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COLLECTED the art of refined living

LAID BACK LUXURY A cozy bungalow in the heart of Los Angeles

LET IT SHINE

Uncharted Los Angeles

A tour of a landscape designer’s Silverlake abode

TOP

10

Our picks for the perfect leather satchel

PLUS A peek inside the quirky Los Angeles shop, Specific

I S S UE 0 1

1

SPRING/SU M M E R 2011

INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING?

COLLECTED Collected is an online lifestyle magazine launched in the summer of 2011. Collected was founded by Los Angeles-based interior designers and bloggers Krista Schrock and Jessica Comingore after the two bonded over a mutual affinity for a simple, welldesigned and carefully curated aesthetic. Collected’s goal is to cultivate a selection of well-edited products and design that highlight the art of refined living. We aim to explore people, places and things with discerning taste while remaining accessible to design enthusiasts. Collected encompasses an array of mediums, including interiors, graphics, product and packaging, as well as travel, fashion, and food—all of the things that we love and live with ever yday. We look forward to sharing our discoveries with you and hope that you find as much inspiration as we do in the beauty of living simply.

Krista Schrock | Co-Founder krista@collectedmag.com, notesondesign.tumblr.com Jessica Comingore | Co-Founder jessica@collectedmag.com, blog.jessicacomingore.com

For advertising rates and information please contact:

press@collectedmag.com

I N EVERY ISSUE

Issue Contributors 8 WH O ’ S WH O

Find out about the the talent who helped the first issue come to life.

Founders Letter 1 1 W ELCO ME TO CO LLE CT E D

A few words from the ladies behind Collected on what it was like to start a venture and realize a dream.

Introduction 1 3 U NCH ART E D LOS ANG E LE S

A view of Los Angeles: the focus and inspiration for this season’s issue.

Top 10 1 4 COG NAC LE AT H E R B AG S

We show you our picks for the most timeless and versatile cognac leather bags to tote around this summer.

History Lesson 4 2 T H E L I F E AND LE G ACY O F G IO PO NT I

A peek inside the brilliant mind of Gio Ponti, design and product extraordinaire.

City Guide 81 LAIE , OAH U

Nate Williams takes us on a local’s tour around the island.

3 COLLECTED

SP R ING/SUMMER 2011

Interiors 4 4 G E T T ING S PE CIFIC

Brooks Hudson Thomas curates rare finds in his hybrid shop and gallery, Specific. 50 H O ME O N T H E G RAIN

Dakota Weitzenburg and Chad Peterson share their favorite rooms at home and a peek inside their woodworking studio. 5 8 LAID B ACK LUXURY

Film director Claire Cottrell’s charming hideaway in the middle of Los Angeles. 70 LE T IT S H INE

Landscape designer Naomi Sanders shows us around her 1940s Spanish Silverlake abode.

Food 2 5 S UMME R’ S B O UNT Y

The menu for a casual summer brunch. 30 LAB WO RK

We visit local favorite Food + Lab’s Silverlake outpost.

Fashion 1 7 AR CH IT E CT URE TO FAS H IO N

A refreshing look at a Lebanon masterpiece, in clothing form. 18 IN T H E NUDE

A refined take on the neutral trend.

4 COLLECTED

SP RING/SUMMER 2011

Fashion 20 G O ING G LO B AL

Inspired fashion and interior product with an ethnic twist. 22 MINIMALIST

Clean lines and a minimal palette to incorporate into your everyday. 40 B LACK + TAN

Highlighting the best in men’s product that’s both sophisticated and laid back.

Travel 78 PACKING FO R MAINE

Comfortable and stylish goods that were made for East Coast vacationing.

Graphic Design 36 T H E O F F I C IAL MANUFACT URING CO MPANY

An interview with the boys of OMFG Co. and the driving force behing their creativity.

O N O U R COVE R DI NI NG RO O M O F CLAIRE COT T RE LL

Photographed by Cara Robbins. Styled by Krista Schrock and Jessica Comingore. See full article on page 58.

5 COLLECTED

S P RING /S UMME R 201 1

CO - FO U NDE R

CO -FO UNDE R

Krista Schrock

Jessica Comingore

krista@collectedmag.com

jessica@collectedmag.com

ADVE RT IS ING

hello@collectedmag.com PRE SS

press@collectedmag.com

Collected is a biannual publication. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. All product prices are correct at press time, but subject to change.

7 COLLECTED

I SSUE CONTRIBUTORS

Aly Comingore WRIT E R & E DITO R

A full-time writer, editor and seeker of all things pop culture for the Santa Barbara Independent, Aly is at her happiest in the presence of good new music. She’s also been known to seek comfort in flea markets, boutique coffee shops, and large, fluffy dogs.

Nicole LaMotte PH OTO G RAPH E R

Nicole LaMotte is a photographer, photo editor and photo producer based in Los Angeles. Her work has taken her to Kenya, India and Haiti. She lives in Santa Monica with her boyfriend and two cats. 

Cara Robbins PH OTO G RAPH E R

Cara Robbins is a photographer based in Southern California who enjoys baking, thrift stores and coffee. Focusing on capturing the little moments, her work is a blend of contemporary and vintage styles.

Nate Williams PH OTO G RAPH E R

Nate Williams is a photographer, blogger, beachcomber and student on the North Shore of Hawaii.

Jennifer Young PH OTO G RAPH E R

Jennifer Young is a lifestyle and portrait photographer fond of mistakes and moments. She enjoys people, adventures, travel, design and a good laugh.

8 COLLECTED

FO U NDER’S LETTER

From its inception, Collected was inspired by the idea of simple, refined living. To us, this means surrounding yourself with nothing more than the necessities, but making sure that these necessities are meticulously crafted and well-designed. No excess, nothing decorated, just appreciating the beauty in the undone. So for our premiere issue, we’ve decided to focus on just that — people, places and product that don’t scream, but whisper. Nothing trendy, but rather, timeless. In turn, our pages our brimming with the faces, homes, and endeavors of some of our favorite young creatives; people who are living and working to sustain and support the idea of quality over quantity. We hope that in flipping through these pages you’ll see something that inspires, get acquianted with a few new faces, and share our love for all things cultivated and collected. — KRISTA S CH RO CK & J E SS ICA CO MING O RE

11 COLLECTED

Introduction—

Uncharted Los Angeles Amongst the downtown skyscrapers and sprawling freeways lies a place we like to call “uncharted L.A.” Being Los Angeles natives, we felt it fitting to start here for our first issue, unearthing some of the players in this hidden hub of creative talent. In the following pages you’ll find a veritable wealth of young, vibrant minds, many of whom choose to call the City of Angels home. From landscape designers and filmmakers to gallery proprietors and restaurateurs, these names and faces are helping to keep Los Angeles on the design map, and injecting the city with a heavy dose of hip along the way. We hope you take these profiles as a jumping off point to discovering your own uncharted surroundings, whether they be hiding beneath the city sprawl or comfortably placed just around the corner.

窶認ashion

Top 10...

r e h t a e L c a Cogn Bags

1 N U TSA MO D E B A DZ E

Glassy, nuciamoon@gmail.com for pricing.

2 P ROEN ZA SCH OUL ER

3 SA N DQV I ST

PS1 Extra Large Leather Satchel, $2,350

Lennart Brown, $315 OUR PICK

5 Z S P O K E BY Z AC P OS E N

Macadamia Soft Lamb Large Shopper, $495 This holds-everything leather tote transitions from daytime to evening thanks to an unexpected pop of blue leather enclosing the brass handles. A true show stopper from the fashion designer who never misses a beat. 4 BILLY K IRK

No. 95 Shoulder Satchel, $325 14 COLLECTED

Fashion—

6 ZARA

7 N U TSA M O D E B A DZ E

Plaited Shopper, $149

Node, nuciamoon@gmail.com for pricing.

8 CLARE VIVIER

9 TH E C A M B R I D G E SATC H E L CO MPANY

La Tropézienne, $320

Briefcase Bag, $158 10 RET ROVELO

Frame Bag, info@retrovelo.de for pricing.

CHRIS BARRETT TEXTILE S

3026 NEBRASKA AVENUE SANTA MONICA CA 90404 T 310 829 9481 F 310 829 6292 www.chrisbarretttextiles.com

Fashion—

Architecture TO FASHI ON

Our Lad yo Location f Lebanon Cathe :H dral Architect arissa, Lebanon : (1930-20 Pier re El-Kho ur y 05)

D I A N E VO N F URST ENB ERG

Geo Stretch-Canvas Jacket, $465

TEN OVERSIX

Drawstring Suede Bag, $158

MO D CLOT H

Ring of Desire, $13

J,CREW

NE E D S U P P LY CO.

3 .1 P H I L L I P LI M

Jersey and Silk Tank, $68

Anthology Sandal, $94

Drawstring Leather Shorts, $495

17 COLLECTED

—Fashion

IN THE NUDE

Calvin Klein S/S 2011

From feathery skirts to rose gold watches, nude colors are a yearround staple. This palette is a soft and feminine take on the conventional beige. Inspired by the movement of this season’s flowy dresses, we round up our favorite nude fashion finds.

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Fashion—

S EE BY CHLOÉ

TA N YA AG U I N I G A

A L E XA N DE R MCQ U E EN

Asymmetrical Jersey Top, $175

Single Rope Knot Necklace, $125

Leather and Brass Skull Keyfob, $275

MIC H A EL KORS

HAUT E H I P PY

Rose Gold-Plated Watch, $250

Laser-Cut Mini Skirt, $395

J. C REW

N EED S U P P LY CO.

A L E XA N DE R WA N G

Corsa Tote, $240

Trigger Boot, $37

Tailored Blouson Dress, $550

19 COLLECTED

窶認ashion

going global

Proenza Schouler S/S 2011

Vibrant and globally inspired patterns are everywhere this season. From ikat oxfords to tribal bracelets, our favorite takes on this trend are black and white with a bold dash of color.

20 COLLECTED

Fashion—

ANT H ROP OLOGIE

DAY BIR G E R E T MI K K E L S E N

PROENZA SCHOULER

Loomed Bowl, $14

Embroidered Cotton Top, $170

Rope Bracelet, $175

JO H N ROBSHAW

U R B A N O U TF I TTE R S

Russet Euro, $190

Osborn Ikat Oxford, $148

DARKROOM

DA N N IJ O

W E ST E L M

Large Hand-Bound Notebook, $37

Moroccan Messenger Bag, $370

Ikat Woven Baskets, $39-$59

21 COLLECTED

窶認ashion

MINIMALIST

Chloテゥ S/S 2011

Minimalism is our mantra. Inspired by clean lines, restraint and function, these selections define our love of all things simple. Japanese architecture and fashion are the guiding forces in this collection of modern and timeless products.

22 COLLECTED

Fashion—

PH AIDON

KOUJI I WASA K I

MJÖLK

John Pawson Works, $95

Wood LED Clock, $150

Kaico Kettle, $140

UR BA NE A R S

M E R C H A N T N O. 4

Plattan Headphones, $60

Kami M Cup, $42

S E L E TTI

M ETSA

FO L E Y + CO R I N N A

Glass Water Bottles Large, $33

Porcelain Pearls, $35

Mid City Leather Tote, $395

23 COLLECTED

Food—

SUMMER BOUNTY Succulent tarts, refreshing gazpacho, warm berry crumbles: The harvest of early summer is here and ripe for the picking. Here we share our favorite (and easy!) recipes to whip up for a casual weekend brunch with friends. R EC I P ES BY R OBI N COM I N G O R E | P H OTO G R A P H Y BY C A R A R O B B I N S

AS PAR AGUS TART

The puff pastry crust perfectly offsets the melted cheese, carmelized onions and roasted asparagus.

窶認ood

GAZPACHO

Chilled soup topped with chopped vegetables and a slice of avocado make for the perfect starter.

Food—

AS PA RAG US TA RT

G AZ PACH O

S ERV ES 4

S E RVE S 4 -6

2 teaspoons butter or olive oil 1 small onion, thinly sliced 1 sheet puff pastry, slightly defrosted 1 cup grated manchego cheese 1 package asparagus Few drops truffle oil 1 teaspoon olive oil

5 medium tomatoes, blanched and peeled 1 red bell pepper 1 yellow bell pepper 3 Persian cucumbers 1 small red onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, chopped 1 cup chopped parsley Juice of 2 lemons 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1/2 teaspoons cayenne pepper 1 1/2 cups tomato juice or tomato-based vegetable juice 1 avocado, sliced Sea salt Freshly ground black pepper

1. Preheat oven to 400°. 2. Trim ends of asparagus and peel stalks, if thick. Toss with 1 teaspoon olive oil and few drops truffle oil and roast until slightly browned, about 15 - 18 minutes. Set aside. 3. Meanwhile, sauté onions in 2 teaspoons butter or olive oil, over medium heat, until caramelized, about 10 minutes. Set aside. 4. On lightly floured board, roll out pastry until 1/4 inch thick, if needed. Place on parchment lined baking sheet. Turn up edges slightly to make a frame. Cover with grated manchego cheese. Spread caramelized onions over cheese. Place roasted asparagus over top of tart. 5. Bake in 400° oven for 20 minutes until pastry is puffed and golden brown. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with few more drops truffle oil, if desired. Cut into squares and serve.

1. Roughly chop tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and onion. 2. Toss them into a blender. Add the garlic, parsley, cayenne, salt and pepper to taste. Blend until chunky. Remove 1/3 of mixture and set aside to garnish. 3. Add tomato juice, lemon juice and extra virgin olive oil to blender. Blend until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning, if desired. 4. Serve cold garnished with 2 tablespoons of chunky vegetable mixture and 4 avocado slices.

27 COLLECTED

窶認ood

APPLE BL AC KBERRY C R U MB L E

A crisp topping with warm, baked apples and berries beneath. Add a dollop of homemade whip cream for a little something extra.

Food—

AP P L E BL AC K B E R RY C R U MB L E S ERV ES 6 - 8

3 Granny Smith apples, peeled and chopped 1 1/2 cups blackberries, rinsed Juice and zest of 1/2 lemon Butter 1/2 cup flour 1/4 cup almond meal 1/4 cup brown sugar 1/2 cup rolled oats 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon Pinch cloves Pinch nutmeg 1 stick unsalted butter 1. Preheat oven to 350°. Butter six 8-oz. ramekins. 2. Combine apples with lemon juice and zest. Carefully mix in blackberries. Fill ramekins 3/4 full with fruit. Set aside. 3. In a medium bowl, combine flour, almond meal, brown sugar, oats and spices. 4. Cut butter into small pieces and add to flour mixture. In a food processor or with a pastry cutter, pulse in butter until it forms small clumps Sprinkle on top of fruit leaving some fruit exposed. 5. Bake at 350° for 30 minutes. Let cool 15 minutes. Serve, or store covered and refrigerated.

29 COLLECTED

—Food

LAB WORK T EX T BY KR ISTA SC HR O C K | P H OTO G R A P H Y BY N I CO L E L A M OTTE

Rustic wood decor amd fresh European faire define Food + Lab’s picnic-meetsfarmhouse aesthetic.

Food—

» FOOD + LAB, SILVERLAKE

Mother and son Esther and Nino Linsmyer began catering events around Los Angeles before opening

their first cafe on a unassuming section of Santa Monica Boulevard between La Brea and Fairfax. Soon a second location in Silverlake sprung up (pictured here) after many requests that their crave-worthy dishes be made available to the masses. Paying respect to their native Austrian beginnings, the menu includes a unique and flavorful blend of European style organic faire. One of the city’s best kept secrets has been revealed; don’t say we didn’t warn you. Clockwise from top left: Counter, Menu, Marketplace 31 COLLECTED

—Food

OUR PICK

Crispy Prosciutto & Fig Salad with Halloumi, Candied Pecans and Balsamic on Arugula, $13 Yes, it’s a salad, but it’s a real hearty one. One that you can’t stop eating and will likely find yourself dreaming about days later. Sweet. Savory. Delicious.

Proin sed neque ac quam pulvinar egestas eu quis turpis.

1. Industrial Porcelain Pendant, $160 / 2. Salt Essentials Collection, $60 / 3. Weck Canning Jar, $6 / 4. LA Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil, $28 / 5. White Le Creuset®, $275 / 6. Rustic Two-Drawer Console Table, $200 / 7. Red Tolix Chair, $275 / 8. FrancisFrancis!® X1 Ground Machine , $700/ 9. Teroforma Lolo Place Setting, $80 / 10. Yarn Dyed Organic Napkins, $16 / 11. Andrea Brugi Cutting Board, $200/ 12. Iron Lined Basket, $60 32 COLLECTED

Food—

LOOK » E H T T GE

Food + Lab 1.

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33 COLLECTED

a higher state of refreshment.

Metromint is mintwater, made with pure water and real mint, for a taste you can feel. Metromint contains no sweeteners, no preservatives, and no calories. Now available in seven distinctive varieties to satisfy any taste. Find us at better grocers or visit us online at metromint.com.

—Graphic Design

I N TE RV I E W BY A LY CO MI N GO RE P H OTOS CO U RTE SY O F O M FG CO.

It’s news to no one that the Ace Hotel group

is one of the nation’s hottest names in hospitality. Tastefully designed and reasonably priced, the Ace’s Palm Springs, New York, and Portland locations have become more than sweet places to stay—they’ve helped to galvanize young creatives near and far. No surprise then that the branding masterminds behind Portland’s Ace (and its built-in Stumptown Roasters and Clyde Common restaurant and bar) are both hip and extremely community conscious. Since starting Portland’s Official Mfg. Co. (OMFGCo., for short) in 2009, Fritz Mesenbrink, Jeremy Pelley, and Matthew Foster have maintained a outlook that’s as much about style and design as it is about supporting the artists, business folk, and causes they believe in. “Making a positive impact on our community is of the utmost importance to us,” they say. “Of course, money is crucial for any business to operate, so our decisions have to make sense monetarily, but our integrity is paramount to maintaining our point of view.” Below, the fellas give us the skinny on OMFGCo. and share some of their PDX favorites. How did you guys come up with the name? We all disliked the idea of having the word “design” in the company name, and really liked Top: the boys of OMFGCo.; Bottom: Cleverly placed typography in the lobby of Ace Hotel Portland.

Graphic Design—

the thought of making things ourselves. It naturally made us think of the bygone era of manufacturing companies and the wonderfully generic names that used to be so prevalent, like “Standard Oil.” Right away we liked the idea of putting a qualifier in front of “manufacturing company,” so we started brainstorming classic, generic words. “Official” stood out to us as a contender, but what really narrowed it down was the URL search. We realized that any name with “manufacturing company” spelled out would be insanely long, so we started looking for shortened versions, [which ultimately led us to] omfgco.com. We didn’t even think about the “OMFG” tie-in until we saw it. People like to call that a happy accident.

How would you describe OMFGCO’s original concept/mission statement? Truthfully, when we first got together we were just tired of working solo and wanted to make cool stuff with each other and our friends. But as our company has gained momentum we have had a bit more time to think about our impact on things and see the results. Ideally, we like to make, design, build and steward brands from the ground up. How would you describe your personal design sensibilities? Individually, we all have very distinct tastes and styles, and we are all pretty particular. Fritz is forever positive and happy, and it shows in everything he does. His craft is impeccable. And somehow he can pull off wearing super bright clothing on a regular basis without it looking ridicu-

STUMPTOWN

Coffee Mug Design Stumptown’s mugs are just one example of OMFGCo’s clever branding endeavors. Their designs are simple, classic, with obvious nods to a bygone era.

37 COLLECTED

—Graphic Design

lous. Mathew likes things to be simple, beautiful and concise. He is a pixel master, and can draw better than he lets himself remember. There is a palpable poetry behind his best work, and it’s usually sung in a minor key. And Jeremy is somewhere in the middle of those two—he loves simple beauty above all, and has a decent craft for not being an expert in anything. But he can easily become obsessed about the intricate details of a project, and can over do it if he isn’t careful. He was once called by Jelly Helm “the most intense laid back dude [he] ever met.” How does that translate to the collective? As a collective, we are drawn to very similar things. We all seem to know what is right for any given client, and while we take different paths, there is often very little disagreement in getting there. Part of why we mesh so well is that we are all ultimately looking to get to a similar place aesthetically, but we get there in our own unique ways. There’s a vibe and DIY ethos that seems to radiate from Portland. What do you think makes it such a creative hub? There is a sense of community in Portland that you don’t find everywhere. Lots of young and broke creatives trying to make something of themselves, set on a rainy backdrop of some of the most beautiful places in the country. We have amazing food, an incredible music scene and an affordable standard of living... Or maybe it’s just in the water. Clockwise from top left: Clyde Common’s dinner menu; Stumptown Roaster’s commemorative postcard; ‘50s-inspired Ace Hotel postcard. 38 COLLECTED

Graphic Design—

What inspires you the most about the city? All of our talented friends (and enemies) who are doing amazing things. Or maybe it’s the fact that we have more strip clubs per capita than any other state in the nation. Top three favorite PDX eating/drinking spots? Matthew: Tiga for drinks, Olympic Provisions for eats. Jeremy: Evoe for food, Clyde Common for drinks Fritz: Podnah’s for food, Spirit of 77 for drinks. Top three favorite local stores/designers? M: I generally buy something at Nationale every time I stop by. J: Monograph, Ampersand, and I am grateful that my girlfriend shops at Lille. F: Little Edie’s Five & Dime, Frances May, & Honorable Mention. Any upcoming projects you’re looking forward to? Honestly, all of them. We’ve got a ton of projects wrapping up and it will be fun to get them all out into the world. And we just found a studio space and will be moving in there in the next month or so, which is very exciting. 2011, we’re gonna kill you.

Clockwise from top right: Logos designed for Olympic Provisions, Clyde Common; Property Of scout books; Ace Hotel Portland press kit; interior of a room at Ace Hotel Portland.

—Men’s Fashion

ATCH... W D N E TR

BLACK + TAN

J. Crew S/S 2011

One thing is certain, black never goes out of style. This spring, the classic lightens up with a hearty dose of tan. Keep this look casual and rugged (think beer on the terrace and tunes in the background) by mixing in textures like suede, leather and cotton.

1. Converse x Ace, $100 / 2. Chilly Chilly’s Trigger Mug, $16 / 3. 3Sixteen Plaid Wool Overshirt, $150 / 4. Makr iPad Attaché, $240 / 5. Wm. J. Mills & Co. Ice Bag, $150 / 6. Off-Axis Watch, $170 / 7. Field Notes 3-Pack, $10 / 8. Geneva Sound System, $650 / 9. Quoddy Suede Chukka Boots, $275 / 10. Standard Belt, $84 / 11. Lightweight Cotton Cardigan, $88/ 12. Frits Henningsen Highback Wingchair, jfchen.com. 40 COLLECTED

Men’s Fashion­—

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—Product Design HISTORY LESSON

GIO PONTI

When it comes to designer worship, Gio Ponti is high on our list. In ad-

dition to being one of the greatest architects in Italian history, Ponti epitomizes a consummate creative. Throughout his career, he dabbled in—and mastered—everything from furniture and product design to entrepreneurial journalism. In 1928 Ponti left his job as artistic director at ceramics manufacturer Richard-Ginori to establish the design and architecture magazine Domus, which he remained an editor for until his death in 1979. Domus was guided by Ponti’s vision for a publication that offered insight From top left: interior of Villa Arreaza from Gio Ponti Archives, Domus covers from style-files.com, interior of La Quinta El Cerrito from World of Interiors. Above: Portrait of Gio Ponti in his later years.

42 COLLECTED

Product Design—

into the style of a particular age, while also promoting the work of progressive designers in Italy and abroad. The most influential periodical of its kind, Domus had—and continues to have—a major influence on Italian visual culture, as well as architecture and design worldwide. Similarly, the magazine’s editorial choices were matched by its cutting edge graphic design and presentation. Much like its founder, Domus was startlingly forward-thinking, often featuring dynamic covers (left) by iconic designers like Paul Rand, Le Corbusier, Charles Eames, and Milton Glaser.

famous construction to date: the Pirelli Tower in Milan. The building, then only the city’s second skyscraper, would establish Ponti’s name on the international architecture scene, and earn him projects that included the Villa Planchart in Caracas, the Villa Nemazee in Tehran, the Hotel Parco dei Principe in Rome, and the Denver Art Museum. Throughout his career, Ponti insisted that decoration and modern ideas were not incompatible, and he advocated the blending of old and new. In turn, many of his designs are still considered to exemplify modernism today.

In addition, Ponti launched Stile magazine, and in 1950 began work on what would become his most

Below: All product from 1st Dibs.

WHERE TO FIND IT

Gio Ponti’s pieces are highly coveted among furniture collectors. Here is a list of dealers that house some of his beautiful and rare pieces. Los Angeles San Francisco Eccola Imports Hedge 7408 Beverly Blvd. 48 Gold St. 323 932 9922 415 433 2233 New York Todd Merrill 65 Bleecker St. 212 673 0531

Chicago Wright Now 1440 W. Hubbard 312 563 0020

43 COLLECTED

—Product Design

Getting

specific I N T ERV I EW BY A LY COMI N G O R E | P H OTO G R A P H Y BY C A R A R O B B I N S

Specific’s entryway houses everything from furntiure to apparel, flanked by an eyecatching stairway to the store’s lofted gallery space.

Product Design—

When it comes to opening your own business, it’s all about getting creative. And no one knows that better than Brooks Hudson Thomas. As the proprietor-cum-curator of West Hollywood’s Specific, Brooks has crafted a space that’s equal parts eclectic, kitschy, modern, and refined. It’s also packed to the gills with some seriously covetable goods, from vintage scores to contemporary furniture and artwork from all around the world. A former manager for design hotspot Blackman Cruz, Brooks admits that he wanted Specific to carry a more lighthearted vibe than his alma mater. “It’s definitely my taste,” he explains of the store. “I personally like the mixing of high and low things. I’m interested in the handmade, but I’m really interested in things I’ve never seen before. It’s similar to the work I did at Blackman Cruz in Shop owner and master curator, Brooks Hudson Thomas. 45 COLLECTED

—Product Design

High ceilings and boldly colored offerings help this storefront pack a big punch. In the case of Specific, less is less.

Product Design—

that way, but my aesthetic is very different. I’m more colorful, maybe a little bit more upbeat and fun … or campy.” In person, Specific’s tall, narrow space houses a jam-packed—and meticulously arranged—collection of items; a grab-bag-esque vision Brooks had from the get-go. “I had been toying with the idea of a general store, sort of taking up this 19th century or early 20th century model of what a store would be like,” he recalls. “A general store is generic enough that you can have almost anything in there, and I just sort of flipped that on its head.” With his idea in place, Specific opened shop in February of 2010—a solid six months ahead of schedule. Surrounded by antique dealers, established design emporiums, and a veritable wealth of fellow collectors, Brooks committed himself to making his little storefront stand apart from the rest. “There’s no way to compete, for me,” he admits. “Other dealers that are dealing with really great vintage things, and antiques, and repurposed industrial; there’s a lot of people doing it and there’s a lot of people that are really good at it, and I just think, why try to imitate that or compete with that? I’m trying to jump ahead of that a little bit by presenting what I hope is a pretty strong aesthetic statement. I’m hoping people will get on board and pick it up.” Thanks to a keen editorial eye and a penchant for stocking never-before-seen items and budding artists, Specific’s role quickly emerged. Yet it was Brooks’s mix of retail design and gallery space that ultimately made it unique. From the beginning, he has aimed to create a storefront in flux; one that looks, feels, and acts like a gallery, complete with opening reception parties and group exhibits.

Top: Mercury glass vases and an organic wood bowl line the stairs leading to the upper gallery. Bottom: A quirky business card that speaks to the nature of the shop. 47 COLLECTED

—Product Design

“I knew I wanted to show things that artists were making and mix it with design,” he explains. “As I started to think about that and how to treat each thing respectfully, it turned into my ability to completely change over the whole space and dedicate all my square footage to an exhibition of one person’s things, and that sort of grew to a collective mindedness. Now there’s about 50 people whose work is featured on the first floor.” In turn, the fluidity of Specific’s gallery made it easier for Brooks to court new designers and artists. “Over half of the stuff [in the store], if not more, are things that I initially saw somebody blogging about online,” he says. “And I got on the phone or sent an email to reach out and tell [the artist] how much I liked what they’re doing, and what I was doing, and that I couldn’t afford to buy anything, but that we do these exhibitions.” Given the current the economy, he found, artists were more than happy to oblige. Similarly, Brooks posits that the state of the game has helped to fuel creatives into action in recent years, and believes that Specific is just one example of an ongoing backlash spurred by the recession. “I think it’s a time where everybody’s being challenged to be as creative and as flexible as possible. A lot of the people who are making things that I like are in the same boat [as me]; we all just started out, none of us have any money, we’re all experimenting with working for ourselves for the first time. And of the people I’ve talked to, they’ve all said that there simply wasn’t any other work for them to do except for this. [It’s about] having to get yourself into a little trouble, getting yourself out there, taking a risk, and creating a problem you have to solve instead of just playing it safe.” For more, visit specificmerchandise.com.

From top: A collection of utilitarian tags from merchandise in the storefront window; oxfords by Dragan Mrdj; a hand selected library of art and design books. 48 COLLECTED

Product Design—

» YOUR THREE SPECIFIC MUST-HAVES?

Workstead’s Industrial-inspired wall lamp and chandelier, the felt hanging pendant lamps, and Mexican planters made from recycled tires.

A bird’s eye view from Specific’s lofted gallery space.

—Interior

HOME ON THE G INTERVIEW BY A LY COM I N G OR E | P HOTO G R A P H Y BY N I CO L E L A M OTTE

Interior—

GRAIN Chad Peterson’s large loft-like master bedroom is light, airy and fresh.

—Interior

Whether it’s a simple, minimalist bench or a whimsi-

cally DIY organ cabinet, craftsmanship is at the heart of todosomething’s creations. In just four years, the Los Angeles-based design and fabrication company has gone from a one-man studio to a bonafide hot commodity, thanks to the joint visions of proprietors Dakota Witzenburg and Chad Petersen. Their designs pull heavily from traditional ideals, but with added twists (think: unique finishes, hard to come by materials, and subtle hints of handmade quirk). Currently, the pair are hard at work on launching their first collection of furniture, a series of chairs, tables and stools that speak strongly to their uniquely straightforward aesthetic. Below, Dakota and Chad talk inspirations, motivations, and how todosomething came to be.

» FROM THE CRAFTSMAN’S PERSPECTIVE, WHAT’S THE BEST PART ABOUT LIVING IN LOS ANGELES?

Chad: Los Angeles is amazing. You can still get anything made in this town. Manufacturing has most definitely moved east, but many shops, large and small, have survived the export of the means of production and managed to find a way to do survive. If you want to make something, chances are there are still a few shops within driving distance that can work it out for you. » IF YOU COULD APPRENTICE UNDER ANY ARCHITECT OR DESIGNER, LIVING OR DEAD, WHO WOULD IT BE?

Dakota: Samuel Mockbee.

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When and how did you decide to become a builder? Dakota: I don’t think I really decided to, it was just sort of a natural thing very early on. My father was a builder and there were always projects going on around our house. I think it influenced the way I understand my surroundings and why I’m so interested in how and why things are made. It’s helpful to be able to visualize not only the parts, but the processes involved in making something, even if I’m not the person doing the building. Chad: I guess I never really decided to become a builder. I still don’t consider myself one; more like a designer/fabricator type, although I can certainly hold my own in the shop. … But I’ve always been a maker, and I guess that instinct to actually produce things is what led me to where I am now. Where did the company name come from? D: todosomething, or td(s) is a name I came up with when I started making and building all sorts of things for people. It was a name that was generic enough for the variety of jobs I ended up doing for artists, musicians, homeowners, etc. I was installing artwork, making furniture, building cabinets, and the general “handyman” types of things people do when they are pursuing their art career. People would often ask if I wanted “to do something” for them. I also thought it sounded sort of funny as one word, and todo means “everything” in Spanish, so, “everythingsomething” also works. We have since sort of refined the things we will do to make a buck and now we really want to focus more on our own design rather than just any work that comes around. Can you tell me a bit about your working relationship? What roles do you each play? C: In the shop, Dakota sort of wears the fabrication hat and I sort of wear the finishes hat. In terms of design, though, I think we rely on each other quite a bit to keep the other in line. Dakota

Opposite page: A mixing of color and materials gives Chad’s bedroom a lived-in vibe. This page: A comfortable nook to read a book; a linear desk and chair from the td(s) line. 53 COLLECTED

—Interior

Dakota’s vintage stove and modern kitchen speak to his love of old and new.

Interior—

has a great sense of humor that he whimsically injects into his designs here and there. Sometimes I have to reel him in on it, but it goes both ways, since my tendencies can lean too far toward minimalism. He keeps me on my toes. He has such fantastic vision and a real appreciation for refinement. How would you compare your aesthetic and approach to each other’s? D: I like to keep it simple in form and function. I find myself reducing things down to a few very basic elements because I think it ends up giving what we make a timeless quality. The simplicity provides a platform where subtle details are apparent, but nothing hits you over the head. C: Our aesthetic approaches are very similar, and I think this is what keeps us interested in working with each other the most. We are both inspired by similar artists and designers, for the most part, and we are both totally infatuated with the simple and elegant combinations of just the right materials and textures in beautifully designed objects. A good design is one thing, but good specifications are another. Are there any materials you prefer? Any materials you’re still dying to work with? D: I do like working with wood and we have plenty of capabilities with it, but there are all sorts of materials I would like to get my hands on. I’m most interested in materials that look great in a natural state and have a bit of soul to them. Some sort of inherent quality that makes it seem like they’ve been around for a while and that they will continue to be around. Domestic woods, polished concrete, blackened steel, super matte paint jobs; the classics. C: I do prefer certain species of wood, like North American hardwoods over imports. I enjoy sourcing small mill lumbers and slabs. They tend to have more character in the coloration

Top: A bright dash of color in an arrangement of Billy Balls. Bottom: Unexpected materials, like walnut drawer and door faces keeps things interesting. 55 COLLECTED

—Interior

and grain, it seems like, and you can just get stuff from them that you can’t get from a big industrial lumberyard. I am also planning to harvest some cottonwood and hackberry slabs from my folk’s place in Oklahoma this year. In terms of materials I’d like to work with, I’d love to have the opportunity to do more work in precious metals and sculptural materials, like ceramic and porcelain. What other people or projects have helped inform your work over the years? D: There are quite a few contemporary Japanese architects with some really amazing residential work. I like the way many of them meld traditional Japanese craft with modern methods and materials and create very sculptural living spaces. All in all, I think I’m most influenced by those who hold craft in high regard. For more, visit todosomething.com. Right: Chad and Dakota in their workshop. Bottom: The A(Plus) chair and side table from their expanding furniture line.

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Laid Back

LUXURY I N T ERV I EW BY A LY COM I N G O R E | P H OTO G R A P H Y BY C A R A R O B B I N S

Interior—

You’d be hard-pressed to sum up Claire Cottrell’s style. As the co-founder of L.A.’s super savvy

anti-marketing firm, Academy of Archivists, she has managed to merge her passions into one sleek and successful business plan. “We use things like a quick and biting wit, the element of surprise and an eye for talent and beauty to light our path through the jungle of oversaturated branding,” declares AOA’s homepage. At home, Claire’s keen eye and creative energy play off each other equally well. Her quaint Westside abode is equal parts European country, urban oasis, and California cool, a testament to that age old adage that good things come in small packages. Below, Claire talks downsizing, vinyl collecting, and why Los Angeles is the place to be. Opposite Page: Bell jars hanging from a tree in Claire’s garden. This page: Self portrait and sketch by Alessandra Olanow. 59 COLLECTED

—Interior

A crisp white sofa, rustic wood table and heavy cable rug create a cozy vibe in the living room.

Interior—

» YOU’RE A VINYL LOVER. WHAT IS CURRENTLY SPINNING?

Françoise Hardy, Bob Dylan, El Sportivo & The Blooz. » THREE FAVORITE LOCAL MUST-STOPS FOR HOUSEWARES SHOPPING?

It’s so hard to pick just three! If I had to narrow it down, I’d say OK, Lawson Fenning, Bazar, Colcha and Shabby Chic.

—Interior

A black metal Eames chair, lyrical print, and acoustic guitar help set a relaxing mood.

Interior— Your property is fantastic and super quaint despite being so close to a huge L.A. street. How did you find the space? I have to say it’s another Craigslist success story. I moved in about a year ago. I had a bit of an inside track—my friend Ali told me about a magical place just off Venice Boulevard that she and her husband had considered buying. She took me by to see it one day and I fell in love with the little white bungalows next door. Then, one of them popped up on Craigslist and I had to inquire. It’s a really unique property. There are two small cottages, a barn and a fairytale garden filled with white roses, jasmine, lemon trees and olive trees. What are some of the biggest changes you’ve made since moving in? I haven’t done that much. Little things here and there, like window dressings and paint. The biggest changes have been in the garden. My neighbors and I have planted a vegetable garden, hung lanterns and mason jars from the trees, built a chicken coop and an outdoor movie screen. (Well, we hung a sheet and bought a projector.) How would you describe the aesthetic of your home? Comfortable minimalism. How does that compare to your work with The Academy of Archivists? My minimalistic sensibilities definitely carry over. I’m a huge believer in the whole “form follows function” thing. But, I’m also very aware that minimalism can feel cold and austere. I think it’s all about striking that balance between exactly what’s necessary and timeless and what’s friendly and easily relatable. I guess you could say my decor is sort of that way too. As much as I love the clean lines of a modern chaise, my ideal will always be an oversized, downfilled, comfy, cozy pure white sofa.

Classic Ray-Bans and delicate jewelry make for an elegant display on a white lacquer dresser. 63 COLLECTED

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A peek inside Claire’s kitchen cabinets reveal vintage Moroccan tumblers, bright white plates and earthware mugs.

Interior—

—Interior

A glass bedroom door allows lots of light to filter in from outside.

Interior— Favorite room in your home and why? My bedroom. I keep a stack of books and magazines by my bed at all times. It’s really indulgent, but sometimes I’ll climb under the covers in the middle of the afternoon and read for a few hours. Favorite piece of furniture? A vintage French baguette holder that my mom found at an antique shop in Sonoma. It’s the prettiest color and such an unexpected shape. I also love how specific its function is. For you, what’s the key to making the most of a small living space? Letting go. I’m constantly taking things to the Goodwill. What’s the best part about living in Los Angeles? How much time you can spend outside. On warm sunny days, I’ll eat breakfast outside, work outside, go for a bike ride, and then watch movies or a little TV projected outside on our hanging sheet. I actually find reasons to be outside. I’m totally romanticizing my everyday, but where else is this kind of lifestyle even possible? What does 2011 have in store? Any projects you’re especially excited about? We’ve started doing more album artwork—vinyl is making a comeback in a big way! We just finished a limited edition EP for a new indie band called El Sportivo & the Blooz, and we’re starting on another for Computer Magic. We also have some interesting web projects underway, a book concept and an exciting creative partnership that’s launching in a few months. All in all, it’s looking to be a really fun 2011. Visit Claire’s professional website at clairecottrell.com.

Top: A vintage mid-century typewriter to draft a personal note. Below: One of the many collaborative projects by Academy of Archivists — El Sportivo & The Blooz album art. 67 COLLECTED

A chalkboard wall in Claire’s office provides the perfect canvas for her weekly agenda.

Interior—

—Interior

The Look FJA L L R AV EN

Classic Kanken Backpack, $72 LE LABO

Santal 26 Vintage Candle, $60

R AY B A N

Arista Sunglasses, $145

IKEA

Hovas Sofa, $500

J O H N R O B S H AW

Pewter Dip Dec Pillow, $100 Dusty Decorative Pillow, $100

RESTOR AT ION HA R DWA R E

Telescoping Floor Fan, $210

I SA MU N O G U C H I

Akari Beehive Table Lamp, $105

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The living room’s mix of warm colors and textures play nicely off the space’s natural light.

—Interior

Shine LET I T

I N T ERV I EW BY A LY COM I N G O R E | P H OTO G R A P H Y BY N I CO L E L A MOTTE

For Naomi Sanders, home is where the light is. Fittingly, the Los Angeles-based landscape de-

signer was first attracted to her Silverlake abode because of its naturalistic qualities. “The light, the breeze, the incredible view of surrounding trees and the reservoir beyond; looking out my windows, there is never a dull moment,” she gushes. But even surrounded by so much natural beauty, its Naomi’s eye for detail and refined simplicity that’s helped heighten the space from house to home. Inside, mid-century modern finds, artwork, and understatedly retro splashes of color create the perfect balance of curated quirk. Combined with nods to her landscape livelihood (sweet potted plants, botanical prints, treatment-free windows), Naomi’s created a space we certainly wouldn’t mind settling into. Below, she talks inspiration, design, and her favorite L.A. haunts.

A collection of postcards and imagery hang above Naomi’s desk to provide inspiration. 71 COLLECTED

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How did you get into landscape design? After receiving my undergraduate degree in Fine Arts, I worked in the interior design world for many, many years as both a designer and a sales rep. Every day during lunch I would pour over the Sunset Magazine plant guide. Over time, it simply became a thrill to discover as much as I possibly could on the subject. This passion went on for some time and then one day a landscape designer came into a showroom I was working at. We spoke in depth about her project. And halfway through the conversation I had an intense desire to stand in her shoes. Six months later, I was enrolled in a Masters of Landscape Architecture program and had an internship at Marmol Radziner.

How long have you lived in your current place? For about a year and a half. What were some of your initial design thoughts and motifs when you first moved in? It was really important to me to create a comfortable, inspiring space I could both work and live in. How often have you changed the space over the years? The interiors haven’t changed much since moving in, as my attention has shifted to the garden. I’m really excited about how the plan is coming along, and hope to install September or October of this year.

A library of art, landscape and architecture books are always accessible in a wall-length bookcase.

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» WHO ARE YOUR DESIGN HEROES?

Richard Serra, Jacques Wirtz, Charles and Ray Eames, Rei Kawakubo, Piet Oudolf, Piero Fornasetti, Roberto Burle Marx, Mario Merz, Shigeru Ban, and Dan Kiley. » IF YOU HAD TO DESCRIBE YOUR DESIGN SENSIBILITY IN THREE WORDS, WHAT WOULD THEY BE?

Refined. Comfortable. Honest.

An Eames chair, rustic cabinet and orange Moroccan table help keep things playful.

—Interior

A striped bedspread that once belonged to Naomi’s grandmother provides a punch of color in the master bedroom.

—Interior

» FAVORITE ROOM IN YOUR HOUSE AND WHY?

My studio (of course). I’m surrounded by books, images and projects underway. I feel most at home here. » FAVORITE PLACE TO ENJOY NATURE IN L.A.?

The Hannah Carter Japanese Garden in Bel Air. The symbolism, the dialogue between natural and manmade materials and the developed sense of narrative space is a great source of inspiration.

—Interior

How would you compare your approach to landscape design to the way you look at interiors? My approach isn’t all that different, actually. Scale, form, and composition are considerations, regardless of the medium. Landscape design is much more “layered” in a sense, as time and ecology are components of any successful design. I am endlessly inspired by—and strive for—the elegance in Dan Kiley’s work. Kiley was an absolute master at connecting exterior and interior space, embracing and designing for the purity of form and materials, and for showcasing the beauty of natural phenomenon. I’ve heard you’re a bit of a foodie. What are some of your favorite places to eat in L.A.? Oh goodness. La Brea Bakery for coffee and pastries; the garden at Chateau Marmont for breakfast with friends; Ammo or Hungry Cat for dinner. (I’m currently having a loving affair with steamed mussels.) And Silverlake Cheese Store to indulge any ol’ time. I’ve also been told you love to travel. Top three favorite destinations? Seville, Spain, Marfa, Texas and Graceland, Tennessee. How about three places you’ve never been and are dying to visit? The Tile Museum in Sintra, Portugal, the Gardens of Katsura in Kyoto, Japan and the Richard Serra Installation on Videy Island in Reykjavic, Iceland. Do you have a favorite at-home pastime? Staring at the moon while taking a bath—it is truly incredible, and totally romantic.

Visit Naomi’s professional website at naomisanders.com. From top: A collection of tableware from Heath Ceramics; a collection of cookbooks and a vintage Le Cruset; a thoughtfully arranged group of neutral tone ceramics. 76 COLLECTED

—Interior

The Look W EST EL M

Lacquer Wood Tray, $22 IKEA

Kulla Table Lamp, $50

D E S I G N W I TH I N R E AC H

Nelson Sunburst Clock, $385

D ESIG N W IT HI N R E AC H

Moller Side Chair 71, $700

R O O M A N D B OA R D

Architecture Queen Bed, $1,000

KI M E-M

Iowa Landscape Quilt, $325

S E R E N A & L I LY

Tan Moroccan Leather Pouf, $395

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—Travel

Packing For...

A little Northeast rain will feel like water off your back with this collection of rugged, nautical and utilitarian-inspired items. Whether you’re roughing it or cozying up indoors, our packing list is certain to leave you looking—and feeling—like a Mainer. P HOTO G R A P H BY A L L I S O N V. S MI TH

1. Fjallraven Greenland Jacket, $258 2. Rosewood Folding Knife, $45 3. Wicker Picnic Basket, $250 4. Roberts Revival Radio, $328 5. Pendleton Lambswool Throw, $98 6. Table Grill, evasolo.com 7. The Perfect Weekender, $1,490 8. Michelle Lane Rope Necklace, michellelane.net 9. Linen Day Blanket, $248 10. Bensimon Sneakers, $55 11. Vintage Leupold Compass, $95 12. Guy Cotton Heavy Crew T, $54

Travel—

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City Guide I N T ERV I EW BY JESSI C A CO MI N G O R E | P H OTO G R A P H Y BY N ATE W I L L I A M S

L IA M S T E W IL A N O WH , OA H U E L A IE IO N A L WHER C R E AT E R , R E O M IC S B LO G G , A N D E C O N UDENT R W H AT APHE IO N S T E O F R T G U O L T O PHO T RES T P L AC O N F L IC A L L M A R K E A C K .C O M AND C M L S B AS A HEAR WHO H DE GOODS, A HANDM

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—Travel How long have you lived in your city? My wife and I have lived on the North Shore of Oahu, Hawaii for the last four years in the small town of Laie. What do you like about photography? I always feel like I know a person better after taking photos of them. Every freckle, smile line and dimple. Most of my inspiration comes from the people I love, and photography encourages me to constantly see them in different light and from different angles and perspective.

How would you spend a day off in your city? If my wife and I have a day off you should know where to find us. Our favorite beaches for swimming, picnics and collecting are Castles, Temple and Melaekahana.

What local dish is a must-try, and where do you recommend finding it? The perfect post-beach treat is an acai bowl from a little shop called Kava Roots, in Pupukea. If you had to have one last meal in your city, which restaurant would you eat at and what would you order? If I could grab one last meal on this island it would be a Bonsai Tuna Roll from Bonsai Sushi in the quaint little surf town of Haliewa.

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Only a local does or knows about... Hiking to the peak of the Crouching Lion. This trail is still relatively unknown and definitely underrated for tourists. In less then two hours you can stand on this peak and enjoy what we consider one of the best ocean views on the island.

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—Travel Favorite outdoor space to people watch? Public beaches in general are great for people watching, of course, but Waimea Bay wins for this area. It’s got surfing, cliff jumping, big waves and an eccentric crowd. A few of our friends made a video that works well as a Waimea Bay teaser to give you just a taste of what is to be enjoyed. Best touristy thing to do? Hike to Maunawili Falls in Kailua. The short trail leads to a swimming hole with a 40-foot cliff for jumping.

Anything else you want to mention? Instead of sitting in for lunch, pick up something on the road and pull off onto one of the harbors or docks. One of our favorite places to relax is the Haliewa Harbor.

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INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING?

COLLECTED Collected is an online lifestyle magazine launched in the summer of 2011. Collected was founded by Los Angeles-based interior designers and bloggers Krista Schrock and Jessica Comingore after the two bonded over a mutual affinity for a simple, welldesigned and carefully curated aesthetic. Collected’s goal is to cultivate a selection of well-edited products and design that highlight the art of refined living. We aim to explore people, places and things with discerning taste while remaining accessible to design enthusiasts. Collected encompasses an array of mediums, including interiors, graphics, product and packaging, as well as travel, fashion and food—all of the things that we love and live with every day. We look forward to sharing our discoveries with you and hope that you find as much inspiration as we do in the beauty of living simply.

Krista Schrock | Co-Founder krista@collectedmag.com, notesondesign.tumblr.com Jessica Comingore | Co-Founder jessica@collectedmag.com, blog.jessicacomingore.com

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press@collectedmag.com


Collected Magazine