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Fire district in “holding pattern” on bond measure

Great strides

Guravitz back in CSFPD saddle By Peter DuGré

“For us to get 66 and twothirds percent approval, the voting residents of this district will want to know, need to know, if the firefighters support this.”

The CarpinteriaSummerland Fire Protection District Board of Directors remains unable to shift into drive to put a $10 to $12 million general obligation bond on the 2014 ballot. As the June deadline looms for making the November ballot, board members at the March 18 meeting decided that without clear support from firefighters to seek public funding on rebuild plans for both local stations, voters would be unlikely to open their wallets. The board will await ––Boardmember communication from Craig Price the firefighters association before spending further dollars on legal council and other procedural costs necessary to go to ballot. Boardmember Craig Price, a stalwart supporter of a bond measure to upgrade both Carpinteria and Summerland stations, said, “I want to have a better idea if we have a prayer of a chance of getting this bond passed,” Price said. “For us to get 66 and two-thirds percent approval, the voting residents of this district will want to know, need to know, if the firefighters support this.” Other points of contention for whether to move forward with the bond came from members of the public who had sat on a district ad hoc committee designed to study the proposed station rebuilds. The district hopes to move its 90-year-old Summerland station a stone’s throw up Lillie Avenue at the site currently occupied by the Mosquito and Vector Management District and to build a seismically fit station there as well as in Carpinteria, bringing both aging facilities into the 21st century. Although the ad hoc committee had recommended moving forward with a bond measure, members at the March 18 meeting said they needed more to time study issues with the location and designs of the proposed rebuilds. They also contended that a district-funded third-party study on engine response times by Diamante Partners was inadequate. Carpinteria resident Doug Treloar likened the proposed station in Summerland to the Taj Mahal and recommended simplifying designs to little more than four metal walls and a roof. He cited examples of fire stations constructed in the style called “butler buildings” in Montana, where he also keeps a home, as adequate and functional. “I’m here to say we can get by on a lot less than is designed,” Treloar said.

FIRE BOARD continued on page 7

PhOTO By GArreTT COMBS

And they’re off! runners sprint from the starting line of the 5k race in the 22nd annual Orchard to Ocean race on March 15. the three-in-one race, consisting of a 10k, 5K and one-mile fun run, saw hundreds of athletes pounding the pavement and the dirt pathways of Carpinteria in an effort to test their speed while raising funds for Carpinteria education Foundation. Top finishers earned medals paired with locally grown avocados and flowers and had an opportunity to stretch their legs under sunny skies.

Water board scrutinizes groundwater supply By LeA BOyD

In preparation for a drought that persists into next year and beyond, the Carpinteria Valley Water District board of directors met on March 12 and authorized a $9,720 contract with Pueblo Water resources for an updated report on the status of the local groundwater basin. high quality, abundant groundwater is considered the district’s ace up its sleeve as it faces a continued drought, and the report will better inform decision makers about the critical resource beneath their feet. Last completed in 2008, the hydrological study should provide CVWD with “one more tool to assess whether we want to continue to pump or change our pumping regime,” said District engineer Bob McDonald. he added that the study will also help the district to determine whether replenishment of the basin is occurring after the drought. At capacity, the valley’s groundwater basin contains 125,000 AF of water accessible to the district. Assuming a maximum draw of 6,000 AF per year, the district’s groundwater supply should last about 20 years, McDonald said. Low cumulative precipitation over the last nine years, however, has resulted in declining levels of groundwater. Sea water contaminating local groundwater is another risk the district may face if the drought persists and underground supplies continue to decline. The pressure of fresh water in the underground aquifers is thought to be keeping salt water from entering the water supply. Depletion of the basin below sea level, however, could result in salt water intrusion.

Sea water contaminating local groundwater is another risk the district may face if the drought persists and underground supplies continue to decline. “We don’t have a way of directly telling (if sea water intrusion is) occurring,” McDonald said. he explained to the board that a testing well near Sandyland Cove would provide early indications of sea water in the aquifers. No plans are in place to drill such a well, but McDonald’s presentation gave the board food for thought. Boardmembers also voted to pursue a water exchange deal for 1,000 acre feet with San Gorgonio Pass Water Agency, but the deal, which would have included other Central Coast Water Authority agencies, such as Montecito Water District, came to a halt when San Gorgonio’s board opted out last week. This winter is coming to a close as the third driest on record, and water agencies throughout the thirsty state are scrambling to find water. Deals to purchase and swap water are cropping up then disappearing at a fast clip. CVWD boardmember June Van Wingerden summed it up in a report on the last meetings of the Water Authority that she had attended on the district’s behalf: “everything I’ve said about these two meetings has probably changed at this point,” she said

2  Thursday, March 20, 2014

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

briefly

CARPINTERIA VALLEY REPUBLICAN CLUB

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REAgAN LIBRARY ToUR sunday, March 30th

Meet at IHoP Restaurant 8:30am for carpooling Tour starts at 10:00am Cost: $34 adult, $31 senior (62+), $27 youth (ages11-17) Box lunch included RsVP to: Martha Hickey 684-2538 or Barbara Hurd 684-3858 Paid for by Carpinteria Valley Republican Club

City council to consider fracking letter, downtown parking improvements

The Carpinteria City Council will discuss a draft letter requesting the state take action against fracking among other items on the agenda for the meeting on Monday, March 24, at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall, 5775 Carpinteria Ave. The council’s other topics to consider include the preparation of a report to consider downtown parking facilities, a possible street lighting assessment, the Traffic Safety Committee recommendations and an Ash Avenue improvement consultant contract. Members of the public are invited to attend and speak on issues of interest. The agenda will be finalized and posted at Carpinteria.ca.us on Friday, March 21.

Health care enrollment assistance offered

www.coastalview.com

Health care enrollment experts will be available on Thursday, March 20, from 5 to 8 p.m. at Carpinteria Library, 5141 Carpinteria Ave., to help residents sign up for Medi-Cal or Covered California. The Santa Barbara Public Library System and County Public Health have teamed up to help residents secure health care coverage by the March 31 enrollment deadline. Bilingual certified enrollment counselors will be on hand to assist in English or Spanish with completing the online application, free of charge. Attendees should bring proof of identity, income and legal residency to the library session. For more information about the health care sign-up session, call the library at 684-4314.

Greenhouse tour set for 29th

VENOCO, INC.

A Series of Oil and Natural Gas Facts This is the second in a series about how Carpinteria and Venoco have worked together for 15 years to ensure the safe production and distribution of oil and natural gas. Last week’s information covered California’s sources of oil and natural gas. California is second only to Texas in oil consumption, yet California produces less than 40 percent of the oil and less than 15 percent of the natural gas used daily. Current community attention is on hydraulic fracturing, which has been used for over 60 years as a way to increase production from existing wells to generate more domestic production. Currently, Venoco does not use hydraulic fracturing in their operations and has no plans to use it in any proposed projects in Carpinteria or in the Santa Barbara Channel. However, it is important that Carpinteria residents are fully informed about the issues relating to the process.

· Oil and natural gas are safely produced from more than 200 active onshore and offshore oil fields

in California. There are approximately 20 active oil fields in Santa Barbara County and in the Santa Barbara Channel. The energy industry is tightly-regulated starting from the initial plans to develop resources to the drilling, completion and production of the oil and natural gas. This includes hydraulic fracture stimulation.

· Once an oil or natural gas well is drilled and properly lined with steel casing and geologists

BRIEFLY continued on page 3

• •sprung spring has

determine hydraulic fracturing is needed, then fluids are pumped through the steel pipe down the well thousands of feet below the earth’s surface. The fluids typically are 99.5 percent water and sand and are pressurized so they produce tiny cracks in the rock formation. These cracks or fractures allow oil and natural gas to flow more freely. The width of each fracture is about the size of the lead inside a #2 pencil, and the height of fractures extend only about 100-200 feet, still thousands of feet below groundwater basins.

Anyone interested in stopping to smell the flowers, should mark the calendar for the 6th Annual Carpinteria Greenhouse & Nursery Tour on Saturday, March 29, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The public is invited to attend free, farmer-guided tours of six flower farms in the Carpinteria Valley. Among the flowers that will be showcased are roses, gerberas, orchids and more. Each farmer will demonstrate a variety of sustainable growing and harvesting practices. B&G Color Nursery, Gallup & Stribling Orchids, Maximum Nursery, Myriad Flowers, Westland Orchids and Produce and Westerlay Orchids are scheduled to take part in the annual tour. This year’s tour will kick off with a four-course “Field to Vase” dinner made with locally grown ingredients and served with Santa Barbara County wines. Tables will be adorned with Carpinteria Valley flowers. The cost to attend is $120 per person or $200 for two people. To purchase tickets for the dinner or find out more about the tour, contact Anna Kalins at 284-8584 or akalins@ccfc.org.

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· In any geologic formation oil and gas deposits are separated from drinking water aquifers by

one or more impermeable rock barriers. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, hydraulic fracturing itself has never been found to adversely impact water supplies. The process is subjected to extensive state and federal regulations including the Clean water Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act.

· The average amount of water used for a hydraulic fracture in California is approximately

100,000 gallons per well—some of which is recycled from the oil production process. This is less than half the amount of water needed to irrigate a golf course for a single day.

· Hydraulic fracturing operations occur over very short time periods, usually lasting only several

hours. The process is not an ongoing operation. Once hydraulic fracturing has occurred inside a well, crude oil or natural gas production may continue for years without additional fracturing.

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Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

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City officials, Carpinteria Beautiful members and children from Nanette’s Daycare came together on March 13 to celebrate trees at Franklin Park. The annual Arbor Day event included the planting of an evergreen used as 2013’s Hospice Tree at the Seal Fountain.

Former Carpinterian victim of alleged Colorado murder

Billy Burchette, who resided in Carpinteria in the late 1990s and early 2000s, was found dead at his Golden, Colo., home, an alleged victim of a murder perpetrated by his new roommate on March 15. Police investigating a house fire at the residence discovered Burchette stabbed and burned to death in an upstairs bedroom with a trail of blood leading to the downstairs bedroom, where there was also an emptied kerosene jug. The downstairs bedroom had been occupied for a week by suspect Thomas Laperch, 22, who was arrested the following day in Denver, according to Denver media reports. Carpinterian Mike Lazaro, an event producer, commented that Burchette was everywhere on the local music scene when he lived in Toro Canyon. He SuBMITTED PHoTo played Avofest and other fundraising Former Carpinterian Billy Burchette benefits as a guitarist and vocalist for was allegedly murdered in his Holy Ghost, among other bands. “He Golden, Colo. home on March 15. was always involved; using music to reach people. He was just a good cat,”

Lecture to teach coping skills

Terminally ill patients and their caregivers can learn new tools for coping at a free lecture presented by the Breast Cancer Resource Center on Wednesday, March 26, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Tannahill Auditorium of the Schott Center, located at 310 W. Padre Street in Santa Barbara. Entitled “Finding Balance and Strength When Coping With Illness and Death,” the educational talk will be presented by Kate Zeiss, Ph.D, a Palliative Care Social Worker with Cottage Hospital and Hospice of Santa Barbara. She will discuss how patients and their caregivers facing various stages and challenges of long-term illness and end of life issues can build upon existing strengths and coping abilities, and identify useful community resources. Spanish translation will be provided. To find out more, call 569-9693.

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Job fair aims to place youths

Around 40 hiring employers are expected to attend the Youth-Focused Job and Resource Fair on Thursday, March 27, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Westside Community Center, 423 West Victoria Street, in Santa Barbara. The annual job fair, which was launched last year, is hosted Santa Barbara County Workforce Investment Board, along with several area youth organizations. In addition to employers, local public and private organizations have been invited to attend and will be available to share their resource information. Though the event is youth-focused, it is open to all job seekers. Business owners that would like to register for the event, or anyone interested in more information, should call 681-4643.

Coastal View News welcomes your letters

Letters must include your name, address, phone number and signature. Letters are subject to editing. Letters over 300 words will be edited in length. Email news@coastalview.com

Ask Jason Have home energy questions? Jason is available to: • Provide expert advice on home energy efficiency • Conduct a site visit to evaluate your home and recommend solutions • Help you take advantage of emPowerSBC financing and utility incentives

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This Program is funded by California utility ratepayers and administered by Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern California Edison and Southern California Gas Company under the auspices of the California Public Utilities Commission.

Coastal View

4  Thursday, March 20, 2014

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

&

Halos Pitchforks

A reader sends a halo to Patsy who helps out in the cafeteria at Aliso School. “She is such a nice lady!” A reader sends a halo to Ms. Shamblin for her support, encouragement and understanding. “You have touched the lives of so many Carpinteria youth and make a difference every day. We love you.” A reader sends a halo to Sarah, Hannah and Kayley Houston for being so kind to give rides to the cheer competitions. “Thank you.” A reader sends a halo to Matt Roberts, City Director of Parks and Recreation, for planting milkweed plants around the city for the monarch butterflies. “Their numbers are down and they need our help. Thanks, Matt, for your quick response.” A reader sends a halo to Caton Tupper for helping a Lemos customer when she fell outside the store and broke her wrist. “Wonderful!” A reader sends a halo to Mr. Reed for being such a caring, patient and funny headmaster and teacher. A reader sends a halo to Sunset Shores, especially Woody, Kelly and Jennifer, for a terrific St. Patrick’s Day party. A reader sends a halo to Vons for being lovely and having two express lines open to help people zip through. “Please remember to keep one line open for over 15 items so the hordes of us doing real shopping aren’t stuck for years.” A reader sends a halo to Emily at Peebee & Jay’s, my favorite deli manager. “You brighten my day every time.” A reader sends a halo to Anthony Staal and his staff at Cabo’s. “Thank you for exceptional customer service and a delicious meal for Carpinteria Arts Center’s Board Retreat. We appreciate all that you do in the community.” A reader sends a halo to Jennifer Vasquez. “You are the best!”

COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM ACADEMY

A reader sends a pitchfork to the jerk who has been scratching vehicles with a key on Vallecito Place. “Hope we run into each other sometime. The police have been notified.”

Submit Halos & Pitchforks online at coastalview.com. All submissions are subject to editing.

FREE 3 DAY COURSE

Do you want to help your family, neighbors and local community during an emergency?

Register Today! Friday, March 28 • 6-10 pm Saturday, March 29 • 8:30 am-5 pm Sunday, March 30 • 8:30 am-5 pm at City Hall (all days must be attended) Participants will learn critical skills related to disaster preparedness, fire suppression, medical operations, search and rescue, team organization, disaster psychology, terrorism and more!

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Thursday, March 20, 2014  5

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

the summerland shore FRAN DAVIS

Pesticides, fire and water Bees in the crossfire?

Dreaded Asian citrus psyllids have turned up in parts of Summerland, according to the CDFA (California Department of Food and Agriculture). These are the bugs you don’t want to see on your citrus trees because they carry HLB, a disease that’s a death knell to the trees. It can, and has, wiped out whole groves in other areas. In fact, HLB is the most devastating disease of citrus in the world. Florida has been walloped by HLB, also known as greening disease. So far there is no cure, only prevention. Although the pysllids have been found in SB County, the disease HLB has not been found. The state, hoping to stamp out the potential for disease, plans to spray parts of Summerland with a cocktail of pesticides. One of those, imidacloprid, is highly toxic to honey bees. The Summerland Citizens Association sent out a bulletin advising residents they could opt out if they were concerned about bees. The Santa Barbara Beekeepers Association is up in arms about the possibility of losing more bees. Last year, 16 bee colonies collapsed in Montecito, with pesticides fingered as one probable cause. Imidacloprid is banned in Europe due to its link to major bee die-offs. The Beekeepers Association is eager to help people targeted for spraying to opt out. For more information visit their website: sbba.org/. The state plans to use imidacloprid (brand name Merit) on the backyard trees of 280 residences, mostly in the Summerland area. Homeowners will be notified by mail if their property is in the treatment area. They can choose to opt out of the spraying, but must post a clear message to this effect on their doors. The CFDA held a meeting last Thursday at Pacifica Graduate Institute to address residents’ concerns about the program. I attended and had a long conversation with a U.C. Extension entomologist whose expertise is bees. I learned that the pesticide will be applied as a “soil drench,” not sprayed, and that the tree takes it up, and nymphs and adult psyllids feed on the leaves and die. Treatment is to take place early in the morning when bees are not present. Bees could die only if they are sprayed directly or ingest the poison, which should not be present

CARpinTeRiA’s newesT

ThRifT sToRe

in pollen or nectar. For more information on the subject, call the CFDA hotline at (800) 491-1899. There are a few alternatives available to control Asian citrus psyllids—some oil sprays and certain wasps and parasitic beetles, but the biological agents are not yet widely available. As I learned more about the seriousness of the disease and its potential impact on the state’s $1.8 billion citrus industry (California produces 80 percent of the nation’s fresh market oranges), I felt less inclined to object to the state’s treatment program. My backyard citrus are adjacent to, not in, the treatment area, but I’ll be keeping a sharp eye on my lemon and lime trees, looking for the dreaded psyllids.

Waste(d) water

That’s Heal the Ocean’s trademarked term for the cleaned-up wastewater that South Coast sanitary districts dump into the ocean. In the Santa Barbara area 16,380,000 gallons of wastewater flow to the ocean from sewer plants every day. Heal the Ocean estimates that using recycled wastewater for outside irrigation would offset over half the water demand throughout the region. And would free up enough drinking water to supply the equivalent of 134,193 residents. So why aren’t we piping in this recycled wastewater right now? Downtown Summerland is already plumbed for it. When they redesigned Lillie Avenue for parking and planting and lights, they also put in pipes to carry recycled water. Hey! Turn on the spigots. I contacted Heal the Ocean’s executive director Hillary Hauser to find out what it would take. It turns out it would take a lot, even though the Summerland Sanitary District is a tertiary treatment plant, which means the water is clean enough for outside watering. Because there are pipes along our main street, Summerland’s local businesses, hotels and restaurants could all have easy access to recycled water. That is, if there were pipes from the sanitary district up to Lillie Ave., which would require engineering and money. The big catch 22, which I learned from Hauser, is that recycled water production has to come from water districts! They’re in charge of water sales. For Summerland, that would be the Montecito Water District (MWD). And right now, MWD’s

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focus is very much elsewhere. Rationing, clamping down on water wasters, frantically searching for places to buy more water before they run out entirely. The MWD doesn’t have plans for recycled water sales. The Montecito wastewater treatment plant doesn’t even have a plan for a tertiary upgrade to make the water usable (and saleable). Heal the Ocean is pushing hard for that to happen. For Summerland there’s an unfortunate domino effect. We’re forced to wait for the Montecito Water District to get their sanitary district to upgrade to the tertiary level (with big expenses involved) so that their wastewater could be recycled. After that occurs, the MWD will be in the recycled water sales business and could sell Summerland’s waste(d) water. Makes you want to tear your hair. One glimmer on the horizon is that there is Proposition 84 funding available for recycled water projects. With the passage of the latest drought relief bill, an additional $200 million was added to the package. Heal the Ocean is on the steering committee for Prop. 84 funding and has been developing projects to get on the list. We have to hope that our poor parched South Coast water agencies make the list. And we should definitely throw our support behind Heal the Ocean’s efforts on our behalf!

Fire Board to review and discuss plans for a new fire station in Summerland. In question were the need for a new station and the best location for it. The committee met over a period of several months and presented their recommendations at last month’s fire board meeting. At that meeting the fire board also heard from the independent consulting firm (Diamante Group) it had hired to look into the same question. As it turned out, the conclusions reached by both the consultants and the committee were pretty much identical. Diamante found that the current Summerland fire station was in nearly all respects “below standard.” They, along with the committee, recommended that the district move forward with purchasing the Lillie Avenue site in Summerland as soon as possible, both to secure the location and to reduce the amount of any general obligation bond. There was consensus that a bond measure was the preferred method for financing construction of a new station in Summerland and critical upgrades to the Carpinteria station. The big question remains: Will building a new Summerland fire station and improving the Carpinteria station—vital to our safety in these dry times—make the fall ballot? One good thing: Long, warm summer evenings in winter.

Reprising the fire station question

Fran Davis is an award-winning writer and freelance editor whose work appears in magazines, print and online journals, anthologies and travel books. She has lived in Summerland most of her life.

Three Summerlanders, Reeve Woolpert, David Hill and Joe Sapienza, served on the 12-person citizen committee appointed by the Carpinteria Summerland

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6  Thursday, March 20, 2014

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

No more room

Cloudy with a chance of termite poo

A woman relaxing on her ground-level patio on March 11 complained that her upstairs neighbor made it rain “termite poo” all over her relaxation. When the downstairs neighbor confronted the upstairs neighbor for sweeping off her balcony, the upstairs neighbor, a 69-yearold woman, allegedly began spitting at the downstairs neighbor, 51, according to the downstairs neighbor. For her part, the upstairs neighbor denied raining spit or termite poo on her neighbor. The two had an antagonistic history, she said, and she had already reached out to management about the downstairs neighbor ’s squalid patio. She allowed her dog to urinate all over the patio, said the upstairs neighbor, and conditions were so poor that fleas had migrated upstairs. Neither asked for prosecution, and deputies advised that the neighbors should handle the situations with apartment complex management before involving law enforcement.

Gateway bust

A deputy who made contact with a man and woman for illegally smoking cigarettes on a Carpinteria Avenue sidewalk on March 5 just before midnight came to suspect that the couple was high on more than nicotine. The deputy noted that the man’s jaw was flexed, teeth grinding. Asked if they’d been smoking meth, the couple said no, with the woman, 45, firing off, “I smoked a line yesterday,” at a rapid cadence. Deputies found her to be on probation for a felony drug charge. The man, 31, said he had also abstained since the previous day. A search of their nearby apartment yielded a small amount of marijuana and a syringe. The woman said she had a phobia about syringes, so clearly the needle wasn’t hers. About whether it belonged to the man, she did not know; syringe use

had been a source of contention in their relationship, the woman explained. They both were arrested for allegedly being under the influence of meth.

Third wheel

A man parked on Via Real having a phone conversation with his girlfriend at 7:50 p.m. on March 3 was intruded upon by an alleged would-be burglar. The park-and-chat driver observed a vehicle pull up behind him occupied by a man and woman. The man exited the vehicle and shined a flashlight into the vehicle in which the phone conversation was happening. When he reached the driver’s side, his face nearly pressed against the window, he noticed there was a man sitting there. The snooper reportedly uttered, “Oh (expletive), he’s in the car,” before backtracking to his vehicle. The near-victim, who commented to deputies that his vehicle had already been burglarized twice, turned on his vehicle and put it in reverse in an attempt to box in the other vehicle. However, the other vehicle also reversed until it smashed bumpers with the parked vehicle behind it. It then pulled a U-turn and drove off before entering the freeway. The near-victim pursued the vehicle while contacting the sheriff’s department. He stopped his pursuit on southbound Highway 101 at Bates Road. During the chase, he managed to get the license plate number for deputies. Deputies linked the vehicle to a 49-year-old Oxnard man and were able to round up a portrait from a former booking. From a lineup, the near-victim picked out the man’s photo as the same guy he was face-to-face with across his car window.

Other reports:

Burglary: Shemara Street, Bluffs Parking Lot, Ortega Hill Road Identity theft: Sandyland Road Public intoxication: Linden Avenue Theft: Eleanor Drive Warrant arrest: Linden Avenue

Remember when you were a small child, and your world was a simple place? It didn’t take long to figure out that Dad was the person to go to if you wanted ice cream, but if you wanted a story, Mom supplied the best lap. Add a year or two and everyone expected you to learn how to count to 10 and then 20 and then on up to 100 and beyond. Soon you had to memorize MELINDA the alphabet song and the date of your birthday and your address and your phone number—just in case you got lost. And you had to know the names of all your relatives, or at least the ones you saw regularly. A few more years passed as you added words to your vocabulary, learned how to read, tackled the multiplication tables and figured out what times the best cartoons were on TV. Each year in school brought more facts you had to store in your memory bank—the names of all the states, the list of all the presidents, the Pythagorean Theorem, the rules of basketball and who was Moby Dick. And to complicate things even more, the social world started becoming more and more important, pushing you to learn the rules of etiquette, who liked whom (an ever changing list), what to wear, what to say, and on and on and on. As an adult you know your social security number, your anniversary, the birthdays of all your children and where they live, when your dog needs a check up, how to cook a dinner in 30 minutes so you can feed a soccer team and where your husband has his secret stash of chocolate. Do your eyes glaze over just thinking of all the data you have stored in your brain? Imagine how many file cabinets it would take to house all those pieces of information that have entered your memory at some point—row after row after row, file after file. No wonder it takes longer and longer for us to find certain tidbits that have gotten misplaced somewhere along the line. I don’t know

about you, but sometimes I see someone in town, stop and have a casual conversation, and walk away with the elves in my brain scrambling around searching for the name of this person I evidently know. It also happens with words. I’m trying to write something specific, and I know I know a certain word that would be perfect to use. It’s on the tip of my tongue, on the edge of my WITTWER mind, just ready to pop up. But I can’t quite recall exactly what it is. Sometimes the thesaurus on my computer provides the answer, sometimes my husband or sometimes I just have to wait for those elves to find the answer and give it to me—usually two days later when I’m in the shower. And we all know that if we put something away in a safe place that’s the kiss of death. We’ll never see that invoice or business card or phone number again. We used to laugh at my mom. She would find the Easter candy when she was looking for decorations for Halloween; Christmas presents would morph into birthday presents, and a new sweater might be two years old before she wore it. Finally she kept a notebook where she jotted down the location of each item, and I’m finally beginning to see the usefulness of such an effort. I know people contribute these memory lapses to advancing age, but I disagree. We just have too much information we have accumulated over the years to store each item efficiently. Even computers bog down and work slower to retrieve info if too many programs are running. Just think of what we have to keep track of—schedules, dates, sizes, names, plans, directions and tax laws. To my way of thinking, it’s a wonder we remember as well as we do as we mature past 60. So the next time someone young starts to give you a hard time about your retention of information, just smile and think about how much richer your memories are.

a monthly muse

Melinda Wittwer first moved to Carpinteria in 1972 and taught mostly junior high students in Oxnard during her 25-year career. Now retired, she enjoys pottery, writing, books and travel. ADVERTISEMENT

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Oh Holy St. Jude, apostle and Martyr, great in virtue and rich in Miracles, near kinsman of Jesus Christ, faithful special patron in time of need, to you do I have recourse from the depth of my heart and humbly beg you to whom God has given such great powers, to come to my assistance. Help me in my present urgent petition. In return I promise to make your name known and cause you to be invoked. Pray for us all who invoke your aid. Amen Say three Our Fathers, three Hail Marys, three Glorias. This Novena must be said for 9 con-

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Providing local news and information for the Carpinteria Valley Managing Editor Lea Boyd Associate Editor Peter Dugré Sales Associate Dan Terry Graphic Designer Kristyn Whittenton Student Intern Joe Rice Publishers Gary L. Dobbins, Michael VanStry Coastal View News is locally owned and operated by RMG Ventures, LLC, 4856 Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria, CA 93013, and is published every Thursday. Coastal View News has been adjudged a newspaper of general circulation by the Superior Court of Santa Barbara County, Case No. 210046. Coastal View News assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material.

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Thursday, March 20, 2014  7

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Trees here today, gone tomorrow

From left, California Avocado Festival boardmembers Gary Dobbins, Leo Fortunato, Emily Miles, Gregg Carty and Mike Lazaro (not pictured, Anthony Staal) are in full swing planning mode for this year’s festival.

Avofest works yearround for community BY LEA BOYD

For many Carpinterians, the California Avocado Festival is just a big party held downtown on the first weekend of October. Organizers are aiming to convince locals otherwise, and the numbers back their claims. In 2013, the festival raised $70,000 for local nonprofits and kicked off a growing scholarship fundraising effort. Avofest may seem like just three days of fun, but it provides year round benefits for the community of Carpinteria. The festival is designed to be revenue neutral, said administrator Debra McCarty, Avofest’s only staff person. Festival goers enter for free, so the cost to produce the event is mainly made up through fees charged to the vendors. Three days worth of rentals, water, electricity, bands, added law enforcement, portable bathrooms, garbage services and many other costs amounted to $270,000 in 2012 (2013’s numbers haven’t been finalized). To encourage charity participation, the festival subsidizes 50 percent of the booth fee for nonprofits. About 20 nonprofits participated in the 2013 festival, and McCarty hopes to see that number grow in years to come. She is working to implement an adopt-a-booth program that pairs nonprofits with willing sponsors. The benefits to festival participation for nonprofits include not only the fundraising potential of a 100,000-person audience, McCarty emphasized, but also the ability to raise awareness and volunteer support for local causes. Carpinteria Lions Club, which started selling its tri tip sandwiches at the first Avofest in 1987, counts on the $14,500 it makes annually to continue its long-time support of local causes, such as Future Farmers of America and Girls Inc. of Carpinteria. According to booth chair David Seehoff, the Lions sell 4,500 sandwiches stuffed with 3,000 pounds of tri tip at a

typical Avofest. “It’s great to have this event available to us,” Seehoff said. The club’s other main fundraiser, the Festival of Trees, relies on the long-vacant Austin’s Hardware store. With the fate of the venue up in the air, Seehoff said, the organization’s reliable Avofest income is key to its ongoing community efforts. Improvements to the festival are implemented every year, Avofest Board President Leo Fortunato said, and currently one of the areas of focus is building up the festival’s scholarship fund. Last year, two Carpinteria High School seniors were awarded $1,000, and this year the organization plans to give three students $1,500. Scholarships are partly funded through beer booth tips. Fortunato noted that the festival has reduced its environmental impact over the years as well as the cost for nonprofit participation. Additionally, a greater emphasis has been placed on local avocado growers and the industry as a whole. “We’re always trying to increase the focus on the avocado,” he said. Organizers point out that though the festival is still six months away, they are already six months into plotting and planning for the 28 th Annual California Avocado Festival. The six-member board meets regularly, and McCarty is working to secure sponsorships, prepare tax materials and sell what remains of 2013 merchandise. Vendor applications went online in January, and McCarty is already processing dozens of submitted applications. This year ’s festival will have new benefits for attendees. Increased fun and activities are promised for the Kids Zone, and last year ’s popular social media booth will be larger. Fortunato said that, though details won’t be available for a while, he is “most looking forward to a new avocado ice cream recipe.”

independent travel Vacation Packages Inclusive Vacations Air & Rail Tickets Hotel & Car Reservations

The Canary Island pine trees are gone. We cannot bring them back, but I believe that, in a democratic society, citizens have a right to question the circumstances in which this action was taken. The Santa Barbara News-Press on March 10 carried a news item, which stated: “The Carpinteria City Council will discuss authorizing City Manager Dave Durflinger to execute a contract for nearly $190,000 for the construction of a park at Monday’s meeting, according to a city staff report. The Seaside Park project will cost $250,000 overall, with the construction materials, tree removal, survey work and construction management contributing to the total.” Although the council meeting to execute the contract was held at 5:30 p.m. on March 10, the trees in question were already removed, cut down and sawed to pieces that morning. I have been informed that Canary pines are non-native; so are palm trees. I have been informed that the pines were infested with bark beetles, but the trees and the heart wood are gone and that can’t be verified. I do know that long, pendulous needles do seem droopy but they channel every drop of moisture down to the tree root where it does the most good.

Thelma Schmidhauser Carpinteria

A workshop to prevent the worst

Are you concerned that a member of your family or a friend may be suicidal? Throughout our lives many of us have experienced moments of hopelessness and depression. Recognizing the red flags of desperation can and does save lives, averting tragedy. HopeNet of Carpinteria is sponsoring its second interactive workshop where participants will learn the warning signs, coping strategies and sources of support within our community. Means matter. An important aspect of suicide prevention is reducing easy access to dangerous substances at home. Removing lethal means from a vulnerable person, especially a youth, can save a life. (It’s like keeping the car keys away from person who has had too much to drink.) How people attempt suicide plays a crucial role in whether they live or die. Keeping a firearm at home triples the risk of suicide. Studies of firearm suicides among youth (age 17 and under) show that at least 82 percent used a firearm belonging to a family member. A new California law mandates that if you have minor children and own a firearm, it must be unloaded and locked away securely separate from the ammunition, which must also be locked securely. Please join us to learn and understand the warning signs, coping strategies and sources of support on Wednesday, March 26, from 7 to 9 p.m., at Carpinteria Woman’s Club.

Toni Wellen, MFT Carpinteria

Coastal View News welcomes your letters

Letters must include your name, address, phone number and signature. Letters are subject to editing. Letters over 300 words will be edited in length. Email news@coastalview.com

coastalview.com

FIRE BOARD: Continued from page 1

Chief Mike Mingee commented that the ad hoc committee had unanimously recommended that the district move forward with a bond measure, as had the Diamante report, leaving Mingee wondering how more time could be needed. He commented that “time is of the essence” and that committee members in attendance were “resurrecting things that had already been discussed in committee.” He said the committee had been so confident in its recommendation to proceed with plans to fund the stations that it recommended finding a way to purchase the land with district funds. “They were okay with the site; they said go ahead and buy it now,” Mingee said. Regarding firefighter support, boardmember Chris Johnson, who was elected to the board with the backing of the firefighters association, commented that he could “put out feelers” to ascertain the level of support among district firefighters. Of whether firefighters would get behind new stations, Price said, “To me there’s a lot of ‘don’t look a gift horse in the mouth’ sort of thing here.” Board President Ben Miller concluded that the district would remain in a “holding pattern” for the short term until word came from district firefighters. He also commented that it was the district’s duty to update facilities that needed it, and that those considering rebuild plans should think about what the district might look like 50 years into the future.

Guravitz reseated on board

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Carpinteria-Summerland Fire Protection District Board of Directors appointed lone applicant and former boardmember Lisa Guravitz into the seat vacated by the passing of boardmember Bob Duncan. Guravitz lost the 2012 election, but both boardmembers who defeated her in that election, Chris Johnson and Bill Taff, voted with the majority to reseat Guravitz. “Thank you for stepping up. We could definitely use the help right now. You’re uniquely qualified,” Taff said. Other board members also expressed relief that Guravitz would be able to hit the ground running.

8  Thursday, March 20, 2014

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

EvEnts 20

Michael Katz storytelling

“Energetic, animated and interactive,” these are a few of the adjectives used to describe Michael Katz’ style of storytelling. the professional storyteller will bring his talents to the carpinteria Library, 5141 carpinteria ave., on Thursday, March 20, at 10:30 a.m. his dramatic, funny and riveting stories are best for children ages 4 and up. to find out more about the event, call the library at 684-4314. For more information on Katz, visit storytellermichael.com.

thUrs.

11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m., Rotary Club of Carpinteria meeting, Lions Park

community Building, 6197 casitas Pass road, non-members rsvP to 886-6463

1 p.m., Bingo, veterans Building, 941 Walnut ave. 2-4 p.m., Creative Small Business Marketing Support Group, Lucky Llama, 5100 carpinteria ave., (818) 468-0540

3-6:30 p.m., Farmers Market and Arts & Crafts Fair, Linden ave. downtown, craft fair: 684-2770 5-8 p.m., Affordable Health Care Enrollment Assistance, carpinteria Library, 5141 carpinteria ave., free, 684-4314

March 20

24

Mon.

26

noon-2 p.m., Free One-on-one Computer Coaching, carpinteria Library, 5141 carpinteria ave., reserve time at 684-4314

1 p.m., Mah Jongg, sandpiper Mobile village clubhouse, 3950 via real, 729-1310

1 p.m., Bingo, veterans Building, 941 Walnut ave. 6 p.m., Celebrate Recovery (Hurts, Hangups, Addictions), First Baptist church, 5026 Foothill rd., 684-3353

6-6:45 p.m., Meditation, carpinteria salt Marsh amphitheatre at ash ave. and sandyland road, free

25 tUEs.

10 a.m.-noon, Carpinteria Writers’ Group, carpinteria

Library multipurpose room, 5141 carpinteria ave., 684-7838

10 a.m.-noon, Habitat Restoration at Tar Pits Park, meet near railroad underpass, 684-2525 1 p.m., Sandpiper Duplicate Bridge Club, sandpiper Mobile village clubhouse, 3950 via real, 684-5522

6-7 p.m., Tasting and Touring Chocolats du CaliBressan, 4193 carpinteria ave., ste. 4, $20, 684-6900

7-8 p.m., Al-Anon Meeting, Faith Lutheran church, 1335 vallecito Place, 331-4817

6-7 p.m. drop in, Free Stress Relief Veteran’s Acupuncture Clinic, 4690 carpinteria ave. ste. a, 684-5012

Flicks Clique

Flicks clique, carpinteria’s films about art series, will screen and discuss a documentary about new York’s “Empress of Fashion,” diana vreeland, on Tuesday, March 25, at 7 p.m. in the carpinteria Library’s multipurpose room, 5141 carpinteria ave. the film, “diana vreeland: the Eye has to travel,” is an intimate portrait illustrating the many stages of the celebrated vogue editor’s remarkable life. the library’s multipurpose room has a hearing Loop system to improve the experience for those with hearing impairments. refreshments and snacks will be provided, and a $5 donation is appreciated.

8 p.m., Karaoke, carpinteria & Linden Pub, 4954 carpinteria Linden ave.

7-9 p.m.,Carpinteria Community Church Choir Practice, 1111 vallecito road, 745-1153

21 Fri.

3-5 p.m., Free One-on-one Computer Coaching,

carpinteria Library, 5141 carpinteria ave., reserve time at 684-4314

5-6 p.m., The Peace Vigil, corner of Linden & carpinteria ave. 6:30 p.m., Curious Cup Storytime, coffee Bean & tea Leaf, 4991 carpinteria ave., 220-6608

9 p.m., Soul Infusion, the Palms, 701 Linden ave., 684-3811

22 sat.

Flicks Clique is a Carpinteria Arts Center Program.

10 a.m.-2 p.m., ABOP (antifreeze, battery, oil, paint disposal), city hall, 5775 carpinteria ave., 684-5405 x 445

10 a.m., Carpinteria Salt Marsh docent led tours, free walks start from the park sign, 684-8077

WEd.

9 p.m., Rock Jedi, the Palms, 701 Linden ave., 684-3811

23 sUn.

26

1-4 p.m., Scrabble, Shepard Place Apartment Clubhouse, 1069 casitas Pass road, free, 453-2956

Art show juror talk

internationally acclaimed water colorist ruth Ellen hoag will give a juror’s talk on Sunday, March 23, at 2 p.m. at the carpinteria arts center, 855 Linden ave. her discussion will center around the artistic decisions and considerations she made when jurying the newest exhibit at the center, “shadows, views and hues.” the talk is free and open to the public. to find out more, call 684-7789. Watercolor artist Ruth Ellen Hoag has earned international recognition for her works.

7-8 a.m., Morning Rotary meeting, Woman’s club, 1059 vallecito rd., $10

10 a.m.-5 p.m., Free One-on-one Computer Coaching, carpinteria Library, 5141 carpinteria ave., reserve time at 684-4314 10:30-noon, Meditation, carpinteria Woman’s club, 1059 vallecito rd., 861-8858

1-4 p.m., Knitting Group, veterans Memorial hall, 941 Walnut ave., free,

684-8077

5:30-7 p.m., Fighting Back Parent Program, canalino school, 1480 carpinteria ave., 963-1433 x125 or x132

5:30-6:30 p.m., Meditation, carpinteria Woman’s club, 1059 vallecito

road, free

www.coastalview.com

Thursday, March 20 , 2014 n 9

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

5:30-7:30 p.m., “Finding Balance and Strength When Coping With Illness and Death,” Schott Center, 310 W. Padre Street, Santa Barbara, free, 569-9693 6 p.m., Kiwanis Club Meeting, Veterans Memorial Hall, 941 Walnut Ave., 368-5644

6:30 p.m., Carpinteria Sport Fishing meeting, Carpinteria Library meeting hall, 5141 Carpinteria Ave., 331-8711

The ABCs of Suicide Prevention – Just in Case

A free workshop entitled “The ABCs of Suicide Prevention – Just in Case” will be held on Wednesday, March 26, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Carpinteria Woman’s Club, 1059 Vallecito Road. Sponsored by HopeNet of Carpinteria, the workshop will feature Lisa Firestone, Ph.D. of The Glendon Association, an international authority on suicide prevention. Participants will learn warning signs, coping strategies and sources of support. Spanish translation will be provided. For more information, call 570-3068 or hopenetofcarp@gmail.com or go to hopenetofcarp.org.

7:30 p.m., 8 Ball Tournament, Carpinteria & Linden Pub, 4954 Carpinteria Ave.

Weekend Weather Station & Tide Chart

Email your event lisitings to www.coastalview.com The Plaza Playhouse Theater Presents...

UNDER GR O UND COM E DY N I G H T

MARCH 22 nd 8 PM | $15 .00

Plaza Playhouse Theater 4916 Carpinteria Avenue | 684-6380 www.plazatheatercarpinteria.com

Plaza Playhouse Theater, is a non-profit organization 501(c) (3) | Tax ID # 95-3565433

www. coastalview. com

Friday

MOSTLY SUNNY

High: 59 Low: 53

Sunrise: 7:11 am

THU 20

A.M. LOW

A.M. HIGH

P.M. HIGH

Tickets available online at plazatheatercarpinteria.com and at Curious Cup Bookstore

Letters must include your name, address, phone number and signature. Letters are subject to editing. Letters over 300 words will be edited in length. Email news@coastalview.com

SUNNY

High: 61 Low:53

P.M. LOW

Get ready to laugh as some of L.A.’s rising star comics take the stage!

Coastal View News welcomes your letters

Thursday

6:25 0.3 ft 12:30 3.6 ft 5:49 1.4 ft 12:16 5.1 ft

FRI 21

7:23 0.4 ft 1:35 3.1 ft 6:26 1.9 ft 1:05 4.9 ft

SAT 22

----8:39 0.5 ft 3:13 2.9 ft 7:22 2.3 ft

Saturday

MOSTLY SUNNY

Sunday

High: 59 Low: 51

SUN 23

2:13 4.7 ft 10:08 0.4 ft 5:08 3.0 ft 9:07 2.5 ft

PARTLY CLOUDY

High: 66 Low: 51

Sunset: 7:04 pm MON 24 3:43 4.7 ft 11:26 0.1 ft 6:20 2.3 ft 11:02 2.3 ft

TUE 25

5:11 4.8 ft 12:27 -0.2 ft 7:05 3.9 ft 12:29 1.8 ft

WED 26 6:22 5.1 ft 1:15 -0.5 ft 7:42 4.4 ft 1:18 1.2 ft

PASSPORT PHOTOS IMMIGRATION PHOTOS Walk In • 5 Minutes • Monday - Friday 8-5

ROCKWELL PRINTING 4850A Carpinteria Ave (behind Rockwell Cleaners)

FOTOS de INMIGRACION FOTOS de PASAPORTE Venga y en 5 minutos las obtendra • De lunes a viernes 8-5

ROCKWELL PRINTING 4850A Carpinteria Ave (detrás de Rockwell Cleaners)

What’s your favorite TV show?

man on the street LARRY NIMMER larry@nimmer.net

“Family Guy.” ––Jo Jo Gonzalez

I can’t stand television… haven’t had cable for 20 years. ––Marilyn Berman

Larry’s comment: “Downton Abbey.”

“SpongeBob SquarePants.” ––Vanessa Santillan

“Rizzoli & Isles.” ––Andy Bailard

“Caillou.” ––Bailey Ballinger

10  Thursday, March 20, 2014

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

biz briefs

spotlight on John McCoy By kiM Drain

John McCoy has basketball on the brain. Not just during March Madness, but all year long. As coach of the Carpinteria High School Frosh/Soph squad, McCoy has just wrapped the 2013-2014 season, which he described as “a great learning experience for all of us.” “Some of the guys had never played before,” explained McCoy. “So, once we all got to know each other, we really turned our record around.” On game days, McCoy was easily spotted courtside dressed impeccably in a suit and one of his signature fedoras. It’s just one of the many ways McCoy shows respect for the game and its players. Just because high school basketball is over doesn’t mean McCoy stops thinking about it. He’s constantly analyzing stats, drills and skills in preparation for the next season. McCoy has learned from some of the best coaches, and he is eager to pass that on to the next generation. When basketball is at your core, there are no days off. Occupation: Basketball coach; Carpinteria High School and Boys & Girls Club. How long have you been in Carpinteria? I’m a local boy, born and raised here. How did you arrive at this particular career? It’s funny because fate has played a big role in landing me in certain positions. This was one of them. I had just moved back to Carpinteria after college, and I got a call from the coach at the high school asking if I could help out. It turned out to be a blessing in disguise. How did you prepare for being a basketball coach? I was always playing sports as a kid, but basketball was the one I focused on most. I played all through high school, and at Sonoma State. The court is what I knew and where I felt most comfortable. What is the best thing about what you do? I have known a lot of these players from the time they were little kids at the Boys & Girls Club. It has been very rewarding to see them grow and mature, not just as athletes but as young men. I like being able to share my experience with them and give them the right dose of discipline and support when they need it most. What is the most challenging thing about what you do? I had a really big squad this year. It was difficult to devise practice drills that can utilize that many people on one court. I need to fairly evaluate the skills of each player and make sure each team member is playing to his strengths. I always coach to win but not to alienate. If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing? I’ve always been athletic, so I am sure something in sports. What is the best advice you have given your players? I’m in a good place in my life right now to relate to the kids. I’m not trying to be fatherly or their friend. I tell them to surround themselves with good people who will help them stay focused. You really have to pursue your goals with a singleminded passion. I think the kids are grateful for the life lessons I can share with them.

SuBMITTeD pHOTO

ryan Morrill is island Brewing Company’s new Head Brewer.

Morrill promoted to iBC’s head brewer

Island Brewing Company announced that Ryan Morrill has been promoted to the position of head brewer. “We’re happy to announce the promotion of (Morrill) to head brewer for the brewery,” stated owner paul Wright. “(Morrill) started as a delivery driver with us four years ago, then moved into the cellar as an assistant brewer, and from day one he has been a major driving force in our efforts toward brewing fresh, flavorful and local beer.” Morrill is an avid home brewer and long-time resident of Carpinteria with a penchant for brewing with conventional and unconventional ingredients. IBC’s recent releases have received several accolades at beer competitions, and the brewery is now releasing its Variance IpA series, in which a new style of IpA is introduced every 10 weeks. Of his promotion, Morrill said, “I’m happy to be brewing in Carpinteria and looking forward to pushing some more boundaries and continuing the trend of brewing great beer here.”

It’s a Gift That Gives Both Ways Consider a Gift Annuity

What do you do in your free time? I hang out with my grandfather. He is 94 years old and I have learned a lot from him— about character and commitment. He keeps me on my toes! I also volunteer at the Boys & Girls Club. What motto do you try to live by? Live in the moment. Don’t look too far ahead, because after all that planning, things may happen to change it all anyway. Kim Drain moved with her family from San Francisco to Carpinteria 10 years ago. Since then, she has been intrigued by the small town charm of Carpinteria. She loves to uncover the hidden gems here, such as the people, whose lives and jobs intersect to make this community thrive.

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Businesses sought for Carpinteria-wide sale

Local businesses interested in taking part in a Carpinteria-wide sale on Tuesday, June 17 must commit by Friday, March 21. A group of merchants is organizing the large scale sale to draw visitors from Santa Ynez to Thousand Oaks, and beyond. participants must agree to a storewide discount of 10 to 25 percent, though specific items can be exempt. Restaurants can offer promotions like a free appetizer with meal purchase. every participating store must contribute at least a $10 gift card and $50 toward coop advertising and possibly a pamphlet with a map. Several businesses have already signed up, but organizers will not proceed unless 50 shops and restaurants agree to participate. To sign up or find out more, contact Kiona at Curious Cup, 220-6608. Payroll rates start at $39 per mo. Bookkeeping as low as $55 Per month. CALL TODAY!

artcetra

Thursday, March 20, 2014  11

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Kirkpatrick mixedmedia goes up at IBC

Island Brewing Company is currently exhibiting Brett Kirkpatrick’s mixed-media on wood show entitled In-between through April 19. “(Inbetween) represents the time after sunset and before sunrise when the sun is below the horizon, but there is still light...a time of day all surfers know well,” according to Kirkpatrick, a producer, artist and surfer who lives with his wife and 1-year-old daughter in Ventura. Of the 12 pieces in the show, seven are acrylic and wood stain paintings on Brett Kirkpatrick’s work is up at Island wood and five are digital paintings Brewing Company. transferred to birch wood. For more information on the show, call 745-8272.

Schmohr shows Splattered Fate

Featured artist Beth Schmohr will present her collection of paintings entitled Splattered Fate at Gallery 113, La Arcada Court, 1114 State Street, Santa Barbara. Schmohr said the show represents “how we splatter pieces of our lives around” and the “fate that comes from what and whom we have splattered.” Splattered Fate runs between March 31 and April 26, including during Santa Barbara’s 1st Thursday art celebration. A private reception for Schmohr is scheduled for Wednesday, April 16, from 5 to 8 p.m.; contact “Tangled Joy” by Beth Schmohr bethschmohr@gmail.com for reservations. For more information, visit bethschmohr. com.

“ReMoved” goes big online

Short film “ReMoved” by local filmmakers Nathaneal and Christina Matanick took the internet by storm shortly after being posted at Vimeo and had received 174,000 views between March 7 and 13. “The film is sending ripples through the foster care community,” stated Christina. Several states are considering incorporating the film, which tells the story of a young girl who is removed from an abusive home and placed in foster care, into foster parent training materials. “ReMoved” was screened at the 2014 Santa Barbara International Film Festival and won the 168 Film Festival Best Picture award last year.

On the Wall

Brett Kirkpatrick art show, Island Brewing Co., 5049 6th St., 745-8272 Edgar Landeros photography show, Corktree Cellars, 910 Linden Ave., 684-1400 Erika Marie Carter art show, Porch, 3823 Santa Claus Lane, 684-0300 Rosa Markolf art show, Friends of the Library Used Bookstore, 5103 Carpinteria Ave., 566-0033 Trevor Gordon art show, Lucky Llama, 5100 Carpinteria Ave., 684-8811 Barbara McIntyre art show, Curious Cup, 5285 Carpinteria Ave., 220-6608 A Spring Bouquet of Hot Women, Palm Loft Gallery, 410 Palm Ave., 684-9700 Homework Center Masks show, Carpinteria Library Multipurpose Room, 5141 Carpinteria Ave., 684-4314 Shadows, Views and Hues, Carpinteria Valley Arts Center, 855 Linden Ave., 6847789 Sue Precht art show, Zookers, 5404 Carpinteria Ave., 684-8893

Email your artcetera items to news@coastalview.com

Wondolowski to act/ direct in “Ghost of a Chance”

When “Ghost of a Chance” takes the stage for its dinner theater billing at Circle Bar B, Carpinterian Mike Wondolowski will have his hands in both the acting and directing sides of the performance. The humorous play, in which Wondolowski is assistant director and supporting actor, has its share of unexpected twists and touching moments and hits the stage on Friday and Saturday nights between April 11 and May 18 at 7 p.m. and at 1 p.m. on Sundays at the theater, 1800 Refugio Road, Goleta. General admission is $49 per person and includes a tri-tip barbecue. “Ghost of a Chance” features a young woman who brings her fiancé and his mother to a hunting cabin where her deceased husband’s ghost resides. For more information, call the theater at 968-1113.

Enjoy FREE family familyactivities, activities,crafts, crafts, Enjoyaa day day of of FREE music, foodand andmore—all more—all music,dance, dance, storytelling, storytelling, food celebrating vibrantculture cultureofofAmerica. America. celebrating the the vibrant ENTERTAINMENT ENTERTAINMENT Honeysuckle HoneysucklePossums Possums Mama Choir MamaPat’s Pat’sInner InnerLight Light Gospel Gospel Choir Young YoungSingers SingersClub Club ThePedestrians Pedestrians The Storytellingby byChris Chris Emmons, Emmons, Dave Storytelling Dave Johnsonand andSojourner Sojourner Kincaid Kincaid Rolle Johnson Rolle FOODTRUCKS TRUCKS FOOD Georgia’sSmokehouse Smokehouse BBQ BBQ Georgia’s McConnell’s Ice Cream McConnell’s Ice Cream Burger Bus Burger Bus

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MUSEUM MUSEUM Gallery Gallerytours tours Curator Curatorlecture lecture Gallery with prizes Gallerygames games with prizes

Y

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS: Michael Kidd in memory of Benjamin E. Ortega,

SPECIAL THANKS TOBarrantes OUR SPONSORS: Michael Kidd in of memory of Benjamin and Neunuebel Wealth Management Group Wells Fargo Advisors E. Ortega, and Neunuebel Barrantes Wealth Management Group of Wells Fargo Advisors

The American Family Folk Festival is FREE and open to families and people of all ages.

Submit your Halos & Pitchforks at coaStalview.com

The American Family Folk Festival FREE and open families and all ages. There will be a small charge for is food and crafts by to local artisans willpeople be for of sale. There will be a small charge for food and crafts by local artisans will be for sale.

www.westmontmuseum.org

www.westmontmuseum.org

Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art 955 La Paz Road, Santa Barbara CA 93108

Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art 955 La Paz Road, Santa Barbara CA 93108

12  Thursday, March 20, 2014

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Final Four face off This week’s vote decides the last two burritos standing PHOtOS By DAn teRRy

BEACH LIQUOR

OAXACA FRESH

REYES MARKET

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Serving a festive dinner 3:30-8:30 pm!

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Thurs 7:30pm: Dusty Jugz Country Fri: Cross Cut • Sat: Big Adventure 684-3811 • 701 Linden Ave.

Adan Morales gives readers a visual taste of what Beach Liquor has to offer.

Haile Carmona displays a piping hot plate of tortilla-wrapped, salsatopped goodness at Oaxaca Fresh.

Sal Romero Jr. delivers a monster Reyes burrito to a lucky customer.

Catalina Lemus shows off a Reynaldo’s burrito built for a big appetite.

taste of the town

The Palms Good Times since 1912

try us oN a WeeK NiGht!

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Thursday, March 13, 2014  13

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Vote with your gut! .

Attention reAders.

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE SAUCES!

only 2 weeks left

Reynaldo's

Rincon Alteño Mi Fiesta Market

Reyes Market

El Buen Gusto

Don Rogé

Coastal View News has added a gastronomical twist to March Madness. Burrito Madness will determine March which Carpinteria restaurant rolls the best burrito. 13 From last week’s Elite Eight restaurants, a reader poll determined the Final Four. Vote this week Reynaldo's to determine the Dynamic Duo who will enter the championship. An overall Burrito Madness champion will be announced March on April 3. To vote, click the link at 20 coastalview.com or select up to two Rincon Alteño restaurants below and Reynaldo's submit your answers to 4856 Carpinteria Ave. by Tuesday, March 25, March at 3 p.m. 27

Reyes Market

Oaxaca Fresh Rudy's

The Spot Rudy's Beach Liquor

Taco Grande

Beach Liquor

Señor Frogs

City Market

Taco Grande

Tinkers

Cabo's Grill

Delgado's

Delgado's

DAILY SPECIALS

Breakfast $5.99 Lunch $6.99 Dinner $9.99

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Best

• BURRITO MADNESS •

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Beach Liquor

Try the Oaxaca Burrito Wet! Estafado • Mole • Enchilada

Burrito YOUR VOTE COUNTS! win!

Reyes Market

Oaxaca Fresh

HELP US GET TO THE FINAL 2!

how to pLay 1. Visit coastalview.com and click on the Burrito Madness link or fill out the form below and return it to CVN by Tuesday, March 25 at 3 p.m.

Try a Five Star REY’S BURRITO

2. Of the four restaurants, select a maximum of two of your favorite burrito spots.

Go Green Sauce for March!

3. Coastal View News will tabulate the votes and cut the bottom two vote recipients from next week’s round to be printed in the Thursday newspaper.

4. Have fun and patronize as many restaurants as possible to refresh your memory and polish your palates.

• BURRITO MADNESS •

BURRITOS

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Take a Tray To Go Linden Ave. @ 9th St. • Downtown Carpinteria • (805) 684-4981

Voter Name: Address: * Votes will not be counted w/o address

Select up to 2

 reyes Market YOU R VOTE  oaxaca Fresh COUNT S !  Beach Liquor  reynaldo’s • BURRIT

• BURRIT

O MADN

O MADN

ESS •

ESS •

Return to Coastal View News at 4856 Carpinteria Ave.

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14  Thursday, March 20, 2014

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Orchard to Ocean raises funds for local schools Photos by Garrett Combs

Several hundred runners gathered for their own personal health and the wellbeing of Carpinteria classrooms at the Orchard to Ocean run, a benefit for Carpinteria Education Foundation, on March 15. Sunny skies lit the bluffs 10k and 5k courses that saw local triathlete Matt Organista own the competition. He ran a 33:33 10k, better than two minutes ahead of second-place John Lofthus of Goleta. Fellow Carpinterian Aaron Gillen finished fourth in the 10k in 35:38. Local runner Andrew Robbins, a 17-year-old Cate School student, finished sixth overall (36:39) and first in the 16 to 19 age group. Victor Centina finished 11th overall (39:15) and first in the 45-to-49 age group. Mariann Thomas (41:29) finished 23rd overall and first among Carpinteria women and women ages 50-to-54. Representing Carpinteria in the 5k, Robbins, who also ran the 10k, topped local finishers in 18:38 for ninth overall. Also double-dipping, Centina finished eighth in 19:54 and first in his age group. Edwin Elizarraraz finished in ninth (19:57) for second in the 16-to-19 category. Among Carpinteria women, Tara Gay crossed the finish line first (23:44) for 35th overall and second in the 40-to-44 age group. Michele Banks of Carpinteria won the women’s 35-to-39 race in 25:24. The big winner were Carpinteria Unified School District schools, to which CEF will forward funds from the well-attended race.

Carpinterian Carter Cox, center, is trailed by Virginia Wigle of santa barbara as they pass on to th

Olivia Dorion, 9, of Carpinteria, sprints to finish the 5k in 36:01.

Matt Theule of Carpinteria crosses the finish line during the Orchard to Ocean 10k run.

santa barbarans teri malinowski, left, and stuart sato cross the 8th Street Footbridge during the 10k run. They finished in 45:47 and 45:48 respectively.

Harper Wolfelyons, 6, finished the 5k race in 34:59 to place ninth in her age division.

From left, 5k racers Ron T Borg (41:35) pose for a po

Thursday, March 20, 2014  15

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Santa Barbarans Cindy Abrami, left, Desa Mandarino, center, and Jessica Douglas, right, celebrate before receiving their medals for the 10k run. Abrami finished in 10th place overall with a time of 38:32, while Mandarino and Douglas finished 22nd and 18th respectively. Each of the three women finished first in her age division.

Carpinterians marith Parton, left, brianna stout, center and Lucy Carleton, all local teachers, display their hard-earned medals from the 5k race. Parton (26:15) and Carleton (24:51) finished third in their age divisions and Stout finished first in hers (22:30).

Bert Buenik of Santa Barbara and Selena Ivey of Santa Clarita trot through the bluffs parking lot on Bailard Avenue during the 10k run. Ivey finished in 55:12, and Buenik in 57:22.

Location for Start/Finish:

Carpinteria Children’s Project (Formerly Main School) 5201 8th Street, Carpinteria, CA

Race Features:

Times:

Late Registration: 7:00 am Race Times: 8:00 am ~ 10k 9:15 am ~ 5k • 10:00 am ~ 1 Mile Awards Ceremony Following Finish of 10k & 5k

Awards Entertainment Register at Active.com Picturesque Course 5K & 10K by 3/11 $40 • Race Day 45Jennifer Van der Tito (26:51), Shaunna Tito (37:17), Cheryl Herman (37:58) and 1 Mile $10 • CUSD Student $10 any race ortrait. INCLUDES FREE T-SHIRT & POST RACE REFRESHMENTS

More information 805-566-1615 • carpeducationfoundation.org

Runners stream up and down Carpinteria Avenue to the Bailard Avenue turnaround in the 5k run.

16  Thursday, March 20, 2014

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Suicide increases in the spring. Learn the risk factors and warning signs. Understand how suicide occurs and how to help someone you care about.

INTERACTIVE COMMUNITY TOOL BOX ABCs OF SUICIDE PREVENTION

“JUST IN CASE”

Wed., March 26, 7-9 pm Carpinteria Woman’s Club 1059 Vallecito Road

Send your news items to news@ coastalview.com

Learn how to make a safety plan for at-risk family, friends, coworkers and classmates. Lisa Fir estone. Ph.D. T he Glendon Assn Inter national authority on suicide pr e vention.

For more information email: HopeNetofCarp@gmail.com (805) 570-3068

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Amrit Joy’s Hints for Healthy & Happy Living Open to the universe

Sit up nice and straight. Imagine an invisible gold thread coming out of the top of your head, gently lifting you. Bring your arms out extended from the sides of your body, as if you are making a “V.” The palms face upwards with all the fingers together, including the thumbs. If the straight arms are not comfortable, just bring the elbows close to the body and still allow the hands to face upwards. Do long deep breathing as you allow yourself to open up the universe. Let the greater plan unfold. Surrender to the Higher Power. The mind will begin to quiet as you deep breathe. You are now opening up to love, kindness, sweetness, compassion, peace, serenity, healing and the perfect plan for you. As you do this, allow yourself to become freer, happier, more relaxed. Just a few minutes can help you to shift your energy and receive the blessing of serenity and gratitude from the universe. Now just drop your arms and relax deeply. Amrit Joy is a certified Hatha and Kundalini Yoga instructor. She has been practicing and teaching yoga since 1976. Amrit offers ongoing group yoga classes open to all levels here in Carpinteria. Private instruction in yoga and meditation is also available by appointment. For more information, call Amrit Joy at 745-1707 or visit www.amritjoy.com.

Spring into action for the health of it! ALI JAVANBAKHT, MD Spring is in the air. The signs are all around us: the sun carves a higher arc across the sky, cats in heat make that incredibly human-baby-like sound, and the small print under March 20 on the calendar reads, “vernal equinox.” An “equinox” is when the sun passes over the intersection of the ecliptic and celestial equators. We get two of them a year. One marks the beginning of spring and the other the beginning of fall. This is not to be confused with “Hardnox,” which is where all the gold in the country is kept. Naturally, it is heavily fortified. In fact, the name comes from the action needed to get anyone’s attention in that place. The place where people get trained to watch over all the gold in the country is called “the School of Hardnox.” But I digress. As the days get longer (thanks in part to the new-and-improved-three-weeksearlier Daylight Savings Time), people spend more time outdoors admiring nature in bloom, the turning of the seasons, and the rebirth of various animals. But nature also has its naughty side. Yes, it beckons us with fragrances and colors but pokes us with thorns and makes us itch with poison oak. Most people know that poison oak has “leaves of three” and therefore it is wise to “leave them be” (to which the great philosopher Homer (Simpson) replied, “Leaves of four, eat some more.”) Most people also have their own recipe for dealing with potential exposure to poison oak. Some take a cold shower right afterwards. Some scrub with Ajax. Personally, I like to indulge in a big bowl of chocolate ice cream. After all, if I’m going to itch, I might as well enjoy things while I can. What makes poison oak “poisonous” is the oil. When the plant’s oil gets on the skin, it starts an allergic reaction. But this is not a typical allergic reaction; it’s a delayed one, meaning that the reaction doesn’t start until a day or two after exposure. It’s not unlike that incredibly witty comeback one thinks of two days after someone has made a snide remark at a dinner party. Some people are more sensitive to this oil than others. There are tales of brave souls who have rolled around in poison oak trying to prove that they’re “immune” to it, which turns out to be a good example of “famous last words.” That’s where nature is its trickiest: the more someone is exposed to something, the more allergic they can become that substance. In other words, every repeated exposure to poison oak can bring about a stronger reaction.

Washing the skin as soon as possible after exposure can help minimize the reaction. Once the oil is washed off, it can no longer spread. However, since it is a delayed reaction, new spots can appear over time. Poison oak rash tends to consist of itchy red lines on the exposed areas of the skin. Sometimes blisters develop. The fluid in these blisters is what the body has made as a result of the allergic reaction. Since the body makes this fluid, it has no poison oak in it and thus is incapable of spreading the rash. Typically, medical intervention is needed for a poison oak rash to go away. For small patches of relatively mild reaction, a prescription steroid cream can help. For stronger or more widespread reactions, steroid pills can be helpful. As with most things, 30 ml of prevention is worth 0.45 kg of cure. So wearing long sleeved shirts and pants and avoiding contact with suspicious plants is helpful. So let’s enjoy this spectacular display that nature has put on for us. Let’s spring like a spring over a spring in spring, all the while keeping a respectable distance from the surrounding foliage. Enjoying nature is like petting a cat: pet the soft furry side, beware the sharp, clawy side. (Author’s note: cats in heat should be considered sharp and clawy all around.) This article was printed in a prior edition of CVN. Dr. Javanbakht is a Board Certified Family Physician practicing at the Carpinteria Branch of Sansum Clinic. His column won second place for best original writing at the 2010 AFCP awards. A collection of his columns has been compiled into a book entitled, “For the Health of It!” available at Xlibris. com. Read more of his work at his website, healthcrap.com.

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NEXT WEEK: Cate School kicks off spring seasons

A little help from Gene Saito

Coastal View News has endeavored to bring the largely behind-the-scenes assistant coaches on the fields and courts at local schools to the forefront. This week we catch up with Gene Saito, who has overseen two CIF championship teams and two CIF winning individuals in the pole vault. He has coached his daughters Natalie and Erin on the tennis sidelines for the past five seasons. Q. How long have you been coaching? My first coaching position was coaching polevaulting at CHS around 1998 to 2000. I then started helping with the CHS girls tennis program for the last five years. Q. Other than winning ball games, what makes for a rewarding coaching experience? A rewarding experience occurs when student-athletes start reaching their full potential and perform better than they ever imagined. Q. At what level did you last play the sport you coach? I never really played tennis before, just picked it up five years ago to help with the girls JV and varsity tennis as needed. Q. What is a highlight of your coaching career? Having coached a CIF Champion in the boys polevault, a CIF Champion in the girls pole-vault and now back to back CIF Champions with girls tennis, I cannot take any credit for the hard work and dedication that those individuals put into their sports. If I had to pick a highlight from coaching, it would be when the parents of an individual on the team take me aside and personally thank me for making a difference in their son or daughter’s life.

BILL SWING PHOTOS

Warrior volleyball players Mason Picerni (#6) and Jose Angeles (#13) extend for the block at Bishop Diego High School.

Warrior volleyball falls at Bishop

Carpinteria High School boys volleyball eked out a game but fell 3-1 (25-9, 24-26, 25-13, 25-15) at Bishop Diego High School. Coach Marc Denitz commented that the Warriors “played with enthusiasm, but that wasn’t enough to overcome the talent of the Cardinals.” Warrior Mason Picerni led the team to its victory in the second game with five blocks. He had eight kills and eight blocks total. Austin Myers contributed three blocks, and Jose Angeles had five kills. The Warriors fell to 0-3 in Tri-Valley League.

Warrior setter Jesus Ortega floats one for a teammate in a loss to Bishop.

B&G Club crowns champs to end season

The third- and fourth-grade Bulls went undefeated and won their Boys & Girls Club league championship.

Basketball season is officially wrapped up at the Carpinteria Boys & Girls Club. Of 19 teams in three divisions, all of which developed their basketball skills and sportsmanship, only three could be champions. The third- and fourth-grade league went to the undefeated Bulls. For fifth- and sixth-graders, the Stars won the championship by the slimmest 49-48 margin. The Major division for seventh- and eighth-grade teams held close until the Gauchos finally pulled away in the third quarter to win the game. “I’m very happy with how the 2014 basketball season unfolded. It was exciting to watch the kids get better with each game,” commented B&G club athletic director Javier Morales. “We couldn’t have had our season without all the volunteers that pitched in, and I can’t wait until the next basketball season, which The seventh- and eighth-grade Gauchos won their will be even bigger and better than this year.” 2014 Boys & Girls Club basketball championship.

prep news

18  Thursday, March 20, 2014

Baseball

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Boys volleyball

March 13 – Warrior boys volleyball lost a tight match at Malibu High School, 3-2 (18-25, 17-25, 28-26, 25-17, 15-11). The Warriors were led by Mason Picerni with a game high 11 kills and three blocks. Giovanni Rodriquez had eight kills, and Jesus Ortega had a personal best 31 assists. Coach Marc Denitz also commended the strong passing and digging of Victor Garcia and Eduardo Tofoya.

Carpinteria High School

March 15 – Warrior boys volleyball had a tough run at the laguna Blanca Tournament, losing all seven of its games. Ontarion Christian, Viewpoint, Beverly Hills and Salesian all dispatched the outgunned Warriors. “We got some valuable experience, both in playing and watching,” coach Marc Denitz commented.

March 13 – Six pitchers combined for a one-hit shutout as Warrior baseball picked up a 7-0 home victory over a talented Dunn School squad. Kevin Stein and Mo Sanchez led the offense, both going 3-for-3 at the plate. Stein had a homerun, double, two runs and four RBI. Sanchez had a double, two runs and an RBI. Sanchez, a senior right hander, was credited with the win for tossing the opening two frames. The Warrior staff took a no hitter into the seventh. David Martinez struck out the side in the fifth, and Sal Delgado pitched a one-two-three third inning. Both are right handed freshmen. “Today’s win started on the mound as the pitchers set the tone early. When Sanchez doubled with two strikes and then Stein knocked him in with two outs, you could feel the confidence build. The group played well,” commented coach Pat Cooney.

Swimming

March 15 – Warrior baseball dropped two games by large margins in a doubleheader at Cabrillo High School. Cabrillo won game one 13-2 and game two 14-4 behind 26 hits and two solid pitching performances. “The good news for the Warriors was that they played well in the beginning of the day and well at the end. The middle was negative,” coach Pat Cooney commented. Kevin Stein and Javier Jasso each had three hits. Pitcher Mo Sanchez gave up seven hits and four runs, two earned, in four innings in game one for the loss. The Warriors, 1-4, play next on Saturday, March 22, at 3 p.m. at CHS’s John Calderwood Field.

BIll SWIng

Warrior volleyball player Victor Saldaña sets up a teammate at the Laguna Blanca Tournament.

March 14 – Warrior boys and girls swimmers lost tight meets against visiting Nordhoff High School. The girls lost 87-76, and boys lost 83-80. First place finishers for Warrior girls were: 200 Medley Relay (2.15.68) Brenda Rodriguez, Leticia Cruz, Allison Wagner, Sierra Garibay; 200 Free (2.19.61) Garibay; 200 IM (2.40.44) Rodriguez; 100 fly (1.12.60) Allison Wagner; 200 free relay (1.56.18) Rodriguez, Garibay, Kelly Griffin, Wagner. And for the boys: 500 free (5.28.35) Noah Reed; 200 free relay (1.39.32) Thomas Fly, Chris Fedderson, Sal Briceno, Malik Mehai; 100 back (1.03.75) Fly. The girls and boys records both stood at 1-1 after the meet.

BIll SWIng

Warrior swimmer Lellanie Silva cuts through the water in a home meet versus Nordhoff High School.

BIll SWIng

Warrior tennis player Ricky Zermeno strikes a backhand in a victory over Pacifica High School.

Boys tennis

March 13 – Warrior boys tennis defeated Pacifica High School, 13-5, in a non league match that was more closely played than the final score. The teams were tied 3-3 after the first round and were locked at 5-5 midway through the second before closing out key sets and building momentum, according to coach Charles Bryant. Number-three singles Jonathan Cleek swept his three sets despite a lingering illness. number-one singles Ben Murray won two of three sets and number-two singles Sam Truax won one singles set. In doubles, number-two Ricky Zermeno/Collin Nathanson swept their three sets. number-one Sean Welty/Sam Gutierrez, playing together for the first time, won two sets including a tiebreaker in the second round. Number-three doubles Bryan Taira/Ruben Andrade also nabbed two sets. “We have played two solid matches in a row, and the boys are very excited,” commented Bryant. The Warriors carry a 5-1 record into the start of Tri-Valley League play.

BIll SWIng

Warrior infielder Teagan Singer takes a hack at a Ranger offering during a league-opening loss to Nordhoff High School.

Softball

March 18 – Warrior girls softball dropped its Tri-Valley League opener 9-1 against visiting Nordhoff High School. The Rangers benefited from a couple of Warrior miscues to jump out to a 4-0 lead from which they never looked back. Natalie Saito pitched the entire game and “pitched well enough to win,” according to coach Henry gonzales. Warrior junior Scarlett Pettine scored the team’s run. She singled, advanced on a Sierra Diaz hit and scored on an over throw. gonzales said the offense showed promise but had trouble stringing its hits together.

Thursday, March 20, 2014  19

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

short stops SUBMITTED PHOTO

Third-place finishers on Carpinteria AYSO U12 soccer are, from top left, coach Cliff Gordon, Dexter Gordon, Emilio Perez, Adrian Gonzalez, Ian Reed, Gabriel Medel, Marco Villarreal, Rafael Lopez and coach Kurt Souza; and from bottom left, Miles Souza, Kameron Dayka, Isaac Benitez, Vincent Rinaldi and Alec Marchand.

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

Mason Picerni (junior) Volleyball

Had eight kills and eight blocks including monster second game against Bishop.

Jesus Ortega (senior) Volleyball

• Gloria Saragosa is celebrating 14 years as a member of the Fosters family. • Edwin Elizarraraz placed second in the 18 to 20 age group for the 5k.

Recorded personal best 31 assists against Malibu High School.

U12 boys take third place at Pot-O-Gold

Carpinteria AYSO U12 boys soccer played in the Pot-O-Gold soccer tournament in Thousand Oaks March 8 and 9 and came away with a 3-1 record for third place. Battling 90-degree heat and wind, the team posted a 2-1 record in pool play. Carpinteria beat Castaic 7-1 and Pacific Palisades 4-0 before losing 2-1 to Santa Monica. In the third place game against a separate Castaic team, Carpinteria won 3 – 2. Coaches Kurt Souza and Cliff Gordon commented, “The boys played their best soccer of the year. We are extremely proud of their growth and progress.”

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Warrior boys tennis at Orcutt Academy, 3:30 p.m. Warrior softball at La Reina, 3:30 p.m. *Warrior track & field vs. Maricopa Relays, 3 p.m. *Cate boys lacrosse vs. St. Francis, 3 p.m.

Friday, March 21 SUBMITTED PHOTO

Carpinteria AYSO U14 girls soccer finished in second at Thousand Oaks Pot-O-Gold Tournament over the March 8 and 9 weekend. Players are, from to left, Sophie Johnson, Josie Gonella, Isabela Montes de Oca, Isabelle Marchand, Haley Hoidal and Charlie Meister; and from bottom left, coach Jarrett Johnson, Marci Ramirez, Tessa Denison, Kelsey Navarro, Cameron Navarro, Kendra Meza, Jeanette Fantone and Coach Raimundo Montes de Oca. Not pictured is coach Mike Gonella.

95th Russell Cup on the horizon

Carpinteria Valley Memorial Stadium will be filled with a flurry of competition on Saturday, April 19, when the 95th Russell Cup track and field meet comes to town. Coach Van Latham has put out a call for volunteers to man the many tasks demanded by the event that draws over a thousand athletes and family members to Carpinteria. To help out at the event as an official, visit warriorcountry.com/track/RussellCUp and click the “Officials” link. Anyone planning on pitching in should plan on arriving at the track at 9 a.m. on the day of the event.

CONNECTING CARPINTERIA

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ONLY $150 FOR 13 WEEKS! Contact Kris at 805.684.4428 or kris@coastalview.com

*Cate boys tennis vs. San Luis Obispo, 3 p.m. Cate softball at Malibu, 3:30 p.m.

Saturday, March 22

*Warrior baseball vs. Thacher, 3 p.m. Warrior softball at Nipomo, 11 a.m. Warrior track & field vs. La Playa (Easter Relays), 9 a.m. *Cate baseball vs. Alumni, 1 p.m. *Cate boys lacrosse vs. Alumni, 2:30 p.m. Cate swimming at Villanova, 9 a.m. Cate track at SBCC (Easter Relays), 9 a.m. Warrior swimming at Villanova, TBA

Monday, March 24

Warrior boys tennis at Thacher, 3:30 p.m.

Tuesday, March 25

Warrior boys tennis at Nordhoff, 3 p.m. Warrior boys golf at Montecito CC, vs. Santa Clara/Nordhoff, 1:30 p.m. *Warrior softball vs. Oak Park, 3:30 p.m. *Warrior boys volleyball vs. Oak Park, 6:30 p.m.

Wednesday, March 26

*Warrior baseball vs. Santa Paula, 3:30 p.m. Warrior softball at Hueneme PVC Tourney, 3:30 p.m. Cate baseball at Elks Field, vs. Orcutt Academy, 3 p.m. *Cate boys lacrosse vs. Peninsula, 3 p.m. *Cate boys volleyball vs. Malibu, 4 p.m. Cate softball at Calvary Christian, 3 p.m.

* Home games

20  Thursday, March 20, 2014

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

club scene

Happy BirtHday

Josie Morales March 19th

xxoo From all of your family

Submit your Club Scene items to news@coastalview.com

Questions about Freemasonry? Submitted photo

At left, Andrea Borunda, 4-H Program Representative from Santa Barbara County, and Richard Evans, Fire Prevention Officer/Inspector from Carpinteria-Summerland Fire Protection District, join members of the Playa Del Sur 4-H Club.

4-H members learn about fire on the farm

the playa del Sur 4-h Club had a full agenda for its march meeting. Richard evans, fire prevention officer/inspector from Carpinteria Summerland Fire Protection District, educated the club about fire safety at a ranch or farm setting. he also discussed livestock behavior and evacuation during fires. In the future, Evans will provide fire extinguisher training for the club. Andrea Borunda, a 4-H Program Representative from Santa barbara County, visited the club, and club member Zachary Robsorough ended the meeting with a presentation on washing and grooming show cattle. For more information on Playa del Sur 4-h, contact Andrea borunda at 893-3410 or Ron Vieira at 451-4057.

National Boys & Girls Club Week comes to Carpinteria

the united boys & Girls Clubs of Carpinteria unit has invited the community to celebrate National boys & Girls Club Week March 24 to 28. The club will host a mix of fun activities that focus on its core areas. Some activities include participating in a world record attempt, art and writing contests, dance performance, math, musical chairs, crazy cookout challenge, as well as an outdoor fair on Friday afternoon from 3 to 5 p.m. The free fair, which will include various games and prizes, will coincide with an open house on Friday to showcase the facility and inform interested individuals about the programming. To find out more, call the club at 684-1568.

Submit Halos & Pitchforks online at coastalview.com. All submissions are subject to editing.

Freemasonry is the world’s first and largest fraternal organization, based on the belief that each man has a responsibility to make the world a better place. The fraternity originated in the Middle Ages with stonemasons who built castles and cathedrals, Freemasonry today provides men with opportunities for fellowship, community service, philanthropy and leadership. The Masons of California have more than 62,000 members and about 340 lodges located throughout the state. For more information, visit freemason.org. Carpinteria Lodge 444 • Call 684-4433

Thursday, March 20, 2014 n 21

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Lic. #855770

805-452-7645 • golandscaping.biz

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22  Thursday, March 20, 2014

Public Notices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as Seth Addison at 8 Camino Verde, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. Full name of registrant(s): Cox, Seth Addison at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a individual. This statement was filed with the County 2/3/2014. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2014-0000317 Publish: Feb. 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as (1)NDG Construction (2) Point Conception Glass at 850 Redwood Avenue, Santa Maria, CA 93455. Full name of registrant(s): George, Nathan David at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a individual. This statement was filed with the County 2/13/2014. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: Nathan George. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Ruiz, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2014-0000430 Publish: Feb. 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as Aresco Interior design at 8295 Bates Road, Carpinteria, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): Aresco, Lindsey at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a individual. This statement was filed with the County 2/21/2014. The registrant began transacting business on 1/1/2014. Signed: Lindsey Aresco. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jan Morales, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2014-0000525 Publish: Feb. 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014. _________________________________ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME. CASE NO.1439918 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: Bruce Howard King 315 E. Sola St. Apt 6, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME: Bruce Howard King PROPOSED NAME: Bruce Howe King THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court on April 16, 2014 at 9:30 am to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. The address of the court is 1100 Anacapa Street, Dept. 6, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Filed at Santa Barbara Superior Court on Feb. 13, 2014 by Terri Chavez. Publish: Feb. 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 _________________________________ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME. CASE NO.1439810 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: Kate Hawkins, 4647 Via Huerto, Santa Barbara, CA 93110 for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME: KATE CRUiKSHANK HAWKiNS PROPOSED NAME: KATE CRUiKSHANK FAUNTlEROy THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court on April 4, 2014 at 9:30 am to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted.

The address of the court is 1100 Anacapa Street, Dept. 6, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Filed at Santa Barbara Superior Court on Feb. 13, 2014 by Terri Chavez. Publish: Feb. 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as EVApOpCOOKiES at 4628 Eleanor Drive, Carpinteria, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): Ornelas, Rebecca at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a individual. This statement was filed with the County 2/25/2014. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: Rebecca Ornelas. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Danielle Gomez, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2014-0000564 Publish: March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as HOMETOWN pATiENT MOBiLiTy AND SAFETy CENTER at 1450 W. McCoy Ln. Ste E, Santa Maria, CA 93455. Full name of registrant(s): Hometown LTC pharmacy inc at business address 1450 W. McCoy Ln. Ste B, Santa Maria, CA 93455. This business is conducted by a corporation. This statement was filed with the County 2/27/2014. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Deborah Sanchez, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2014-0000606 Publish: March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as THE BEACH BOWL COMpANy at 901 Linden Avenue, Carpinteria, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): Hamadi, Faycal Alex at business address 4521B Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria, CA 93013. This business is conducted by a individual. This statement was filed with the County 2/24/2014. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2014-0000546 Publish: March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014. _________________________________ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME. CASE NO.1440072 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: Amy Pachoua Lee, 122 W. Micheltorena #C, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME: AMy PACHOUA lEE PROPOSED NAME: AyMiEE PACHOUA lEE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court on April 30, 2014 at 9:30 am to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. The address of the court is 1100 Anacapa Street, Dept. 6, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Filed at Santa Barbara Superior Court on Feb. 24, 2014 by Terri Chavez Publish: March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014 _________________________________ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME. CASE NO.1439680 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: Olivia Paul, 3732 Monterey Pine St. A211, Santa Barbara, CA 93105

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME: OliviA JANE PAUl PROPOSED NAME: OliviA JANE lAROvERE PAUl THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court on April 2, 2014 at 9:30 am to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. The address of the court is 1100 Anacapa Street, Dept. 6, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Filed at Santa Barbara Superior Court on Feb. 25, 2014 by Narzralli Baksh Publish: March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as THEBESTiRS at 15685 N Cave Creek Road, Suite 200, Phoenix, AZ 85032. Full name of registrant(s): Dawg, Inc at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the County 2/26/2014. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by N/A, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2014-0000569 Publish: March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as GREEN GARDEN BAKERy at 160 Ash Avenue #7, Carpinteria, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): Hicklin, Denise Barker at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a Individual. This statement was filed with the County 2/19/2014. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: Denise B. Hicklin. in accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jan Morales, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2014-0000489 Publish: March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as CARp HOUSE pRESS at 4403-B Catlin Circle, Carpinteria, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): Gold, Jeremy at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a Individual. This statement was filed with the County 3/5/2014. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2014-0000660 Publish: March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014. _________________________________ SUMMONS (Family Law) CASE NUMBER 1439704 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: JORGE SOTERO you are being sued. NOTiCE TO THE pERSON SERVED: you are served as an individual. Petitioner’s name is: MARTHA BELLO you have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. if you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. you may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. you can get information about finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal

Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), or by contacting your local county bar association. NOTICE: The restraining orders are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. Starting immediately, you and your spouse or domestic partner are restrained from 1. removing the minor child or children of the parties, if any, from the state without the prior written consent of the other party or an order of the court; 2. cashing, borrowing against, canceling, transferring, disposing of, pr changing the beneficiaries of any insurance or any other coverage, including life, health, automobile, and disability, held for the benefit of the parties and their minor child or children; 3. transferring, encumbering, hypothecating, concealing, or in any way disposing of any property, real or personal, whether community, quasi-community, or separate, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court, except in the usual course of business or for the necessities of life; and 4. creating a nonprobate transfer or modifying a nonprobate transfer in the manner that affects the disposition of property subject to the transfer, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court. Before revocation of a nonprobate transfer can take effect or a right of supervisorship to property can be eliminated, notice of the change must be filed and served on the other party. you must notify each other of any proposed extraordinary expenditures at least five business days prior to incurring these extraordinary expenditures and account to the court for all extraordinary expenditures made after these restraining orders are effective. However, you may use community property, quasi-community property, or your own separate property to pay an attorney to help you or to pay court costs. SANTA BARBARA COUNTy SUpERiOR COURT 1100 ANACAPA STREET P.O. BOX 21107, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101 The name, address, and telephone number of petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney are: MARTHA BELLO 1115 E. GUTIERREZ STREET SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 Date:1/21/2014 Clerk, by Robyn Rodgriguez, Deputy, for GARy M. BLAiR, Executive Officer. Publish: MARCH 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014 _________________________________ SUMMONS (Family Law) CASE NUMBER 1415680 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: BALDEMAR PULE you are being sued. NOTiCE TO THE pERSON SERVED: you are served as an individual. Petitioner’s name is: BERTHA SALiNAS you have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. if you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. you may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. you can get information about finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), or by contacting your local county bar association. NOTICE: The restraining orders are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. Starting immediately, you and your spouse or domestic partner are restrained from 1. removing the minor child or children of the parties, if any, from the state without the prior written consent of the other party or an order of the court; 2. cashing, borrowing against, canceling, transferring, disposing of, pr changing the beneficiaries of any insurance or any other coverage, including life, health, automobile, and disability, held for the benefit of the parties and their minor child or children; 3. transferring, encumbering, hypothecating, concealing, or in any way disposing of any property, real or personal, whether community, quasi-community, or separate, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court, except in the usual course of business or for the necessities of life; and 4. creating a nonprobate transfer or modifying a nonprobate transfer in the manner that affects the disposition of property subject to the transfer, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court. Before revocation of a nonprobate transfer can take effect or a right of supervisorship to property can be eliminated, notice of the change must be filed and served on the other party. you must notify each other of any proposed extraordinary expenditures at

least five business days prior to incurring these extraordinary expenditures and account to the court for all extraordinary expenditures made after these restraining orders are effective. However, you may use community property, quasi-community property, or your own separate property to pay an attorney to help you or to pay court costs. SANTA BARBARA COUNTy SUpERiOR COURT 1100 ANACAPA STREET P.O. BOX 21107, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101 The name, address, and telephone number of petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney are: BERTHA SALiNAS 1025 OLIVE ST. #37 SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101 Date:1/21/2014 Clerk, by Denyse Avila, Deputy, for Darrel E. parker, Executive Officer. Publish: MARCH 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014 _________________________________ SUMMONS (Family Law) CASE NUMBER 1439481 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: GERMAN ALFREDO SOTO FLORES you are being sued. NOTiCE TO THE pERSON SERVED: you are served as an individual. Petitioner ’s name is: MARICANDE ESTRADA you have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. if you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. you may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. you can get information about finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), or by contacting your local county bar association. NOTICE: The restraining orders are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. Starting immediately, you and your spouse or domestic partner are restrained from 1. removing the minor child or children of the parties, if any, from the state without the prior written consent of the other party or an order of the court; 2. cashing, borrowing against, canceling, transferring, disposing of, pr changing the beneficiaries of any insurance or any other coverage, including life, health, automobile, and disability, held for the benefit of the parties and their minor child or children; 3. transferring, encumbering, hypothecating, concealing, or in any way disposing of any property, real or personal, whether community, quasi-community, or separate, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court, except in the usual course of business or for the necessities of life; and 4. creating a nonprobate transfer or modifying a nonprobate transfer in the manner that affects the disposition of property subject to the transfer, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court. Before revocation of a nonprobate transfer can take effect or a right of supervisorship to property can be eliminated, notice of the change must be filed and served on the other party. you must notify each other of any proposed extraordinary expenditures at least five business days prior to incurring these extraordinary expenditures and account to the court for all extraordinary expenditures made after these restraining orders are effective. However, you may use community property, quasi-community property, or your own separate property to pay an attorney to help you or to pay court costs. SANTA BARBARA COUNTy SUpERiOR COURT 1100 ANACAPA STREET P.O. BOX 21107, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101 The name, address, and telephone number of petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney are: MARICANDE ESTRADA 206 N. SALINAS STREET SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 Date:1/02/2014 Clerk, by Denyse Avila, Deputy, for Darrel E. parker, Executive Officer. Publish: MARCH 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014 _________________________________ SUMMONS (Dissolution of Marriage without Children) CASE NO. FN2014-051149 In the superior court of the State of Arizona in and for the County of Maricopa in re the matter of: TEENA C. KEpHART, 3410 W. Desert Vista Trail, phoenix, AZ 85083, Petitioner, And THEODOROS, VOUNiOTiS, Respondent, FROM THE STATE OF ARiZONA TO: THEODOROS VOUNiOTiS, Address Unknown To Petitioner

1.A lawsuit has been filed against you. A copy of the lawsuit and other court papers are served on you with this Summons. 2.If you do not want a judgment or order taken against you with or without your input, you must file and Answer of Response in writing with the Court, and pay the filing fee. if you do not file an Answer or Response, the other party may be given the relief requested in his or her Petition of Complaint. To file your Response or Answer, take or sent the Answer or Response to the Office of the Clerk of the Superior Court, 201 W. Jefferson Street, Phoenix, AZ 85003-2205, along with the appropriate filing fee. Mail a copy of your Response or Answer to the other party at the address listed at the top of this Summons. 3.If this Summons and the other court papers were served on you by a registered process server or the Sheriff within the State of Arizona, your Response or Answer must be filed within TWENTy (20) CALENDAR DAyS from the date you were served., not counting the day you were served. If this Summons and the other papers were served on you by a registered process server or Sheriff outside the State of Arizona, your Response must be filed within THiRTy (30) CALENDAR DAyS from the date you were served, not counting the day you were served. Service by a registered process server or the Sheriff is complete when made. Service by Publication is complete 30 days after the date of the first publication. 4.you can get a copy of the court papers filed in the case from the petitioner at the address at the to of this paper, or from the Clerk of the Superior Court at the address listed in Paragraph 2 above. 5.Requests for reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities must be made to the office of the Judge or Commissioner assigned to the case five days before your scheduled court date. SIGNED AND SEALED this date: FEB 19, 2014 by MiCHAEL K. JEANES, CLERK, B. COWELL, DEpUTy CLERK. SEAL: Superior Court of Maricopa, State of Arizona. Publish: March 13, 20, 27, April 2, 2014 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as ANiMAL CARE HOSpiTAL at 1307 North H St. STE A, Lompoc, CA 93436. Full name of registrant(s): Mendez, Tammy R DVM at business address 4076 E Hwy 246, Lompoc, CA 93436. This business is conducted by a Individual. This statement was filed with the County 3/12/2014. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: Tammy Mendez. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Carol Kraus, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2014-0000732 Publish: March 13, 20, 27, April 3, 2014. _________________________________ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME. CASE NO.1439825 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: Brooke Tanya Barbata, (PO Box 1373, Summerland, CA 93067) for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME: BROOKE TANyA BARBATA PROPOSED NAME: BROOKE TRilliAN WyRD

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court on April 16, 2014 at 9:30 am to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. The address of the court is 1100 Anacapa Street, Dept. 6, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Filed at Santa Barbara Superior Court on Feb 21, 2014 by Publish: March 13, 20, 27, April 3, 2014 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as (1)NIMMER LEGAL GRApHiCS (2)NiMMER piCTURES at 1040 Linden Avenue, Carpinteria, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): Nimmer, Laurence at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a Individual. This statement was filed with the County 3/14/2014. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the

See PUBliC NOTiCES Continued on page 23

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

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Public Notices Cont’d from page 22

use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2014-0000766 Publish: March 20, 27, April 3, 10, 2014. _________________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as KOGCO at 1165 Vallecito Road, Carpinteria, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): Odett, Keith at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a Individual. This statement was filed with the County 2/24/2014. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: Keith Odett. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jan Morales, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2014-0000545 Publish: March 20, 27, April 3, 10, 2014. _________________________________________

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE CASE NUMBER 1440222

ESTATE OF MARGARET JEANNE MASON To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of MARGARET JEANNE MASON. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by ROBERT MASON in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. The PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that ROBERT MASON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION request authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived

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notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 10, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. in Dept. 5 of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, Anacapa Division, at 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O. Box 21107, Santa Barbara, CA, 93121-1107.

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IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of a petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the heating date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: CHRISTOPHER W STEWARD, ESQ. SBN 171188, CHRISTOPHER W STEWARD, APLC, 2204 GARNET AVENUE, SUITE 301, SAN DIEGO, CA 92109, Telephone: 619-297-8480 Attorney for Petitioner Robert Mason Signed: Christopher W Steward, Attorney for Petitioner Publish: March 20, 27, April 3, 10, 2014. _________________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as RINCON BROADBAND at 3221 Laurel Canyon Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. Full name of registrant(s): Oshiro, Robert at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a Individual. This statement was filed with the County 3/7/2014. The registrant began transacting business on 1/1/2009. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy

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Thursday, March 20, 2014 n 23

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of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2014-0000687 Publish: March 20, 27, April 3, 10, 2014. _________________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as WEBSITE RETROFIT at 20 Skyline Circle, Santa Barbara, CA 93102 (mailing address: PO Box 838, Santa Barbara, CA 93102). Full name of registrant(s): Villalba Lopez, Jacquelineat business address same as above. This business is conducted by a Individual. This statement was filed with the County 3/17/2014. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed:Jacqualine Villalba Lopez. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by N/A, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2014-0000794 Publish: March 20, 27, April 3, 10, 2014.

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24  Thursday, March 20, 2014

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

hindsight calendar hindsight

Coastal View NewsCrossword • Tel: (805) 684-4428 The Weekly

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ACROSS 1 Not COD 16 15 8 Online merchant 18 17 15 Pangs of conscience 20 21 22 19 16 Pottery 25 26 23 24 casserole dish 17 Show of tears, 28 29 30 27 maybe 33 34 31 32 18 Solidifies 19 Bar fixture 35 36 37 20 Smiling, perhaps Thursday, March 14 39 40 41 42 43 22 Comedy routine story38time, Library preschooler 10:30 a.m., Carpinteria library, 5141 Carpinteria 23Ave., Zealous 684-4314 45 46 47 48 44 25 Make revisions Rotary Club of Carpinteria meeting, 11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m., lions Park Community 50 51 49 to Building, 6197 Casitas Pass road, non-members rSVP to 566-1906 26 Aviation hero Bingo, 1 p.m., Veterans 54 Ave. 55 56 52 Building, 941 53 Walnut 27 Handed over and Arts & Crafts Fair, 3-6:30 p.m., linden Ave. downtown, Craft Farmers Market 59 60 57 58 28fair: Extend, as a 684-2770 lease Free Stress Relief Veteran’s Acupuncture Clinic, 6-7 p.m. 62 drop in, 4690 Carpinteria 61 30Ave. Seasoned Ste. A, 684-5012 64 63 31 Poem8ofp.m., lament Karaoke, Carpinteria & linden Pub, 4954 Carpinteria linden Ave. 33 Sub sandwich Dusty Jugz Country Night, 9 p.m., the Palms, 701 linden Ave., Copyright 2014684-3811 by The Puzzle Syndicate 35 Scuba device 38 Polish remover Friday, 15 6 Chemical 40 FierceMarch 43 What a hairline 54 Old Russian feline CVCC Lunch & Learn, noon-1 p.m., Curious Cup, 929 linden 684-5479 x10. 44 ____ gin fizz compound sometimes does Ave., assembly The Peace Vigil, 5-6 p.m., corner & Egyptian Carpinteria Ave. 55 Museum pieces 45 Chamber 7 Strip group bareof linden44 beetle Music in our Schools Month Concert, 7:3046 p.m., CHS cafeteria,58 4810 foothillTV road, 48 Make 8 List ender tracks that's Conundrum Aniston's 684-4701 49 Send packing 47 Lands, in Lucca usually co-star Back Track, 9 p.m., the Palms, 701 linden53 Ave., 684-3811 50 Word 60 Mai ___ before abbreviated Ready, in the 9 Irked, with "off" Star or Ranger kitchen 51 Neck ring March of old 10 Saturday, 16Humerus locale 52 Mixed with 11 Gets one's Carpinteria Salt Marsh docent ledgoat tours, 10 a.m., free walks start from the park 54sign, 12 "Casino" co-star Connection 684-8077 56 20-20, Pokemon 13 Temptress e.g. Magicarp League, 11 a.m., Curious Cup, 929 linden Ave., (619) 972-3467 57 14 Get back on Took a breather Energy Balancing, 2-4 p.m., Curious Cup, 929 linden Ave., free Answer to Last Week's Crossword 21 "Boyz the “Thetrack Quiet Man,” 8 p.m., Plazan Playhouse theater, 4916 Carpinteria Ave., $5 59 Clenched, as Hood" director Y A WAve., L U N C A P D R A T The Groovie Line, 9 p.m., the Palms, 701 linden 684-3811 24 College offering A R I A teeth N E R V E E U R O 61 Benign tumor 29 Comedian's W E L T A G A I N S N O W Monday, 62 CrummyMarch feeling 18 asset S A L E S W O M A N T O M E Women Inspiration, 5315 foothill 63 Law of 30 11:30 student's Goinga.m.-1:30 nowherep.m., Girls inc. S LofACarpinteria, T N O M I N A L road, worry$70, 684-636432 Up to now E S O T E R I C N U N Basic Bridge, 1 p.m., Sandpiper Mobile 64 NBA 34 "Death Be statistic ___ Village P O clubhouse, P D E 3950 A L Via T real, M E684-5921 C C A Mah Jongg, 1 p.m., Sandpiper clubhouse, 3950 Via real, 729-1310 Proud"Mobile Village I D E S S T A I R D R A W Bingo, 941 Walnut DOWN1 p.m., Veterans 36Building, Sticky stuff C Ave. A D E T E N T E R O V A Celebrate Recovery (Hurts, Hangups, 6 p.m., Church, 1 Foreshadow 37 Poster pointerAddictions), R A P firstGBaptist I V E A W A5026 Y rd.,as 684-3353 2foothill 38 Oakland's Dismissal, A N A G R A M L I A R CVCC’s 6-8 p.m., Carpinteria fromCuba officeTrip Meeting, county D I Rlibrary E RMulti-Purpose I F L E R room, A N G5141 E Ave., 684-5479 3Carpinteria 39 Pine x10 Eliciting feeling or cedar M E S A I N L A W B E A D A 4Community Toolbox: Serve the Depressed 41 How Winner's take Throattopart I C O N Person S T with A T Understanding, E L E N D p.m., song Carpinteria Woman’s Club, 1059 Vallecito road, 57-8:30 42 Most Soprano's macabre T E N T H Y P684-2509 E R E D G Y

Tuesday, March 19

Coffee with Cops, 9-11 a.m., Crushcakes, 4945 Carpinteria Ave., 684-5405 x437 Carpinteria Writers’ Group, 10 a.m.-noon, Carpinteria library multipurpose room, Sudoku Puzzle by websudoku.com 5141 Carpinteria Ave., 684-7838 Sandpiper Duplicate Bridge Club, 1 p.m., Sandpiper Mobile Village Clubhouse, Level: Easy 3950 Via real, 684-5522 Battle of the Books club, 3:30 p.m., Curious Cup, 929 linden Ave., 220-6608 Beginner Meditation Workshop, 6:30 p.m., Curious Cup back meeting room, 929 linden Ave., 705-4703 Al-Anon Meeting, 7-8 p.m., faith lutheran Church, 1335 Vallecito Place, 331-4817 ESL Class, 7 p.m., first Baptist Church, 5026 foothill road, free, 684-3353

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5 7 1 4 2 7 3 7 1 2 E a c h S u d o kMarch u h a s a20 Wednesday, 6 8 2 5 unique solution that can Morning Rotary meeting be reached logically with- with Cyndi Macias, The Gym Next Door, 7-8 a.m., 2 $10 6 1 3 Woman’s Club, 1059digits Vallecito rd., out guessing. Enter Meditation, 10:30-noon, Carpinteria Woman’s club, 1059 Vallecito rd., 847-208-6520 from 1 to 9 into the blank 7 Ave., 3 free, 684-8077 8 4Hall, 941 Walnut Knitting spaces.Group, Every 1-4 rowp.m., mustVeterans Memorial Fighting Parent 5:30-7 p.m., Canalino School, 1480 Carpinteria Ave., containBack one of each Program, digit. 9 3 8 6 963-1433 x125 or x132 as So must every column, Kiwanis Club3x3 Meeting, must every square.6 p.m., Veterans Memorial Hall, 941 Walnut Ave., 368-5644 5 3 2 1 Coastal View Book Club meeting, 7:30 p.m., Carpinteria Branch library, 684-4428 Level: Hard

Puzzle by websudoku.com 8 Ball Tournament, 7:30 p.m., Carpinteria & linden Pub, 4954 Carpinteria linden Ave.

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Last week’s answers:

2 7 5 8 4 6 9 3 1

1 8 9 7 3 2 4 5 6 8 7 1 6 3 4 6 5 1 9 2 8 7 Lani Garfield photography show, island Brewing Co., 5049 St.,7 745-8272 3 8 6 2 5 1 64 9 5 show, Corktree Cellars, 910 8 linden Michael Fisher Fish art 5 7 1 3 8 4 6684-1400 9 2 Ave., 6 3 7 1 2 8 5 4 9 Liz Brady art show, Porch, 3823 Santa Claus lane, 684-0300 7 6 2 4 3 9 Carpinteria 8 5 1 5103 2art show, friends of the library1used3Bookstore, Arturo Tello Ave., 7 6 3 2 5 4 1 9 8 566-0033 4 9 2 6 8 1 3 7 5 8 exhibit, 855 At the Arts Gallery, 855 linden 2 Ave., “SPACE” 684-7789 Carpinteria Plein Air Painters art show, lucky llama, 5100 Carpinteria Ave., 684-8811 9 3 4 8 1 6 7220-6608 5 2 Ave., 5 7 & Inspiration show, Curious 9 Imagination Cup, 929 linden 9 4 3 8 2 1 6 7 5 7 8 6 3 5 4 9 1 2 6 4 8 3 7 9 4 6 2 5 1 4 6 5 2 1 3 7 8 9 9 7 8 3 2 1 9 5 8 7 4 3 6 1 9 4 7 6 8 5 2 3 4 2 9 658432197

ONGOING

Thursday, March 14, 2013  25

by Margie E. Burke

th

Puzzle by websudoku.com

Puzzle by websudoku.com

3 7 2 1 9 5 8 6 4

Puzzle by websudoku.com

CArPiNteriA VAlley MuSeuM of HiStory

CArPiNtEriA VALLEy MusEuM of History As the nation gears up for March Madness (starting March 19), CVN The Warrior Band poses for a photograph theofsteps of the Santa thought it would be appropriate to stoke theonfire excitement with an Barbara County Courthouse in the 1930s. Common early Carpinteria image of Carpinteria’s version of highly competitive basketball. Sports surnames, such as Thurmond, Bailard and Senteney, filled the band rivals Carpinteria and Bishop Diego high schools vie for a piece of the roster. ball at this Feb. 7, 1978 game.

Readers– • Caption this photo •

He said, she said

Bring on the funny! Send us your best caption for this photo by Monday, March 25. Coastal View News is ready to get a little silly with Carpinteria history, and we’d like readers to join us by coming up with clever captions for photos from the past. At the end of each month we’ll publish our favorite caption submissions from readers. Get creative, get goofy, but keep comments brief and don’t expect CVN to print any inappropriate language or innuendo. All submissions will be edited for grammar, punctuation, length and content. Please send captions to news@coastalview. com. Caption writers selected for publication will receive the following grand prizes: bragging rights, name in lights (well, black ink) and a free copy of Coastal View News from any rack in Carpinteria Valley.

He said, she said Bring on the funny! To learn more about Carpinteria’s unique and interesting past, visit the Carpinteria Valley

Send usofyour best caption this Saturday photo by Monday, March Museum History, open Tuesdayfor through from 1 to 4 p.m. at 95624. Maple Ave. Coastal View News is ready to get a little silly with Carpinteria history, and we’d like readers to join us by coming up with clever captions for photos from the past. At the end of each month we’ll publish our favorite caption submissions from readers. Get creative, get goofy, but keep comments brief and don’t expect CVN to print Thursday, March 14 or innuendo. All submissions will be edited for gramany inappropriate language City ofpunctuation, Carpinteria Architectural Review Board meeting, 5:30 Council Chammar, length and content. Please send captions to p.m., news@coastalview. bers, Caption City Hall, 5775 Carpinteria 684-5405will receive the following grand com. writers selected forAve., publication prizes: bragging Friday, March rights, 15 name in lights (well, black ink) and a free copy of Coastal View News from any rack inBoard Carpinteria Valley. SB S. County Architectural of Review meeting, 9 a.m., 123 e. Anapamu St.,

Civic

rm. 17, Santa Barbara To learn more about Carpinteria’s unique and interesting past, visit the Carpinteria Valley

Monday, 18 Tuesday through Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. at 956 Maple Ave. Museum ofMarch History, open

SB County Zoning Administrator meeting, 9:30 a.m., 123 e. Anapamu St., rm. 17, Santa Barbara, 568-2000

Tuesday, March 19

SB County Board of Supervisors meeting, 9 a.m., Board of Supervisors Conference rm., 105 e. Anapamu St., Santa Barbara, 568-2000 Carpinteria-Summerland Fire Protection District Board meeting, 6:30 p.m., Council Chambers, City Hall, 5775 Carpinteria Ave., 684-5405

Ongoing

County Supervisor Salud Carbajal drop in office hours, friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Carpinteria Children’s Project at Main, 5201 8th St. rm. 101, 568-2186

Thursday, March 20, 2014  25

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

school notes

Capps’ office calls for student art entries

Representative Lois Capps’ office is seeking entries for the 2014 annual Congressional Art competition. All high school students in the 24th Congressional District can enter to have their winning work of art hang for one year in the U.S. Capitol, where thousands of visitors will see it. “This annual competition is a wonderful opportunity to support young artists across the nation,” Capps said. The completed work must be submitted by a high school student in California’s 24th Congressional District to one of Capps’ local offices no later than 5 p.m., Friday, April 18. The winning student will receive two roundtrip tickets for a ribbon-cutting ceremony and reception for the new display in June 2014. Art pieces must be two-dimensional, no larger than 28 by 28 inches and no more than 4 inches in depth including the frame in all dimensions. For detailed information on competition guidelines and framing instructions, and for entry forms, visit capps.house.gov/serving-you/art-competition.

Gamez graduates from Cal Lu

Blue Lotus Dharma WEDNESDAY EVENINGS 5:30 - 6:30 PM

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Free & open to the public, beginners welcome. Instructions and cushions provided.

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Author Mary Amato visited Carpinteria Middle School students during lunch last week.

Attempted and completed suicides are rarely impulsive acts.

CHS Virtual Enterprise class to hold car wash

Tickets purchased now for an April 12 carwash will help Carpinteria high School students take a bite out of the Big Apple. The Virtual enterprise class is scheduled to travel to New York City for a competition on April 1 and needs financial support. The carwash was originally scheduled for March 1 but had to be postponed due to weather until Saturday, April 12, from 8 a.m. until noon at Carpinteria Boys & Girls Club, 4849 Foothill Road. Car wash tickets can be purchased from Ve students.

SUBMiTTeD phOTO

Howard School students formed the Mockingbird Choir to sing in the school’s Talent Show.

Howard School students have talent

Wed, March 26 7:00 - 9:00pm Woman’s Club 1059 Vallecito Rd., Carpinteria, CA 93013 Info: (805) 570-3068

California Lutheran University announced that Carpinterian Joselyn Gamez earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology and is eligible to participate in the school’s commencement ceremony on May 17. CLU has an enrollment in 4,400 students and is based in Thousand Oaks.

The recent Talent Show at howard School demonstrated that the small school has big talent. From magicians to musicians, acts ran the gamut. Student Lea Grandle reportedly has a knack for standing on her hands, and Daniella Terry demonstrated an authentic hula dance. Others did comedy routines, and the dancing chickens provided their own twist on talent.

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CLIVIAS IN BLOOM SUCCULENTS GALOR

ABCs of Suicide

SUBMiTTeD phOTO

Springes! Sal 1 gallon size $4.50 5 gallon size $8.50

“HopeNet of Carpinteria is providing a valuable service for all Carpinterians with their Suicide Prevention Workshop. If you are in a crisis situation or know someone who is, I urge you to attend.”

CMS students eat with author

Students at Carpinteria Middle School have had multiple authors walk their hallways recently, the most recent being “Guitar Notes” writer Mary Amato. She shared the process behind penning her 15 books, and the songstress and ukulele player also entertained the students with song during their lunch period. The song came from her most recent youth book “Guitar Music.”

Meditation

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26  Thursday, March 20, 2014

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Kids discuss drought Students at Our Lady of Mount Carmel School are up to date on the drought and many of the challenges that come with a third dry winter in California. Second-grade teacher Amanda McElfresh recently launched the school’s Writing Academy, an after-school offering that gives students opportunities to improve their writing skills and weigh in on important topics like the statewide drought. The class meets weekly for one hour and is available to grades first through fourth. CVN invited the young wordsmiths to share their ideas on the drought with readers. Enjoy. It is important to save water because if we didn’t we would all die. If we did save water we would all live and survive. We would give the plants water to drink. But if we didn’t, all the plants would die and we need plants because they give us food to live.

You can reduce water use by taking less showers and not taking so much water from Lake Cachuma because the drought might get worse. We can take shorter showers to save water too. - Isabel Arroyo, second grade

- Angelique huey, second grade It is hard to save water because you need it a lot; like for showers, drinking, washing your dishes, and ice for your freezer. - Sofia Prober, second grade It is important to save water because if we run out of water that would be terrible! It could also be bad because animals that live under water could die. Oh no! If we do not have enough water, we could die. We had a big storm this month! Hurray!

- Ava Shabestari, second grade

Lake Cachuma should be our last thought for water. As you know, we are in a drought. We should take care of the water we have. First we should take one shower a day. Lake Cachuma is almost gone! Stop using water from Lake Cachuma.

- Katlyn Jensen, fourth grade

the drought is not good at all. the animals will die and that is not good. It is not good for people either. the animals probably feel thirsty. the people probably feel thirsty too. - Liam regan, first grade

As you know, there is a massive drought going on. To help stop it, we must protect our lakes that provide water for us. We can also help stop it by using as little water as possible. We need to stop this drought because as most people know, it is essential for life. This drought needs to stop or we could have serious problems.

- Anna Braastad, fourth grade I have an idea about an invention that can save water. My idea is to have the amount of water you need to bathe. So once you use that water, it goes down a drain and then it is filtered. Then the water is reused for your next shower. This is a way to save water.

- Brett Persoon, third grade You can solve the drought problem by using the water that is already used. You can take two minute showers and you can stop wasting water. You can save water by turning off the water when you wash a dish or brush your teeth. You can also put less water in your bath tub. - grayson Macleod, third grade

We need to stop using all of this water. As you know, we are in a drought, so we should stop using water. Did you know when you flush the toilet, you are wasting six gallons of water? A five-minute shower wastes more than twenty gallons of water. We should take less showers and baths. When we take a shower, it should be as short as possible. When we take baths, we should not put that much water in it. We should not drink that much water either. Although I am not saying you shouldn’t drink barely any water. We should tell everyone to not waste water!

- Caitlin hubbs, fourth grade

Did you know that California is in a drought? We are wasting water so we need to save it. I think it is important to save water because water is a resource. A way we can save it is by taking shorter showers, not leaving the water running, and turn off our sprinklers. This is how you can save water during a drought.

- Ava Prober, third grade A kind of invention to help with the drought is to have a bottle underground. It helps by staying underground. It is one hundred feet long and it’s full of water and if there’s a drought, then it will give the land water. the bottle is metal so no one would take any. - Emma Wessel, second grade

It is important to save water because we would die without it. We also would be very smelly because we wouldn’t be able to take showers. We would also be very thirsty. We also could not wash our hands without water.

I can help the drought by using less water. I won’t drink too much water. I won’t take too many showers. I won’t use the sink that much.

- danica damiani, second grade

- Aidan Naber, first grade

The Santa Barbara drought is affecting animals by not having food or water for the animals. Also, it is affecting us by animals dying and that means no food for us. Animals are very important, especially bees because they pollinate our plants. It is also important to save animals because they can be our only friends. It’s so important to save water to help the animals.

- Luis huerta, fourth grade The drought is affecting wild animals because if they don’t get water the more likely there’s a chance they’ll become extinct. The really rare animals will be gone, so please try to save water because that will make animals very happy and they’ll live longer. Many animals like deer, fox, and rabbits will be gone. When the animals are gone like the pigs, there will be no bacon. The animals we eat will no longer be there. So please try to save water for all of us and the animals.

- Natasha huey, third grade

how are plants affected by the drought? Well, they’re probably dying. Without water, their roots will die. If the roots are dying then the plants are dying. Plus, if plants die, that would be bad because we need them for stuff. But it is a good thing that it rained a lot. - gabriela ochoa Medieros, second grade

If I were to make an invention, it would be a water machine. It would stop the drought. We would have more water.

- Elijah dunn, first grade I can solve droughts by making a machine that stops droughts. I can help by saving water. I think we should filter out ocean water. don’t waste water or leave the water on. - Ben Segal, second grade

If I could make an invention to stop the drought, I would make a special thing that can contract water. This is how it works: you basically just throw a little marble into the clouds. Then the marble is actually electric. Then you will get a big jar of water right under where you throw the marble and then it will rain and all of the rivers will be full. I think that my invention will help the drought.

- Alexia horton, first grade

It is hard to save water because we need showers and baths. Everyone has to drink water to survive. When kids flush the toilet a bunch of times, they are wasting water. Do not waste water and do not throw it out.

- Kevin Allison, second grade I can reduce water by not taking long baths. I can give water that I drink to the plants. I can drink water but not waste it. We need to stop wasting water. That is how we can save water.

- Emma Coglizer, third grade

I save water by turning off the water while I brush my teeth. I can also take a shorter shower. We cannot wash our cars. We can also not water our grass. Saving water is cool! - Sophia regan, first grade I will save water when I get a glass of water and drink it all. I will only get water when I need it. I know that there is a drought now.

- Sadie Coglizer, first grade

Thursday, March 20, 2014  27

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

on the road

Join the Carpinteria Valley Chamber of Commerce

Austria & Germany featuring Oktoberfest September 22-30, 2014 $3,099* per person/double

*See complete itinerary for details

Highlights • Round trip Airfare - LAX • 10 Meals • 7 Nights Accommodations in Innsbruck • Munich’s Oktoberfest • Neuschwanstein Castle • Imperial Palace & much more!

Join us for a free informational meeting on Friday March 28, 2014 at 6:30pm Shepard Place Apartments - Club House • 1069 Casitas Pass Road • Carpinteria, CA Public Welcome! Please RSVP to (805) 684-5479 *For complete trip details and brochure or to RSVP for presentation:

tel: (805) 684-5479 info@carpinteriachamber.org www.carpinteriachamber.org

E

MAGAZIN CARPINTERIA

Available at local businesses, Coastal View News office and at carpinteriamagazine. com

winter2014

CVN hits new low

Herbert and Suzanne DeFriez carried Coastal View News below the 60th Parallel. The adventurers first touched down in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on Jan. 31 and toured other points south before embarking on the Cal Discoveries Travel series cruise on the M.S. L’Austral to Antarctica. The travelers cruised to unique, pristine and icy stops on the Antarctic Peninsula, where they viewed wild animals in their habitat. Penguins, humpback whales and leopard seals are among the animals that call Antarctica home. The DeFriezes took the opportunity to head south because Herbert turns 70 this year, and they fear that climate change will cause Antarctica to close to tourists in the near future.

CST #2048841-40

What’s new at the harbor seal rookery? The following counts taken from March 10 to 16 were compiled from Carpinteria Seal Watch volunteer reports. Carpinteria harbor seal beach closure runs from Dec. 1 to June 1 each year. Seal Watch volunteers are still welcome to sign up by calling 684-2247.

High Adult Count

Travelers pay tribute to Cape Horn’s victims

Jim Sandison, Peter Nichols and Steve Bliss traveled to the tip of South America on a two-week trip for the three old sailors. They whipped out their CVN on Horn Island at the base of a steel monument with a silhouette of an albatross representing the 7,000 sailors who perished trying to round Cape Horn between 1650 and 1914, prior to the opening of the Panama Canal. The travelers also cruised to the fjords of the Straits of Magellan, Tierra del Fuego and Patagonia. “The trip took two weeks and for three old sailors we told lots of lies and had a lot more fun,” commented the travelers.

Going on the road?

Snap a photo with your Coastal View News in hand and

email it to news@coastalview.com. Tell us about your trip!

Visitors

260 80+ High Pup Count

Over 1,703 people came to view the seals. Volunteers noted origins including China, Finland, Mexico, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Ireland, Norway, Denmark, Iowa, Rhode Island, North Carolina, Arizona, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Hawaii, Wisconsin, Washington, Kansas, Louisiana, Oregon, Colorado, Oklahoma, New York, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Vermont, Alaska and Utah. Groups included a couple of schools and staff from EDC.

Disturbances

There were two instances of oil workers scaring the seals by deliberately approaching too closely at the pier end turnaround, two disturbances from pier activity, one by a helicopter and a major disturbance caused by a kayaker entering the rookery area.

Natural History Notes

Harbor seals do not migrate, but remain in a local area. Carpinteria harbor seals may stay within about a 50 to 100 mile radius. Elephant seals migrate thousands of miles to the north twice annually, and male California sea lions typically migrate north after breeding, ranging as far as British Columbia.

More Info

The Carpinteria harbor seal rookery is located immediately east of Casitas Pier, between the Carpinteria Bluffs Nature Preserve and Carpinteria State Beach. Please remember not to bring dogs, bicycles or loud voices to view the seals. Harbor seals, when disturbed, may flee and become separated from their pups. Volunteers ask that dogs remain outside the rope area at all times. Call 684-2247 or email CarpSealWatch@gmail.com if you are interested in volunteering. To find out more, visit sealwatchcarpinteria.com.

28 n Thursday, March 20, 2014

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

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Buying or selling a home with us is like a walk on the beach!

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4915-C Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria • 805.684.4161

MAGAZINE Available at local businesses, Coastal View News office and at www.carpinteriamagazine.com

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