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SOUTH METRO MARCH 7, 2013 ARAPAHOE COUNTY | DOUGLAS COUNTY | ELBERT COUNTY

2 Senior LIVING • South Metro

Douglas County seniors on the rise Services reflect sharp increase in numbers By Rhonda Moore rmoore@ourcoloradonews.com

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ouglas County’s future is reflected in the county’s 2012 demographic summary, which highlights what county officials have long known: Senior concerns are on the rise. The county reported its senior population rose 177.8 percent between 2000 and 2010, making area seniors age 65 and older 7.1 percent of the county’s population. If the trend continues, Douglas County’s seniors by the year 2030 will comprise 20 percent of the county’s total forecasted population, according to the county’s demographic research. With numbers like that, commission-

ers know they need to raise the bar for the county’s senior residents. Commissioner spokesman Jack Hilbert is secretary for the Denver Regional Council of Governments board and knows firsthand that the numbers speak volumes. DRCOG runs an agency on aging that reported Douglas County ranks as the fastest-aging county in the DRCOG region. The senior population in the county has doubled since 2005 and, by 2015, is expected to double again, Hilbert said. “We know we have got to get a handle on senior services provided in the county,” Hilbert said. “We provide support to variety of advocacy groups who also provide senior services.” The county aims to assist seniors applying for first-time services and government assistance, protect the aging population and shift resources within the county, Hilbert said. Among the greatest challenges facing Douglas County seniors are transportation

March 7, 2013

DOUGLAS COUNTY’S SENIOR SERVICES Human services department: adult protection services; eligibility to resources including old age pension, Medicaid and Medicare savings programs, long term care, low income energy assistance programs, food assistance, grandparent support, emergency and burial assistance. Community planning and sustainable development department: transportation services; emergency assistance; rent assistance to avoid eviction; utility assistance to avoid service interruption; resource coordination; information and referral services; Neighbor Network Program assisting home-bound elderly and adults with disabilities; education opportunities. For more information about the county’s senior services visit www.douglas.co.us/humanservices/senior-services/. Source: Douglas County government services; standard assistance for long-term care, food and veteran services; and senior housing. While the county doesn’t expect to provide senior housing, it could offer incentives to bolster the senior housing options throughout the county, Hilbert said. Seniors of today might not envision the senior living facilities of yesterday, but have an interest in downsizing in proximity to their family members, he said. “One of the things we are having as an issue with right now is what is our policy

regarding (incentives),” Hilbert said. “We want to make this as easy as we can. Senior housing is going to be a huge issue. We need to start thinking about things like patio homes, mixed-use residences. We don’t have a lot of that product out here. “We need to help our seniors because it’s a matter of helping our community. It’s not about helping developers make money, it’s about helping our families stay together. We need it here so we don’t have to move them miles and miles away due to financial, physical, aging considerations.”

Parker Senior Center a hub of activity Nonprofit offers shuttle, meals and plenty of fun

By Chris Michlewicz cmichlewicz@ourcoloradonews.com

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ai chi. Line dancing. An enchanting evening at the theater. Vacations to Niagara Falls, Savannah, Ga., and Cape Cod. It sounds like a chapter from the life of an energetic, jet-setting couple. Then, you throw in bingo nights, pancake breakfasts, movie nights and endless card games and get a more well-rounded

PARKER SENIOR CENTER 303-841-5370, 10675 Longs Way Members: 547 Membership cost: $24 per year Activities: pancake breakfasts, line dancing classes, movie night, trips to Blackhawk, computer classes, annual vacations, nights at the theater, tai chi, card games, exercise classes. view of the Parker Senior Center. It is, in fact, fun among friends that keeps the 547-member group thriving. “It’s a real happy place. People love it here once they get started,” said Jan Dengal, center manager. “We’re pretty much full of people with daytime activities.” Combine that social interac-

tion and laughter with senior life essentials — reliable transportation, well-balanced meals, health screenings, estate preparations — and the result is an all-inclusive, centralized point of sustenance, all for a paltry $24 per year. Despite the fact that the Parker Senior Center operates at full capacity and relies largely on grants and donations to fund operations, it continues to invite older residents to join, especially shutins who have no access to nutritious meals. “We’ve done a lot of advertising with brochures and newsletters,” Dengal said. “We’re overcrowded, but we manage. We just Center continues on Page 7

A group of seniors play cards at the Parker Senior Center on Longs Way Feb. 22. The senior center has 547 members and continues to grow at a rapid pace. Photo by Chris Michlewicz

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March 7, 2013

South Metro •

Seniors rule in Castle Rock Programs abound at popular center By Rhonda Moore rmoore@ourcoloradonews.com

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ontrary to conventional wisdom, the Castle Rock Senior Center is no place for a leisurely lifestyle. The senior center e formed in 1971 as a senior citizen r club and has grown to a nonprofit e ewith nearly 1,000 members. Situated ein the town’s recreation center, its services redefine the senior lifestyle. e With a list of activities from recresational sports teams to overnight bus -trips, the center keeps its members -active, engaged and entertained. o “We’re always trying to add new oprograms,” said Terry Shipley, executive director. “We’re trying to get away from the same things you see on the calendar all the time and add new things. Some of these things are on people’s bucket list, so we’re trying to offer more of those services.” Newer services at the senior center include a train ride in the Royal Gorge, tour of the local PBS station and history trips on the town trolley. A new “Coffee and Conversation” group helps seniors catch up on current events, and a sleigh ride at Snow

Senior Living COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA

CASTLE ROCK SENIOR CENTER 2323 Woodlands Blvd., Castle Rock 303-688-9498 Open 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday Shuttle service 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday-Friday Annual fee: $36 singles; $67 couples. Monthly outings include transportation as part of the activity fee. Outings include lunches and dinners at Denver-area restaurants; museums and tourist sites; theaters; concerts; and “bucket list” trips including casino day trips and overnight stays. General interest activities: Hot lunch served at 11:45 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, $2.50 donation; Lunch and Learn, 11:30 a.m. one Wednesday each month, with a meal and a wellness presentation; SeniorzArt classes, 2 p.m. Thursdays, instruction-led drawing or painting project. Special services: Shuttle service for seniors and disabled, open to members and non-members, destinations in central Douglas County, medical destinations in the Denver metro area; health services including a visiting nurse, chair massage, Sit and Be Fit class; financial advisory services. For more information and a complete list of programs, services and benefits, visit www.castlerockseniorcenter.org. Mountain Ranch ranked high with participants. The Castle Rock senior center also boasts two senior softball leagues — one of which came in first in the state competition — and a bowling league, and this year will add pickleball to its roster. Pickleball is a racquet court sport combining elements

Senior LIVING 3

This special section Senior Living supplement was produced by Colorado Community Media, which publishes the award-winning newspapers that cover the south metro regions and encourages our community to read, connect and learn. For more information about advertising in the newspapers or special sections throughout the year, please call 303-566-4100. To share a news tip, please visit our website at ourcoloradonews.com or email to news@ourcoloradonews.com. Send news release to our new PRlink service by visiting the website and clicking on press releases. Colorado Community Media 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd. Ste. 210 Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

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The Castle Rock Senior Center, 2323 Woodlands Blvd., offers a variety of activities for area residents. File photo

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of badminton, tennis and table tennis that “seems to be sweeping the nation,” Shipley said. Response to the center’s philosophy was an increase in participation that prompted the center to upgrade from its 14-passenger shuttle to a 35-passenger bus. The bus is routinely full. The Castle Rock senior center is for members age 50 and older. “This is having fun after 50,” Shipley said. “They think we’re a care home but we’re not. We’re very active and trying to do fun things. We want people to come here and let it be your life’s second half.”

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4 Senior LIVING • South Metro

March 7, 2013

SSPR works out body, mind, soul Rec district offers lots of activities geared to seniors

Programs ranging from fitness to quilting open to those over 55

By Jennifer Smith jsmith@ourcoloradonews.com

U

se it or lose it” is one of Linda Aluise’s favorite phrases, and about 76 million baby boomers know exactly what she means. Aluise is South Suburban Parks and Recreation District’s senior programs coordinator, and she says her classes are definitely gaining in popularity. In fact, the district recently hired an additional employee to focus on Goodson and Lone Tree recreation centers’ seniors. “It’s important to stay active all through the aging process for the mind and the body,” she said. “South Suburban offers a wide range of opportunities to stay active no matter what your ability level is. The main thing is to get out and move, even if it’s walking the indoor track.” With the first 3.47 million baby boomers turning 68 this year, diversity is key to keeping them fit. Especially since they have 12 more years to live on av-

Malley center of senior activities

MALLEY SENIOR RECREATION CENTER

By Tom Munds tmunds@ourcoloradonews.com

South Suburban Parks and Recreation offers a wide variety of classes and programs for seniors including senior tap dancing at the Buck Recreation Center. File photo erage, 13 more than their parents could expect. SSPR makes sure there are programs to keep seniors coming back for all those years, offering something for everyone. Some of the most popular classes include line dancing, tap dancing and fitness classes. Older adults are also enjoying Zumba, a Colombian-style dance class, and Silver Sneakers, which encourages physical activity in combination with social events. Buck Recreation Center in Littleton has a therapeutic warm water pool to soothe arthritic muscles or to help with rehab

after an injury, and some centers offer massage and even facials to relax after a good workout or just a long day. Aluise notes that mental and social health are just as important as physical health, and SSPR can tend to those as well. History and one-on-one computer classes are popular choices for seniors, as are day trips, outdoor recreation opportunities and drop-in activities like cards and other games. A great day to drop in at Buck is Thursday, when “Lunch is Served.” SSPR continues on Page 7

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t was a typical Friday morning at Englewood’s Malley Senior Recreation Center Feb. 22 as about 100 people took part in activities ranging from getting help preparing their taxes to taking part in a fitness class. “Malley is a great asset for our community,” Charles Smith said as he readied to use the treadmill. “I live nearby and use the center a lot for physical fitness, I have taken some classes and I come over to meet friends to play cards or shoot pool.” Joyce Musgrove, Malley facilities supervisor, said the center seeks to offer programs that meet the needs and desires of the almost 2,200 senior who are Malley members. Membership is open to any-

3380 S. Lincoln St. Englewood, CO 80113 Web site: Go to www.englewoodgov.org, click on city department, parks and recreation and, on the left menu, Malley Senior Recreation Center Hours of operation: Monday through Thursday - 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday - 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday - 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

one 55 or older. Membership is free but there is a request for a $15 donation to help pay administrative costs. The center is busy, offering programs like the Volunteers of America serving lunch Monday through Friday in the center ballroom and the Visiting Nurse Association program the third Thursday of each month. “I have been here at the center for 18 years and I believe seniors are more interest in physical fitness and maintain good health now than there used to be,” Musgrove said. “We also see the older seniors more interested in group

Malley continues on Page 7

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Senior Triad covers bases

Social activities, educational programs, fitness, referrals offered

SENIOR ORGANIZATIONS

Senior Outreach Services: www. highlandsranch.org/services/senior-outreach-services/; Jodie McCann, 720-2404922 or jmccann@highlandsranch.org HRCA Senior Fitness: www.hrcaonline.org/ProgramsEvents/SeniorPrograming.aspx Valerie Kuhns, 303-471-7048 or Valerie.kuhns@hrcaonline.org Senior Club: Ron Winter 303-7911692 www.hrcaonline.org/ProgramsEvents/SeniorProgramming/SeniorClub. aspx

By Ryan Boldrey rboldrey@ourcoloradonews.com

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ormed in 2012, the Highlands Ranch Senior Programs Triad brings together the big three senior organizations in the community to offer a wealth of services to help those over 50 live sand age with a high level of asuccess. - Each group has a different focus, said Highlands Ranch Senior Services Coordinator Jodie McCann. The Highlands Ranch Senior Club, for rinstance, hones in on social eactivities, while the Metro Disdtrict’s Senior Outreach Services specializes in providing information, service referrals and education, and the Highlands Ranch Community Association offers a number of health and wellness programs for serniors. “We are working together to offer as strong a senior pro-

gram as possible and that’s why we came together,” said McCann, who oversees the Senior Outreach Services Program. “Each of us is very different and critical to successful aging.” The Highlands Ranch Senior Club meets regularly at Southridge Recreation Center, 4800 McArthur Ranch Road, and hosts monthly luncheons, near-daily card games, bimonthly bus trips to Black Hawk, weekly evening shopping trips to Walmart and other fun activities such as bowling, quilting and nights on the town in Denver. The HRCA, meanwhile, has a slew of fitness programs for individuals 55 and up. A variety of classes are of-

fered Monday-Saturday at all four recreation centers, including drop-in aerobics, mind-body, indoor cycling and a range of aquatic fitness courses to include aqua Zumba, swimnastics and senior-fit aqua. The Metro District’s outreach services continue to add new programs, some of which have also had a social flair to them — such as the Valentine’s Day at the Mansion, which drew close to 600 people this year, and Facebook 101, a class that teaches seniors the basics of social networking. Most of the programs the Metro District offers have an educational edge to them, including the annual Senior Health and Information Fair, other technology and computer training courses, and quarterly workshops that highlight long-term care solutions such as senior care and housing options. “We’re also looking to begin offering programming that interacts with adults of all ages, 50 and better, not just 65 and better,” McCann said. “They will cater a little more to what I like to call that `pre-senior age group’ which has been kind of ignored.”

South Metro •

Senior LIVING 5

Senior living decision guide By MorningStar Senior Living

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etirement options are brighter and wider than ever before in history. Yet all those choices can sometimes just lead to confusion. Our first advice is to clearly identify what you’re trying to solve, with an eye not just to next year, but to the next 5-10 years. Assisted living is the best choice if your parent or spouse needs more personal care than he/she can get (or afford) in the home or in an independent living community, yet doesn’t need 24-hour medical care and supervision. Ask yourself: will this transition ease stress on either the senior’s life or the family caregiver’s? Starting the conversation Pick a time and place that’s relaxed. Then start slow. This is not a once-for-all conversation; it often comes in stages. Still, you might be surprised. Perhaps your loved one has been thinking about this very thing for some time. Don’t forget to include the benefits — a new adventure! — in your discussion. Finding candidates Ah, Google. There you will find more choices than you can imagine. Too many, really. So first nar-

row the field geographically, then by type of community. Limit yourself to 3-4 candidates. The adult child (or healthier spouse) is typically given the initial legwork. Tour no more than two communities in a day (or risk becoming overwhelmed). Take notes. Begin to weigh value against cost. If you like what you see and hear, return to your top two with your loved one for a more social tour.

Talk it up Speak with friends about senior living to glean from their experience. Consult with trusted advisers who have already guided you through major life decisions. Who should make the decision?

This often comes down to a consensus among several family members. The senior him or herself, even if suffering from dementia, must be given a voice. After all, we’re talking about their new home. Their new adventure. Yes, they may be losing some capabilities, but our human spirit craves dignity, independence and choice. In the end, don’t let the complexities of this decision mask the fact that your instincts are to be trusted. One place will just feel like home. And the staff will feel like family. You’ll know it straight away.

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6 Senior LIVING • South Metro

March 7, 2013

‘Sandwichers’ caring for younger, older generations Adults raising own children, caring for aging parents face challenges

By Sara Van Cleve svancleve@ourcoloradonews.com

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ike most moms, Melonie Richards day is filled with caring for others. From cooking meals for her children, Luke, 7, and Rachel, 11, and making sure they get to Cub Scouts and piano practice and cheerleading and play rehearsals, to ensuring homework gets done and just spending quality time with her children, Richards has a busy day. In March 2012, though, Melonie and Lars, her husband of 18 years, welcomed another family member into their home and daily routine — Velma, Lars’ 95-yearold mother who has dementia. “I love it,” Velma said of the transition from living on her own to living with her youngest child and his family. “It’s nice to be with somebody that cares about you.” The Richards’ are now one of nearly 66 million Americans, according to AARP, who find themselves in the “Sandwich Generation” — parents who are raising their own young children while providing

care to an aging parent. Serving as the primary caregiver for her mother-in-law has both benefits and challenges, Melonie said. “Being her primary caregiver, I don’t have to worry about her care,” Melonie said. “I know she is getting good care and her needs are being met.” Melonie also said having Velma live with the family helps teach her children about unconditional love and instill in them the need to respect their elders. “A benefit is we learn to care and respect those in generations before us,” she said. “The kids get a sense of what it’s like to grow older and the concerns we face. It teaches sacrificial loving. You learn to love and do things for a person, even if they can’t reciprocate it.” Velma moving in with her family took some adjustment, both physically in terms of house arrangements, as well as with schedules and care, but it was a decision both the entire family is pleased with. “It’s a way we can love her in this season (of life),” Melonie said. “Heaven is part of this season eventually and we want to usher her in with love.” The decision to care for a parent or grandparent or have them live in a professional care facility is one each family must make on their own, Melonie said. Families

Call About Our

Rachel, Velma and Melonie Richards at their home in Littleton. Melonie takes care of her 95-year-old grandmother as well as two children and a husband. Photo by Andy Carpenean have to look at what will best fit their situation and what the adult is more comfortable with. Balancing care for children and an elderly parent is one of the biggest challenges for the Sandwich Generation, and Melonie often feels that pressure, she said. “I make a lot of decisions and sometimes I just don’t want to make decisions for a while,” she said. Though Lars and his siblings help care for Velma, Melonie is the primary caregiver, as many women “Sandwichers” are.

Following Velma’s move, Melonie quit her contract work with adoptions and foster care to focus all of her attention on her children and Velma. Melonie has set up a schedule for Velma that helps keep her mind sharp and gives her a chance to socialize, as well as helps her stay strong when constant caring might make her weary. Mondays she and Velma stay at home; Tuesdays Velma goes to a day center where she can socialize with others her age and do activities; Wednesdays they go to Bible study; Thursdays Velma gets a bath and Fridays the two go on an outing to lunch or the store. “Sometime I struggle with a little bit of guilt because I feel like she should do more,” Melonie said. “But in this season in life, she rests a lot and that’s part of it.” Velma, who is still very healthy physically, helps with chores where she can, such as the laundry, but people still often have a misconception. “A lot of people think she helps raise the kids and she does a lot of work, but that’s not how it is,” Melonie said. Melonie said she often has to help people understand the situation. “Like with my daughter, I try to let her teachers know the situation,” Melonie said. “It might take us five more minutes

Sandwichers continues on Page 7

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6 Senior LIVING • South Metro

March 7, 2013

‘Sandwichers’ caring for younger, older generations Adults raising own children, caring for aging parents face challenges

By Sara Van Cleve svancleve@ourcoloradonews.com

L

ike most moms, Melonie Richards day is filled with caring for others. From cooking meals for her children, Luke, 7, and Rachel, 11, and making sure they get to Cub Scouts and piano practice and cheerleading and play rehearsals, to ensuring homework gets done and just spending quality time with her children, Richards has a busy day. In March 2012, though, Melonie and Lars, her husband of 18 years, welcomed another family member into their home and daily routine — Velma, Lars’ 95-yearold mother who has dementia. “I love it,” Velma said of the transition from living on her own to living with her youngest child and his family. “It’s nice to be with somebody that cares about you.” The Richards’ are now one of nearly 66 million Americans, according to AARP, who find themselves in the “Sandwich Generation” — parents who are raising their own young children while providing

care to an aging parent. Serving as the primary caregiver for her mother-in-law has both benefits and challenges, Melonie said. “Being her primary caregiver, I don’t have to worry about her care,” Melonie said. “I know she is getting good care and her needs are being met.” Melonie also said having Velma live with the family helps teach her children about unconditional love and instill in them the need to respect their elders. “A benefit is we learn to care and respect those in generations before us,” she said. “The kids get a sense of what it’s like to grow older and the concerns we face. It teaches sacrificial loving. You learn to love and do things for a person, even if they can’t reciprocate it.” Velma moving in with her family took some adjustment, both physically in terms of house arrangements, as well as with schedules and care, but it was a decision both the entire family is pleased with. “It’s a way we can love her in this season (of life),” Melonie said. “Heaven is part of this season eventually and we want to usher her in with love.” The decision to care for a parent or grandparent or have them live in a professional care facility is one each family must make on their own, Melonie said. Families

Call About Our

Rachel, Velma and Melonie Richards at their home in Littleton. Melonie takes care of her 95-year-old grandmother as well as two children and a husband. Photo by Andy Carpenean have to look at what will best fit their situation and what the adult is more comfortable with. Balancing care for children and an elderly parent is one of the biggest challenges for the Sandwich Generation, and Melonie often feels that pressure, she said. “I make a lot of decisions and sometimes I just don’t want to make decisions for a while,” she said. Though Lars and his siblings help care for Velma, Melonie is the primary caregiver, as many women “Sandwichers” are.

Following Velma’s move, Melonie quit her contract work with adoptions and foster care to focus all of her attention on her children and Velma. Melonie has set up a schedule for Velma that helps keep her mind sharp and gives her a chance to socialize, as well as helps her stay strong when constant caring might make her weary. Mondays she and Velma stay at home; Tuesdays Velma goes to a day center where she can socialize with others her age and do activities; Wednesdays they go to Bible study; Thursdays Velma gets a bath and Fridays the two go on an outing to lunch or the store. “Sometime I struggle with a little bit of guilt because I feel like she should do more,” Melonie said. “But in this season in life, she rests a lot and that’s part of it.” Velma, who is still very healthy physically, helps with chores where she can, such as the laundry, but people still often have a misconception. “A lot of people think she helps raise the kids and she does a lot of work, but that’s not how it is,” Melonie said. Melonie said she often has to help people understand the situation. “Like with my daughter, I try to let her teachers know the situation,” Melonie said. “It might take us five more minutes

Sandwichers continues on Page 7

Move-In Specials! Lakeview Senior Living 303-647-6673 LakeviewSeniorLiving.com 7390 W. Eastman Place, Lakewood, CO 80227 INDEPENDENT LIVING WITH CARE OPTIONS

Actual Spectrum Residents

Lincoln Meadows Senior Living 303-731-0401 LincolnMeadowsSeniorLiving.com 10001 S. Oswego Street, Parker, CO 80134 INDEPENDENT LIVING | ASSISTED LIVING | MEMORY CARE

Your care. Your comfort. Our pleasure. A healthy, happy life starts with peace of mind. That’s why our staff is as experienced as they are compassionate.

HighPointe Assisted Living & Memory Care

OPENING FALL 2013!

303-731-5442 HighPointeAssistedLiving.com 6383 E. Girard Place, Denver, CO 80222 ASSISTED LIVING | MEMORY CARE SPECTRUM RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES

March 7, 2013

South Metro •

Senior LIVING 7

Sandwichers: ‘We want to look at life and not have regrets’

Sandwichers continued from Page 6 to get somewhere, but that’s OK. People r don’t always understand if they haven’t r walked in your shoes, but we’re doing r what’s right, and they don’t have to completely understand. This is the best we can do right now and that’s OK.” d In order to be able to care for all of the members of her family, Melonie, just like many “Sandwichers,” must care for herself too, both mentally and physically.

Melonie said she finds listening to music, reading and just time to rest help her stay healthy and strong enough to care for her family. “It helps tremendously,” she said. “And prayer, too.” Melonie and the family have found support through their other family members and friends, whether it is having Velma stay with Lars’ brother for a weekend or just writing a quick email.

“It might not seem significant, but it is,” she said. “It’s always appreciated to get a call or email and they say `Hang in there,” or `You’re doing good.’” Melonie has also found Alzheimer’s caregiver support groups through the Alzheimer’s Association helpful in maintaining her mental and physical health. “When you go to a support group, it’s so helpful to hear others’ situations,” she said. “It doesn’t seem as difficult and you

know you’re not alone.” The Richards’ situation, which is shared by so many Americans as the baby boomers are aging, has taught Melonie to truly live in the moment, she said, and appreciate what and who she has. “I believe you reap what you sow,” she said. “We want to look at life and not have regrets. We need to know we did what we could in this season (of her life). We love having her here.”

Malley: Senior Center financed Center: Demand for transportation is at all-time high Douglas County Community De- to donate time and services. Guests Center continued from Page 2 largely by private donations velopment Block Grants totaling have included specialists in mem-

d e d h

t Malley continued from Page 4 cations like the Molly Brown House and the Broadmoor nactivities while younger Hotel. Englewood’s effort to seniors are more indepenbuild a senior recreation dent.” The center offers several center began as a bicentenfitness programs ranging nial project in 1975. It may from Zumba Gold program be the only senior center in exercising to the beat of Lat- the state finances largely by tin music to a program to pro- private donations. The cenmote flexibility and balance. ter is named for Elsie MalOther center programs ley, a long-time Englewood and activities include a book resident. She insisted the rclub, a class on raising chick- amount she gave never be reens and turkeys and a pro- vealed but it was deemed as, sgram helping seniors down- “very generous.” The center opened in late size possessions. There are computer classes, a variety of 1977. A voter-approved bond arts and craft classes as well issue financed the 2003 exski trips, hiking adventures pansion that almost doubled and visits to local historic lo- the size of the facility.

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want to bring more people here.” With at least 200 trips per month, demand for transportation is at an all-time high. The center maintains a home pick-up shuttle service that’s available for free to any Parker resident over 60. It brings them to medical appointments, the grocery store and the senior center itself. Dengal has applied for two

$35,000 to hire a full-time dispatcher and driver. She expects a decision on the application this summer. The senior center, which serves as an activity hub and does not provide housing, is also hoping for approval on another pair of grants to fund meals. The fiscally efficient nonprofit regularly brings in experts and business professionals who are willing

ory care, foot care, lung function and hearing. Most recently, AARP stopped by at no charge to help the seniors file their tax returns. “I never bring in anyone who charges money. I always look for free services,” Dengal said. “There are a lot of people out there who are willing to donate services. I think people have a soft spot for seniors.”

SSPR: ‘The program is quite popular to help seniors’

SSPR continued from Page 4 “It’s a great opportunity to meet new people as well as meet up with friends in an affordable and friendly location,” said Aluise. Monthly menus are online and posted at Buck, and special luncheons are

crafted for many holidays. SSPR even offers a bribe of sorts to get seniors in the door, offering a property-tax rebate to those who volunteer to help with special projects and events. “The program is quite popular

to help seniors,” said Aluise. A listing of all programs can be found in SSPR’s catalog, which residents should have recently received in the mail, or online at www.sspr. org. For more information, call Aluise at 303-730-4609.

8 Senior LIVING • South Metro

March 7, 2013


Senior Living_South Colorado