Rod Company (a. 1869-1907) Bangor, ME A three-piece rod, with each piece measuring forty-and-threequarters inches, with an extra tip that is twenty-five-and-onehalf inches. Marked “The Leonard Rod,” H.L. Leonard Rod Co. Makers, and “Special Tournament.” A three-piece rod with the handle piece and two tips measuring thirty-two-and-one-half inches and the middle piece measuring only nineteen inches. Marked “The Leonard Rod,” “H.L. Leonard Rod Co. Makers,” and “Special Tournament.” As found. $100 - $200

79 The Kissich Company Fish Finder Cedar Rapids, IA, c. 1950 Printed on the label, “There’s NO CASTING; just tie it to your line and drop it in the current. It floats across streams automatically, reaching over 300 feet beyond casting range.” In its original box. As found. provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $50 - $100 80 Box of Lures Two dozen fishing lures and some fishing collector’s ephemera. As found.

provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner 81 Eight Fishing Lures and a Fishing Thermometer Five vintage Heddon lures, a Creek Chub, an in-the--box Lazy Ike, an in the box Marty’s Silver Streak, a display card of Pequea baby doll lures, an in the box Taylor fishing thermometer, and a Bob-Bet bait box. As found.

provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $25 - $50 55

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82 Two Carl Christiansen (b. 1958) Brown Trout Decoys Newberry, MI, c. 1980 An eleven-inch and a five-inch decoy each with glass eyes and metal fins. The larger decoy has a metal tail, the smaller has a wood. Both are initialed “CC” on the underside. Original condition. provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $200 - $300

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83 Two Fish Decoys And Book Minnesota and Michigan, c. 1930 and 1950 An old four-inch-long fish decoy and a newer, longer Michigan style decoy. A 1986 first edition copy of the book The Fish Decoy signed by all three Kimball authors, numbered 420. The red-headed decoy has in-use wear and missing fins. The other is in original paint. provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $100 - $200

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84 Two Veron Baggs, Sr. (1925-1985) Michigan Fish Kalkaska, MI, c. 1970 Both are approximately ten inches long with painted eyes and metal fins and tails. Original paint with light wear from handling. provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $100 - $200

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85 Two William Flanigan (1917-1970) Fish Decoys Staples, MN, c. 1960 A seven-inch-long and a five-and-one-half-inch-long decoy with rounded metal fins and tails, displaying wood-burned lines and dots. Original condition. provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $100 - $200

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86 Two Ben Chosa (1929-2007) Fish Decoys Lac du Flambeau, WI, c. 1986 and 1998 Two decoys, one measuring seven and one-half inches, the other six and one-half iches. Both have glass eyes, metal fins, curved tails, and are signed and dated on the underside by this Native American Ojibway carver. Original paint with light wear from use. provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $200 - $300

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87 Large Alton “Chub” Buchman (1916-1989) Fish Decoy Mt. Clemens, MI, c. 1950 A seventeen-inch-long decoy with a small carved mouth, glass eyes, a wooden tail, and metal fins. Restored and repainted by Frank Finney from Pungo, VA. Minimal wear from handling. provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $200 - $400

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88 Four Carl Christiansen (b. 1958) Fish Decoys Newberry, MI, c. 1990 A collection of four decoys: two yellow perch, a catfish or horn pout, and a bluegill. The largest is eight inches long and all are initialed “CC” by the maker. Original condition. provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $300 - $400 89 Four Trout Decoys Michigan, c. 1980

92 Five Ernest A. Peterson (b. 1935) Trout Decoys McMillan, MI, c. 1980

The decoys measure five to seven and one-half inches, and are made by several artists: Marvin J. Mason (1941-2010) of Cheboygan, MI, Andrew J Downey of Newberry, MI, and two by John E. Eddy of Cheboygan. All are in original paint with minimal wear.

A collection of eight-to-nine-inch-long decoys with glass eyes and metal fins. Four have the maker’s “EP” initials under the lower jaw. All are in original condition with minimal wear from handling.

provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner

provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $150 - $250

$100 - $200 93 Six Fish Decoys 90 Five Sunfish Decoys Four of the decoys are by Ernest A. Peterson (b. 1935) of McMillan, MI and one is by John Eddy (b. 1938) of Cheboygan, MI. The longest is six and one-half inches. All are in original paint with minimal wear.

The longest is ten inches long. Four are attributed to Ernest A. Peterson of McMillan, MI. Others are by Marvin J. Mason (1941-2010) of Cheboygan, MI and Donald Johnson of Cadillac, MI. All appear to be in original paint with minimal wear.

provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner

provenance:

$100 - $200

$200 - $300

91 Six Fish Decoys c. 1980

93a Three Fish Decoys Ernest Peterson (b. 1935) McMillan, MI, c. 1980

A collection of decoys measuring five to eight inches by several artists: K. Sletten (cast metal decoy) from Willmar, MN, George Aho (1911-1994) of Rapid City, MI, John Snow (Ojibway), Lac du Flambeau, WI, two by Robert Smith, Traverse City, MI, and an unidentified perch. All appear to be in original paint with minimal wear. provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner

The frog is seven inches long and the brook and steelhead trout are nine inches. The trout are marked with the maker’s “EP” initials on the underside. In original paint with minimal wear. provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $200 - $400

$200 - $300

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100

94 Outstanding Collection of Pike or Muskie Floats

98 Fourteen Pear and Egg-Shaped Bobbers

Twenty-one old pike or muskie floats, varying in length from four-and-one-half inches long to seventeen inches long. Many of them were acquired from author Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. of Maryland. As found

A collection of old and vintage bobbers, mostly wooden but some cork. Included are a “Wing Bob” made by the Dayton Acme Co. in Cincinnati, Ohio, an old pear-shaped bobber in original paint and brass fittings, and a couple one-inch-long miniature ice fishing bobbers. As found.

provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $1,000 - $2,000 95 Twelve Fishing Bobbers A dozen, mostly contemporary, assorted bobbers. As found.

provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $300 - $500 99 Eight Stick and Tear-Shaped Bobbers

provenance:

A small collection of vintage bobbers. The longest ones are approximately seven inches in length. As found

$25 - $50

provenance: provenance: Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner

96 Eight Miniature Ice Fishing Bobbers Michigan, c. 1950 A small collection of vintage ice fishing “bitty stick” bobbers. The longest measures one inch. As found. provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection

$25 - $50

100 Seven Miniature Bobbers Five miniature ice fishing bobbers, the longest is one-andthree-quarters inches long, and a miniature floating fishing rig. As found. provenance:

97 Five Pencil-Shaped Bobbers Three seven-inch-long, Winona-model celluloid bobbers made by Heddon of Dowagic, Michigan and two eight-inchlong porcupine quill bobbers. As found. provenance:

$200 - $300

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $50 - $100

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection

$100 - $200 59

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101 Ralph Cahoon (1910-1982) Fire Screen signed “by Cahoon” lower right inscribed “painted for Capt. Winsor White” lower right An exceptionally rare forty-six-inch-high adjustable metal fire screen with a red painted center pole supported by three curled iron feet. The curved twenty-by-thirty-inch screen was painted by Ralph E. Cahoon, the famous folk art painter from Cotuit, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The nautical motif includes an eighteenth century U.S. Naval ship, mermaids, and sea serpents. The painting has an inscription “painted for Capt. Winsor White” above the signature in the lower right-hand corner. Winsor White (1901-1975) was a well-known American folk art collector from Duxbury, Massachusetts. The majority of his extensive decoy collection was donated to the Museum of American Folk Art, New York. provenance:

Private Collection, New England

$6,000 - $9,000

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103 Cigar Humidor with Painted Pointer Dog Motif, c. 1950 A wooden humidor measuring ten-and-three-quarters inches by seven-and-one-quarter inches by four inches high. Displays a pointer and pheasant motif with a “John Hopwood” signature in the lower left corner. The humidor has a rectangular ceramic plate in the lift top and on the bottom of the inside. Good working condition with some varnish loss on the top and light wear. 102 Dolphin Massachusetts, 19th Century A carved wooden dolphin measuring nine inches high. The carving displays carved eyes, mouth, gills, raised scales, and incised tail detail. In old paint worn to the wood in places and missing some filler that may have been between the carving and some brace or bracket. $100 - $200 60

$50 - $100

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104 Soapstone Bird and Glass Duck A seven-inch-long Inuit soapstone carving of a puffin by Mr. Krashudluak, Baker Lake, Nunavut Territory, Canada, 1967. A five-inch-long, frosted glass duckling in a resting pose, c. 1950. Displays carved wings, eyes, and beak detail. Vintage paper informational label adhered to the underside. Original condition with some wear to the soapstone.

106 Three Bird Carvings Pennsylvania (attr.) c. 1930 and 1900

$200 - $400

107 Horse Motif Carved Box

105 Swan Butter Mold New England, second half of 19th century A bell-shaped hardwood butter mold with an incised swan motif that leaves a raised swan impression in the top of a round three-and-one-half-inch butter pad. The bell has tight age lines and a tight crack on one side. Tight age lines in the swan. $200 - $300

Two finches with twisted copper wire legs mounted on a section of a birch tree branch with a green painted thin wooden base. An earlier warbler carving with tack eyes, carved wings, and a superbly crafted base. Original paint with wear. $300 - $600

108 Wooden Ladle and Bowl Native American America Northeast, 19th century A nine-inch-diameter burl bowl and a ten-inch-long ladle with an animaleffigy-carved handle. The bowl has a few fine age cracks, as does the ladle, which also has a couple chips. $1,000 - $1,500

An incredible nine-and-one-half by six-andone-half by four-and-one-half-inch grainpainted box, with applied polychrome wooden cut-out decoration. The top of the box displays a prancing horse motif framed with four scalloped-edge pieces and gold painted pin-stripe lines. The front and two of the sides share the same detail with applied decorations representing the tools of a blacksmith and wagon builder. The initials “J.B.” are painted on the inside of the cover. The box is in original finish with expected minor wear, mostly on edges. $1,200 - $1,800 61

BONEFISH & TARPON TRUST 2013 ARTIST OF THE YEAR Brett Smith 109

109 Brett J. Smith (b. 1958) Bone Try, 2012 signed “Brett J. Smith” lower right oil on linen, 16 by 20 in. Born in 1958, Brett Smith began his career in art as an illustrator working with his New York agents on assignments for books, magazines, and advertising art. Twenty years ago he turned to easel painting, chronicling his outdoor experiences in sporting art. Working in oils, transparent watercolors, and etching, Smith’s work has a nostalgic, timeless appeal that has become his trademark. Eight years ago he moved to a summer studio in northwest Montana where he immersed himself in the history and culture of the Rocky Mountain West. His subject matter expanded to include Native Americans and the adventurous characters who populated the west.

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“Ideas,” Smith states, “are what make interesting, unique paintings. There are only so many within the confines of contemporary activities such as sporting subjects, wildlife and landscape painting. When you mix the historical culture of outdoorsmen and the magnificent landscapes of the places where they recreate, ideas become limitless.” Brett Smith has thrilled sporting art collectors with his vivid oils for over twenty-five years. Chosen as the Bonefish Tarpon Trust Artist of the Year for 2013, 50% of the proceeds from the sale of Bone Try will go directly to BTT. $4,000 - $6,000

110

110 Brett J. Smith (b. 1958) Rock Creek Bridge, 2008 signed “Brett J. Smith” lower right watercolor, 21 by 29 in. $3,000 - $5,000

111

111 Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969) A Fine Day for Fishing signed “Aiden Lassell Ripley ©” lower left watercolor, 18 by 28½ in. The Sporting Gallery and Bookshop, New York, New York label on back provenance:

Private Collection, South Carolina

$6,000 - $9,000

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112

112 Mike Stidham (20th century) Striped Bass signed “M. Stidham” lower right oil on canvas, 20 by 32 in. $5,000 - $7,000

113

113 Andrew Giffin (b. 1960) Ladder Pool II, 2010 signed “Andrew Giffin 10” lower left acrylic on canvas, 36 by 12 in. Andrew Giffin’s work is a refreshing addition among sporting artists. His canvases are often aerial perspectives, depicting long river corridors captured in a truly unique manner. $2,000 - $3,000

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114

114 Thomas A. Daly (b. 1937) Adirondack Mink signed “T.A. Daly” lower left watercolor, 12 by 19 in. $3,000 - $5,000 115

115 Thomas A. Daly (b. 1937) Salmon on Canvas signed “T.A. Daly” lower right watercolor, 10 by 15 in. $3,000 - $5,000 65

116 Richard LaBarre Goodwin (1840-1910) Hanging Woodcock signed “R. LaBarre Goodwin” lower right oil on canvas, 20 by 16 in.

116

$2,000 - $4,000

117 Willi (Wilhelm) Lorenz (1901-1981) Deer on the Edge of the Forest signed “Willi Lorenz” lower left Oil on canvas, 30 by 40 in. provenance:

Private Collection, Massachusetts

$1,000 - $2,000

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117

118

118 Howard Hill (d. 1870) Day’s End signed “HHill” lower right oil on canvas, 24 by 30 in. Although he was a popular artist in his time, Howard Hill is now best-known for being Norman Rockwell’s (1894-1978) maternal grandfather. This work depicts a hunter cleaning his gun after a successful day of mallard shooting as evidenced by what surrounds him. Hill has paid special attention to the birds, capturing their graceful form and richly-colored plumage. provenance:

119

Private Collection, Massachusetts

$5,000 - $7,000

119 Scott Leighton (1849-1898) Prince signed “Scott Leighton” lower left oil on board, 9 by 14 in. label inscribed “Prince 156” on back provenance:

Private Collection, Massachusetts

$800 - $1,200

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120

121

122.1

122.2

120 R. Ward Binks (1880-1950) Good Dog-Fetch signed “Ward Binks” lower right gouache, 10¼ by 13 in. Harlow, McDonald & Co. New York, New York label on back $800 - $1,200 121 Fistrub Eagle and Mallard oil on canvas, 32 by 40 in. Brun Rassmussen label inscribed “661243/1” on back $600 - $900

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122 Alexander Pope, Jr. (1849-1924) Two Prints, c. 1880 122.1 Dash III 122.2 Pysche each signed in plate “A. Pope Jr.” lower right each chromolithograph, 9½ by 13 in. $200 - $400

123 Piero Fornasetti (1913-1988) Setter Umbrella Stand, 1988 signed “Fornasetti” on back lithographically and transfer-printed metal, 32 by 13½ by 6 in. inscribed “88 i” on back

123

provenance:

Private Collection, purchased at Sotheby’s, Important 20th Century Design, New York, 14 June 2008, Lot 6 Private Collection, Massachusetts $4,000 - $6,000

123a

123a Charles Tice (1810-1870) Brook Trout on the Bank, 1840 signed “TICE” lower right oil on board, 36 by 30 in. inscribed “Newburg, NY 1840” lower right $2,000 - $4,000

124

124 Pheasant and Shotgun Bookends c. 1950 A pair of wooden bookends measuring eight inches wide and three-and-one-quarter inches high decorated with a white metal, miniature double-barreled shotgun and a painted-metal, miniature ring-necked pheasant. The bookends are lead-weighted and have felt bottoms. Original condition with light wear from handling. $100 - $200

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126

127

128

129

130

125 Mallard Bookends A pair of seven-inch-high flying white metal ducks with metal bases. The birds have a brass finish with some painted details. The lower half of one of the duck’s bills is missing and his wing is cracked. $50 - $100 126 Ceramic Bobwhite Quail Boehm Porcelain (a. 1949) (attr.) Trenton, NJ, c. 1960 Marked on the bottom “limited edition,” also a horse’s head chess piece green mark with “BOEHM” in a banner across the base. Chips to wing tips. $100 - $200 127 Miniature Mallard Pair, Elephant, and Duck Tray A five-and one-half-inch-high pair of ceramic mallard ducks. A one-inch-high porcelain baby elephant marked “Germany” on its underside. A Metzler and Ortloff of Germany four-andone-half-inch-circular porcelain tray with four ducks on one side. The mallard pair has minor chips and wear, the elephant may have the tip of his trunk missing, and the tray is in original condition. $50 - $75

128 Two Porcelain Elephants Hutschenreuther Kunstabteilung (a. 1857) Selb, Bavaria, Germany, c. 1920 Two ten-inch-long by eight-and-one-half-inches-tall elephants with raised trunks and green factory marks on the bottom of one foot of each. The lighter one has a remnant of an old Abercrombie and Fitch, New York price tag. The lighter colored one has a missing tail. $100 - $200 129 Eight Miniature Austrian Bronze Animals Vienna, Austria, c. 1930 A group of cold-painted Austrian bronze miniature animals. The pheasant is two-and-one-half-inches-long, the fox is one-andone-half-inches-long and the chipmunk is three-quarters of an inch high. The chipmunk, rat, and rabbit are stamped “Austria” on their undersides. Original condition with minor wear. $50 - $100 130 Pheasant Ashtray and Two Lighters c. 1950 A seven-inch-diameter wooden ashtray displaying a wood marquetry ring-necked pheasant motif in the bottom and a glass insert. A Ronson Minerva model cigarette lighter, made in Newark, New Jersey, with a ceramic mid-section displaying a flying ring-necked pheasant motif, signed with the initials “FV.” A threeand-one-half-inch-high cigarette lighter with a colored miniature flying pheasant inside the rectangular lucite base. As found. $50 - $100

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131a131a

132

133.1

131 Paul Comolera (1818-1897) Standing Pheasant signed “P. Comolera” on top of base white metal, 12 by 6 by 15 in. $600 - $900 131a Paul Comolera (1818-1897) Pheasant Plaque white metal, 13 by 4 by 24 in. $400 - $600

133.2

132 Mammy Door Stop Hubley Manufacturing Company Lancaster, PA, c. 1930 An eight-and-three-quarter-inch-high cast iron doorstop. A mixture of old repaint and later touch-up with wear to include overall minor chipping. $300 - $500 Δ

133 Wildfowl Plates (8 of 12 illustrated) Lynn Bogue Hunt, c. 1950 A set of twelve platinum-rimmed china plates measuring ten-and-one-quarter inches. Each hand-colored plate depicts a pair of ducks or game birds. The plates were originally commissioned and sold by Sun Glo Studios which had retail locations in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. As Found, some have age spots. $400 - $800 71

134 Louis Frisino (b. 1934) American Merganser signed “Louis Frisino” lower left acrylic on board, 24 by 34 in.

134

$300 - $500

135 135 Daniel Logé (b. 1954) Goldeneye signed “Daniel Logé” lower right oil on canvas, 12 by 20 in. provenance:

The Finnell Family Trust

$500 - $700

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136

136 Alden Bryan (1913-2001) The Bridge at Chappaquidick signed “Alden Bryan” lower left oil on canvasboard, 14 by 19½ in. inscribed “The Bridge at Chappaquiddick by Alden Bryan” on back provenance:

The Finnell Family Trust

$200 - $400

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137 Jerry Rose (20th century) Boathouse, 1993 signed and dated “Jerry Rose 93” lower right watercolor, 12 by 15¾ in. $200 - $400

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140

138 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) The White Heron, 1927 signed “Frank W. Benson” lower left etching, 11¾ by 7¾ in. trial proof (a-4) Paff # 274, edition #5 of 5 provenance:

Private Collection of Frank W. Benson By descent in the family to his great grandson $500 - $700 139 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) Dory Fisherman, 1927 signed “Frank W. Benson” lower left etching, 7¾ by 10 in. trial proof (c-4) Paff # 267, edition # 8 of 8 published state: edition of 150

provenance:

Private Collection of Frank W. Benson By descent in the family to his great grandson $3,000 - $5,000

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141

140 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) The Gunners Blind, 1921 signed “Frank W. Benson” lower left etching and pencil drawing, 8 by 9¾ in. trial proof (a-1) Paff # 204, edition # 5 of 5 published state: edition of 150 provenance:

Private Collection of Frank W. Benson By descent in the family to his great grandson $2,000 - $4,000 141 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) Redheads No. 2, 1923 signed “Frank W. Benson” lower left drypoint, 8 by 10 in. trial proof (b-1) Paff # 226, edition # 7 of 7 published state: edition of 150

provenance:

Private Collection of Frank W. Benson By descent in the family to his great grandson $1,000 - $2000 73

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144

145

146

147

142 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) Sanctuary, 1932 signed “Frank W. Benson” lower left etching, 7 by 9 in. Paff # 327, edition # 150 of 150

144 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) Off Pea Island, 1921 signed “ Frank W. Benson” lower left etching, 7 by 10¾ in. Paff # 206, edition # 5 of 150

146 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) Old Sqaws No. 2, 1918 signed “Frank W. Benson” lower left drypoint, 5 by 10 in. Paff # 144, edition # 136 of 136

provenance:

Private Collection of Frank W. Benson By descent in the family to his great grandson

provenance:

Private Collection of Frank W. Benson By descent in the family to his great grandson

provenance:

$400 - $600

$600 - $900

$600 - $900

143 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) Ipswich Marshes, 1926 signed “Frank W. Benson” lower left drypoint, 7¾ by 10 in. trial proof (b-1) Paff # 257, edition # 2 of 2 published state: edition of 150

145 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) Pair of Geese (Frontispiece), 1919 signed “Frank W. Benson” lower left etching, 4 by 6 in. inscribed “frontispiece 2nd Vol. Catalogue 10 prints $50” lower left Paff # 158, edition # 10 of 275

147 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) Yellowlegs at Dusk, 1928 signed “Frank W. Benson” lower left etching, 8 by 11¾ in. Paff # 279, edition # 150 of 150

provenance:

Private Collection of Frank W. Benson By descent in the family to his great grandson

provenance:

$1,000 - $2000

$600 - $900

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Private Collection of Frank W. Benson By descent in the family to his great grandson

Private Collection of Frank W. Benson By descent in the family to his great grandson

provenance:

Private Collection of Frank W. Benson By descent in the family to his great grandson $600 - $900

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149

150

151.1

151.2

151.3

148 Churchill Ettinger (1903-1984) Putting Out Decoys signed “Churchill Ettinger” lower right watercolor, 14 by 20 in.

151 Churchill Ettinger (1903-1984) Three Drypoints

$200 - $400 149 Churchill Ettinger (1903-1984) Duck Hunting signed “Churchill Ettinger” lower left watercolor, 14 by 20 in. $100 - $200 150 Churchill Ettinger (1903-1984) Approaching the Blind signed “Chuchill Ettinger” lower left watercolor, 14 by 20 in.

151.1 The Right Fly signed “Churchill Ettinger” lower right 9 by 11¾ in. inscribed “The Right Fly” lower left 151.2 On Cedar Point Brook signed “Churchill Ettinger” lower right 9 by 11½ in. inscribed “On Cedar Point Brook” lower left 151.3 Opening Day signed “Churchill Ettinger” lower right 8 by 9¾ in. inscribed “Opening Day” lower left $500 - $800

$100 - $200

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160.4

152 Ogden M. Pleissner (1905-1983) Blue Boat on the Saint Anne, 1959 signed “Ogden M Pleissner N. A.” lower right color print, 14¾ by 22¾ in. J. Assenheim & Sons, New York, New York label on back published and copyrighted by the Anglers Club of New York in an edition of 300 Considered by many to be the most desirable of all of Pleissner’s prints. The original Blue Boat on the St. Anne resides at the Shelburne Museum in Vermont. literature: Peter Bergh, The Art of Ogden M. Pleissner, Boston, MA, 1984, p. 108, illustrated.

$1,500 - $2,500 153 Ogden M. Pleissner (1905-1983) Leaping Sea Trout, 1957 signed “Ogden M Pleissner N. A.” lower right color print, 15¼ by 23¾ in. published and copyrighted by Frost and Reed in an edition of 300 literature: Peter Bergh, The Art of Ogden M. Pleissner, Boston, MA, 1984, p. 108, illustrated.

$500 - $700 154 Ogden M. Pleissner (1905-1983) Head of the Pool, 1979 signed “Ogden M Pleissner” lower right color print, 16½ by 21¾ in. published and copyrighted by The Crossroads of Sport & Orvis in an edition of 280 literature: Peter Bergh, The Art of Ogden M. Pleissner, Boston, MA, 1984, p. 109, illustrated.

$500 - $700

160.3

155 Ogden M. Pleissner (1905-1983) Hendrickson’s Pool, 1980 signed “Ogden M Pleissner” lower right color print, 15 by 24 in. published and copyrighted by The Crossroads of Sport & Orvis in an edition of 275 literature:

Peter Bergh, The Art of Ogden M. Pleissner, Boston, MA, 1984, p. 109, illustrated. $500 - $700 156 Ogden M. Pleissner (1905-1983) Battenkill at Benedicts Crossing, 1978 signed “Ogden M Pleissner” lower right color print,16¼by 22¾ in. published and copyrighted by The Crossroads of Sport & Orvis in an edition of 290 literature: Peter Bergh, The Art of Ogden M. Pleissner, Boston, MA, 1984, p. 109, illustrated.

$500 - $700 157 Ogden M. Pleissner (1905-1983) Lye Brook Pool, 1971 signed “Ogden M Pleissner” lower right color print, 16 by 25 in. published and copyrighted by the American Museum of Flyfishing in an edition of 400 literature: Peter Bergh, The Art of Ogden M. Pleissner, Boston, MA, 1984, p. 108, illustrated.

$500 - $700

158 Ogden M. Pleissner (1905-1983) Hillside Orchards Grouse Shooting, 1975 signed “Ogden M Pleissner” lower right color print,15 by 24 in. published and copyrighted by The Crossroads of Sport in an edition of 275 literature: Peter Bergh, The Art of Ogden M. Pleissner, Boston, MA, 1984, p. 109, illustrated.

$500 - $700 159 Ogden M. Pleissner (1905-1983) Woodcock Cover, 1976 signed “Ogden M Pleissner” lower right color print, 15 by 24 in. published and copyrighted by The Crossroads of Sport in an edition of 275 literature: Peter Bergh, The Art of Ogden M. Pleissner, Boston, MA, 1984, p. 109, illustrated.

$500 - $700 160 Arthur Burdett Frost (1851-1928) Five Shooting Prints, 1895 each chromolithograph, 12½ by 19¼ 160.1 Shooting Ducks from a Battery Goodspeeds Book Shop, Inc. Boston, Massachusetts label inscribed “Date: 2-16-61” and “no. 3977” on back 160.2 Quail Shooting Goodspeeds Book Shop, Inc. Boston, Massachusetts label inscribed “Date: 2-16-61” and “no. 3977” on back 160.3 Quail, A Dead Stand 160.4 English Snipe 160.5 Autumn Grouse Goodspeeds Book Shop, Inc. Boston, Massachusetts label inscribed “Date: 2-16-61” and “no. 3977” on back $1,000 - $2,000 77

161.1

161.2

161.3

161.4

161 Alexander Pope, Jr. (1849-1924) Thirteen lithographs (ten illustrated) from the Upland Game Birds and Waterfowl of the United States series New York: Scribner, Armstrong and Co., 1877-78 each chromolithograph, 14 by 20 in. Alexander Pope Jr. was one of a group of important sporting artists who developed an American style of watercolor in the late nineteenth century. Many of theses artists, including Pope, reproduced their watercolors in portfolios of chromolithographs such as this one. A rare series of prints, the complete portfolio was divided into ten sections of two, with each section having its own cover page. provenance:

Jon Carthay Collection

$4,000 - $6,000

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161.5

161.6

161.7

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161.9

161.10

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162.1

162.2

162.4

162.3

162.5

162 Richard E. Bishop (1887-1975) Set of 22 framed Christmas card etchings, (five illustrated) Each measuring approximately four by six inches with frames measuring twelve by ten inches, from the years 1943-1945, 1948, 1953, and 1956-1972 (please note at least two of the etchings show foxing). $2,000 - $4,000

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165.3

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167

166 Roland Clark (1874-1957) The Broken Wing signed “Roland Clark” lower right etching, 7½ by 11 in.

166

literature:

Roland Clark’s Etchings, New York, NY, 1938, no. 30, illustrated. $100 - $200

163 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) Duck and Ripples, 1915 signed “Frank W. Benson” lower left etching, 4 by 6 in. Paff #40, edition # 17 of 50 $1,000 - $1,500 164 Churchill Ettinger (1903-1984) Summer Duck signed “Churchill Ettinger” lower right drypoint, 7¾ by 10¾ in. inscribed “Summer Duck” lower left $100 - $200

165 Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969) Three Prints 165.1 Flying Turkey signed “A. Lassell Ripley” lower right drypoint, 11 by 9½ in. inscribed “Flying Turkey ©” lower left 165.2 Wild Turkeys signed “A. Lassell Ripley” lower right drypoint, 10 by 12 in. inscribed “Wild Turkeys” lower left 165.3 Turkey Blind signed “A. Lassell Ripley” lower right drypoint, 9¼ by 14 in. inscribed “Turkey Blind ©” lower left literature: A. Lassell Ripley and Dana S. Lamb, Sporting Etchings, Barre, MA, 1970, pp. 62-63, illustrated. A. Lassell Ripley and Dana S. Lamb, Sporting Etchings, Barre, MA, 1970, pp. 52-53, illustrated. A. Lassell Ripley and Dana S. Lamb, Sporting Etchings, Barre, MA, 1970, pp. 82-83, illustrated.

167 Roland Clark (1874-1957) Dusk signed “Roland Clark” lower right etching, 10.25 by 8.75 in. literature:

Roland Clark’s Etchings, New York, NY, 1938, no. 20, illustrated. $200 - $400 168 Richard E. Bishop (1887-1975) Green Wings, 1929 signed “R.E. Bishop” lower right drypoint, 6¼ by 9 in. inscribed in plate “REB 29” lower right published in an edition of 65

literature: Russell A. Fink, Richard E. Bishop: Etchings, Drypoints, and Aquatints, St. Paul, MN, 2008, p. 124, illustrated.

$200 - $400

$100 - $300 81

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169.2

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169 Roland Clark (1874-1957) Two Hand-Colored Prints each signed “Roland Clark” lower right each aquatint, 16½ by 13¾ in. 169.1 Dawn, 1939 inscribed “250/210” lower left 169.2 The Alarm, 1937 inscribed “250/222” lower left

175 Robert Piscatori (b. 1946) Two Paintings, 1984 each signed and dated “Bob Piscatori 1984 ©” lower right each opaque watercolor 175.1 Massachusetts Oldsquaw 5 by 7½ in. 175.2 Cobb Goose 4 by 9½ in.

$300 - $500

$150 - $250

170 David Hagerbaumer (b. 1921) Ducks Over Wintry Field, 1972 signed “David Hagerbaumer” lower right color print, 12¾ by 16½ in. inscribed “359/450” lower right edition # 359 of 450

176 John Hutchinson (b. 1940) Male Goldeneye by Frank W. Benson signed “Hutchinson” lower right watercolor, 11¾ by 8½ in. inscribed “Lot 180 cat 407” on back

$100 - $200 171 after Sir Edwin Landseer (1802-1873) Bolton Abbey in the Olden Days hand-colored engraving, 22 by 28 in. engraved by Samuel Cousins $400 - $600 172 after F.F. Palmer The Return From The Woods, 1857-72 published by Currier (1813–1888) & Ives (1824–1895) lithograph, 11 by 15 in. $100 - $300 173 Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969) The Field and Stream Portfolio: Gunning in America, 1947 six color prints, each 10 by 12 in. published by Gunning and Fishing Prints Publishing Company, Inc. One of four shown.

Hutchinson submitted this work, which illustrates a decoy carved by Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) to the 1997 Massachusetts State Duck Stamp Contest. $200 - $400 177 Kelton, Elmer Frank C. McCarthy: The Old West, A Portrait in Paintings. Greenwich Press Ltd. Trumbull, CT. 1981. Deluxe Limited Edition. Number 572/1500. Signed “Frank C. McCarthy.” With signed, numbered print Crossing the Divide. $800 - $1,200 178 Flint, Ralph Contemporary American Etching. American Art Dealers Association, New York: NY. 1930. With frontispiece etching Startled Ducks, Paff # 293. $400 - $600 179 MACKEY, WILLIAM J., JR. American Bird Decoys. E. P. Dutton & Co. Inc. New York, NY. 1965. Extremely rare deluxe edition. Number 31/50. Signed. $1,500 - $2,500

174 Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969) Covey by the Cabin signed “A. Lassell Ripley” lower right color print, 18 by 26½ in. Sporting Gallery & Bookshop, Inc., New York, New York label on back $200 - $400

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SESSION II Decoys and Folk Art

180 Sperm Whale Clark Voorhees (1911-1980) Weston, VT, c. 1950 A thirty-five-inch-long half-whale carving by master whale carver, Clark Voorhees. Signed on the back with the artist’s stylized “CV” incised signature and stamped “C Voorhees”. Voorhees was the son of Clark Greenwood Voorhees (1871-1933), who was one of the founders of the Old Lyme, Connecticut Art Colony. When he first began carving, Voorhees enlisted the expertise of Wildfowler decoy founder, Ted Mulliken, in nearby Old Saybrook, Connecticut to aid in the carving of his whales. After establishing himself in his craft, he moved his carving business to its permanent home in Vermont. Original paint with wear including areas of dried sap, a scrape to the edge of the pectoral fin, and both flukes of the tail have been reset. $3,000 - $5,000

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181 Fin Whale Clark Voorhees (1911-1980) Weston, VT, c. 1960 An eighteen-inch-long half-whale carving. Signed on the back with his stylized “CV” incised signature and stamped “C Voorhees”. This and the following two carvings were purchased directly from a nautical gift shop in Osterville, Massachusetts on Cape Cod c. 1960. Original condition with patina. $2,000 - $4,000

182 Humpback Whale Clark Voorhees (1911-1980) Weston, VT, c. 1960 An eighteen-inch-long half-whale carving. Signed on the back with his stylized “CV” incised signature and stamped “C Voorhees”. Original condition with patina. $2,000 - $4,000

183 Sperm Whale Clark Voorhees (1911-1980) Weston, VT, c. 1960 A seventeen-and-one-half-inch-long half-whale carving. Signed on the back with his stylized “CV” incised signature and stamped “C Voorhees”. Original condition. $2,000 - $4,000

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184 Ship Diorama Charles Hart (1862-1960) Gloucester, MA, c. 1900

184

A fifteen-and-one-quarter-inch-wide diorama on a poplar backboard with a fir frame. The motif is a half model of a traditional Grand Banks or Gloucester fishing schooner with carved wooden sails and waves. Original condition with minimal wear. provenance:

Private Collection of the artist Charles Hart and his wife Annette By descent to their granddaughter Norma Hart Anderson $1,000 - $1,500

185 Wood Duck Drake Charles Hart (1862-1960) Gloucester, MA, c. 1910

185

A standing wood duck showcasing Hart’s intricate carving ability. This plump life-size bird displays glass eyes, carved bill and crest detail, layered primary feathers, leather feet, and a section of branch mounted on a beveled edge base. Original paint with craquelure on the breast. Wear from handling including tail chips, an age crack along the back, and a loose head. provenance:

Private Collection of the artist Charles Hart and his wife Annette By descent to their granddaughter Norma Hart Anderson $2,000 - $4,000

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186

187

188

186 Crowing Rooster Charles Hart (1862-1960) Gloucester, MA, c. 1910

187 Miniature Gull Charles Hart (1862-1960) Gloucester, MA, c. 1930

An important life-size bantam rooster carving exhibiting a crowing pose. Displaying tack eyes, an open beak with carved tongue, an inserted carved crest, a wooden inserted tail with applied metal feathers, and an original beveled base. Original paint with wear from handling to include paint flakes on tack eyes and a tight age crack on one side.

A three-inch-long flying bird carving with painted metallic wings on a pyramid-shaped base. Original condition with minimal wear.

provenance:

Private Collection of the artist Charles Hart and his wife Annette By descent to their granddaughter Norma Hart Anderson $3,000 - $5,000

provenance:

Private Collection of the artist Charles Hart and his wife Annette By descent to their granddaughter Norma Hart Anderson $50 - $100 188 Flying Wigeon Hen Charles Hart (1862-1960) Gloucester, MA, c. 1920 A tack-eyed, life-size silhouette of a wigeon in flight with two attached wings and a metallic leg. Original paint with minor separation at the wing joint caused from hanging from the two mounting holes drilled in the wing and minor age lines at the joint of the other wing.

provenance:

Private Collection of the artist Charles Hart and his wife Annette By descent to their granddaughter Norma Hart Anderson $200 - $400

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189

190

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189 Miniature Owl Tree Ken Kirby (b. 1946) Little Egg Harbor, NJ, 2012

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190 Roothead Egret Nathaniel Kirby (b. 1973) Tuckerton, NJ, 2012

A twenty-eight-inch-high sculpture of seven different species of North American owls mounted on a natural tree branch with a turned and beveled edge base. Signed and dated on the bottom. Original condition.

Measuring just over forty-two inches, this folk art carving is crafted with a removable and repositionable root head. The maker’s initials “NK” are incised on the bottom. Original antiqued paint with even wear.

$300 - $500

$200 - $300

191 Feeding Plover Nathaniel Kirby (b. 1973) Tuckerton, NJ, 2012

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192

A Verity-style shorebird carving with the maker’s “NK” initials incised on the bottom. Original antiqued paint with even wear. $100 - $200 Δ

192 Feeding Red Knot Nathaniel Kirby (b. 1973) Tuckerton, NJ, 2012 A Verity-style shorebird carving with the maker’s “NK” initials incised on the bottom. Original paint and even wear. $100 - $200

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194

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193 Feeding Flicker Ken Kirby (b. 1946) Little Egg Harbor, NJ, 2012 A life-size, split-tail carving with incised wings and eye grooves. Mounted on a sculpted post base, the maker’s stamp and signature appear on the bottom of the bird. $100 - $150

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194 Woodcock Ken Kirby (b. 1946) Little Egg Harbor, NJ, 2012 A well-proportioned, life-size woodcock in a resting pose. Signed “Ken Kirby 2012” and stamped “Ken Kirby” on the bottom. Original paint. $100 - $150

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195 Running Curlew Wind Bird Ken Kirby (b. 1946) Little Egg Harbor, NJ, 2012 This hollowed-from-the-bottom shorebird is carved to be perfectly balanced on its stick and teeter in the wind or to the touch. Signed “Ken Kirby 2012” and stamped “Ken Kirby” on the bottom. Original condition. $200 - $300

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196 Flock of Miniature Robins Ken Kirby (b. 1946) Little Egg Harbor, NJ, 2012 Carved in the Pennsylvania tradition, this twelveinch-high bird tree displays four robins in various postures. Each bird is mounted on a branch which is set in a painted wood base. Signed “Ken Kirby 2012” and stamped “Ken Kirby” on the bottom of the base. Original condition. $250 - $300

196

197

198

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197 Miniature Puffin Ken Kirby (b. 1946) Little Egg Harbor, NJ, 2012 A three-and-one-half-inch carving with the maker’s “Ken Kirby” stamp on the bottom. Original condition. $50 - $75

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198 Miniature Woodcock Ken Kirby (b. 1946) Little Egg Harbor, NJ, 2012 A well-rendered, three-and-three-quarter-inch woodcock carving mounted on a metal post and wooden base. It is signed and stamped “Ken Kirby 2012” on the bottom of the base. Original paint. $75 - $125

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199 Flying Blue-Winged Teal Drake Chauncey Wheeler (1888-1945) Alexandria Bay, NY, c. 1925 This life-size, half-bodied duck model displays blended feather detail, a gently curved wing with scratch-painted detail on the underside, incised bill and tail carving, and an eye groove. On the back is a hand-crafted copper hanger. Original paint with light wear, minor shrinkage, and minor flaking to the original filler at the wing insertion. literature:

Harold W. Reiser III, Chauncey Wheeler, Lewes, DE, 2002, p. 84, similar carving illustrated. $10,000 - $15,000

200 Golden Pheasant Plaque Oscar W. Peterson (1887-1951) Cadillac, MI, c. 1940 A seventeen-and-one-half-inch-high by nineand-three-eighth-inch-wide by half-inch-thick relief carved plaque with a bird motif. The back exhibits the maker’s tacked tin strip binding. The carving displays a glass eye and coggled detail on the bird and trees. Original paint with minimal wear. provenance:

Ronald Fritz Collection Private Collection

exhibited:

Michigan State University Museum, “Hooked On Carving: Oscar W. Peterson.” October 24, 1982 - April 10, 1983

literature: Ronald J. Fritz, Michigan’s Master Carver, Oscar W. Peterson, 1887-1951, Boulder Junction, WI, 1987, pp. 70 and 73, similar examples illustrated.

$10,000 - $20,000

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201

Photo courtesy of David Allen Š 2007

201 (detail)

“Gus had a broadness of interest and artist’s eye that allowed him to come up with birds of such merit that they rivaled the best of the others... Gus Wilson looked at waterfowl much the way the Ward brothers did. There was a similarity in their ability to capture an unusual pose and to produce a decoy that continues to enthrall even the seasoned gunners who have spent their lives observing waterfowl.” -Maine decoy author and historian, Captian John Dinan

Bay. According to art historian, Gene Kangas, “his job as a lighthouse keeper provided financial security and ample time to facilitate rapid artistic advancement. Imaginative decoys and wildlife carving began to taking shape in an incredible variety of poses.” Kangas describes Wilson as an esteemed fixture of Americana. Early regional traditions and requirements drove carvers to produce big solid decoys with modest paint patterns. “Seaworthiness, durability, practicality, effectiveness and affordability were essential considerations...Wilson’s genius is demonstrated by his ability to work within those existing traditions, yet elevate the Maine decoy to a higher level of artistic achievement.” 201 Preening Eider Drake Augustus Aaron Wilson (1864-1950) Maine, c. 1900 This boldly carved sea duck is one of the finest traditional Maine decoys to ever be offered at public auction. The carving features an exceptionally rendered turned head with carved eyes and upper bill, and raised wings. This impressive sculpture epitomizes the decoy as American folk art. The bird measures over seventeen-and-one-half-inches in length, and over eight-and-one-half-inches in width and height respectively. The two-piece construction features a prodigious eight-inch by four-inch inletted head which is canted, in keeping with the preening attitude of the bird. The bird’s bill tip just touches the back left corner of the inlay, fully completing the graceful turn. The bottom displays an anchor line ring fastened with an old fence staple. Wilson was born “Down East,” on Mount Desert Island, Maine. Though he is foremost remembered as carver he was also a boat builder, waterman, outdoorsman, and lighthouse keeper. He was an attendant to a number of Maine’s lighthouses, including the Great Duck Island Light, Goose Rocks Station on Fox Island, Two Lights Station on Cape Elizabeth, Marshalls Point Light at Port Clyde and lastly Spring Point Light in Casco

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Wilson’s interests were, by no means, limited to decoys. He carved a variety of songbirds, decoratives, weathervanes, and big cats. A pair of Wilson’s tigers are featured in the American Identities exhibit, on display as a part of the permanent collection of the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York. Though Wilson is widely celebrated for his variety of forms, it is important to note that no other preening eider drake in original paint has come to light. This rare and exceptional piece has never before been offered at public auction. In original paint with light even gunning wear. The tip of the bill has a very old chip on one side. There are age lines and tight cracks in the head and neck. The inletted portion has some original filler loss and one crack has later in-use filler. literature: Frank Maresca and Roger Ricco, American Vernacular: New Discoveries In Folk, Self-Taught, And Outsider Sculpture, New York, NY, 2002, p. 42, exact decoy illustrated. Gene Kangas, “Gus Wilson, Folk Artist”, Decoy Magazine, Lewes, DE, November/December 1994, pp. 8-13. Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, p. 149, similar decoy illustrated.

$150,000 - $250,000

201

202

202 Eider Drake Maine, c. 1920 An elegant “Down East” sea duck decoy exhibiting appealing form, an intricately outlined carved head and bill, a traditional inletted neck, and a long, tapered, over-sized body. Eider duck decoys featuring a high-head position are true rarities for collectors. This style of carving would have been prone to breakage bouncing around duck boats off of Maine’s rocky coastline. Original paint with even gunning wear and professional touch-up to a neck crack. $5,000 - $7,000

203

203 Eider Drake Eider Drake North Shore, MA, c. 1920 A swimming sea duck decoy with pronounced bill carving, two-piece body construction, and original rigging. Repaint with gunning wear and body seam separation. $200 - $300

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204 Rare Canada Goose Thomas Gelston (1851-1924) Oyster Bay, NY, c. 1910 An over-sized hollow goose decoy displaying round black glass eyes, an inserted bill, a chisel-carved ice groove behind the neck seat, and carved raised primaries. Working repaint with light gunning wear, seam separation, and a few tight cracks. $5,000 - $7,000

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205 Swimming Canada Goose Coastal New Jersey, c. 1920

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Displaying graceful form, this early hunting decoy features an arched neck and pronounced cheek carving. Working repaint with even gunning wear including some flaking. $1,500 - $2,500

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206 Salesman’s Sample Robin Snipe Mason Decoy Factory (1896-1924) Detroit, MI, c. 1905 A one-of-a-kind salesman’s sample shorebird decoy by the Mason Decoy Factory inscribed “Robin Snipe, $7.00. Dz.” on the underside. This “A-1” grade shorebird decoy exhibits glass eyes, spring to summer plumage in its painted feather detail, as well as an early swirled, stippled, and outlined speculum. Historically, salesmen would carry examples of the decoys illustrated in the catalog in their pursuit of orders for their company. This example was one of six salesman’s sample decoys, each a different species, acquired by noted New Jersey collector, Mort Hanson. Original paint with minor wear, including minor flaking in the bill insertion area. provenance:

Mort Hanson Collection Private Collection, Midwest

literature:

Russ J. Goldberger and Alan Haid, Mason Decoys: A Pictorial Guide, Lewes, DE, 1993, pp. 98-99, similar decoys illustrated. Byron Cheever, Mason Decoys, Spanish Fork, UT, 1974, p. 132, related decoy illustrated in the Mason Factory catalog. $18,000 - $24,000

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207 Ruddy Turnstone John Horn Oceanville, NJ, c. 1890 A rare and exceptional shorebird decoy. One of approximately six Horn turnstones known to exist in original paint, this is perhaps the best of the group. Displays pronounced cheek carving and a beautifully contoured body with a delicate thin tail. With its provenance, bold carving, and sharp paint, this is not only one of the finest Horn shorebirds to come on the market, but also one of the finer New Jersey ruddy turnstones. Original paint with light gunning wear. provenance:

Noyes Collection Gary Giberson Collection Private Collection

literature: James R. Doherty, Classic New Jersey Decoys, Louisville, KY, 2011, p. 175, plate 388, rigmate illustrated. Sotheby’s, Auction of the Distinguished Collection of Dr. James M. McCleery, January 2000, p. 220, lot 606, rigmate illustrated. Guyette and Schmidt, The Hillman Collection, April 1996, p. 156, lot 654, rigmate illustrated.

$10,000 - $15,000

208

208 Ruddy Turnstone Coastal New Jersey, c. 1880 A flat-bottomed shorebird, for use as a sitting beach bird or, with its stick hole, as a stick-up decoy. This decoy appeared as Lot 602 in the January, 2000 sale of Dr. James M. McCleery’s important decoy collection. Original paint, worn to the wood in places and light gunning wear. provenance:

Dr. James M. McCleery Collection Private Collection, Florida

literature: Quintina Colio, American Decoys, Ephrata, PA, 1972, p. 47, similar decoy illustrated. Sotheby’s and Guyette & Schmidt, Inc., American Waterfowl Decoys: The Distinguished Collection of Dr. James M. McCleery, New York, NY, Jan. 2000, lot 602.

$6,000 - $9,000 209 Exceedingly Rare Tern Obediah Verity (1813- 1901) Seaford, Long Island, NY, c. 1880 The late 19th century brought about a change in millinery fashion. A hat decorated with feathers, wings, or at times an entire bird was the height of couture. The bounty on terns was ten dollars per hundred feather pelts. This exact decoy along with its rigmate are illustrated on page thirty-one of Henry Fleckenstein’s book Shore Bird Decoys, the caption reads, “these two exceedingly rare tern decoys are in completely original condition and were made by Obediah Verity of Seaford, Long Island, New York - c- 1880. Only one rig of twelve are known to have been made by Obediah.” This rare rig was passed down through the extended Verity family of Seaford to Nelson Verity (1854-1947). Nelson Verity is

known to have guided Yankee baseball greats, Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, in South Oyster Bay. Original paint with craquelure, gunning wear, flaking, and remnants of whitewash. provenance:

Private Collection

literature:

Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., Shore Bird Decoys, Exton, PA, 1980, p. 31, plate 34 and color plate 72, exact decoy illustrated. William J. Mackey, Jr., American Bird Decoys, New York, NY, 1965, p. 58, plate 38, similar rigmate illustrated. Richard P. Baldwin, The Verity Family of Long Island, New York, Southold, NY, 2000, p. 126. $10,000 - $20,000 209

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210 Running Sandpiper Obediah Verity (1813-1901) Seaford, NY, c. 1860 One of the most coveted shorebird forms, these small gunning decoys have captured the imaginations of collectors for almost a century. This important Long Island shorebird decoy displays carved eyes, Verity’s signature deeply carved wings, and a William J. Mackey, Jr. collection stamp on the underside. This sandpiper is in breeding plumage with desirable “red-backed” stippling. While several near mint examples of these peeps have come on the market in recent years, this example showcases the true even wear of a period gunning decoy. The importance of this example is further accentuated by the collector’s stamp on the bottom. William Mackey’s close proximity to Long Island enabled him to collect numerous Verity decoys, at the time referring to them as the work of Henry Osborne of Bellport, New York. The fact that this little running sanderling made the final cut as part of Mackey’s permanent collection is not to be overlooked. In original paint with even gunning wear and shot scars. provenance:

William J. Mackey, Jr. Collection Private Collection, Florida

literature: William J. Mackey, Jr., American Bird Decoys, New York, NY, 1965, p. 102, plate 85, similar decoys illustrated. Dr. Cynthia Byrd, The Decoys of Long Island, Water Mill, NY, 2010, p. 31, similar example illustrated.

$20,000 - $25,000

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211 Dowitcher Charles Sumner Bunn (1865-1952) Shinnecock, NY or William “Bill” Bowman (1824-1906) of Bangor, ME and Lawrence, NY, c. 1905 One of the finest Long Island dowitcher decoys known to exist, this bird is from the same gunning rig as the outstanding greater yellowlegs, which was also originally collected by the waterfowl artist, Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974). This important shorebird decoy exhibits pronounced shoulder, cheek, raised-wing, and slightly dropped tail carving. This richly colored bird has deeply-recessed, German bead glass eyes, and its original splined-through bill. The underside of the tail has remnants of a jelly-jar collection label from the Weiler family. In 1970, pioneer decoy collector William Mackey wrote the text for Weiler’s “Classic Shorebird Decoys” portfolio. Across from Weiler’s Plate No. 3, illustrating “Bowman” shorebirds, Mackey writes: “In hand, Bowman’s decoys have the feel of real birds. His knowledge and study of the live bird and his skill with a knife transferred the feel of the wishbone, the unfolded wings and the modeling of the bone structure to blocks of wood. His was a unique talent not given to any other decoy maker.” Mackey also states “nothing finer has been found ever since.” Original paint with minor touch-up by Gigi Hopkins to one side of the bill tip and a hairline neck crack. provenance:

Milton C. Weiler Collection, by descent in the family

literature:

Dr. Cynthia Byrd, The Decoys of Long Island, Water Mill, NY, 2010, p. 39, similar example illustrated. Quintina Colio, American Decoys, Ephrata, PA, 1972, pp. 68 and 69, similar example illustrated. William J. Mackey, Jr., American Bird Decoys, New York, NY, 1965, p. 103, plate 87, similar example illustrated. Copley Fine Art Auctions, The Sporting Sale 2006, Boston, MA, July, 26 and 27, 2006, lots 273-274, exact decoy and rig mate illustrated. $40,000 - $60,000

212

212

212 Redhead Drake A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1910 This early redhead is an exceptional and bold decoy carving displaying raised and crossed primary feathers, tail carving, glass eyes, expertlyblended paint, and carved bill detail. This important decoy measures over seven inches in width and is nearly sixteen inches long, it features deep rasp carving and a slightly uplifted head, accurately capturing the likeness of species. This fine example is an early pre-brand decoy; the bottom has a pencil-written species identification and a price of twenty-four dollars.

212 (detail)

In the early 1900s, Joseph F. Sherer hunted with A. Elmer Crowell and George Flynn, the largest landowner on Martha’s Vineyard at the time. This redhead is from the same collection as the, then record setting, Crowell decorative running curlew sold by this firm as lot 198 in The Sporting Sale 2007. In excellent original paint with minor wear and a tight age crack along the bottom. provenance:

Joseph F. Sherer Collection, acquired directly from the artist Private Collection, by descent in the family to the current owner

literature:

Shirley and John Delph, New England Decoys, Exton, PA, 1990, p. 114, similar example illustrated. Brian Cullity, The Songless Aviary: The World of A.E. Crowell & Son, Sandwich, MA, 1992, p. 65, figure 13, similar decoy illustrated. Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, p. 160, similar decoy illustrated. $20,000 - $40,000

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214 Leaping Brook Trout A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1930 A rare fish carving by Crowell that measures eight inches across mounted on a thirteenand-one-quarter-inch-long oval plaque. The painted water motif plaque has a beveled edge and a rectangular stamp on the back. The fish has carved mouth and gill detail and an early, anatomically-correct glass eye. Original paint has a coat of sealer with two faint drips running down the plaque. The dorsal fin has a faint age line, the pectoral has been reset, the anal fin is missing and a portion of the pelvic fin is missing. Minor scratch to tail. literature:

Brian Cullity, The Songless Aviary: The World of A.E. Crowell & Son, Sandwich, MA, 1992, p. 23, figure 22, similar fish carving illustrated. $4,000 - $6,000

213 Golden Plover A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1910 An early working Crowell shorebird decoy displaying fine painted detail, glass eyes, and split-tail carving with painted primaries. This bird appears captured in time with an inquisitive pose. It is Crowell’s earliest works that most commonly convey animated postures. It is exceedingly difficult to find early examples of this species by Crowell as he concentrated primarily on black-bellied plover and yellowlegs during the first quarter of the 20th century. The vast majority of Crowell’s golden plover were created well after the era of shorebird hunting had ended in the 1920s. Original paint with even gunning wear. provenance:

James R. Doherty Collection Private Collection

literature:

Shirley and John Delph, New England Decoys, Exton, PA, 1990, p. 143, similar example illustrated. $25,000 - $35,000 105

215 Dowitcher A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1910 An exceptional working Crowell shorebird decoy displaying glass eyes, fine painted detail, and a split-tail carving with painted primaries. Describing a similar shorebird carving in his book American Wildfowl Decoys, Jeff Waingrow writes, “Crowell’s dowitcher decoy is a transitional carving, displaying the virility of his earlier work with a measure of new refinement found in the later examples. It possesses enough of the best qualities from each period, however to deserve a place among the finer examples of Crowell shorebirds.” Outstanding original paint with minor gunning wear including a rub to the wing tip. Reset crack in original bill. provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

literature:

Donna Tonelli, Top of the Line Hunting Collectibles, Atglen, PA, 1998, p. 88 similar examples illustrated. Paul A. Johnsgard, The Bird Decoy: An American Art Form, Lincoln, NE, 1976, p. 20 B, similar decoy illustrated. Jeff Waingrow, American Wildfowl Decoys, New York, NY, 1989, p. 97, similar example illustrated. Brian Cullity, The Songless Aviary: The World of A.E. Crowell & Son, Sandwich, MA, 1992, p. 49, plate 1, similar bird illustrated. $40,000 - $50,000

215

Photograph of a proud Elmer Crowell taken at John C. Phillips’ Oldham Pond Camp, 1920.

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215

216 Preening Jack Curlew A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1930 A stunning life-size mantle carving by Crowell exhibiting a rare side-preening posture. The head and bill gracefully parallel the body with the tip of the bill almost touching its flank. The bird’s anatomically-correct posture is reflected in the staggered stance of the legs and canted body and tail. The sculpted dark-brown wooden base gradually lightens at the high points, as though reflecting the light of the day. On the bottom, “Jack” is written in Crowell’s penciled script and his rectangular stamp is evenly impressed. Original paint with very faint craquelure and warm patina, original blemish in wood on left side and a minute chip to end of wing tip. provenance:

Private Collection

literature:

Brian Cullity, The Songless Aviary: The World of A. E. Crowell & Son, Sandwich, MA, 1992, p. 25, figure 26, similar bird illustrated. $30,000 - $60,000

Photograph of Crowell in his workshop. Note the preening yellowlegs similar to lot 218 shown in the lower right hand corner.

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217 Lesser Yellowlegs A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1930 An alert “summer” yellowlegs displaying glass eyes and exquisitely blended feathering. The carved quohog shell base with a blue hue is signed “A. E. Crowell. Maker. Cape Cod” on the bottom, above the maker’s rectangular stamp. Original paint with minor wear including a missing toe and minor touch-up to both legs. provenance:

William J. Mackey, Jr. Collection Donal C. O’Brien, Jr. Collection, acquired from the above

literature: Allen H. Eaton, Handicrafts of New England, New York, NY, 1949, p. 74, plate 15, similar carving illustrated. Shirley and John Delph, New England Decoys, Exton, PA, 1990, p. 103, similar examples illustrated.

$10,000 - $15,000

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218 Preening Greater Yellowlegs A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1930 A turned-head, preening shorebird with an elegantly lifted wing on a carved rock base. The bird displays an open bill preening a painted metal feather. The edges of the feather tips along the outer edge of the cupped wing are gracefully scalloped. This shorebird showcases not only Crowell’s great sense of design and composition, but also displays the intricate and elaborate blended feather detail seen on the maker’s finest works. The bottom of the base bears the maker’s deeply impressed rectangular stamp. Outstanding original paint with minimal wear and minor touch-up. provenance:

Vose Galleries, Boston, Massachusetts Donal C. O’Brien, Jr. Collection, acquired from the above $20,000 - $30,000

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219 Wigeon Drake A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1930 This species of working duck decoy was rarely carved by Crowell. The bird displays a slightly turned head, carved bill detail, stippled paint along the back, layered tail carving, and the maker’s rectangular stamp in the bottom. In original paint with light craquelure on end grain, and even wear. Touch-up on stamp and area where inset cicurlar weight was removed and filled on bottom. literature:

Brian Cullity, The Songless Aviary: The World of A.E. Crowell & Son, Sandwich, MA, 1992, p. 67, figure 17, similar decoy illustrated. $10,000 - $12,000

220 Half-Sized Ruffed Grouse A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1920 An extremely rare seven-and-one-quarter-inch-tall game bird carving with a deeply impressed maker’s rectangular stamp on the bottom. This rare upland bird carving features carved thighs, a meticulously rounded tail, and relief carved feathers on the ruff, placing it among the maker’s very best grouse sculptures. Original paint with minor touch-up to toes and beak. literature:

Brian Cullity, The Songless Aviary: The World of A.E. Crowell & Son, Sandwich, MA, 1992, p. 86, figure 53, similar carving illustrated. $10,000 - $12,000

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220

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221 Three “Lumberyard” Shorebirds Gilbert E. Wallace (1873-1917) (attr.) Forked River, NJ, c. 1890 A rig of three shorebird decoys with black glass “shoe button” eyes and carved wings. Old paint, worn to the wood, with gunning wear. provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$600 - $900

222

222 Yellowlegs Pair Long Island, NY, c. 1900 Two rigmate shorebird decoys with stringing holes. Both are in original paint with light gunning wear. Bills appear to be original. provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$600 - $900

223

223 Yellowlegs Pair Long Island, NY, c. 1900 The shorebirds display deeply carved wings and the initials “JL” incised in the underside of each. In original paint with even gunning wear and flaking. $800 - $1,200

114

224 Yellowlegs Edward P. Gosling (1875-1939) Newport, RI, c. 1900

224

225

A painted eye shorebird displaying three-piece vertical lamination from Gosling’s personal rig. Original paint with light gunning wear including a shortened bill tip. Left lamina of head professionally restored. provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

literature:

Bill LaPointe, “Capt. Frank Besse & Edward Gosling,” Decoy Magazine, Lewes, DE, March/April, 2010, p. 11, rigmate illustrated. $400 - $800 225 Yellowlegs W. S. Morton (1809-1871) Quincy, MA, c. 1865 An early shorebird decoy with the W.S. Morton brand on the underside. The decoy has old square pegs filling two holes for wire legs. Old in-use repaint with gunning wear, a replaced bill, and restoration to tail section. provenance:

W. S. Morton rig Paul W. Masengarb Collection

226

$400 - $800

226 Peep New Jersey, c. 1900 A feeding sandpiper decoy measuring eight inches long from the collection of Malcolm Fleming of Bellport, New York. Fleming started collecting in 1939, was a founding member of two early decoy collector associations, and was also a noted wildlife artist until his passing in 1994. “Fleming Collection” is written on the underside of the bird. Very old in-use repaint with light gunning wear and a replaced bill with touch-up to the insertion area. provenance:

Malcom J. Fleming Collection Paul W. Masengarb Collection $400 - $600 227 Greater Yellowlegs Dan Horn (attr.) New Gretna, NJ, c. 1890 A tack-eyed shorebird with raised wings and the initials “D.H.” incised on the underside. Original paint with old in-use repaint to the underside and even gunning wear. The bill is likely an old replacement.

provenance:

227

228

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

literature:

Guyette and Schmidt, The Hillman Collection, April 1996, p. 156, lot 656, rigmate illustrated. $300 - $500 228 Black-Bellied Plover John E. Loveland (1851-1920) (attr.) Point Pleasant, NJ, c. 1890 A painted-eye shorebird with eye grooves, carved wings, and a carved notch delineating the primaries. Original paint with sealer, light gunning wear, faint drips down left side, and a professional bill replacement with surrounding touch-up.

provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$300 - $500 115

229 Black Duck John English (1852-1915) Florence, NJ, c. 1890

229

A hollow tack-eyed decoy with carved bill detail, raised wings, and tail carving. The underside displays the maker’s “J. English” brand, a “J.B. Perkins” of Beverly, New Jersey rig brand, a “W.S. Marter” of Burlington, New Jersey rig brand, and its original weight. Old in-use repaint with light gunning wear, including a neck crack and a tail feather chip. provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

literature: Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., New Jersey Decoys, Exton, PA, 1983, p. 194, similar bird illustrated. Gene and Linda Kangas, Decoys, Paducah, KY, 1992, pp. 113 and 169, similar decoy illustrated.

$2,000 - $3,000

230 Mallard Drake John English (1852-1915) Florence, NJ, c. 1890

230

A hollow tack-eyed decoy with carved bill detail, raised wings, and tail carving. The underside displays a “J.B. Perkins” of Beverly, New Jersey rig brand, a “W.S. Marter” of Burlington, New Jersey rig brand, and its original weight. In-use repaint by Beach Haven, New Jersey carver Chris Sprague (1888-1982) with light craquelure on the bottom. Gunning wear including a neck crack and old tail feather chips. provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

literature:

Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., New Jersey Decoys, Exton, PA, 1983, p. 221, similar example illustrated. $2,000 - $3,000

Δ

231

231 Hooded Merganser Pair Clifford Van Zandt Townsend’s Inlet, NJ, c. 1920 This matched pair of hollow hooded mergansers is featured in Quintina Colio’s “American Decoys” and the drake is featured in William J. Mackey’s book “American Bird Decoys.” Made out of cedar with original bottom boards. Early gunning examples of this species are difficult to find. In original paint with even gunning wear. The hen has a crack in the neck. provenance:

William J. Mackey, Jr. Collection The University Club of Milwaukee Decoy Collection

literature:

William J. Mackey, Jr., American Bird Decoys, New York, NY, 1965, plate 117, p. 139, exact drake illustrated. Robert Shaw, Call to the Sky: The Decoy Collection of James M. McCleery, M.D., Houston, TX, 1992, p. 60. Quintina Colio, American Decoys, Ephrata, PA, 1972, p. 18, exact decoys illustrated. $5,000 -$7,000

116

232 Black Duck Philadelphia, PA, c. 1870

232

An early hollow decoy with German shoe-button glass eyes. The four-piece construction of the body is joined by numerous square nails and a couple long, square mortised pegs. The heart-shaped back, with a pronounced ice groove, ends in a paddle tail. With carved eye grooves, the eyes are pronounced as is the carved nail at the end of the bill. Original paint with gunning wear, a reset neck, and professional tail chip repair by Cameron McIntyre. $1,500 - $2,500

233 Black Duck Daniel Lake Leeds (1852-1922) Pleasantville, NJ, c. 1885

233

This decoy was hollowed from the top and pegged with square nails. It displays shoe-button glass eyes and is stamped “F.E. Thissell” and and a lightly etched identification “Daniel Lake Leeds, NJ 1885” on the bottom. Original paint, worn to the wood in places, with gunning wear and a bill chip. $500 - $800

234 Black Duck Thomas Fitzpatrick (1887-1958) Delanco, NJ, c. 1930

234

A hollow tack-eye Delaware River decoy displaying Fitzpatrick’s most intricate paint, carved bill detail, raised wing and tail carving, and its original weight. Original paint with light gunning wear and a few chips to wing tips and tail. literature:

Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., New Jersey Decoys, Exton, PA, 1983, p. 196, plate 467, similar example illustrated. $1,500 - $2,500

117

235

Δ

235 Canvasback Pair Burlington, NJ, c. 1900 An early hollow pair of Delaware River diving ducks displaying incised wing carving and a thin center board between the two body halves. Working repaint with gunning wear. $400 - $600

236 Brant Harry V. Shourds (1861-1920) Tuckerton, NJ, c. 1890

236

A classic New Jersey brant decoy. Mix of original paint with some old in-use repaint, gunning wear, and a professional bill repair by Russ Allen. $600 - $900

237

Δ

237 Goose Pair William “Bill’ Hammarstrom (b. 1935) Waretown, NJ, c. 1950 Two hollow geese, one in a swimming posture, both branded “B. Hammerstrom” on the underside. A mixture of original and working repaint with light gunning wear. literature: Allen Linchorst, “The Hammerstroms of Waretown,” Decoy Magazine, May/June 2012, p. 35, similar decoy illustrated.

$300 - $500

118

238 Canada Goose Barnegat Bay, NJ, c. 1900

238

A hollow decoy displaying pronounced bill carving, full cheeks, rasped texture applied to wings, and a large rectangular weight with hammered corners. In working repaint with even gunning wear. $400 - $600

239 Swimming Black Duck John Winfield Bowen (1854-1953) Atlantic City, NJ, c. 1880

239

An early hollow swimming decoy with carved raised wing detail. In old paint with gunning wear including a broken left eye. $300 - $500

240 Red-Breasted Merganser Drake Harry V. Shourds (1861-1920) Tuckerton, NJ, c. 1880

240

A hollow decoy displaying a carved crest, bill detail, an inset rectangular weight, and the rig initials “EE� on the underside. In working repaint with gunning wear including a reset bill and neck. $600 - $900

119

241

241 Hudsonian Curlew Harry V. Shourds (1861-1920) Tuckerton, NJ, c. 1890 An exemplary Shourds “green rig” shorebird decoy, described as such because of its hue. This curlew displays painted eyes, a splined bill, and exceptionally-blended feathering. This curlew resides amongst the finest examples by this maker known to exist. Original paint with light even gunning wear. provenance:

Dr. Cointreau Collection Randy Root Collection Jim and Deb Allen Collection Private Collection, Midwest

literature: Joe Engers, The Great Book of Wildfowl Decoys, San Diego, CA, 1990, p. 116, similar decoy illustrated. Donna Tonelli, Top of the Line Hunting Collectibles, Atglen, PA, 1998, p. 62, similar example illustrated. Robert Shaw, Call to the Sky: The Decoy Collection of James M. McCleery, M.D., Houston, TX, 1992, p. 59, similar example illustrated. James R. Doherty, Classic New Jersey Decoys, Louisville, KY, 2011, p. 69, similar decoys illustrated.

242

$22,500 - $27,500 242 Robin Snipe Harry V. Shourds (1861-1920) Tuckerton, NJ, c. 1890 An exquisite Shourds shorebird with superb feather paint, surface, and form. An early collection identification on the underside reads “Harry Shourds Tuckerton, NJ 1870-1900”. Original paint with light even gunning wear. provenance:

Alan and Elaine Haid Collection Jim and Deb Allen Collection Private Collection, Midwest

literature:

Donna Tonelli, Top of the Line Hunting Collectibles, Atglen, PA, 1998, p. 62, exact decoy illustrated. Robert Shaw, Call to the Sky: The Decoy Collection of James M. McCleery, M.D., Houston, TX, 1992, p. 59, similar example illustrated. James R. Doherty, Classic New Jersey Decoys, Louisville, KY, 2011, p. 70, similar decoys illustrated.

243

$12,500 - $17,500 243 Yellowlegs Harry V. Shourds (1861-1920) Tuckerton, NJ, c. 1890 A painted eye shorebird decoy with its original through splined bill and incredible original dry surface. This outstanding Shourds shorebird decoys features the maker’s finest stippled paint and rarely seen painted wing tips. Superb original paint with light gunning wear. provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

literature:

James R. Doherty, Classic New Jersey Decoys, Louisville, KY, 2011, p. 66, similar decoys illustrated. $10,000 - $15,000

120

241

243

242

121

244

244 Mallard Drake Hiram “Hy” Hotze (1886-1977) Peoria, IL, c. 1930 This hollow Illinois River mallard decoy displays all the aspects of the maker’s master craftsmanship, including its original rigging. Hotze was known to have signed and dated the inside of his decoys. As seen on this example, Hotze’s most elaborate paint detailing is found on his mallard decoys. Originally collected in lieu of payment for medical services by Illinois doctor, Dr. E. C. Burhams, this decoy descended to his daughter, the spouse of Jim Fowler, noted zoologist and host of the Emmy Award-winning Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom. Original paint with craquelure, even gunning wear, and flaking to top left edge of head. provenance:

Dr. E. C. Burhams Collection Betsey Burhams Fowler Collection

literature:

245

Stephen O’Brien, Jr. and Julie Carlson, Masterworks of the Illinois River, Boston, MA, 2005, p. 115, similar decoys illustrated. Alan Haid, Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway, Exton, PA, 1981, p. 172, similar bird illustrated. $3,000 - $5,000

245 Pintail Drake Charles S. Schoenheider, Sr. (1854-1924) Peoria, IL, c. 1890 An early hollow Illinois River decoy exhibiting fine form, detailed paint, and a painted stencil number “487” on the underside. One of the earliest and most famous decoy makers of the area, Schoenheider often marked the underside of his decoys with painted stencils. In original paint with craquelure, minor flaking, and gunning wear. literature:

Paul W. Parmalee and Forrest D. Loomis, Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois, DeKalb, IL, 1969, p. 332, plate 284, similar decoy illustrated. Alan Haid, Decoys of the Mississippi River, Exton, PA, 1981, p. 164, similar decoy illustrated. $1,000 - $1,500

246

246 Mallard Drake Hiram “Hy” Hotze (1886-1977) Peoria, IL, c. 1930 A hollow Illinois River decoy displaying glass eyes, carved bill detail, warm patina, and a “L.J.R.” rig brand on the underside. Original paint with even gunning wear and some working overpaint on each side. Rigging removed. literature: Stephen O’Brien, Jr. and Julie Carlson, Masterworks of the Illinois River, Boston, MA, 2005, p. 115, similar decoys illustrated. Alan Haid, Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway, Exton, PA, 1981, p. 172. similar bird illustrated.

$1,500 - $2,500

122

247 Mallard Ice Duck Charles Schoenheider Sr. (1854-1924) Peoria, IL, c. 1900 A rare hollow stick-up mallard drake decoy with a removable cast foot. Old working paint was successfully removed to reveal original paint by Ken DeLong in the 1980s. Stencils “C. S.” and “Peoria” have been strengthened, neck has been reset. provenance:

Charles Schoenheider rig Private Collection, Midwest

literature:

Richard A. Bourne, Jr., Rare American Decoys and Bird Carvings, Hyannis, MA, July,1986, p. 107, lot 561A, exact decoy illustrated. $12,000 - $16,000

248 Pintail Pair Charles S. Schoenheider, Sr. (1854-1944) Peoria, IL, c. 1900 An exceedingly rare pair of hollow Illinois River decoys by the maker. There are only two Schoenheider pintail hens known. The decoys exhibit delicately carved heads with glass eyes, and carved bill detail. The drake has superb combed paint detail on the entirety of its back. Original paint with remnants of varnish and even gunning wear. Touchup to a tight crack in drake’s head and the hen’s bill tip. literature:

Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. and Julie Carlson, Masterworks of the Illinois River, Boston, MA, 2005, front cover and pp. 42-51. Paul W. Parmalee and Forrest D. Loomis, Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois, DeKalb, IL, 1969, pp. 331 and 332, plates 283 and 284, similar decoys illustrated. $25,000 - $35,000

Related Schoenheider merganser pair featured on the cover of Masterworks of the Illinois River.

124

248

125

249

249 Pintail Pair Bert Graves (1880-1956) Peoria, IL, c. 1930 A hollow rigmate pair of Illinois River decoys displaying glass eyes, incised bill detail, and detailed paint by Catherine Elliston (1849-1953). Rig branded “J.L.S.” on the underside of each with an original Graves raised letter strip lead weight. The “J.L.S.” rig brand has also been found on Graves mallards. Original paint with some varnish, gunning wear and a minor professional repair to right side edge of hen’s bill. literature: Stephen O’Brien, Jr. and Julie Carlson, Masterworks of the Illinois River, Boston, MA, 2005, p. 103, similar decoys illustrated.

$12,000 - $18,000

126

249 (detail)

250

251

250 Premier Grade Mallard Hen Mason Decoy Factory (1896-1924) Detroit, MI, c. 1920

251 Black-Bellied Plover Mason Decoy Factory (1896-1924) Detroit, MI, c. 1910

A hollow Michigan decoy with outstanding swirled paint. Original paint with light gunning wear, body seam separation with filler loss.

A full-bodied, tack-eye shorebird decoy in spring breeding plumage. In original paint with gunning wear including numerous shot scars.

$1,500 - $2,500

literature:

Russ J. Goldberger and Alan Haid, Mason Decoys: A Pictorial Guide, Lewes, DE, 1993, p. 100, similar example illustrated. $1,000 - $2,000

252

252 Goose or Over-Sized Black Duck Weathervane c. 1900

253 No lot

A thirty-five-inch-long, one-inch-thick silhouette weathervane with whirligig moveable wings attached. On one side a remaining metal name plate reads “L.A. Dearth.� Dearth is believed to have founded the Estey Machine Company in Laconia, New Hampshire and this weathervane was part of his estate. Dry original paint with craquelure, old tin plate repair to tail, vintage replacement to one-half of wing axle and to lower half of one leg. $1,500 - $2,500 127

254

255

256

257

254 Diminutive Standing Green-Winged Teal Lloyd J. Tyler (1898-1970) Crisfield, MD, c. 1950

256 Canvasback Hen and Drake William Heverin (1860-1951) Charlestown, MD, c. 1920

An alert, seven-and-one-half-inch-high, drake green-winged teal carving with carved wings on a driftwood base. A similar Tyler teal carving is illustrated on the back of the dust jacket of Henry Stanbury’s biography of the carver. Original paint with light wear from handling and shrinkage to putty on legs.

The drake is rig branded “K” on its breast and retains its original rigging. The full-bodied hen has had her rigging removed. It is exceedingly difficult to find Heverin decoys in original paint. Original paint with even gunning wear. The drake has a tight age crack through the neck and the hen has one along the bottom and through her bill.

literature:

Henry Stansbury, Lloyd J. Tyler, Folk Artist, Decoy Maker, Burtonsville, MD, 1995 p. 47 and rear of dust jacket, similar carving illustrated. $800 - $1,200 255 Canvasback Pair Jim Currier (1886-1969) Havre de Grace, MD, c. 1920 The decoys have their original rigging and the drake has an “F” owner’s brand on the bottom. Original paint with heavy gunning wear and in-use touch-up to the drakes head. The drake has a doweled knot hole in the body and vertical cracks in the head. The hen has an age crack along the bottom and through the neck.

literature:

J. Evans McKinney, Decoys of the Susquehanna Flats and their Makers, Ocean City, MD, 1978, p. 36, similar examples illustrated $800 - $1,200

128

literature:

J. Evans McKinney, Decoys of the Susquehanna Flats and their Makers, Ocean City, MD, 1978, p. 47, similar examples illustrated. $4,000 - $6,000 257 Redhead Drake R. Madison Mitchell (1903-1993) Havre de Grace, MD, c. 1940 An early working decoy by this famed Chesapeake Bay carver. Original paint with gunning wear, including tight age cracks and an inserted side weight. $100 - $150

258

259

258 Half-Sized Mallard Pair The Ward Brothers, Lemuel T. (1896-1983) and Stephen (1895-1976) Crisfield, MD, 1947 An exceptional and early pair of standing halfsized balsa mallards displaying glass eyes, carved bill detail, inserted raised “peach basket” wing feathers and a pleasing light patina. Signed “Lem Ward -1947-” on the front of each circular base. Each measures eight-and-one-quarter inches. In original paint, the drake has a minor bill chip and touch-up to repaired left edges of both feet. literature: Ronald J. Gard and Brian J. McGrath, The Ward Brothers’ Decoys. A Collector’s Guide, Plano, TX, 1989, plates 109 -111, pp. 125 and 126, similar examples illustrated.

$10,000 - $12,000

259 Wigeon Hen Lloyd Sterling (1880-1964) Crisfield, MD, c. 1920 A boldly carved wigeon with a well-sculpted humpbacked body. The head and back display scratch-painted feathering. The outer islands off Cape Cod had significant wigeon flights and decoys of this species are often found by numerous different makers including Joseph W. Lincoln (1859-1938) who also made decoys for the Leland Family (see lot 313). Fine original paint with light gunning wear, a tight check along the back, and one eye replaced. provenance:

The Wasque Point Camp, Chappaquidick Island, Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts By descent in the Leland Family $3,000 - $5,000 129

260

260 (detail)

131

260

260 Broadbill Drake The Ward Brothers, Lemuel T. (1896-1983) and Stephen (1895-1976) Crisfield, MD, 1936 In 1936, Dr. Edgar Burke (1889-1950), a famed illustrator of sporting books, took delivery of a pair of broadbills and three other pairs of decoys from Lem Ward and his brother, Steve. Dr. Burke gave Lem a painting of a pintail in flight, which he proudly hung in his home for many years. Dr. Burke was a lifelong friend of sporting author Eugene V. Connett who in 1947, inspired by Dr. Burke, edited a book titled Duck Shooting Along the Atlantic Tidewater which chronicled the early days of waterfowl hunting along the Atlantic. Contributing chapters to the book were A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952), Charles “Shang” Wheeler (1872-1949), and Dr. Burke. In addition to writing a chapter, Burke also lent images of his Ward Brothers decoys and illustrated color plates of ducks in flight. This broadbill drake is from that group of now-famous Ward Brothers decoys purchased by William J. Mackey, Jr. from Dr. Burke’s family. This decoy is an extremely rare 1936 model pinch-breast greater scaup drake exhibiting a turned head, glass eyes, detailed bill carving, outstanding stippled paint, and lined primary feather detail. While the Ward Brothers are known to have made pinch-breast canvasbacks and several pintails, this is one of the rarest Ward pinch-breast forms of all. Considered

by many to be the finest Ward Brothers broadbill known to exist, this folk art carving ranks among the greatest examples of the species we have ever seen. The bottom is signed by the maker “Lem Ward, Crisfield, MD 1936” and also bears William Purnell, Jr’s “W.H.P. jr.” brand. Outstanding original paint with minimal wear, a tight original age line down back and along bottom. provenance:

Dr. Edgar Burke Collection, acquired directly from the Ward Brothers William J. Mackey, Jr. Collection William H. Purnell, Jr. Collection

literature: Eugene V. Connett, ed., Duck Shooting Along the Atlantic Tidewater, New York, NY, 1947, p. 129, exact decoy illustrated. John T. Ordeman and M.C. Weiler, Jr., The Art of Milton C. Weiler, Hilton Head Island, SC, 2011, p. 104, exact decoy illustrated.

$30,000 - $50,000

Lot 260 illustrated in Eugene V. Connett’s Duck Shooting Along The Atlantic Tidewater, page 129, upper right.

133

261

261 Mallard Pair The Ward Brothers, Lemuel T. (1896-1983) and Stephen (1895-1976) Crisfield, MD, c. 1942 Though never rigged or hunted, this early pair of mallards was originally made for gunning. Robert Shaw describes the mallard drake and black duck in the collection of the late Dr. James McCleery as follows: The Ward’s 1942 marsh-duck design featured sleek, slightly elongated bodies and bills and Lem’s skillful and intricate paint. Though the Ward Brothers made hundreds of mallard decoys, the majority were created after 1950 as the mallard population increased. These decoys exhibit heads made of cedar, turned approximately thirty degrees with detailed bills, and glass eyes on hard balsa bodies. Exceptional original paint with minimal wear. literature: Robert Shaw, Call to the Sky: The Decoy Collection of James M. McCleery, M.D., Houston, TX, 1992, p. 79, similar decoy illustrated. Ronald J. Gard and Brian J. McGrath, The Ward Brothers’ Decoys: A Collector’s Guide, Plano, TX, 1989, p. 83, plates 75 and 76, similar examples illustrated.

$25,000 - $35,000 262 262 Black Duck Crisfield, MD, c. 1970 A balsa-bodied decoy with a turned head, possibly by the Ward Brothers. Original paint with light gunning wear. $600 - $900

134

263

263 Pintail Hen The Ward Brothers, Lemuel T. (1896-1983) and Stephen (1895-1976) Crisfield, MD, 1945 A classic 1940s Ward balsa-bodied decoy with a turned head, superb dry original paint, and the Ward Brothers’ best razor-sharp bill carving. Excellent orginal paint. A few rubs and an age line at the neck seam. Keel has been removed. literature:

Ronald J. Gard and Brian J. McGrath, The Ward Brothers’ Decoys: A Collector’s Guide, Plano, TX, 1989, p 65, plates 61 and 62, similar examples illustrated. $5,000 - $10,000

264

264 Mallard Pair The Ward Brothers, Lemuel T. (1896-1983) and Stephen (1895-1976) Crisfield, MD, 1953 A rigmate pair of mallards with slightly turned heads and upswept pine tails that are inserted into their balsa bodies. Each retains its original keel and is signed and dated by Lem Ward on the underside. Original paint with even gunning wear including some dings. Restoration to hen’s bill tip. provenance:

John Collier Collection

literature: Ronald J. Gard and Brian J. McGrath, The Ward Brothers’ Decoys: A Collector’s Guide, Plano, TX, 1989, p. 84, plate 79, similar examples illustrated.

$2,000 - $3,000

135

265

265 Bufflehead Pair Ira D. Hudson (1876-1949) Chincoteague, VA, c. 1920 A rare rigmate pair with tack eyes, carved bill detail, desirable form, and fluted tail carving. Mix of original paint and later repaint, worn to the wood in places, heavy gunning wear, and an age crack along the bottom of the drake. literature:

Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr. Southern Decoys, Exton, PA, 1983, p. 61, plate 60, similar decoy illustrated. Henry H. Stansbury, Ira D. Hudson and Family, Lewes, DE, 2002, p. 81, similar decoys illustrated. $3,000 - $4,000

266

266 Black Duck Ira D. Hudson (1873-1949) Chincoteague, VA, c. 1920 A classic football-shaped, tack-eyed decoy with carved bill detail and fluted tail carving. Original rigging and a “P” brand on the underside. Original paint with even gunning wear and a few tight age cracks, one along the bottom. provenance:

William H. Purnell, Jr. Collection Private Collection

literature:

Henry H. Stansbury, Ira D. Hudson and Family, Lewes, DE, 2002, p. 61, similar decoys illustrated. $2,000 - $3,000

267

267 Hooded Merganser Pair Charles E. Jester (1876-1952) Chincoteague, VA, c. 1930 Two hollow merganser decoys with painted eyes. The hen has the Roy Bull (1911-1982) of Townsend, Virginia collection brand on the underside and the drake has an incised “A” rig mark and its original weight. The drake is illustrated in an article in the 1965 edition of “Decoy Collectors Guide” featuring, pioneering Long Island collector and artist, Malcolm J. Fleming’s merganser decoy collection. Both are in old working repaint with heavy gunning wear; the hen has an age crack along the bottom and a bill repair. literature: Malcolm J. Fleming, One Man’s Mergansers, Decoy Collector’s Guide, Burlington, IA, 1965, p. 16, exact drake illustrated.

$2,000 - $3,000

136

268

268 Turning Bluebill Drake Ira D. Hudson (1876-1949) Chincoteague, VA, c. 1900 With this exceptional turning bluebill, Ira Hudson has incorporated elements into a decoy that seem to be completely unique to this Southern maker’s work. Every aspect of the bird’s form and paint from tip to tail supports its animation. Well conceived and executed, the bird’s head is positioned in a turn that is echoed in the curvature of the tail. The extraordinary steps taken by Hudson may have been done to capture the essence of a preening scaup. Upon resurfacing, scaup, which are active divers, will often fluff their feathers to dry off and reach back with their bills to their preen (uropygial) gland. They then use the oil gathered on their bill to dress their feathers. The asymmetrical paint to the breast, scapulars, and speculums was intentionally applied to denote movement of the wings and body and Hudson’s efforts even extend into to the curvature of the carved ice groove behind the bird’s head. Hudson’s obsession with creating motion in this decoy lead him so far as to take anatomical liberties, even curving the bird’s bill. The underside has “5-5” stamped into the lead weight and hand painted below the weight. These numbers are believed to be the identification marks of Carter Smith (1898-1971), “the first Southern decoy collector.”

268

138

This rare decoy is illustrated twice in Henry Stansbury’s book on Ira Hudson and also appears in Gene and Linda Kangas’ book, Decoys. This celebrated Hudson is considered to be the finest hollow bluebill by the maker known to exist and ranks as one of the finest bluebill decoys to ever be offered publicly at auction. Original paint with gunning wear and minimal touch-up to head. provenance:

Carter Smith Collection Private Collection

literature: Bruce Lowe, “Carter Smith: The First Southern Decoy Collector,” Decoy Magazine, Lewes, DE, May/June 2012, p. 9, exact decoy illustrated. Henry H. Stansbury, Ira D. Hudson and Family, Lewes, DE, 2002, p. 72, exact decoy illustrated twice. Adele Earnest, The Art of the Decoy: American Bird Carvings, New York, NY, 1965, color plate insert, similar example illustrated. Gene and Linda Kangas, Decoys, Paducah, KY, 1992, p. 119, plates 176 and 177, exact decoy illustrated.

$50,000 - $70,000

268

269

269 Canvasback Drake Ivar G. Fernlund (1881-1933) Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, c. 1915 A hollow decoy with crosshatched comb painting and strong swirl and stipple paint on the back. Retains its original swing weight with an impressed “F” in the lead bulb. Finding Fernlund canvasbacks in original paint with intact bills is exceptionally difficult; this is a stellar example given its form, paint, surface, and rarity. In original paint with gunning wear including a few shot scars. provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

literature:

Bernard W. Crandell, Decoying: St. Clair to St. Lawrence, Erin, Ontario, 1988, p. 196, similar decoy illustrated. R. Paul Brisco, Waterfowl Decoys of Southwestern Ontario, Erin, Ontario, 1986, cp. 68, p. 124, similar decoy illustrated. Bernie Gates, Ontario Decoys, Kingston, Ontario, 1982, p. 34, similar decoy illustrated. $10,000 - $15,000

270

270 Canvasback Hen Ivar G. Fernlund (1881-1933) Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, c. 1915 A hollow decoy from this exceptional carver with straight-combed feather detail on the breast and back. Retains its original swing weight with an impressed “F” in the lead bulb. Original paint with craquelure, light gunning wear including a few shot holes, and flaking to upper and forward area of each speculum. provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

literature:

Bernard W. Crandell, Decoying: St. Clair to St. Lawrence, Erin, Ontario, 1988, p. 196, similar decoy illustrated. R. Paul Brisco, Waterfowl Decoys of Southwestern Ontario, Erin, Ontario, 1986, cp. 69, p. 124, similar decoy illustrated. Bernie Gates, Ontario Decoys, Kingston, Ontario, 1982, p. 34, similar decoy illustrated. $10,000 - $15,000

271

271 Broadbill Drake James F. Harper (1857-1948) 271 Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, c. 1900 A rare hollow turned-head decoy displaying comb-painted detail, scratch-painted primaries, and wet-onwet blending highlighting the cheeks. Signed by the maker with a serifed “H” under the tail. One of the finest Ontario broadbill decoys we have handled. Original paint with light even gunning wear, head is slightly loose. Some minor working touch-up to shot holes. provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

$12,000 - $16,000

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272 Redhead Hen c. 1900 A hollow decoy branded “HEM” on the underside. This rig was found in Oshawa, just east of Toronto on Lake Ontario. Old original paint with gunning wear to including dings, shot scars, and a neck repair. $1,000 - $1,500

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273 Terns Mounted on a Crab Float Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1990

274 274

A flock of eight terns mounted on a fifty-two-inch-long section of an old crab float that was fitted as a wall mount shelf. The piece was inspired by the artist having seen similar groupings of terns on this very float at a local crab house on the Chesapeake Bay. Each is signed with the maker’s incised “McNair” on the underside. Original condition with minor repair to a couple slats in the float. $4,000 - $6,000

274 Heron Head Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 2010 A seventeen-inch-high, life-size carving of a heron’s head and neck. This finished piece displays carved eyes, bill detail, and incised feather detail on the upper portion of the head. This “root head” carving was made from a single red cedar branch. The base is a chamfered block of purple heart-wood which was salvaged from a restoration of the tall ship “Susan Conant.” Like the more famous “Mayflower II,” in Plymouth, the “Susan Conant” is a replica of the original English ship which in 1606 brought one hundred and five colonists to the ill-fated Jamestown, Virginia settlement. The maker’s incised signature is on one side of the base of the neck. Original condition. $2,250 - $2,750

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275 Greater Yellowlegs Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1990

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A thirteen-inch-long Bunn or Bowman style shorebird with the maker’s incised signature on the underside. Original paint. provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$1,000 - $1,200 276 Golden Plover Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1990 A Bunn or Bowman style shorebird decoy with black glass eyes and carved wings. Signed with the maker’s incised “McNair” on the underside. Original paint with wear applied by the maker. provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$800 - $1,200 277 Golden Plover Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1980 A glass-eyed shorebird with raised wings and carved primaries. Incised “McNair” signature on the underside. Original condition. provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$600 - $900 278 Golden Plover Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1980 A New England “rocking” style shorebird displaying black glass eyes, inserted raised primaries, and the maker’s incised signature on the underside. Original condition with crazing on neck. provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$600 - $900 279 Two Peeps Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 2000

279

A small Long Island style shorebird in a feeding posture with carved wing detail and a tack-eyed sandpiper with carved wings. Both have the maker’s incised signature on the underside. Both are in original condition with maker applied wear, including shot scars. provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$600 - $900

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281 274

280 Three Yellowlegs Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 2005 A nineteen-inch-high yellowlegs with wire legs and two other hollow yellowlegs, one with a turned head. All display black glass eyes, split-tail carving, carved primaries, and the maker’s incised signature on the underside. All are in original condition. $2,000 - $3,000

281 Golden Plover Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1990 A tack-eyed shorebird decoy with wire legs and a hardwood base. The maker’s incised signature is on the underside of the bird. Original condition. $1,000 - $1,400

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282 “Pocket-Sized” Ruddy Duck Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1975

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283

A seven-inch-long decoy carving with maker’s incised signature, a dog bone lead weight, leather anchor-line loop, and a Conover Collection stamp on the bottom. Though diminutive, this was not made as a miniature, rather it was inspired by pocket-sized decoys such as the Lee Dudley (1860-1942) teal illustrated in plate I of William J. Mackey’s American Bird Decoys. Original condition. provenance:

Dr. John Conover III Collection, acquired directly from the artist Paul W. Masengarb Collection

literature:

William J. Mackey, Jr., American Bird Decoys, New York, NY, 1965, plate I. $400 - $600 283 Ruddy Duck Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1990

284

The decoy exhibits a gently round-shaped body with lightly raised wings and a pronounced head with attitude. Signed “McNair” on the underside by the maker. Original condition with applied wear and deep patina. provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$500 - $900 284 Pintail Drake Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, 2012 A well carved and painted hollow pintail drake decoy displaying an inset oak tail, comb-painted vermiculation, a beveled rectangular weight, a leather anchor-line loop fastened with star-head copper tacks, and an incised signature on the bottom. Original condition. $2,000 - $3,000 285 285 Canvasback Pair Ian McNair (b. 1981) Craddockville, VA, c. 1999 Displaying glass eyes, gently stipple painted wings, and the maker’s “I McNair” incised signature on the bottom of each. Original condition with minimal wear from handling. $600 - $900

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286 Life-Size Flying Pintail Drake Michael Borrett Madison, WI, 2008 A flying pintail with wing and tail feathers carved in relief. A screw eye for hanging is fastened to the back of the duck. Signed and dated by the maker on the top edge of left wing. Original condition. Lead tail is bent. $300 - $500

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287 Flying Wild Turkey George W. Reinbold (1885-1946) Lansdowne, PA, 1940 A well-executed, quarter-sized, twelve-inch-long, flying upland-game bird carving. Features include painted eyes, detailed head carving, incised wing feather delineation, a wire bracket for wall mounting, and a bold signature under the wing. Original paint, with touch-up to repairs at seams, several wing tips, tail, and beard. $500 - $700

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288 Miniature Pheasant Carving James J. Ahearn (d. 1963) New York, c. 1930 A seven-inch-long carving of a ring-necked pheasant signed by the maker on the bottom of the birch twig base. Original paint with a damaged beak. $200 - $300

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289 Black Duck Box Wildfowler Decoys (a. 1939-1957) Old Saybrook, CT, c. 1950

289

A decoy with two hollowed out compartments inside. The back, when lifted from the raised primary feathers, is the box’s hinged top. The decoy has an inletted head with fine scratch paint detail. Edward “Ted” Mulliken (1896-1964) crafted these beautifully designed birds to be used as cigarette or jewelry boxes. They often sat atop men’s dressers to hold cufflinks, tie tacks, etc. Original paint with minor wear and a reset bill. $200 - $300

290 Feeding Sanderling Massachusetts, c. 1900

290

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293

A classic shorebird carving displaying great attitude and a split tail. Original paint with minimal gunning wear. $400 - $600 291 Woodcock Steve Morey Tuckerton, NJ, c. 1980 A life-size game bird carving with carved raised primary feathers and an incised “M” signature on the underside. Original paint with an age line near the bill insertion. $200 - $300

292 Flying Half-Sized Black Duck A detailed twelve-and-one-half-inch-high carving mounted on a wooden base by an accomplished maker. Original paint with chip to the wing tip and tail, and reset bill. $100 - $200 293 Dowitcher David Rhodes (b. 1933) Absecon, NJ, c. 1980 A life-size shorebird decoy signed by the maker on the underside of the tail. Original paint with a cracked leg and a missing bill tip. $100 - $150

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296

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294 Penguin Pair Frank S. Finney (b. 1947) Pungo, VA, c. 1990

296 Great Horned Owl Flattie Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1980

Two seventeen-inch-high standing turned head penguins with etched carved eyes, separately carved inserted beaks, inletted legs, and applied carved wings. Original paint with wear including age lines and filler loss.

A seventeen-inch-high, one-and-one-half-inch-thick, life-size owl silhouette decoy on a seven-inch-high base. The decoy displays a carved beak along with wing and ear detail. The edges are rounded over with a rasp finish and the eyes are old brass twelve gauge shotgun shell ends. The maker’s incised signature is located on the lower back of the carving. Original condition with a couple tight age cracks.

$2,000 - $4,000 295 Emperor Penguin Frank S. Finney (b. 1947) Pungo, VA, c. 2000 A twenty-seven-inch-high hollow carving with scratch-detailed paint on the back. Signed on the bottom with the maker’s serifed “F”. Original condition. $3,000 - $4,000

provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$200 - $400 297 Rig of Three Curlews Ira Steve Skees (b. 1953) Onancock, VA, c. 2000 Three slightly over-sized hollow shorebird decoys with through splined bills, black glass eyes, and raised carved wings. Signed with the maker’s incised “I Skees” on the underside of each. Original condition with wear applied by the maker. provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$1,000 - $1,500 148

298

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298 Redfish Frank S. Finney (b. 1947) Pungo, VA, c. 1990

300 Cobb Style Black Duck Frank S. Finney (b. 1947) Pungo, VA, c. 1990

A thirty-and-one-half-inch-long, half-bodied red drum carving displaying carved eye along with mouth and gill detail. The body has incised scales and fins. The carving hangs from two pieces of antique chain. Original paint with a couple mars caused by the chain mounting. 240 $1,000 - $1,500

A hollow decoy carved in the 19th century style of Nathan Cobb, Jr. (1825-1905), displaying black glass eyes, an inset head, and rigging. Signed on the bottom with the maker’s incised “F”. Original condition with wear applied by the maker. provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$800 - $1,200

299 Carved Dog Head Frank S. Finney (b. 1947) Pungo, VA, c. 1990

301 Miniature Blue-Winged Teal Pair Frank S. Finney (b. 1947) Pungo, VA, c. 1990

A bust carving of a Labrador retriever that is six and one-half inches high and eight inches long. The maker’s incised “F” signature is on the bottom. Original paint with minimal wear and a couple dried sap bleed dots.

Two Stevens Brothers style decoys measuring six and one-half inches long. They exhibit glass eyes and carved bill detail. Signed “FF” by the maker on the underside of both tails. Original condition.

$500 - $800

$800 - $1,200

149

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303

304

305

302 Preening Black Duck Coastal Connecticut, c. 1860

304 Root Head Brant Waquoit, Cape Cod, MA, c. 1900

A very early hollow tack-eyed decoy with a turned head and a body displaying a knife carved finish. In early working paint with even gunning wear.

A high-head decoy from a rig of brant decoys that was discovered on the south coast of Cape Cod by Dr. George Ross Starr, Jr., who illustrated one example in his 1974 book, Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway. Two rigmates were lots 606 and 607 in the famous 1986 auction of Dr. Starr’s collection. Dr. Starr writes that the brant were used on Waquoit Bay around 1900. Traces of original paint, worn to the wood, gunning wear including age cracks.

$500 - $800 303 Bluebill Drake Charles Ralph Wells (1895-1979) Stratford, CT, c. 1910 A hollow full-bodied decoy with the strong early influence of Wells’ friend Charles “Shang” Wheeler (1872-1949). The maker’s “CRW” brand is on the bottom. A mixture of original and old in-use repaint with light gunning wear including a bill chip. Touchup to crack in bill. $300 - $500

literature:

George Ross Starr, Jr., M.D., Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway, New York, NY, 1974, p. 155, Figure 76, rigmate illustrated. $600 - $800 305 Bluebill Drake Roswell E. Bliss (1887-1967) Stratford, CT, c. 1930 A classic Stratford School decoy displaying glass eyes, incised bill detail, comb-painted vermiculation, slightly raised primaries, and its original rigging. Original paint with even gunning wear. $300 - $500

150

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306 Preening Black Duck Stratford, CT, c. 1860 The form of this bird is similar to the work of Albert D. Laing (1811-1886), a pioneer of the Stratford School of decoy carving. An exceptionally hollow decoy displaying subtle bill carving and a uniquely formed neck and head pattern, seen in the earliest Stratford, Connecticut decoys. The two-piece body has a carved shoulder groove designed to accommodate the neck and flows to a gently curved tail. Original paint with some working touch-up and light gunning wear. literature:

Richard A. Bourne, Jr. Waterfowl Decoys and Related Items, Hyannis, MA, June, 1998, p. 88, lot 522, exact decoy illustrated. $6,000 - $9,000

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307

308

309

310

307 Hollow Bluebill Drake Philip Marston Brasher (attr.) Brooklyn, NY, c. 1910

309 Canvasback Pair James R. Kelson (1888-1968) (attr.) Mt. Clemens, Michigan, c. 1950

An expertly crafted and extremely hollow decoy bearing the brand “P. Brasher” on the bottom.

A pair of balsa-bodied decoys with their original keels which have a near half circle lead weight incorporated into each of them. The pair display painted tack eyes, detailed bill carving, raised wings, and incised fanned-out tail carving. Original paint with gunning wear including some flaking.

Philip Brasher was an ornithologist, bird hunter, taxidermist, and builder of pond models. He spent his life sharing these interests with two of his sons, Philip and Rex. Rex is best known for painting a series of birds displayed in the book Birds and Trees of North America. Original paint with heavy gunning wear; a round inset weight is missing. $300 - $500 308 Bluebill Lake Superior, c. 1920 A glass-eyed decoy with carved bill detail, intricate painted feathering, and a conjoined “HB” brand on the bottom. In old paint with craquelure and a coat of old sealer; light gunning wear including a neck crack and a bill chip. provenance:

Joseph F. Sherer Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family to the current owner $400 - $600

152

$600 - $900 310 Canvasback Drake Jack Eppel (b. 1899) Peoria, IL, c. 1940 A high-head hollow decoy displaying glass eyes, a shelf tail, and an incised “A” rig mark on the underside. Old paint with a light wash of working repaint on the body and light gunning wear. $400 - $600

311

312

311 Long-Bodied Broadbill Hen Chauncey Wheeler (1888-1945) Alexandria Bay, NY, c. 1910

312 Important Canvasback Drake August Moak (1852-1942) Tustin, WI, c. 1910

An exceptional example by this maker, measuring almost seventeen inches from tip to tail. Dr. Starr wrote on the bottom “Chauncey Wheeler” and “BB-50”, his maker identification and collection inventory code. Also present is Starr’s small paper collection label and the “Starr Collection” shield-shaped ink stamp. The bottom is also stamped “J.J.F.” Original paint with light gunning wear including paint rubs and a slight neck seam separation.

A hollow hump-backed decoy painted in rarely found immature, emerging plumage. The animated swimming pose of this decoy elevates it to the best of Wisconsin folk art. Original paint with light even gunning wear and faint craquelure.

provenance:

George Ross Starr, Jr. M.D. Collection Private Collection, Midwest

literature:

Harold W. Reiser III, Chauncey Wheeler, Lewes, DE, 2002, p. 70, exact decoy illustrated. George Ross Starr, Jr. M.D., Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway, New York, NY, 1974, figure 120, p. 226, exact decoy illustrated. $6,000 - $9,000

provenance:

St. Valentine Rig Linda and Gene Kangas Collection Private Collection, Midwest

literature:

Gene and Linda Kangas, Decoys, Paducah, KY, 1992, plate 269, p. 158, exact decoy illustrated. Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, p. 226, similar decoy illustrated. Gene and Linda Kangas, Decoys, A North American Survey, Spanish Fork, UT, 1983, plate 337, p. 226, exact decoy illustrated. $8,000 - $12,000

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313

315

314

316

317

313 Wigeon Pair Joseph W. Lincoln (1859-1938) Accord, MA, c. 1920

315 Preening Black Duck Martin D. Collins (b. 1960) East Wareham, MA, c. 1990

A pair of widgeon decoys made by Lincoln for the Curtis Nye Smith and O. S. Leland rig. Gunned over at the Wasque Point Camp on Chappaquiddick Island, Martha’s Vineyard. They display traditional circular inset lead Vineyard weights and a “C. N. Smith” brand on the bottom. Original paint worn to the wood in places with heavy gunning wear. The drake has a broken bill and is missing an eye. The hen has an age crack along the bottom.

A hollow, turned-head black duck fashioned in the style of A. E. Crowell, displaying detailed bill, primary feather, and tail carving. The bottom of the decoy has the maker’s oval brand and Colburn C. Wood Jr. collection stamps. Original paint with minimal wear.

provenance:

From the Wasque Point Camp, Chappaquiddick Island, Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts C.N. Smith Rig By descent in the Leland Family $800 - $1,200 314 Goldeneye Hen Fred C. Nickerson (1902-1980) and Theodore Perry Lindberg (1912-2000) Monument Beach, MA, c. 1930

A painted-eye decoy displaying carved bill detail, raised wings, a paddle tail, and a keel. Fred Nickerson worked with Ted Lindberg at Bigelow’s Boat Yard (1899-present) on Cape Cod. They are known to have made decoys for their own rigs using Nickerson’s patterns. An excerpt from Lindberg’s obituary lists him as a boat builder and carpenter, eulogizing him as a founding member of the Monument Beach Sportsman’s Club, an avid hunter, fisherman, and decoy carver. Old, possibly original paint with gunning wear including in-use repaint to the breast, an old tail chip, and a repair to the neck. Two nail holes in head. $600 - $900 154

$200 - $300 316 Red-Breasted Merganser Drake Costal Maine, c. 1940 A traditional Down East sea duck decoy with an inletted neck seat and incised “HH” initials on the bottom. Old paint on the body with gunning wear. Replaced head with cracked bill. $150 - $250 317 Sleeping Old Squaw Nantucket, MA, c. 1920 A turned-head decoy with a tucked-under-the-wing bill. Professionally restored by Jamie Reason. $150 - $250

318

319

320

321

318 Red-Breasted Merganser Hen Martin D. Collins (b. 1960) East Wareham, MA, c. 1990

320 Bufflehead Drake Martin D. Colins (b. 1960) East Wareham, MA, c. 1980

A swimming merganser decoy displaying carved eyes, bill detail, a raised crest, and wings. Branded on the bottom by the maker “M. D. Collins”. Original condition.

A Cape Cod decoy exhibiting a slightly turned head with glass eyes, incised bill detail, raised wing and tail carving. The bottom has his oval maker’s brand. Original paint with faint age lines.

$250 - $350 319 Running Curlew Martin Hanson (b. 1965) Prior Lake, MN, c. 2000 This life-size shorebird decoy displays carved eyes, raised wings, a split tail, and the maker’s initials incised on the underside. Original condition with minimal wear. Bill tip reset. $800 - $1,200

$150 - $250 321 Canvasback Drake Paul Femia (b. 1956) Ashland, MA, c. 1970 A hollow decoy displaying glass eyes, detailed bill carving, raised wing and tail carving. The bottom has a brand of the maker’s conjoined initials “PF” in a “V” pattern. Original paint with even gunning wear. $150 - $250

155

322

322

322 White-Winged Scoter Martha’s Vineyard, MA, c. 1920 The only white-winged scoter known to have survived from the Tizzer rig. Scoter decoys were rarely made on the Vineyard. This tack-eye sea duck has many of the attributes of the area’s finest carvers. If Henry Keyes Chadwick (1865-1958) made a scoter, it would surely resemble the form and craftsmanship of this decoy. Original paint with white over-paint removed from speculums, light gunning wear, a couple tight age cracks, and the head is loose. provenance:

Tizzer Rig, Forge Pond, Assonet, Massachusetts

$6,000 - $9,000

One of two drake wood ducks from the Tizzer rig. This equally rare decoy features the same construction as lot 322.

157

323

323 Running Yellowlegs South Coastal, MA, c. 1910 The delicate ticked feathering along the breast and sides closely resembles the work of Massachusetts carver David Goodspeed from Duxbury. Fashioned with a baleen bill, this elegant yellowlegs was carved in a full running position. Dr. George Ross Starr, Jr. discusses the “forward look” of David Goodspeed’s (1862-1943) birds in his Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway. A merganser drake, lot 568, in The Rare Decoy Collection of George Ross Starr, Jr. M.D. appears to be carved by the same hand. The stippled paint along the back is similar to that seen on the work of Joseph Lincoln (1859-1938). Original paint with even gunning wear. provenance:

Private Collection

literature:

George Ross Starr, Jr., M.D., Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway, New York, NY, 1974, p. 81. Richard Bourne, The Rare Decoy Collection of George Ross Starr, Jr., M.D., Hyannis, MA, 1986, lot 568, related example illustrated. $6,000 - $9,000

324 Cross-Wing Black Duck A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1910

325 Willet Flattie A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1910

An early pre-brand decoy by this most famous Cape Cod carver. The decoy exhibits glass eyes, bill detail, crossed and raised wing tips, and layered tail feathers. A preening rigmate is featured in the photograph of Dr. George Ross Starr, opposite the decoy collector’s tribute page of the 1986 Bourne auction catalog; The Rare Collection of George Ross Starr, Jr. M.D. and is listed as lot 441 in that sale. In original paint with even gunning wear, a reset head, and professional restoration to an age crack along the back by Gigi Hopkins.

A life-size, three-quarters-of-an-inch-thick, tack-eye, silhouette decoy exhibiting the finest aspects of Crowell’s shorebird paint. In the early 1900s, Joseph F. Sherer hunted with A. Elmer Crowell and George Flynn, the largest landowner on Martha’s Vineyard, at the time. Bold original paint with minimal wear including a tight crack around neck, two small screw holes on one side from a wall mount, and some scratches that surround one of the holes.

provenance:

Private Collection, Duxbury, Massachusetts

literature:

Brian Cullity, The Songless Aviary: The World of A.E. Crowell & Son, Sandwich, MA, 1992, p. 63, similar decoys illustrated. Shirley and John Delph, New England Decoys, Exton, PA, 1990, p. 150, similar example illustrated. Richard Bourne, The Rare Decoy Collection of George Ross Starr, Jr., M.D., Hyannis, MA, 1986, lot 441, similar example illustrated. $6,000 - $9,000 158

provenance:

Joseph F. Sherer Collection, acquired directly from the artist Private Collection, by descent in the family to the current owner

literature:

Shirley and John Delph, New England Decoys, Exton, PA, 1990, p. 149, similar example illustrated. Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, p. 163, similar decoy illustrated. $2,000 - $3,000

324

325

159

326

326 Black-Bellied Plover Dr. Clarence T. Gardner (1844-1907) and Newton Dexter (d. 1901) Little Compton, RI, c. 1885 Painted in emerging or eclipse plumage, Gardner-Dexter shorebirds exhibiting this pattern are exceedingly rare. In the 1930s Frank D. Lisle purchased the summer home of Dr. Clarence Gardner. The summer home, built in 1883, was perfectly located on the productive shores of Sakonnet Point which was ideal for fishing and hunting. Soon after the purchase, Lisle discovered Gardner and Dexter’s rig of shorebirds in an out-building on the property. Newton Dexter was an excellent taxidermist and both gentlemen carved shorebirds while Dexter painted them. Information regarding this important rig was first published in 327

160

Hal Sorenson’s 1966-67 Decoy Collector’s Guide. Original paint with minimal gunning wear. Small hole in left shoulder. provenance:

Private Collection, Midwest

Robert Shaw, Call to the Sky: The Decoy Collection of James M. McCleery, M.D., Houston, TX, 1992, pp. 32-33, similar examples illustrated. Hal Sorenson ed., Decoy Collector’s Guide: 1966-67 Annual, Burlington, IA, pp. 63-67, similar examples illustrated.

literature:

$10,000 - $15,000

328

327 Peep with Wire Legs Nantucket, MA, c. 1920

238

329

A small sandpiper carving with shoe-button glass eyes, carved raised wings, and wire legs with sheet-lead feet. Original paint with wear, putty loss to thigh areas, and a replaced bill. provenance:

Private Collection, Nantucket, Massachusetts

$2,500 - $3,500 328 Running Yellowlegs Flattie Edward Franklin “Capt. Frank” Besse (1852-1934) Westport, MA, c. 1880 An early one-and-one-quarter-inch-thick, flat-sided, feeding shorebird decoy with black shoe-button eyes. Original paint with flaking and light gunning wear including a tight neck crack on one side, old in-use touch-up to the white underside, and some flaking. literature:

Bill LaPointe, “Capt. Frank Besse & Edward Gosling”, Decoy Magazine, Lewes, DE, March/April, 2010, p. 9, rigmate illustrated.

330

$1,000 - $1,500 239 329 Dunlin Cape Cod, MA, c. 1900 A rare species of shorebird decoy, once known as the red-backed sandpiper, with tack eyes and an alloy bill. The size, distinct bill shape, and paint also suggest that this could be an even rarer curlew sandpiper decoy. Previous to this bird’s discovery, only a handful of these alloy-billed shorebirds by this talented Cape Cod carver have surfaced. The tail retains a curved metal wire insert designed for stringing the decoy and for carrying it in the field. Original paint with an appealing, old second coat of white on the underside with gunning wear and age cracks to head and neck.

331

$2,000 - $3,000 330 Lesser Yellowlegs Coffin Family Nantucket, MA, c. 1900 A delicately carved, tack-eyed shorebird decoy with an applied head. In repaint with light wear and a professional bill replacement. $200 - $300

240

331 Yellowlegs Nantucket, MA, c. 1880 This carving shows similar characteristics to the carvings attributed to Captain James Wyer (1816-1899) of Nantucket, MA. A tack-eyed shorebird decoy showing expertly joined two-piece construction. In old, possibly original paint, with gunning wear, and touch-up around the replaced bill.

332

$600 - $900 332 Golden Plover Cape Cod, MA, c. 1880 A full-bodied shorebird decoy with hard wax eyes and nicely stippled feather paint. Original paint with heavy gunning wear including a tail chip and shot scars. $400 - $600 161

333

333 Golden Plover William Folger (1820-1895) (attr.) Nantucket, MA, c. 1850 An early, painted-eye shorebird decoy displaying classic split tail form and carved wings. The pattern of this plover, the depth of the split tail, and the incised wing cuts are closely linked to those seen in the famous Folger rig curlews (see lot 336). Original paint with light craquelure, light even gunning wear, and an old chip to tail. provenance:

Private Collection, Florida

$5,000 - $7,000

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334 (detail)

334 Important Canada Goose A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1920 An outstanding life-size goose decoy. The tack-eyed head has carved bill detail with strong rasped feathering along the back. The body is full and well-formed with an oval brand on the bottom.

provenance:

Dr. Joseph Sherer, Jr. and his father, Joseph F. Sherer, were avid sportsmen and their waterfront farm afforded them ample space for upland game, waterfowl shooting, and fishing. Dr. Sherer traveled the world on hunting and fishing expeditions and was a member of numerous sportsman’s organizations including the famous Laurel Brook Club.

literature: Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, p. 160, similar decoy illustrated. Shirley and John Delph, New England Decoys, Exton, PA, 1990, pp. 115 and 147, similar examples illustrated Brian Cullity, The Songless Aviary: The World of A.E. Crowell & Son, Sandwich, MA, 1992, p. 74, figure 31, similar bird illustrated.

In the early 1900s, Joseph F. Sherer hunted with A. Elmer Crowell and George Flynn, the largest landowner on Martha’s Vineyard at the time. In original paint with light wear, an original age crack along the bottom, fly specks, and minor filler loss at the neck seam.

334

Joseph F. Sherer Collection, acquired directly from the artist Private Collection, by descent in the family to the current owner

$10,000 - $15,000

335

335 Rigmate Yellowlegs Pair A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1910 A running greater yellowlegs and a sentinel lesser yellowlegs shorebird duo that were crafted at the same time. Their incredible near-mint condition suggests that they were never used in the field. In the early 1900s, Joseph F. Sherer hunted with A. Elmer Crowell and George Flynn, the largest landowner on Martha’s Vineyard at the time. This pair is from the same collection as the, then record setting, Crowell decorative running curlew sold by this firm as lot 198 in The Sporting Sale 2007. In original paint with minimal wear. provenance:

Joseph F. Sherer Collection, acquired directly from the artist Private Collection, by descent in the family to the current owner

Photograph by Stephen O’Brien, Jr.

literature: Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, pp. 162 and 163, similar decoys illustrated. Shirley and John Delph, New England Decoys, Exton, PA, 1990, pp. 143 and 153, similar examples illustrated. Adele Earnest, The Art of the Decoy, New York, NY, 1965, pp. 170 and 171, similar example illustrated. Brian Cullity, The Songless Aviary: The World of A. E. Crowell & Son, Sandwich, MA, 1992, p. 60, figures 5 and 6, similar birds illustrated.

$30,000 - $40,000 Photograph of the Sherer Family library showing lot 335 (top) and lot 212 (bottom).

165

336 Hollow Eskimo Curlew William Folger (1820-1895) Nantucket, MA, c. 1850 A hollow tack-eye shorebird decoy with incised wing definition and a split tail carving. In the early 1800s Nantucket Island was a stop-over for the seasonal migration of Eskimo curlew. The birds were so numerous that early gunners, with primitive black powder firearms, routinely brought down several with a single shot. Later in that century when the number of birds drastically declined, most hunters assumed their flight path had changed with the immense flocks veering further out to sea. The plump Eskimo curlew had been referred to as the “dough bird,” a staple of a coastal New Englander’s spring and fall diet. This decoy originated from the famous Folger rig which consisted of one dozen Eskimo curlew decoys. This rig is considered to be the most important of the species known to exist in addition to being an iconic part of Nantucket’s folk art history. As a testament to the craftsmanship of this hollow two-piece decoy, the body seam shows no separation. Outstanding original paint with light gunning wear. provenance:

Franklin Folger (1842-1923) Collection (son of William) Franklin Folger Webster, by descent in the family Donal C. O’Brien, Jr. Collection, acquired from the above Private Collection

literature: Robert Shaw, Call to the Sky. The Decoy Collection of James M. McCleery, M.D., Houston, TX, 1992, p. 13, rigmate illustrated. James Reginato, “Folk Art’s Old Guard”, Town & Country Magazine, January 1990, p. 161.

$30,000 - $50,000

336

337

337 Outstanding Curlew Nantucket, MA, c. 1880 An exceptional and bold two-piece shorebird decoy measuring over fifteen inches in length. This decoy is patterned with stippled feathering, probably executed with a piece of natural sponge, a material readily available to the seafaring community on Nantucket. The head rests in the body with a detachable mortis and tennon fit. This detachable construction, like the famous dovetailed shorebirds and geese, would help protect the bill and neck from breakage during transport. Original paint with even gunning wear. Replaced bill. Remnants of old glue in neck seat. literature: Paul A. Johnsgard, The Bird Decoy. An American Art Form, Lincoln, NE, 1976, p. 157, similar decoy illustrated. Richard A. Bourne Co. Inc., Rare American Decoys & Bird Carvings, Hyannis, MA, July 10-11, 1984, Lot 7X, exact bird illustrated.

$25,000 - $35,000

338

338 Canvasback Drake Ferdinand Bach (1888-1967) Detroit, MI, c. 1930 This content bird displays exceptional bill carving, extensive feather carving on the back and gently notched tail feather detail. This classic wide-body model is approximately nine inches wide. The bottom is incised with the maker’s stylized “F. Bach” signature. The underside of the decoy has “Ralph Loeff” written in faded ink. Ralph Loeff (1921-2002) was a founding member of the midwest Decoy Collectors Association and was an exhibitor at their first show with co-founders Willis Pennington and Hal Sorenson. Loeff was known for his generous 1976 gift of twenty-five outstanding decoys to the Art Institute of Chicago. The decoy is in excellent gunning paint with nice patina. Bach was know to keep the birds in his personal gunning rig meticulously painted and this decoy shows a second coat by the maker. provenance:

Ferdinand Bach rig Ralph Loeff Collection Private Collection

literature:

Donna Tonelli, Top of the Line Hunting Collectibles, Atglen, PA, 1998, p. 111, similar decoy illustrated. Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, p. 239, similar decoy illustrated. $6,000 - $8,000

168

339 Miniature Canada Goose A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1930

339

340

The carving displays warm patina and the maker’s rectangular stamp on the bottom. Original paint with a reset neck, and a bill chip. $800 - $1,200 340 Miniature Red-Breasted Merganser A. Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) East Harwich, MA, c. 1929 The carving displays warm patina and the maker’s rectangular stamp on the bottom. Original paint with an old bill repair. $800 - $1,200

341 Four Miniature Waterfowl Carvings James J. Ahearn New York, c. 1950

341

The mallard drake, blue-winged teal drake, and wood duck drake are by Ahearn and each is identified and signed by the maker on the bottom. The pair of Canada geese are similar in age and form, but are unsigned and most likely done by another carver. The four are in original paint with minor wear and foot damage. The wood duck has a missing bill tip. $300 - $400

342 Miniature Ring-Necked Duck & Two Duck Paperweights

342

A seven-inch-long miniature ring-necked duck decoy with a felt bottom. A three-inch-long miniature bronze canvasback decoy paperweight by Joel Barber (1876-1952) of Wilton, CT. A two-and-one-half-inch-long brass decoy paperweight. In original condition. $50 - $100

169

343

344

345

346

343 Ring-Necked Drake William Schultz (1923-1983) Milwaukee, WI, 1975

345 Redhead Drake Donal C. O’Brien, Jr. New Canaan, CT, 1967

A tucked-head decoy, inscribed, signed, and dated by the maker on the bottom. Original paint with minor sap bleed dots on right side.

A competition decoy displaying glass eyes, carved bill detail, fine comb-painted vermiculation, and carved primary and tail feathers. Faintly written on the underside, “H.M. Award 1967, International Decoy Contest, Davenport, Iowa. Donal C. O’Brien, Jr.” Original condition with the keel removed.

$1,000 - $2,000 344 Decorative Baikal Teal William J. Koelpin (1938-1996) Wauwatosa, WI, 1974 A life-size pair of standing baikal teal, these eastern Asian birds are popular with exotic fowl collectors. The pair are expertly carved and painted. Koelpin signed and dated each bird under its tail and the underside of the base. Original paint with minimal wear. $1,500 - $2,500

$500 - $700 346 Canvasback Drake Donal C. O’Brien, Jr. New Canaan, CT, 1967 A competition decoy displaying glass eyes, carved bill detail, combed vermiculation, carved speculum, and primaries and tail feathers. The underside has a faint dedication with the maker’s signature and “1967 World’s Championship Duck Decoy Contest” written on the underside. Original paint with patina, minimal wear, and sealer added to keel seam. $500 - $700

170

347

348

349

347 Curlew Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1985

349 Yellowlegs Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1975

A life-size roothead curlew exhibiting incised eyes, raised wings, and the maker’s incised signature. Original paint with a couple paint rubs on the head.

An early, McNair shorebird with combed feathering and a deeply incised signature on the underside. Original paint with minimal flaking.

$1,000 - $1,500

provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$600 - $900 348 Roothead Godwit Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1985

350 No Lot

A hollow fifteen-inch shorebird decoy with raised wings, carved eyes, and lightly applied gunning wear. “McNair” is incised on the underside of the bird. Original condition. provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$800 - $1,200

171

351

352

353

354

351 Ruddy Turnstone Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 2000

353 Ruddy Turnstone Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1990

A tack-eye shorebird decoy in breeding plumage featuring raised wings and a stringing hole through the tail. Signed on the underside. Original condition.

A life-size, tack-eye shorebird decoy with raised wings and the maker’s incised signature on the underside. Original condition.

$600 - $900 Δ

provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$600 - $900

352 Feeding Ruddy Turnstone Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1990

354 Black-Bellied Plover Mark S. McNair (b. 1950) Craddockville, VA, c. 1975

A feeding shorebird decoy in the Verity style with the maker’s incised signature on the underside. Original condition.

An early McNair shorebird with a deeply incised signature on the underside. Original condition with light gunning wear applied by the maker.

$400 - $600

provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$600 - $900

172

355

356

357

358

359

355 Peep Hurley Conklin (1913-1983) Manahawkin, NJ, c. 1970

357 Long-Billed Curlew William Gibian (b. 1946) Onancock, VA, c. 1980

A small seven-inch-long shorebird carving. Original paint with some staining on the underside.

A slightly over-sized carving displaying glass eyes, carved wing detail, and the maker’s early “WG” signature. In original paint with sealer, some flaking from sap bleeding, and wear from handling including a loose head.

provenance:

Malcolm Burnham Rowe Collection By descent in the family to the current owner $50 - $75 356 Three Factory Black Ducks Mason Decoy Factory (1896-1924) Detroit, MI, c. 1915 Lot of three Mason black ducks including all three grades: standard, challenge, and premier. As found condition. The challenge-grade bird was restored by Ray Schalk. $200 - $300

$400 - $600 358 Black Duck and Goldeneye Drake As found condition. $100 - $200 359 Hand-Trap Thrower Winchester-Western by Olin Industries East Alton, IL, c. 1950 A hand-held trap thrower by the Western-Winchester division of Olin Industries with a group of “White 137 Flyer” clay pigeons in its original cardboard shipping box. In original condition with wear from use. $100 - $200 173

360

360 Yellowlegs William Seneno (1896-1962) (attr.) Absecon, NJ, c. 1920 A lesser yellowlegs with carved eyes. Mix of original and working paint with a replaced bill. provenance:

Paul W. Masengarb Collection

$300 - $500

361

361 Early Shorebird Hosea Sprague (1779-1843) Hingham, MA, c. 1840 John P. Richardson (1935-2011), a life-long resident and local historian of Hingham, Massachusetts, carefully collected and documented thousands of items he received from the founding families of the Hingham and Accord area. His recent passing has brought these objects to light. He collected this shorebird in 1968 from the Mason Foley family who acquired the decoy from the George Lincoln Collection. The decoy appears to have been carved without a bill, is simply painted with heavily leaded paints and the stick is fixed into its hole. Original paint with light gunning wear. provenance:

George Lincoln Collection Mason Foley Collection John P. Richardson Collection Private Collection $100 - $200

362

362 Black-Bellied Plover Possibly the work of Levi Rhodes Truex (1860-1934) Atlantic City, NJ A glass-eyed shorebird decoy. Original paint with light wear including a small tail chip. $200 - $400

174

Index Goodwin, Richard La Barre: 116

Adams, Ansel: 38 Adamson, Harry Curieux: 29, 31

Crowell, A. Elmer: 212- 20, 324, 325, 334, 335, 339, 340

Gosling, Edward P.: 224

Ahearn, James J.: 288, 341

Cruwys, Roger S.: 30

Graves, Bert: 249

Audubon, John James: 32, 33, 36

Currier & Ives: 172

H.L. Leonard Rod Company: 76

Audubon, John Woodhouse: 34

Currier, Jim: 255

Hagerbaumer, David: 17-20, 170

Bach, Ferdinand: 338

Daly, Thomas A.: 114, 115

Hammarstrom, William: 237

Baggs, Sr., Vernon: 84

de Grandmaison, Orestes Nicholas: 40-41

Hanson, Martin: 319

Barber, Joel: 342 Benson, Frank W.: 58, 138-47, 163 Besse, Capt. Edward Franklin: 328 Binks, R. Ward: 120 Bishop, Richard E.: 1-8, 162, 168 Bliss, Roswell E.: 305 Borrett, Michael: 286 Bowen, John Winfield: 239 Bowman, William or Bunn, Charles Sumner: 211

English, John: 229, 230 Eppel, Jack: 310 Ettinger, Churchill: 148-151, 164 Femia, Paul: 321 Fernlund, Ivar G.: 269, 270 Finney, Frank S.: 294, 295, 298-01 Fistrub: 121 Fitzpatrick, Thomas: 234 Flanigan, William: 85

Brasher, Philip Marston: 307

Flint, Ralph: 178

Bryan, Alden: 136

Folger, William: 333, 336

Buchman, Alton Chub: 87

Fornasetti, Piero: 123

Bunn, Charles Sumner or William Bowman: 211

Fraser, J.E.: 46

Cahoon, Ralph: 101 Chosa, Ben: 86 Christiansen, Carl: 82, 88

Frazier, Luke: 24 Frisino, Louis: 134 Frost, Arthur Burdett: 160

Clark, Roland: 166, 167, 169

Gardner, Dr. Clarence T. and Newton Dexter: 326

Coffin Family: 330

Gelston, Thomas: 204

Colins, Martin D.: 315, 318, 320

Gibian, William: 357

Comolera, Paul: 131, 131a

Giffin, Andrew: 113

Conklin, Hurley: 355

Goodwin, Philip R.: 47

176

Hardy Bros. Ltd.: 75, 77 Harper, James F.: 271 Harrison, John C.: 26 Hart, Charles: 184-88 Heverin, William: 256 Higginson, M. B.: 25 Hill, Howard: 118 Horn, Dan: 227 Horn, John: 207 Hotze, Hiram Hy�: 244, 246 Hubley Manufacturing Company: 132 Hudson, Ira D.: 265, 266, 268 Hunt, Lynn Bogue: 21-23, 133 Hutchinson, John: 176 Irvine, Lawrence: 68-73 Jester, Charles E.: 267 Kay, William F.M.: 39 Kelson, James R.: 309 Kelton, Elmer: 177 Kemp, Oliver: 48 Kirby, Ken: 189, 193-98 Kirby, Nathaniel: 190-92

Koelpin, William J.: 44, 59-61, 344

Peterson, Ernest A.: 92, 93a

Tait, Arthur Fitzwilliam: 37

Kunstabteilung, Hutschenreuther: 128

Peterson, Oscar W.: 200

Tanner, Tim: 49

Landseer, Sir Edwin: 171

Piscatori, Robert: 175

The Kissich Company: 79

Leeds, Daniel Lake: 233

Pleissner, Ogden M.: 152-59

Tice, Charles: 123a

Leighton, Scott: 119

Pope, Jr., Alexander: 56, 122, 161

Truex, Levi Rhodes: 362

Lincoln, Joseph W.: 313

Porcelain, Boehm: 126

Tyler, Lloyd J.: 254

Lindberg, Theodore Perry: 314

Reece, Maynard: 27, 28

Verity, Obediah: 209, 210

LogĂŠ, Daniel: 135

Reinbold, George W.: 287

Vom Hofe, Edward: 78

Lorenz, Willi (Wilhelm): 117

Reneson, Chet: 14, 15

Voorhees, Clark: 180-83

Loveland, John E.: 228

Rhodes, David: 293

Wallace, Gilbert E.: 221

Maass, David: 9

Ripley, Aiden Lassell: 10, 111, 165, 173, 174

Walley, William J.: 67

Mackey, Jr., William J.: 179

Roberts: 63, 64

Malloch, Peter Duncan: 66

Rose, Jerry: 137

Ward, Lemuel T. and Stephen: 258, 260, 261, 263, 264

Mason Decoy Factory: 206, 250, 251, 356

Rosseau, Percival Leonard: 35

Mcaleb, Fred: 16

Rungius, Carl Clemens Moritz: 42, 43

McNair, Ian: 285

Schoenheider, Sr., Charles S.: 245, 247, 248

McNair, Mark S.: 273-84, 296, 347-49, 351-54

Weiler, Milton C.: 11-13 Wells, Charles Ralph: 303 Wheeler, Chauncey: 199, 311 Whorf, John: 51-5

Schultz, William: 343

Wickey, Harry H.: 57

Mercer, Galen: 62

Seneno, William: 360

Wildfowler Decoys: 289

Mitchell, R. Madison: 257

Shourds, Harry V.: 236, 240-43

Wilson, Augustus Aaron: 201

Moak, August: 312

Skees, Ira Steve: 297

Winchester-Western: 359

Morey, Steve: 291

Smith, Brett J.: 50, 109, 110

Wolton, Alan: 45

Morton, W. S.: 225

Sprague, Hosea: 361

Zandt, Clifford Van: 231

Nickerson, Fred C.: 314

Sterling, Lloyd: 259

O’Brien, Jr., Donal C.: 345, 346

Stidham, Mike: 112

177

Bibliography Ansel Adams: A Documentary Film, Dir. Ric Burns, American Experience. PBS, 2002. Film.

Engers, Joe, ed. The Great Book of Wildfowl Decoys. San Diego, CA: Thunder Bay Press, Inc., 1990.

Baldwin, Richard P. The Verity Family of Long Island, New York. Southold, NY: Richard P. Baldwin, 2000.

Fink, Russell A. Richard E. Bishop: Etchings, Drypoints, and Aquatints. St. Paul, MN: Brown and Bigelow, 2008.

Bergh, Peter. The Art of Ogden M. Pleissner. Boston, MA: David R. Godine, 1984.

Fleckenstein, Jr., Henry A. New Jersey Decoys. Exton, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 1983.

Berkey, Barry R. and Velma A. Chincoteague Carvers and Their Decoys. Gettysburg, PA: Herff Jones University Publications, 1981.

Fleckenstein, Jr., Henry A. Shore Bird Decoys. Exton, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 1980.

Bourne Co. Inc., Richard A. Rare American Decoys and Bird Carvings. Hyannis, MA: Richard A. Bourne Inc., 1985.

Fleckenstein, Jr., Henry A. Southern Decoys of Virginia and the Carolinas. Exton, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 1983.

Bourne Co. Inc., Richard A. Waterfowl Decoys and Related Items. Hyannis, MA: Richard A. Bourne Inc., 1998.

Fleming, Malcolm J. One Man’s Mergansers. Burlington, IA: Decoy Collector’s Guide, 1965.

Brisco, R. Paul. Waterfowl Decoys of Southwest Ontario and the Men Who Made Them. Erin, ON: Boston Mills Press, 1986.

Gard, Ronald J. and Brian J. McGrath. Ward Brothers’ Decoys: A Collector’s Guide. Wolf City, TX: Henington Publishing Co., 1989.

Byrd, Dr. Cynthia. The Decoys of Long Island. Water Mill, NY: Long Island Decoy Collectors Association, 2010.

Gates, Bernie. Ontario Decoys. Kingston, ON: Upper Canadian, 1982.

Cheever, Byron. Mason Decoys. Spanish Fork, UT: Hillcrest Publications, Inc., 1974.

Goldberger, Russ J. and Alan G. Haid. Mason Decoys: A Complete Pictorial Guide. Lewes, DE: Decoy Magazine, 2003.

Colio, Quintina. American Decoys. Ephrata, PA: Science Press, 1972.

Guyette & Schmidt Inc. The Hillman Collection: Rare Antique Waterfowl Decoys. West Farmington, ME: Guyette & Schmidt, Inc., 1996.

Connett, Eugene V. ed. Duck Shooting Along the Atlantic Tidewater. New York, NY: William Morrow & Company, 1947.

Haid, Alan. Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway. Exton, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 1981.

Copley Fine Art Auctions, The Sporting Sale 2006, Boston, MA: Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC, 2006.

Inman, Diane K. From Marsh to Mountain: The Art of Harry Curieux Adamson. San Francisco, CA: Di Les Books, 1999.

Crandell, Bernard W. Decoying: The St. Clair to the St. Lawrence. Erin, ON: Boston Mills Press, 1988.

Johnsgard, Paul A. The Bird Decoy: An American Art Form. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 1976.

Cullity, Brian. The Songless Aviary: The World of A.E. Crowell & Son. Sandwich, MA: Heritage Plantation, 1992.

Kangas, Gene and Linda. Decoys. Paducah, KY: Collector Books, 1992.

Delph, John and Shirley. New England Decoy. Exton, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 1990.

Kangas, Gene and Linda. Decoys: A North American Survey. Spanish Fork, UT: Hillcrest Publication, Inc., 1983.

Doherty, James R. Classic New Jersey Decoys. Louisville, KY: 2001.

Kangas, Gene. Gus Wilson, Folk Artist. Lewes, DE: Decoy Magazine, November/December, 1994.

Earnest, Adele. The Art of the Decoy: American Bird Carvings. New York, NY: Bramhall House, 1965.

LaPointe, Bill. Capt. Frank Besse & Edward Gosling. Lewes, DE: Decoy Magazine, March/April, 2010.

Eaton, Allen H. Handicrafts of New England. New York, NY: Harper, 1949.

Linchorst, Allen. The Hammerstroms of Waretown. Lewes, DE: Decoy Magazine, May/June 2012.

Ellis, Joseph H. Birds in Wood and Paint: American Miniature Bird Carvings and their Carvers, 1900-1970. Lebanon, NH: University Press of New England, 2009.

Lowe, Bruce. Carter Smith: The First Southern Decoy Collector. Lewes, DE: Decoy Magazine, May/June 2012.

178

Mackey, Jr., William. American Bird Decoys. New York, NY: E.P. Dutton & Co., Inc., 1965.

Shaw, Robert. Call to the Sky: The Decoy Collection of James M. McCleery, M.D. Houston, TX: Gulf Publishing Co., 1992.

McKinney, J. Evans. Decoys of the Susquehanna Flats and their Makers. Ocean City, MD: The Holly Press, 1978.

Sorenson, Harold. Decoy Collector’s Guide. Burlington, IA: Harold Sorenson, 1967.

O’Brien Jr., Stephen B. and Julie Carlson. Masterworks of the Illinois River. Boston, MA: Stephen O’Brien Jr. Fine Arts, LLC, 2005.

Sorenson, Harold. Decoy Collector’s Guide. Burlington, IA: Harold Sorenson, 1977.

Ordeman, John T. and M.C. Weiler, Jr. The Art of Milton C. Weiler. Hilton Head Island, SC: Lydia Inglett Publishing Ltd., 2011.

Sotheby’s and Guyette & Schmidt. American Waterfowl Decoys: The Distinguished Collection of Dr. James M. McCleery. New York, January 22, 2000. New York, NY: Sotheby’s, 2000.

Parmalee, Paul W. and Forrest D. Loomis. Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University Press, 1969. Peterson, Larry Len. Philip R. Goodwin: America’s Sporting & Wildlife Artist. Hayden, ID: Mountain Press Publishing Company, 2001. Reginato, James. Folk Art’s Old Guard. Town & Country Magazine, January 1990. Reiser, III Harold W. Chauncey Wheeler. Lewes, DE: Decoy Magazine, 2002. Ripley, A. Lassell and Dana S. Lamb. Sporting Etchings. Barre, MA: Barre Publishers, 1970. Roland Clark’s Etchings. New York, NY: Derrydale Press, 1938.

Stansbury, Henry H. Ira D. Hudson and Family, Chincoteague Carvers. Lewes, DE: Decoy Magazine, 2002. Stansbury, Henry H. Lloyd J. Tyler. Burtonsville, MD: Decoy Magazine, 1995. Starr, Jr., M.D., George Ross. Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway. New York, NY: Winchester Press, 1974. Swanson, Ronald S. Fish Models, Plaques & Effigies: Piscine Sporting Art. Far Hills, NJ: Meadow Run Press, 2009. The Crossroads of Sport, Inc. New York, NY: 1977-78. Tonelli, Donna. Top of the Line Hunting and Fishing Collectibles. Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 1998.

Saturday Evening Post. June, 1909. Waingrow, Jeff. American Waterfowl Decoys. New York, NY: 1985. Scribners. October, 1911. Shaw, Robert. Bird Decoys of North America. New York, NY: Sterling, 2010.

179

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Terms and Conditions of Sale 1 Your bidding on items indicates your acceptance of the following Terms and Conditions of Sale by Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC. These terms are subject to amendment before or during the sale. Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC operates as an agent of the seller only, and is not responsible in any way in the event the seller or buyer fails to fulfill their respective agreements. In all instances the auctioneer’s interpretation of these conditions is final and binding on all bidders. 2 All bids are per lot as numbered in the catalog unless otherwise announced by the auctioneer. The sales price shall consist of the final bid price plus the buyer’s premium, plus any applicable sales tax. A buyer’s premium of 15% (18% for online bidding) of the final bid price up to and including $1,000,000, plus 10% of the final bid price over $1,000,000, will be applied to each lot sold, to be paid by the buyer as part of the purchase price. 3 All goods are sold “as is” and all sales are final with no exchanges or refunds. Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC and its consignors make no representations or warranties as to merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, the correctness of the catalog or other description of physical condition, quality, size, medium, importance, rarity, provenance or historical relevance of any property, and no statement made at the sale, or in the bill of sale, or invoice, or elsewhere shall be deemed such a warranty or representation or an assumption of liability. The purchaser assumes complete responsibility for items at the fall of the hammer. 4 Condition reports are not included in this catalog. It is the responsibility of prospective bidders to examine lots and decide their level of interest. Neither the auctioneer, Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC, nor the consignor, is responsible for the accuracy of any printed or verbal descriptions. Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC strongly encourages clients to attend our previews and auctions so as to best determine condition of lots. If you require absolute certainty in all areas of authenticity, and the results of your evaluation leave uncertainty in your mind, we recommend you not bid on the item in question. Due to the high volume of condition requests, Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC reserves the right to reject requests at its sole discretion. All weights and measurements are approximate.

11 Bidding increments will normally follow the pattern below, but may vary at the sole discretion of the auctioneer: Estimate Increment To 999.99 50 1,000 – 2,499.99 100 2,500 – 4,999.99 250 5,000 – 9,999.99 500 10,000 – 24,999.99 1,000 25,000 – 49,999.99 2,500 50,000 – 99,999.99 5,000 Over 100,000 at auctioneers discretion 12 Successful bidders are to pay for their purchases during or immediately after the sale or upon receipt of an invoice, unless other arrangements have been authorized in writing by the auction house. Payment may be made by cash or good check payable to Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC. The auction house reserves the right to hold property until checks clear. A monthly service charge of 1.5% will be added to unpaid balances beginning 30 days after the sale date. A $50.00 fee will be added for returned checks. If a check fails to clear after the second deposit, the purchaser will be held responsible for any and all fees incurred until we have collected good funds. Purchases picked up at the auction will be subject to the New York State and local tax of 8.875%. Buyers claiming exemption from sales tax must have the appropriate documentation on file with Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC prior to the release of property. Purchases delivered to New York after the auction will be subject to the applicable New York state and local taxes and purchases picked up or delivered to Massachusetts after the sale will be subject to the 6.25% Massachusetts Sales Tax unless exempted by applicable law.

5 If you are bidding as an agent for another individual or company, and you execute a bid on behalf of someone else under your bidder number, then you are responsible for the settlement of that account.

13 If the purchaser breaches any of its obligations under these Conditions of Sale, including its obligation to pay in full the purchase price of all items for which it was the highest successful bidder, Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC may exercise all of its rights and remedies under the law including, without limitation, (a) canceling the sale, and applying any payments made by the purchaser to the damages caused by the purchaser’s breach, and/or (b) offering at public auction, without reserve, any lot or item for which the purchaser has failed to pay in full the purchase price, holding the purchaser liable for any deficiency plus all costs of sale.

6 Absentee and telephone bids will be executed when possible as a convenience to customers: the auction house will not be held responsible for any errors or failures to accurately execute bids. If bids for identical amounts are submitted for the same lot and are the highest bids of the auction, the property will be sold to the person whose written bid was received and accepted first. All absentee and telephone bids must be received no later than 5 pm EST, Saturday, January 19, 2013.

14 Buyers wishing to pick up items at the sale must do so by 6 pm EST, Monday, January 21, 2013. All internet bidders wishing to pick up items at the sale must notify Copley before 6 pm EST, Monday, January, 21 2013. Buyers wishing to pick up items after the auction may do so only by appointment after January 30, 2013 and as per schedule announced by the auction house at the conclusion of the sale. We kindly ask that all items be removed from our warehouse within 30 days of auction end to avoid a $5 daily storage fee.

7 Unless indicated by a box ( ), all lots in this sale are offered subject to a reserve. This is a confidential figure set by the consignor and the auction house below which a lot will not be sold. The reserve will not exceed the low estimate, and the auction house will execute the reserve bids by bidding for the consignor. If any lots in the catalog are offered without a reserve, such lots will be designated by a ( ). Estimates are subject to change at any time prior to the offering of each lot.

15 Shipping is the responsibility of the buyer. Once your payment has cleared and we have received a signed Shipping Release Form, items will be released for shipment. Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC shall have no liability for any loss or damage to such items. Buyers should allow up to four weeks for shipment.

8 Lots with a (∆) symbol indicate that Stephen O’Brien Fine Arts, LLC and/ or Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC owns the lot in whole or in part or has an economic interest in the lot equivalent to an ownership interest. 9 The auctioneer reserves the right to reject any bid that, in his opinion, is not commensurate with the value of the lot. The auctioneer has the sole right to re-offer a lot and/or settle disputed bids. The record of sale kept by the auction house will be taken as final in the event of dispute. Additionally, items may be withdrawn at any time prior to the offering of each lot.

16 Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC is the owner of the images of each lot offered for sale, and may use such images at any time at its sole discretion for advertising, publicity, and for archival purposes. 17 In no event will the liability of Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC to any purchaser with respect to any item exceed the purchase price actually paid by such purchaser for such item. 18 Any legal disputes arising from this auction shall be governed by and constructed and enforced in accordance with the laws of the State of New York. The buyer and any agent for the buyer shall be deemed to have consented to the jurisdiction of the state courts of, and the federal courts sitting in, the Stet of New York.

10 Some property sold at auction can be subject to laws governing export from the United States, such as items that include material from some endangered species. Import restrictions from foreign countries are subject to these same governing laws. Granting of licensing for import or export of goods from local authorities is the sole responsibility of the buyer. Denial or delay of licensing will not constitute delay or cancellation in payment for the total purchase price of these lots.

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268 Newbury Street | Boston, Massachusetts 02116 | 617.536.0030 | copleyart.com

Out-of-State Delivery and Authorized Shipping Release Form Copley Fine Art Auctions | 268 Newbury Street | Boston, Massachusetts 02116 Tel: 617.536.0030 | Fax: 617.266.4896 | info@copleyart.com | copleyart.com If Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC (Copley) is required to deliver the items to a purchaser outside of Massachusetts the sale is exempt from Massachusetts Sales Tax under MGLA 64H ยง6(b) .

1. Copley is obligated to deliver the items out of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 2. Copley is obligated to deliver the items to an interstate carrier as noted below. 3. Title will pass upon delivery to the out of state destination. 4. Please be aware that packing and the payment for shipping is the responsibility of the successful Buyer. Upon making the item(s) available for shipping to the Buyer or its Agent, Buyer shall be responsible for the care and packaging of the item(s). The Buyer shall bear the risk of loss from and after Copley making available such item(s) to the interstate carrier, including the insurance of the item(s) against all risks of loss including without limitation, fire, theft or any other damage to the items(s). 5. At your option, you may contact one of the interstate carriers listed below, or one of your choosing to arrange for shipping. Carriers pick up frequently at our offices. SHIPPING OPTIONS: The UPS Store: 781.224.2500 or email store4423@theupsstore.com Boston Pack and Ship: 781.986.6500 or 1.800.400.7284 U.S. Art: 781.986.6500 or 1.800.872.7826 6. Item(s) will not be released without a signed authorization form from the invoiced buyer. You may include this form with your payment or fax it to 617.266.4896. 7. Payments of cash, check or bank transfer must be posted to your account before property is released. 8. Shipping can take up to four weeks and is processed in order in which payment is received. Print name: (as invoiced)

Place and Manner of Delivery: To an interstate Common Carrier for delivery out of state:

Address of Buyer:

I authorize: to pick up my item(s) (Please specify Name of Common Carrier)

Phone:

Lot #s:

Sale Date:

Email: Signature: (required)

Internal use only Received by: Signature

Print Name

Date 183

The Sporting Sale 2013 JULY | PLYMOUTH, MA Now accepting consignments Copley Fine Art Auctions is pleased to announce our upcoming Sporting Sale 2013 featuring paintings, prints, decoys, and American folk art

COPLEY FINE ART AUCTIONS INFORMATION & CATALOG CONSIGNMENTS 268 Newbury Street Aimee Stashak-Moore Stephen O’Brien, Jr. Boston, MA 02116 617.536.0030 617.536.0030 aimee@copleyart.com info@copleyart.com copleyart.com

formerly Mass Audubon Visual Arts Center

M u s e u m o f A m e r i ca n B i rd A rt at Mass Audubon

Only Owls

January 27-April 21, 2013 / Tuesday-Sunday, 1-5pm 963 Washington Street Canton, MA 02021 massaudubon.org/maba 781-821-8853 maba@massaudubon.org p

p

This exhibition was organized by the Woodson Art Museum, with additional artworks from the Mass Audubon Collection. Clockwise from top left: Burrowing Owl by George M. Sutton, watercolor,1936, Mass Audubon Collection; Concentrate by Cary Hunkel, watercolor and graphite, 2005,Woodson Art Museum Collection; Little Owl by Andrea Rich, woodcut, 1987,Woodson Art 185 Museum Collection; High Ground by Robert Verity Clem, watercolor, 1989, Mass Audubon Collection.

© Keno Auctions, Inc. 2013 Principal Auctioneer Leigh Keno 1377646

Anish Kapoor (Indian, b. 1954), Untitled, 1993, Sandstone sculpture H. 52 in.; W. 31⅞ in.; D. 42⅛ in. Estimate $150,000 - 250,000

INVITATION TO CONSIGN We are currently accepting property for our June 11, 2013 IMPRESSIONIST, MODERN & CONTEMPORARY ART SALE

Property accepted from March 22 to April 1 I N Q U I R I E S : +1 212 734 2381 Leigh@kenoauctions.com Fineart@kenoauctions.com

CATALOGUES: +1 212 734 2381 Catalogues@kenoauctions.com

View catalogues and leave bids online at Kenoauctions.com

QLF

Q U E B E C- L A B R A D O R F O U N DAT I O N

ATLANTIC CENTER FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

QLF exists to support the rural communities and environment of eastern Canada and New England and to create models for stewardship of natural resources and cultural heritage that can be applied worldwide.

Caribou, Long Range Mountains, Western Newfoundland

FOR OVER HALF A CENTURY, the Quebec-Labrador Foundation (QLF) has been defined through its unique approach of working across borders. In the early days of the organization, those borders were geographic — state, provincial, and U.S./Canada. In recent years, the regional model in North America is now shared with places as diverse as Latin America and the Middle East. QLF is distinguished by its emphasis on connecting environmental problem-solving with associated needs of culture and community. Environmental issues cannot be addressed without making sure that solutions include people. QLF has always promoted the potential of individual initiative and leadership — that one person can make a difference. For example, QLF taps the energy and commitment of high school Volunteers, university Interns, and young professionals worldwide to provide experiential training opportunities for the next generation of leaders. QLF Alumni number several thousand. Quebec-Labrador Foundation

55 South Main Street Ipswich, Massachusetts 01938 U.S.A. For more information, visit www.QLF.org

978.356.0038

Soaring, 1942 tempura ŠAndrew Wyeth. Collection of Shelburne Museum.

Wyeth Vertigo Extreme perspectives, unconventional angles, and powerful narratives in 40 works by N.C. Wyeth, Andrew Wyeth and Jamie Wyeth, three generations of one of the most influential families in modern American art. June 22 -October 27.

presented by:

major support is from:

additional support:

The Wyeth Foundation for American Art The Robert Lehman Foundation

Where you sh, Boneesh & Tarpon Trust is at work. Conserving habitat and protecting sheries is what we’re all about, so please join our network of anglers and sportsmen just like you. Make a donation to Nurture Belize or any of these programs and become a Boneesh & Tarpon Trust member.

Nurture Belize – protecting shing areas from development and destruction Florida Keys – working with guides/anglers to protect and improve sheries for the future Bahamas – ats and mangrove conservation Project Permit – population study, what, when, and how they tick Boca Grande, Florida – juvenile tarpon habitat restoration To donate, join, learn more about us, or identify a project you’d like to be involved in, visit us on the web at www.boneeshtarpontrust.org or email us at info@tarbone.org.

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Order Now!

by James R. Doherty • Featuring New Jersey’s finest coastal decoys in original paint • 216 pages with 426 color photographs • Accurate decoy maker identification • 1000 numbered First Edition copies

To Order: Send a check payable to Jim Doherty in the amount of $66.00 for each book ordered. Mail to: Weber Display & Packaging Attn: Jim Doherty 3500 Richmond Street Philadelphia PA 19134

The Art Of Aiden Lassell Ripley: Deluxe Edition This meticulously hand crafted leather-bound and gilt edition is the perfect gift for the art collector, bird-lover, hunter, or fisherman. To order, please contact Nancy@copleyart.com or call 617.536.0536 Limited to 350 copies APPRAISALS • AUCTION REPRESENTATION • BROKERAGE • COLLECTIONS MANAGEMENT

268 Newbury Street • Boston, MA 02116 • 617.536.0536 • copleyart.com

The most comprehensive book to date on the artist, chronicling paintings from his early collection of work, illustrations and murals, landscapes and cityscapes, scenes of the south and his well-known sporting art. The 230 page book includes over 200 color images. Limited to 1000 copies, the trade edition is $75. To order, please contact Nancy@copleyart.com or call 617.536.0536.

Notes

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COPLEY FINE ART AUCTIONS 268 Newbury Street | Boston, Massachusetts 02116 | 617.536.0030


Winter Sale Catalog 2013