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4/20 2014

07

PUBLISHER

Matt Sandberg msandberg@summitdaily.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Ben Trollinger btrollinger@summitdaily.com MANAGING EDITOR

Jessica Smith jsmith@summitdaily.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Jason Woodside jwoodside@summitdaily.com MARKETING DIRECTOR

Maggie Butler mbutler@summitdaily.com ADVERTISING SALES STAFF

Cindy Boisvert, Ashley Kujawski, Sara Petty, Josilynn Reynolds, Meredith Metz

GUTS JOINT DISCUSSION

16

04 SMOKE SHACKS STAMPED OUT

Intro by Kelsey Fowler

SUPPORT STAFF

Susan Gilmore

CREATIVE LEAD

Ashley Detmering CREATIVE TEAM

Carly Hoover, Darin Bliss, Malisa Samsel CREATIVE TEAM SUPERVISOR

Afton Groepper CONTRIBUTORS

Kelsey Fowler, Krista Driscoll, Lauren Glendenning, Nick Young, Noah Klug Uncredited photos from Thinkstock PRINTING & PRE-PRESS

Colorado Mountain News Media Gypsum, Colorado

On The Cover: Photo by Nick Young

331 W. Main St., Frisco, CO 80443 p: 970.668.3998 | f: 970.668.3859 www.summitdaily.com

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Jim Morgan

General Manager

CANNABIS CODE

05 WHAT ‘LEGAL’ MEANS

by Noah Klug

07 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

by Kelsey Fowler

10 MARIJUANA MATH by Krista Driscoll

POT’S PROGRESS

14 PERSPECTIVES by Kelsey Fowler

16 CANNABIS:

A LOOK BACK

by Jessica Smith Copyright ©2014. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited.

23 MOUNTAIN

COMMUNITIES

by Lauren Glendenning

38 EDIBLES

30 HIGH TIME

FOR A SNACK

by Krista Driscoll

COUNTER CULTURE

36 KNOW YOUR VESSELS

by Krista Driscoll

37 HASHING IT OUT by Krista Driscoll

38 WHAT’S IN A STRAIN

by Krista Driscoll 420 - 2014 3

JOINT DISCUSSION

SMOKE SHACKS STAMPED OUT DOES THE DESTRUCTION OF SMOKE SHACKS ON VAIL RESORTS LAND RESOLVE A LEGAL/SAFETY ISSUE OR UNDERMINE A UNIQUE SUBCULTURE? over the last year at Vail, Beaver Creek, Keystone and Breckenridge. On Feb. 14, an “Inside Edition” video showed skiers and riders smoking what appeared to be marijuana inside one such structure at Breckenridge Ski Resort — a two-story building known as “Leo’s.” Officials destroyed the structure using explosives shortly after the video aired. A Facebook page, “Leo’s Rebuild Project,” has received more than 4,000 likes so far. A YouTube video published March 4, “Local’s Edition - Booze

Drinking Skiers (Inside Edition Parody)” has more than 40,000 views, and copies the style and wording of the “Inside Edition” video, just replacing marijuana with alcohol. In a prepared statement, Blaise Carrig, president of Vail Resorts’ Mountain Division, said: “In addition to destroying illegal structures where this kind of illegal activity may be taking place, we are communicating the legalities around marijuana use with our guests and the community.” — Kelsey Fowler

PRO

CON

It’s our responsibility as stewards of that land to work with the Forest Service to identify and dispose of those illegal structures. … The long and short of it is, we don’t need a reason because it’s an illegal structure on the land and that’s within our rights. – RUSS PECORARO, Vail Resorts spokesman

This whole thing was disastrous from the start, and it is very upsetting to know the consequences of opportunistic and tabloid journalism. Blaming and punishing everyone else for those idiots in the video is like categorizing your entire family over its least-desirable member. It was too quick a move. … This has really made me consider, for once in years, to not obtain my Epic Pass next season. The attitude of Vail Resorts is one that has scoffed at the local population, and I don’t think this violent act was the end of their actions. – JOHN HALL, former full-time resident of Breckenridge

Suppose someone went into a structure and got high, and collided into a child, who they killed or hurt. The first question is if we knew about the structure, and if so, why didn’t we tear it down. It’s a safety and liability issue. – BILL KIGHT, USFS public affairs officer The safety of our guests and our employees is our highest priority and we therefore take a zero tolerance approach to skiing or riding under the influence. - BLAISE CARRIG, president of Vail Resorts’ Mountain Division, in a prepared statement It’s pretty clear to us, as far as legality, there’s really no gray area in Amendment 64 as far as it being legal (in public). We support the ski resort keeping it safe, family friendly and following those federal land statutes about not using marijuana. – JORDAN SCHULTZ, coordinator of the Summit County Healthy Futures Initiative Despite Colorado law, marijuana remains illegal on federal lands, period. For the 22 ski areas in Colorado that operate on national forest system lands, marijuana is still prohibited. Let me remind everyone that you can be cited and fined for marijuana use and possession on national forests. I will also add that it is against the law for anyone to build any structures on national forest system lands without a permit. - SCOTT FITZWILLIAMS, forest supervisor for the White River National Forest, in a prepared statement

A number of comments accompanied the Feb. 26 Summit Daily News article about the destruction of the shacks: Again, what about drinking and skiing/riding?????? inside edition made our town/resort look like a bunch of idiots. - JUSTIN SAUNDERS “Using any ski lift, ski slope or trail while under the influence of drugs or alcohol also is prohibited under the Colorado Ski Safety Act.” They openly provide alcohol at most of the resorts. Nobody at the bar goes on the lifts after drinking? - TONY BARONE What a bunch of hypocrites. Selling alchohol [sic] openly and legally all over the mountain while hand-wringing about the dangers of pot. Might want to stick to the safety aspects of having un-permitted structures and leave it at that. - CARLSON PETERS I read with interest these comments as I thought the same thing! Sell booze and let people ride and ski drunk or at least buzzed on booze that Vail makes $$ on... but God forbid anyone has a toke and then skis. Smoking pot at the ski area has been going as long as the ski area has been there... shacks or not. Vail is so hypocritical in so many ways... - MAUREEN HYLAND

DECIDE for YOURSELF

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ZACH BRESCIA. LEO’S SHACK IN BRECKENRIDGE SKI RESORT, BEFORE AND AFTER DEMOLITION.

A SWIRLING STORM of social media backlash hit Vail Resorts as beloved secret structures on ski resort lands were destroyed this spring in an effort to prevent marijuana consumption. A number of structures reportedly associated with prohibited marijuana use, and constructed illegally on U.S. Forest Service land, were razed. The structures, known as “smoke shacks,” have been destroyed as Vail Resorts and the Forest Service are made aware of them. Mountain operations teams and USFS officials have destroyed “several”

CANNABIS CODE

F IR S T,

there may be a misconception that marijuana is now legal, which is untrue. Most anything to do with marijuana remains illegal because it violates federal law. The situation is that Colorado state law now allows use and cultivation of marijuana in certain circumstances, and the federal government is being less active in enforcing federal marijuana laws. However, landlords and tenants should understand that the federal government can, and does, continue to enforce marijuana laws in Colorado from time to time, particularly where a person is also accused of other law violations.

by NOAH KLUG

UNDERSTANDING ISSUES RAISED IN THE CONTEXT OF RESIDENTIAL LEASES, LANDLORDS AND POT

S E CO ND,

landlords often wonder if they are allowed to ban marijuana in a leased premises. The answer is yes. Many standard leases already provide that the tenant will not violate any laws. Under such broad language, the use and/or cultivation of marijuana by the tenant already violates the lease (because marijuana violates federal law) and thus can be grounds for eviction. Landlords may add even more express language to their leases disallowing marijuana in the premises, if desired. Marijuana is automatically disallowed with regard to any Section 8 (low-income) housing, which is federally regulated. There is apparently no requirement for landlords to accommodate the use of medical marijuana under the Americans with Disabilities Act because landlords need not accommodate an activity that violates federal law.

TH IRD,

some landlords go the other direction and wonder whether they may permit marijuana in a leased premises. The answer is that landlords may allow marijuana, but it raises tricky issues. Given that marijuana remains illegal, it might be most prudent for these landlords to turn a blind eye to the tenants’ activities rather than expressly provide in the lease that marijuana is permitted. Landlords should consider that allowing marijuana may expose them to liability. First, marijuana may violate restrictive covenants and result in enforcement against the landlord by a homeowners association or neighboring owner. Second, marijuana may violate zoning laws and result in enforcement against the landlord by the local government. Third, there is the chance that the federal government could seek to penalize the landlord for allowing illegal activity.

420 - 2014 5

CANNABIS CODE

FO U R T H,

even if a landlord allows marijuana, many local governments require tenants to obtain a permit before using and/or cultivating marijuana in a leased premises. For instance, such permits are required by Summit County and the town of Breckenridge. The permits typically require tenants to obtain express permission from their landlord to use marijuana in the premises and impose other restrictions (such as that marijuana odor may not escape the premises and that a grow area may need to be secured). Landlords and tenants should check local ordinances for details.

F IFT H,

where a landlord chooses to expressly allow marijuana, the landlord should consider addressing marijuana issues in the lease. For example, a landlord could require proof that a tenant using medical marijuana is fully compliant with state law. Landlords allowing marijuana may also wish to require a larger security deposit (particularly to address mold issues that commonly result from marijuana cultivation); to require the tenant to pay for any increases in the landlord’s insurance premiums or utility bills caused by the marijuana (particularly energy bills caused by grow lamps); and to indemnify the landlord from any claims arising from the tenant’s marijuana-related activities. In sum, landlords are not required to allow marijuana in their leased premises. If they do so, they should be cautious concerning potential liability and consider including appropriate protections in the lease.

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CANNABIS CODE

GET INQUISITIVE ABOUT

YOUR CANNABIS

WHO CAN BUY MARIJUANA, WHERE IT’S GROWN AND WHAT THE STATE IS DOING WITH ALL THAT TAX MONEY by KELSEY FOWLER IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS about the framework and

regulations supporting the purchase of recreational marijuana in Summit County, you’ll likely find many of your answers here. Statutes, codes and other sources have been cited for those who wish to explore further any individual query.

Who can purchase recreational marijuana? Anyone 21 and older, with a valid government ID, is allowed to purchase, smoke and possess marijuana in Colorado. Much like in a liquor store, individuals need to show an ID in order to make purchases. You can share with a friend, as long as you aren’t getting paid in the process. (Colorado Department of Revenue: Permanent Rules Related to the Colorado Retail Marijuana Code, p. 36, 48, section C)

How much can individuals buy? In a single transaction, Colorado residents can purchase up to 1 ounce, while out-of-state visitors can purchase 1/4 ounce. All adults 21 and older can possess up to 1 ounce on their person. Researchers have concluded the average joint contains slightly less than a half-gram of marijuana. An ounce is slightly more than 28 grams, so 1 ounce equals approximately 60 joints. (Colorado Department of Revenue: Permanent Rules Related to the Colorado Retail Marijuana Code, p. 48, section D; The Denver Post)

How much does it cost? In the medical-marijuana market, ounces run from $150 to close to $300. But the more common purchase amount is an eighth of an ounce, which costs around $25 to $45 for medical marijuana. Stores have set their own prices for retail products, but customers have to pay state and local taxes for the marijuana — 25 percent for the state, on top of a 5 percent excise tax in Summit County and other retail sales taxes. Most stores will only accept cash because banking regulations mean that marijuana stores commonly don’t have access to banking services. People can make multiple purchases in the same day, as long as they do not exceed the 1-ounce limit. (The Denver Post)

Where and when can people purchase marijuana? Licensed retail shops began selling recreational marijuana on Jan. 1, 2014. The shops were previously medical marijuana dispensaries and may or may not have chosen to continue to sell medical products in addition to retail products. The earliest brandnew retail shops can open is Oct. 1, 2014. Shops have hours mandated by the state, much like liquor stores, so no purchases can be made before 8 a.m. (Colorado Department of Revenue: Permanent Rules Related to the Colorado Retail Marijuana Code, p. 42, 48, section A; The Denver Post)

420 - 2014 7

CANNABIS CODE

Why are marijuana stores having trouble with banks?

The issue is rooted in the Currency and Foreign Transactions Reporting Act of 1970, commonly called the Bank Secrecy Act, which regulates how banks must report and respond to transactions believed to be linked to illegal activity. Marijuana sales are sanctioned in Colorado by the state government, but they remain illegal federally, leaving banks and businesses in a legal limbo. On Friday, Feb. 14, the Obama administration issued new guidelines pertaining to banks in relation to recreational and medical marijuana stores, but according to The New York Times, the banking industry responded that the new guidelines would not be sufficient to make banks feel at ease about opening accounts for or granting loans to marijuana businesses because the drug would still be illegal under the federal Controlled Substances Act. (The New York Times)

Where can people legally smoke or consume marijuana? The only place it’s 100 percent OK to consume marijuana is in a private residence, with permission from the owner. Most ski areas are on federal land, where marijuana use and possession is still illegal — same with national parks, national forests and national monuments. Hotels and resorts can institute their own smoking policies. Under Colorado’s Clean Indoor Air Act, marijuana smoking isn’t allowed anywhere that cigarette smoking is also banned. Consumption is specifically banned in any state-licensed marijuana facility. (Colorado Clean Indoor Air Act; Colorado Department of Revenue: Permanent Rules Related to the Colorado Retail Marijuana Code, p. 49)

A VARIETY OF MARIJUANA STRAINS LINE THE SHELVES AT ALPENGLOW BOTANICALS. A SIGN CLEARLY STATES THEY’RE FOR MEDICINAL USE ONLY. WHILE RECREATIONAL USE IS NOW LEGAL, MANY SHOPS STILL KEEP “TOP SHELF” STRAINS EXCLUSIVE FOR THEIR MEDICAL PATIENTS.

8 Rocky Mountain Marijuana

Can people take marijuana out of Colorado? Definitely not. Every city and county in Colorado has its own marijuana regulations, so even transporting from place to place within the state can be tricky. It is still illegal to transport marijuana across state lines, even if it was purchased legally in Colorado. Denver International Airport announced it is against the law to take marijuana into the airport, as well. (www.colorado.gov; The Denver Post)

How much money is the state making? Business licenses cost anywhere from $2,750 to $14,000, plus local fees. In November, voters passed a 15 percent excise tax and 10 percent sales tax on recreational marijuana. That 25 percent state tax is expected to generate $70 million every year. The first $40 million will go toward school construction, and the rest will be used to regulate the marijuana business and put together educational campaigns. (www.colorado.gov; Proposition AA)

Does anyone know who is purchasing marijuana? Amendment 64 prohibits a list of marijuana purchasers, but customers will be on camera. The state’s rules require shops have security cameras pointed at the cash register, the entrances and the exits. (Amendment 64, p. 8, section C; Colorado Department of Revenue: Permanent Rules Related to the Colorado Retail Marijuana Code, p. 37)

How are marijuana sales monitored? Colorado’s seed-to-sale marijuana inventory tracking system doesn’t track every plant. But businesses are required to record their process through the tracking system, which is meant to ensure the product does not get outside the state. Businesses are subject to audits or inspections by the state Marijuana Enforcement Division, as well. The marijuana must have a label that lists its potency and any nonorganic pesticides or fungicides used in its cultivation. (The Denver Post; Colorado Department of Revenue: Marijuana Enforcement Division website; Colorado Department of Revenue: Permanent Rules Related to the Colorado Retail Marijuana Code, p. 92)

What can people grow? Adults can grow up to six plants in their own home, three of which can be flowering at once, and in a locked, contained space. It is legal to keep the resulting harvest of the plants at home, even if the amount exceeds 1 ounce. Individuals can only transport 1 ounce or less. However, landlords are also allowed to create policies for their private properties. (Colorado Amendment 64, p. 4, section 3)

Where do shops get their marijuana? Until October 2014, retail marijuana stores must grow at least 70 percent of the product they sell. The first supply sold to customers starting on Jan. 1, 2014, came from a one-time transfer from the stores’ medical marijuana supplies. (Colorado Department of Revenue: Permanent Rules Related to the Colorado Retail Marijuana Code, pp. 22, 48, section A1)

What about safety concerns? Many shops must be located at least 1,000 feet away from schools, and the state has mandated any marijuana products must be sold in childproof packaging. Certain marketing has also been banned, in hopes of limiting exposure to children. Sharing or giving marijuana to minors is a crime, which carries similar penalties as providing alcohol to minors. (The Denver Post; Colorado Department of Revenue: Permanent Rules Related to the Colorado Retail Marijuana Code, pp. 2, 114)

Can employers still fire people from jobs for smoking marijuana? Yes, employers still can fire workers for using it, on or off duty. State law gives employers total authority to impose any drug regulations they wish. (The Denver Post)

Are people allowed to drive? A state law creates a pre-set limit for drivers, similar to alcohol. Drivers with a reading of 5 nanograms of active THC in their systems will be considered impaired and will be cited. It is illegal to smoke or eat marijuana in a moving vehicle, but it may be carried as long as it is in a closed container. (Colorado House Bill 13-1325; www.colorado.gov)

420 - 2014 9

CANNABIS CODE

THE STATE OF COLORADO limits the amount of marijuana a person can purchase at one time to an ounce for in-state residents and a quarter-ounce for out-of-state visitors. But when faced with options ranging from straight buds to hash to edibles, trying to figure out what that means can be trickier than you think. Each marijuana strain and even individual plants contain varying amounts of active THC, which is typically measured in milligrams. “What we look at as your average bud out there, the average flower, is around 16 (percent) to 17 percent THC in the bud,” said Nick Brown, of High Country Healing in Silverthorne. “If you take one gram of bud, 17 percent of that gram is THC, which is 170 milligrams.” This measurement is used as a baseline of comparison for other products, such as edibles and concentrates. If you do the math, a quarter-ounce of marijuana buds, also called flowers, is roughly equivalent to 1,050 to 1,400 milligrams of active THC. An edible made from THC oil or butter can contain as much as 100 milligrams of active THC, according to state retail marijuana laws, which means you could potentially buy 10 to 14 cookies, brownies, juice boxes, etc., as an equivalent to that quarter-ounce. But here’s where the math gets tricky. The Colorado Marijuana Enforcement Division hasn’t yet set standards on testing and labeling most cannabis products, so it’s hard to know how much active THC you are getting when you start combining buds, edibles and hash. Brown said it’s up to each individual retail store to make sure they are doing things legally and limiting customers to the correct amount of products for each purchase. “What the Marijuana Enforcement Division had us do is break it down ourselves and say that 1 gram of pot is equal to two edibles,” Brown said. Brown said High Country Healing stays on the conservative side to ensure compliance with the law, but other stores may approach sales of concentrates and edibles in different ways. Because there is no set standard for testing and labeling each product, it can appear as if one store is hooking you up and another is ripping you off.

10 Rocky Mountain Marijuana

MARIJUANA MATHEMATICS by KRISTA DRISCOLL “The customer might think that each shop might be doing things in a shady way,” Brown said. “I only allow you to buy 200 milligrams of edibles for 1 gram of bud, where say in Denver you could buy 500 milligrams for every 1 gram of bud. None of us are uniform because the Marijuana Enforcement Division hasn’t come up with what that rule is.” Concentrates, commonly called hash, are also tricky to measure. Brown said he errs on the conservative side for those products, as well. “With concentrates, you look at earwax — it’s a form of hash — 1 gram of earwax could be 60 percent, 70 percent, 80 percent, 90 percent, so we’re looking at 1 gram of earwax and saying it’s on the high end, 80 percent THC,” Brown said. Labeling packages with exact milligram amounts of active THC could prove to be difficult because each gram of hash or batch of oil would have to be tested. Despite the hurdles, Brown said he would love for there to be a standard across the industry. “These companies aren’t required to test, it’s not required on the label which percentage THC the concentrates are,” Brown said. “We get a gram of wax from a company, we buy it from them, the labeling doesn’t have to be on that. It doesn’t list on the label what percentage concentration it is. It’ll be in a range of 60 (percent) to 90 percent — we go conservative and take the higher numbers on that. We’re trying to create the standard that the Marijuana Enforcement Division was not able to create themselves.”

BUDS:

An average bud, or flower, of marijuana contains between 15 percent and 20 percent active THC. This means that one gram of marijuana contains 150 to 200 milligrams of active THC and a quarter-ounce of marijuana buds, which weighs just more than 7 grams, contains slightly more than 1,050 to 1,400 milligrams of active THC. 1 GRAM MARIJUANA BUDS = 150 TO 200 MILLIGRAMS OF ACTIVE THC ¼ OUNCE MARIJUANA BUDS = 1,050 TO 1,400 MILLIGRAMS OF ACTIVE THC

EDIBLES:

Currently, edibles available for medical marijuana patients can contain up to 200 milligrams of active THC. The limit for retail edibles is 100 milligrams.

DO THE MATH

1 GRAM MARIJUANA BUDS = 1 TO 2, 100 MILLIGRAM EDIBLES ¼ OUNCE MARIJUANA BUDS = 10 TO 14, 100 MILLIGRAM EDIBLES

HASH:

Butane hash, commonly called shatter or earwax, contains 60 percent to 90 percent active THC, meaning that a gram of earwax could contain 600 to 900 milligrams of active THC. 1 GRAM HASH = 600 TO 900 MILLIGRAMS OF ACTIVE THC 1 GRAM HASH = 4 TO 6 GRAMS OF MARIJUANA BUDS ¼ OUNCE MARIJUANA BUDS = 1.75 TO 1.16 GRAMS OF HASH

Out-of-state residents can purchase up to a quarter of an ounce of marijuana buds, also called flowers, at one time. There are 28.3495 grams in an ounce.

Keep in mind that a recommended dose of active THC is 10 milligrams.

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A MESSAGE FROM THE BRECKENRIDGE CANNABIS CLUB WHILE HERE, there are a few things to keep in mind about legal cannabis. Please remember to consume responsibly and exercise restraint, especially with concentrates and edibles. Please do not drive high, and do not smoke in public. It will take the cooperation of everyone to make this legalization effort a success. Enjoy your time here, have fun and stay safe!

ROCKY MOUNTAIN HIGH THE BRECKENRIDGE CANNABIS CLUB (BCC) grows only organic cannabis, ensuring your “Rocky Mountain High� is as pure as it gets. With over sixty strains grown in house there is always a wide selection to choose from. Looking to leave the smallest footprint possible, they employ the greenest techniques available like wind and solar power. Every plant at the Cannabis Club is given just the right amount of TLC, providing for one of the most potent and flavorful products on the market.

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WIDEST SELECTION OF EDIBLES WORKING WITH an ever increasing list of vendors across the state of Colorado, BCC boasts to carry the widest selection of marijuana products. At the Cannabis Club, customer's choices are not limited to just smoking. For those who prefer not to smoke, you can choose to vaporize or eat your cannabis! They offer an array of edible products including sodas, tinctures, candies, chocolate bars, baked goods, oral sprays, THC drops and more. For the vapor connoisseur, BCC carries shatter, glass, oil, and wax along with other concentrates and accessories. The Club provides a one stop shop for all your cannabis needs.

BRECKENRIDGE'S FIRST LICENSED RETAIL MARIJUANA STORE THE BRECKENRIDGE CANNABIS CLUB is a locally owned and operated retail marijuana store nestled in the heart of downtown Breckenridge. Located across the street from Starbucks, you can find the cannabis lined counters at the top of the stairs as soon as you step inside off of Main Street. In their 5th year of business, they are proud to be at the forefront of the cannabis movement as Colorado begins to pull away from a failed prohibition. Friendly staff is very knowledgeable on the wide range of products and are very passionate about educating the customers. The atmosphere at the Breckenridge Cannabis club is warm and inviting with the aim of providing a sensational cannabis experience. photos by arthur balluff photography

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420 - 2014 13

PERSPECTIVES POT’S PAST COMPARED WITH ITS PRESENT

GARY LINDSTROM, 72 He first moved to Colorado to serve as a police officer in Lakewood. Originally from Iowa, he served in the Air Force for six years before becoming a New York City police officer. He later served as a school administrator for Jefferson Public County Schools, commuting from Dillon every day. Now retired, he owns a home in Breckenridge and still teachers at Metro State College. After leaving the school district, Lindstrom started working as a detective in Breckenridge in the ’70s, eventually serving as undersheriff and then the director of public safety for the county. He also spent years as a county commissioner from 1995-2004 and state representative from 2004-2007, running for governor in 2006.

by KELSEY FOWLER

14 Rocky Mountain Marijuana

POT’S PROGRESS

THE PENDULUM KEEPS SWINGING — THERE ARE NO LAWS, THEN THERE ARE STRICT LAWS. A LOT OF PEOPLE DON’T REALIZE BRECKENRIDGE WAS THE FIRST CITY IN COLORADO TO LEGALIZE MEDICAL MARIJUANA YEARS AGO. HOW DID THE ATTITUDES ABOUT MARIJUANA DIFFER WHEN YOU FIRST ARRIVED IN SUMMIT COMPARED TO NOW?

“I don’t remember ever arresting someone for marijuana in my history in Summit County. We did arrest some people for sales, the drug dealers so to speak. You caught someone with just a little marijuana, you’d walk them over and have them flush it down the toilet.”

WHAT WERE SOME OF THE MOST STRIKING DIFFERENCES?

“At that time in the early 1970s, pot was $14 an ounce, now it’s $400. But that ounce had stems and leaves, very few buds, people were basically just getting a contact high, there wasn’t a lot going on.”

WAS THERE CONCERN IN GENERAL AMONG LAW ENFORCEMENT ABOUT DRUGS IN THE AREA?

“We felt there was a very serious problem with cocaine in Summit County. We were very successful, we arrested a Silverthorne town council member and two police officers.

For a long time, if you were caught with a DUI, they would take you home. Nobody ever got arrested. And then they would get back in their cars and go other places and kill someone.” In the mid-80s, Lindstrom said that policy shifted to zero tolerance, putting people in jail overnight to sober up. “It’s a sociological shift by the powers that be, the town or the police chiefs. It was at 100 percent tolerance and went to zero. People said, this isn’t working.” Lindstrom said he didn’t see any pushback for bringing medical marijuana to the county: “It was the same thing when gambling became legal. Before, gambling was not enforced, and then they made it legal and then started enforcement.”

WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE BIGGEST IMPACT TO THE ATTITUDES AND CHANGES SURROUNDING MARIJUANA ENFORCEMENT OR LEGALIZATION? “Neither you nor I know what the political temperature is in Summit County at any given time or day. Today, most people think legalization is a wonderful thing, but at the same time, the local community gets the laws and law enforcement they want, that’s how it changes.” Lindstrom doesn’t smoke, though he did years ago. “It never changes. The product changes, the way of purchasing changes, where you purchase it changes.”

...

What happens is a guy inherits $1 million, comes to Summit County, opens a restaurant and takes all the money and shoves it up his nose.

...

We have literally, in the entire time I’ve been in Summit County, and that’s 40 years now, I have never, ever seen heroin.

...

From day one there was a lot of marijuana here.”

DO YOU THINK THE SALE OF RETAIL MARIJUANA HAS CHANGED ANYTHING?

“With legalization, there’s no more marijuana today, no more places to buy than before, you can just buy it legally now. You didn’t increase the market, you just moved it.

...

There is no more marijuana crossing the border today than 15 years ago. There’s a finite amount of demand.” As a county commissioner and later a state representative, Lindstrom worked on passing laws forbidding indoor cigarette smoking. When he moved to Summit County, there were only 3,000 people.

AFTER LIVING HERE FOR ALMOST 40 YEARS, WHAT CULTURAL SHIFTS HAVE YOU NOTICED AS FAR AS THIS ISSUE IS CONCERNED? “The pendulum keeps swinging — there are no laws, then there are strict laws. A lot of people don’t realize Breckenridge was the first city in Colorado to legalize medical marijuana years ago.

...

GARY LINSTROM WITNESSED THE ADVENT OF THE LEGALIZATION MOVEMENT IN SUMMIT COUNTY.

In the ’70s there were three places in the county you could get an abortion, clinics, so people would come up from Denver and Colorado Springs. We collectively always believe we are openminded here.

420 - 2014 15

CANNAB S

by JESSICA SMITH

A LO O K BACK 16 Rocky Mountain Marijuana

POT’S PROGRESS

NOVEMBER 2000

A HISTORY of MARIJUANA AND LEGALIZATION IN COLORADO AND SUMMIT COUNTY

Colorado legalizes medical marijuana. Amendment 20, known as the Medical Use of Marijuana Act, passes with 54 percent support from voters. The law allows marijuana use “for persons suffering from debilitating medical conditions.” These conditions include cancer, glaucoma and treatment for conditions such as seizures, severe pain, etc. Patients can possess no more than 2 ounces and no more than six plants. Smoking in public was not allowed. (0-4-287, Article XVII, Section 14 Colorado.gov, Ballotpedia)

1975

Colorado becomes one of 10 states to decriminalize marijuana, based on a federal commission report from 1972 from the Nixon administration. The report, known as The National Commission on Marijuana and Drug Abuse, or the Shafer Commission, recommended that Congress lessen penalties for marijuana use and possession and use other methods to discourage heavy use. The Colorado law made possessing less than 1 ounce a petty offense, with a $100 fine, with harsher consequences for possessing more than an ounce, intent to distribute and cultivation. (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws)

2006

The 2006 general election offers Amendment 44, a statewide measure for legalizing marijuana. It fails, with 58 percent of voters against it, although in Breckenridge it is approved by more than 70 percent of voters. The amendment would have allowed people 21 and older to legally possess as much as 1 ounce of marijuana. Public consumption would not have been allowed under Amendment 44. (Colorado Ballot Analysis, Final Draft. Colorado General Assembly; Ballotpedia, Summit Daily News) ABOVE: MARIJUANA, LEGAL FOR MEDICINAL USE, BECOMES AVAILABLE TO THOSE WITH DEBILITATING MEDICAL CONDITIONS. DISPENSARIES POP UP AS A NEW WAVE PHARMACY, OFFERING A VARIETY OF “HERBAL PERSCRIPTIONS.”

420 - 2014 17

POT’S PROGRESS

NOVEMBER 2009

Voters in the town of Breckenridge vote yes by 73 percent to decriminalize marijuana. Similar to the failed Amendment 44, people 21 years and older are allowed to possess 1 ounce or less of marijuana. (Summit Daily News, The Denver Post)

JAN. 1, 2010

Breckenridge’s marijuana measure goes into effect. Smoking in public is not allowed. Decriminalization means that possession of 1 ounce or less was considered a misdemeanor and punishable by a fine of $100 plus court costs. (Summit Daily News)

RIGHT: PHOTO BY NICK YOUNG. THE GREENHOUSE AT ALPENGLOW BOTANICALS. UNTIL OCTOBER 2014, RETAIL MARIJUANA STORES MUST GROW AT LEAST 70 PERCENT OF THE PRODUCT THEY SELL.

MAY 28, 2013

Gov. John Hickenlooper signs several bills designed to regulate recreational marijuana, including limits on blood levels while driving (5 nanograms of active THC per milliliter), limits on how much an out-ofstate resident can buy in a single purchase (1/4 ounce) and setting up voter referendums for taxation (calling for 15 percent excise tax and an additional 10 percent sales tax) of non-medical marijuana. (Reuters; Colorado House Bill 13-1325; Colorado.gov)

SEPTEMBER 2013

On Sept. 9, 2013, the Colorado Department of Revenue adopts final regulations for recreational marijuana businesses with the Colorado Retail Marijuana Code (HB 13-1317). This includes issues such as licensing fees, inventory tracking, security requirements, waste disposal, packaging and advertising, among others. The regulations become effective Oct. 15, 2013. (The Denver Post; Colorado Department of Revenue, Marijuana Enforcement Division, Colorado.gov)

LEFT: A BRECKENRIDGE CANNABIS CLUB EMPLOYEE WEIGHS OUT THE CORRECT AMOUNT OF MARIJUANA .

NOVEMBER 2012

Amendment 64 passes statewide on Nov. 6, 2012, by about 55 percent, making Colorado one of the first states to legalize recreational marijuana. The state of Washington also passes a recreational marijuana law called Initiative 502, similar to Amendment 64. The amendment states that anyone 21 years and older, possessing a valid government ID, may purchase, smoke and possess marijuana. State residents may buy up to 1 ounce in a single transaction. (Colorado Department of Revenue: Permanent Rules Related to the Colorado Retail Marijuana Code, p. 36, 48, sections C and D; SensibleColorado.org)

RIGHT: COURESTY OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. GOV. JOHN HICKENLOOPER TALKS ABOUT AMENDMENT 64 AT THE STATE CAPITOL IN DENVER ON DEC. 10, 2012. MARIJUANA FOR RECREATIONAL USE BECAME LEGAL IN COLORADO WHEN HICKENLOOPER TOOK THE PURPOSELY LOW-KEY PROCEDURAL STEP OF DECLARING THE VOTERAPPROVED CHANGE PART OF THE STATE CONSTITUTION.

18 Rocky Mountain Marijuana

A

RIGHT: FROM WHEN THEY OPENED AT 8 A.M., BRECKENRIDGE CANNABIS CLUB HAD A LINE OUT THE DOOR FOR A MAJORITY OF THE DAY. THE SHOP DID BETTER IN SALES IN THE FIRST TWO HOURS OF RECREATIONAL PURCHASES THAN THEY HAD IN THE LAST THREE MONTHS WITH JUST MEDICAL MARIJUANA.

NOVEMBER 2013

Proposition AA, which proposed a tax on recreational marijuana sales, is passed by the voters. The 25 percent tax consists of a 10 percent sales tax on top of a 15 percent excise tax on statewide recreational marijuana sales. That 25 percent state tax is expected to generate $70 million every year. The first $40 million will go toward school construction, and the rest will be used to regulate the marijuana industry and put together educational campaigns. In Summit County, there is also a local 5 percent excise tax on top of the 25 percent state tax. (Colorado.gov; Proposition AA; Summit Daily News; The Denver Post)

JAN. 1, 2014

Businesses open their doors to begin selling recreational marijuana for the first time. Lines stretch out the door at many businesses, with waits of up to 20 minutes and more. Recreational marijuana businesses in Frisco and Silverthorne estimate between 200 and 500 customers on the first day, referred to as “Green Wednesday.” The Breckenridge Cannabis Club estimates it had nearly 1,500 customers on opening day. (Summit Daily News, The Denver Post)

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CBD: The Side of Marijuana Everyone Should Hear CBD, or Cannabidiol, is THC’s non-psychoactive cousin. While THC is known as the ingredient in marijuana that is responsible for a euphoric high, CBD is often overlooked despite incredibly powerful emerging evidence of medical relief. CBDs are being studied more closely now than ever and in many cases have been found to treat severe illnesses in unparalleled ways. From sufferers of seizures to glaucoma, chronic pain to severe migraines, CBDs provide incredible relief of symptoms across an array of illnesses without the side effects many pharmaceutical remedies possess. A case that has gained much notoriety and support as of late pertains to a 3-month old girl named Charlotte. She is one of few that suffers from Dravet Syndrome, which causes her upwards of 300 “grand mal” seizures per week that last up to several hours at a time. Charlotte was lagging far behind her twin sister on growth charts, stunted by these crippling seizures every day. At age 5, her parents had exhausted all options with traditional medicine and decided to give medical marijuana a try, as legalized in their home -state of Colorado. The daily application of CBDs in Charlotte’s diet decreased the number of seizures she suffered from hundreds each week to only two or three per month. She now stands side-by-side with her twin sister, living an active and healthy life, feeding herself and learning to speak. This case gained not only the attention from widely-known public figure, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, but also his support in the legalization of medical marijuana – a complete 180 from his former stance against it. The tides are beginning to turn as millions across the US see the potential for this natural remedy over the use of highly abused prescription drugs. The potential doesn’t stop there. The financial benefits of legalizing marijuana and the seemingly limitless applications of the natural resource, hemp, can together increase the sustainability of our country and resources immeasurably. Visit Medical Marijuana of the Rockies website (www.mmrockies.com) to find your nearest prescribing doctor and obtain your medical marijuana card. You may also call for more information.

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by LAUREN GLENDENNING

P

ITKIN COUNTY SHERIFF Joe DiSalvo hugged Silverpeak Apothecary owner Jordan Lewis just before the store made its first recreational marijuana sale March 5.

“I’m glad you’re doing this,” DiSalvo told him. “This is a big deal for all of us. You’re doing this the right way — this is the model.”

It was a sight that might have seemed normal in Aspen, but it was still a sight that made you scratch your head a little bit. A sheriff hugging a pot shop owner — you don’t see that every day. Colorado’s recreational marijuana laws, which were written, rewritten and revised throughout 2013, took effect Jan. 1 of this year. Since then, law enforcement agencies around the state have been adjusting to the times, with many chiefs and sheriffs reacting with less enthusiasm or optimism than DiSalvo has. But DiSalvo feels he has no reason to respond any other way. The two dispensaries that were the first to open in Pitkin County for recreational sales — Stash and the Silverpeak Apothecary, both on March 5 — “waited to do it right,” DiSalvo said. DiSalvo and the Valley Marijuana Council, a group organized by DiSalvo made up of community and business leaders, are working hard to make sure adults are the only people who get their hands on legalized marijuana, though. “The main message is, ‘It’s not for (children) — delay, delay, delay; put this off as long as you can,’” DiSalvo said. “If you can make it past 21, you’ve done yourself a big favor. … This is not a product for children. We have to keep hammering that home like we do with alcohol, driving, coffee — all the things we don’t want kids to do when they’re developing.”

420 - 2014 23

POT’S PROGRESS

In a study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin about the impacts of alcohol and marijuana on the young brain, early marijuana use points to severe cognitive consequences. “Converging lines of evidence suggest that regular use of marijuana, starting before 18, is associated with increased deficits in poorer attention, visual search, reduced overall or verbal IQ, and executive functioning,” the report states. Colorado Teen Weed Brain is another group that formed in the Roaring Fork Valley to tackle this very subject. The group hosts educational forums to spread the word to parents and children in the community that marijuana, although legal, is not OK for kids. Roaring Fork School District spokeswoman Sheryl Barto said school principals have been reporting increased use and availability of marijuana since the legalization of recreational marijuana. “Much of this is what students are reporting and what adults are observing; we haven’t yet seen statistical confirmation,” she said. “It will be interesting to see if we find spikes when we do our annual health surveys.” The 2011 Healthy Kids Colorado Survey, a risk behavior survey of middle and high school students in Colorado done every two years, shows that marijuana use had not increased among high school students since medical marijuana became legal. Results from the 2013 survey are not yet available.

STILL ILLEGAL FOR CHILDREN

The Eagle River Youth Coalition, a nonprofit in Eagle County that works with schools and youth throughout the region on reducing substance abuse, has multiple efforts underway to prevent marijuana use, including educational programs in the schools.There are no recreational marijuana stores open yet in Eagle County, but the coalition is already well prepared for challenges relating to the new industry, said Executive Director Michelle Hartel Stecher. “The biggest shift we’re seeing is that kids are reporting that marijuana is less harmful,” Hartel Stecher said. “When less harm is perceived, typically kids will start doing that behavior more. … Another shift we’re seeing is that they’re reporting it’s easier to get, so that’s concerning for us.” Glenwood Springs Police Chief Terry Wilson likes the community collaboration he’s seeing in response to legalized marijuana, but he’s not so sure the true effects of legalized marijuana will be known for some time. “I truly don’t believe we’re going to understand the consequences for 10 to 20 years,” Wilson said. “Are we going to raise a generation of people less developed and less productive because of allowances we’re making? The answer scares me.” Wilson thinks anyone who feels strongly about either side of the legalized marijuana argument is just, excuse the pun, blowing smoke. “It’s a big roll of the dice,” Wilson said. “And we’ll find out if we won or lost in a generation.”

ABOVE: PHOTO BY MICHAEL MCLAUGHLIN/THE ASPEN TIMES PITKIN COUNTY SHERIFF JOE DISALVO HUGS SILVERPEAK APOTHECARY OWNER JORDAN LEWIS DURING THE STORE’S RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA GRAND OPENING. DISALVO SAID LEWIS HAS GONE ABOUT LEGALIZED RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA IN THE RIGHT WAY AND FEELS THE STORE WILL BE A RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS WITHIN THE COMMUNITY.

24 Rocky Mountain Marijuana

Wilson and every law enforcement officer in the state is facing that uncertainty head-on. New laws allow Colorado residents over the age of 21 to legally buy, use and possess up to an ounce of marijuana. Out of state residents can purchase up to ¼ ounce in a single transaction, but can possess up to one ounce.

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New laws equal new laws to be broken. Eagle County Sheriff Joe Hoy doesn’t think legalized weed means his department will have less to do in the way of enforcement. In fact, it could turn out to be just the opposite. “There’s still enough illegal marijuana out there coming into the state,” Hoy said. “We still have enough (illegal) business out there we need to deal with.” Wilson said he knows another police officer who works near the Colorado-Wyoming border, where every weekend it’s like a Cheech and Chong movie. Wyoming residents are being caught coming back from Colorado with marijuana, their cars often completely full of smoke when they’re pulled over. The Colorado Drug Recognition Expert program began in 1987, but the state’s new legalized marijuana industry is making it more popular. Wilson has multiple officers trained, while Hoy said he has three officers trained through the program. The Pitkin County Sheriff ’s Department has one expert, DiSalvo said, and in Breckenridge — where there are four operating recreational marijuana stores open — Police Chief Shannon Haynes said her officers are familiar with roadside tests for marijuana. She’s also sending an officer to the drug recognition expert training. “There’s a big push across the state to get more trained in drug recognition,” Haynes said.

EDUCATING DRIVERS, TOURISTS

The Colorado Department of Transportation recently launched a campaign targeting “drugged driving.” Avon Police Chief Bob Ticer is chair of the Interagency Task Force on Drunk Driving and is promoting the CDOT campaign locally. He said police departments are not only certifying more drug recognition experts, but also more Advanced Roadside Impaired Driving Enforcement, known as ARIDE. That program isn’t as intensive as the drug recognition expert program, but it goes beyond the level of training police officers receive in police academies.

“We are really wanting to emphasize that (marijuana) is a substance that causes impairment,” Ticer said. “There are misperceptions about it — some think it’s not as dangerous as alcohol to drive on. I would say that it’s just a different drug; it acts differently in the body.” At the end of February, Vail Resorts and the U.S. Forest Service announced they would be working together to destroy so-called “smoke shacks” at the company’s ski resorts. The illegal structures had been

built for the purposes of smoking marijuana while skiing, which remains illegal. Because so many of the customers walking into the pot shops in places like Aspen, Vail and Breckenridge will be tourists, educating them truly is up to the communities, DiSalvo said. Anyone who purchases marijuana at Silverpeak in Aspen can ask a staff member anything about the laws, but owner Jordan Lewis also provides a pamphlet that guides customers toward responsible use. In Breckenridge, Haynes said the ratio of tourists to locals buying marijuana at the beginning of the year was 8 to 1. So, the town and police department have worked together to pass out information much like Lewis’s pamphlet in Aspen. Recreational marijuana store owners are also trying to inform customers who might not know the laws. At Stash, a store just across from the Aspen/Pitkin County Airport, co-owner Garrett Patrick told a Texas couple in March where they should consume their pot. He specifically said not while driving or skiing. The woman, in her 60s, shrugged her shoulders after Patrick walked away and said she’d be using her legally purchased cannabis on the chair lift.

420 - 2014 25

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BOULDER COMPANY MAKES EDIBLES FOR SUMMIT COUNTY MARIJUANA STORES ROWS OF THC-INFUSED candy bars, brownies and sour gummies may not be what come to mind when you think of marijuana, but various lines of edibles have grown incredibly popular with the advent of retail cannabis in the High Country. You might peer around corners, trying to spot some hidden on-site bakery, but it’s more likely that the sweet treats came from a company like The Growing Kitchen in Boulder. Holden Sproul, mountain sales rep for the company, said The Growing Kitchen began when a pair of medical dispensary owners in Boulder started creating custom edibles to meet their patients’ needs about five years ago. “They started making the menu for Growing Kitchen,” he said. “The products are all organic and natural, as well as offering things that are dairy-free, gluten-free and health conscious on a whole. We’ve slowly been growing into the space that we occupy just east to Boulder.”

BUD-BASED TREATS

Sproul said The Growing Kitchen makes a full line of edibles, including staples such as cookies and brownies, as well as fruit and nut balls made with fruit, nuts and hash oil, which is a whole-flower extraction from the company’s own garden. Though pursuing a certified organic tag is currently impossible for the marijuana industry, Sproul said the company uses all organic ingredients in its recipes. “We use the whole bud or whole flower product to make our edible, where most companies make it using trim,” he said. “Everything comes from our own garden; we do everything in-house. So we have control from start to finish, from plant to processing.” Though current laws stipulate that marijuana stores must grow 70 percent of the product they sell, edibles fall under a different classification, Sproul said, which means The Growing Kitchen can create its products exclusively from the cannabis it grows and sell them to medical and recreational stores all over the state. “We’ve been able to put up one of the only outdoor grows,” he said. “We have a hoop house that we started about a year and a half ago. We’re really looking forward to getting a lot more outdoor crops and saving our indoor space for high-quality concentrates and flowers.”

OTHER CANNABIS PRODUCTS

One of the things Sproul loves about his company’s products is that using quality organic ingredients can produce a different effect than a product made with preservatives or artificial colors or flavors. “If you’re eating something that’s a healthy item, you’re going to digest it differently and you’re going to absorb it differently and experience a lot less of the couch lock,” he said, referring to a lethargic high. Cannabis also mixes with different ingredients in each edible or topical product, which can impact the experience. For example, The Growing Kitchen combines mint with a hybrid of indica and sativa to create a spray that uses the combined effects of mint and marijuana to sooth an upset stomach. Raw herbs are combined with marijuana to create sleep aid and pain pill capsules, and the company also makes a deep-tissue rub salve. “One of the first products we made is a topical rub that works great on back pain, skin irritation, all sorts of things,” Sproul said. “The salve mixed with all the other ingredients — cocoa butter, chamomile — there’s a lot more integration with all those other herbs and the effect it has when mixed with them.” THIS PAGE (TOP TO BOTTOM): MARY’S WAY SALVE FROM THE GROWING KITCHEN. A COLLECTION OF PRODUCTS FROM THE GROWING KITCHEN. OPPOSITE PAGE: A LARGE COLLECTION OF PRODUCTS FROM THE GROWING KITCHEN.

30 Rocky Mountain Marijuana

GET THE GOODS The Growing Kitchen edibles are available locally at the following shops: • Alpenglow Botanicals, Breckenridge (medical sales only)

• Breckenridge Cannabis Club, Breckenridge (recreational sales only)

• Medical Marijuana of the Rockies, Frisco (medical sales only)

• Soul Shine Medical Consulting, Breckenridge (medical sales only)

• Organix, Breckenridge (medical and recreational sales)

MEDICAL VS. RECREATIONAL

The Growing Kitchen will obtain its license to create recreational marijuana products in March and will be ready to distribute those products sometime in April, Sproul said. Some producers of edibles were ready to charge ahead with retails sales on the first of the year, but existing Growing Kitchen edible products on Summit County store shelves came from the shops having permission from the state to do a one-time transfer of items from medical stock to retail before Jan. 1. “The differences between medical and retail are mostly based on packaging and quantity of active ingredients,” Sproul said. “You can’t have something more than 100 milligrams (of THC) for retail. It’s been a little all over the place in terms of general regulations.” Sproul said it’s important to read the packaging on each item to be informed about what you are getting. Not all cookies are created equally; some may contain more THC than others, and that THC could be measured in different ways. “The first thing you should check on the label is whether the amount you are listing is active THC or not,” he said. “There are a lot of products out there that the companies weigh out a certain amount of plants per edible and they don’t get it lab tested. Look at active THC — if that’s not labeled, it could be strong, it could be weak; it’s going to be very inconsistent.” Every batch of oil used at The Growing Kitchen is tested for its specific THC content, Sproul explained, rather than relying on general guidelines of X amount of leaves of a certain strain or from a certain plant equaling X amount of THC. “We test for any leftover solvents, any pesticides — everything to make sure it’s 100 percent clean — and then each batch is labeled specifically with the testing we’ve done on it,” he said. “With retail, they’re going to start requiring testing with all of those things, but we’ve done it from the start to make sure everything we’re sending out is consistent and also of high quality.” The other thing to be aware of on edible packaging is what type of cannabis was used to create a particular product. A brownie made with sativa is going to give you a different high than a cookie made with indica or a hybrid strain.

GROWING IN POPULARITY

Sproul said there are a number of reasons people are choosing edibles over smoking to ingest THC. “It’s healthier than smoking,” he said. “Cannabis has been proven not to be too destructive, but you are still inhaling smoke. This is something that doesn’t involve that process at all, and now, you can find something that works for you on a daily basis and also on a situational basis.” The Growing Kitchen’s Chill Pills, for instance, are very discreet, can be carried around easily and can be used on a regular basis because the low levels of THC allow the user to maintain more functionality. Sproul also recommended the Chill Pills, or something with a similar low level of THC, as a starting point for those who have never dabbled in consuming edibles. “The best lesson is to always start small,” he said. “We offer a product called Chill Pills and they are 10 milligram candies. I think that is where you should start until you figure out what’s appropriate for your weight and body type. You absorb them sublingually, through the glands in your mouth, instead of going through the entire digestion process.” Recipes at The Growing Kitchen continue to evolve as the extraction process of removing the THC from the cannabis becomes more effective. Sproul said edibles are a great way to feel healthier about your marijuana use. “We’re really excited to be doing something positive in the industry, and we’re trying not to sacrifice on quality to get products to patients and recreational users and people who care about what they are putting into their lives and what they are getting out of it,” he said.

420 - 2014 31

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Serious smoker or first-timer, Organix has a knowledgeable staff and an extensive product line to customize your one-on-one experience. Their strains are all grown in-house for consistency. OUR BUDS: • Indica or Sativa – Trained staff will help you select the perfect strain to fit your needs. • Concentrates – Can be smoked on top of a bowl, vaporized, used in an oil rig or in a vapor pen. Browse our glass selection. • Vapor Pens – Use with our concentrates or prefilled cartridges. Perfect for smokers on the go. TIP: Looking for an alternative to the old school joint? Try one of the new vapor pens, an e-cig for marijuana. More discreet and less odor for the discerning smoker.

32 Rocky Mountain Marijuana SPONSORED CONTENT

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420 - 2014 33

ONE OF THE 1ST

LEGAL

DISPENSARIES IN THE WORLD!!

Serene Wellness located in historic Empire, Colorado was the sixth medical marijuana facility to be inspected by the state of Colorado. The store was once again on the forefront of changing history when it opened its doors to sell to the public on January 1, 2014. A bold move helping to be a part of the end of prohibition. Serene Wellness Fraser also made history in the town of Fraser by being the first and only medical marijuana store in all of Grand County. Empire is conveniently located only two miles west of interstate 70 at exit 232. Both stores are easily accessible from highway 40 and are the closest stores to the Winter Park Ski Resort and on the way to the fun and beauty of Rocky Mountain National Park!

Serving Medical Patients 228 Byers Ave Fraser, CO 80442 970-363-7180 NOW OPEN to Adults 21 & Over!! 13 East Park Ave Empire, CO 80438 303-569-2011 SPONSORED CONTENT

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13 East Park Ave Empire, CO 80438

Conveniently located only two miles west of interstate 70 at exit 232 Closest Stores to Winter Park and on the way to Rocky Mountain National Park

COUNTER CULTURE

SMOKE ’EM

IF YOU GOT ’EM

by KRISTA DRISCOLL

JOINTS, PIPES, BONGS, BATS AND OTHER SMOKING VESSELS If your preferred method of cycling THC

through your bloodstream is smoking, options abound for inhaling the heady stuff. These paraphernalia pieces vary in price, depending on where they are purchased and how high-tech they are, but from a standard joint to elaborately artistic glass pieces, you’re sure to find the vessel that suits your needs.

JOINTS

Easily transportable and discreet, it’s no wonder that joints are still prevalent, despite all of the advancements in smoking technology. Most shops carry rolling papers, blunt wraps and even rolling devices to roll your own joints, or a few, such as the Breckenridge Cannabis Club, sell pre-rolled joints if your fingers just aren’t that nimble. How they work: A joint is similar to a hand-rolled tobacco cigarette and can be rolled with or without a filter. Crumble or grind whole flowers into smaller pieces, remove any stems and seeds and roll into a rolling paper. Light one end, and take a drag, called a hit, from the other.

PIPES

VAPORIZERS

The latest smoking technology, for marijuana and tobacco, comes in the form of the vaporizer. Vaporizers are used for smoking both flowers and hash, and the idea behind this penstyle apparatus is to surround the material with heat, rather than combusting it. Butane vaporizers use a metal heating element or wire around a wick, York said, and others use a ceramic heating element. “The idea is to have as little combustion as possible or eliminate combustion totally,” York said. “The portable vaporizing pens do that as best they can because you’re still loading your material onto a heating coil that gets red hot. There are some heating elements with the vaporizers that come with a built-in metal screen over the heating elements.” How they work: Marijuana flowers are packed into one end of the vaporizer pen, called the oven, similar to packing the bowl of a pipe. Heat surrounds the flowers and releases the active ingredients in the marijuana as a vapor, which is inhaled through the other end of the pen. Larger vaporizers are constructed differently, but the general idea of decreasing the amount of inhaled smoke is the same.

36 Rocky Mountain Marijuana

The next step up from a joint is a hitter or bat, an incredibly simple pipe. Hitters can be made of various materials, but one of the most common is glass. “A bat is a small, straight piece of glass with a hole on each end, one for your material and one to smoke out of,” said Zach York, processing supervisor at Alpenglow Botanicals. If you’re looking for something a bit larger, graduate to a bowl-style piece, a glass pipe with a relatively deep bowl fitted with a carb or choke on the side and four or five inches of glass between your face and the end of it. This is one of the most popular vessels for smoking marijuana, a less common style of which is the steamroller. “Not as many people like those,” York said of the steamroller-style pipe. “It’s a straight tube with the carb at the very end and the bowl at the end of the piece. The only difference is the shape.”

How they work: To smoke out of a hitter, load one end of it, typically the end with the larger flare, by packing the marijuana tightly into it. Light the packed material, and take a hit from the other end. A bowl-style piece works in a similar fashion, with flowers packed into the bowl. If the pipe has a carb, inhale with your finger over the hole on the side of the bowl and release the carb while continuing to inhale to draw the smoke into your lungs.

WATER PIPES

Adding a water filter to a pipe allows for a cleaner, smoother intake and arguably a more flavorful experience when smoking. The cooling aspect of the water can help eliminate coughing and throat irritation from smoke, York said. The universal title of water pipe applies to vessels in a range of sizes, from smaller bubblers, which have water filtration at the end of a bowl glass piece, on up to tabletop-sitting bongs. How they work: Putting your mouth onto the mouthpiece of the pipe creates a vacuum, and inhaling draws the smoke into the chamber, where it bubbles through the water. Once the chamber fills with the desired amount of water-cooled smoke, the smoker can release the vacuum with a carb and continue inhaling to draw the smoke into their lungs.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: PRE-ROLLED JOINTS AT BRECKENRIDGE CANNABIS CLUB. AN EXAMPLE OF A BOWL-STYLE PIECE FROM ALPENGLOW BOTANICALS IN BRECKENRIDGE. BOWL-STYLE PIECES ON DISPLAY AT BRECKENRIDGE CANNABIS CLUB.

COUNTER CULTURE

SOME OF THE PRODUCTS local recreational marijuana

stores get a lot of questions about are concentrates. Concentrates, commonly called hash, are exactly that — a concentrated substance created from marijuana flowers that provides a more immediate, more intense effect for THC consumers.

HASHING

IT OUT

WHAT ARE CONCENTRATES AND HOW ARE THEY USED? by KRISTA DRISCOLL

“Some people say it’s better for their health or lungs because they feel like they don’t need to smoke as much to get the same effect,” said Zach York, processing supervisor at Alpenglow Botanicals in Breckenridge. “Flavor is probably another factor — concentrates can be pretty flavorful.”

PHOTOS BY: NICK YOUNG. ABOVE: BUTANE HASH AND A VAPORIZING PEN. RIGHT: ASSORTED DABBERS FOR TRANSFERRING HASH TO A NAIL.

BUBBLE HASH Concentrates come in different forms, based on what solvent is used to create them. Classic hash, or bubble hash, is produced using a water solvent. It’s is a tar-like, black substance of varying consistency from the rock hard, pressed form to powder form, which is gummy and sticky. “It’s popular because it’s easier to consume than the other ones,” York said, referring to other styles of hash. “Just put it into a glass piece and light it up.”

Companies have also developed e-nails, York said, which plug into the wall. The e-nail contains a small power box converter that attaches to the nail and heats it, eliminating the need for a torch. OTHER KINDS OF HASH Other, less common, types of concentrates are extracted using carbon dioxide or isopropyl alcohol as a solvent. This results in a black liquid that’s generally not quite as flavorful as the bubble or butane varieties, but there are exceptions, York said. “It’s not as prominent,” he said. “There’s not a ton of knowledge about or people making those varieties.”

BUTANE HASH Another variety of concentrate is butane hash, which is created by running liquid butane through a tightly packed tube of buds. As the liquid comes out, it evaporates away and then the butane is further purged using heat, York said. This process results in different consistencies of butane hash. The first, called shatter, has a concrete, rock-hard density. Shatter is clearer looking with some translucence to it, and it’s popular for its visual appearance and flavor, York said. A second form of butane hash is liquid butane hash oil, which is mainly used for vaporizing out of portable vaporizing pens. Wax, or butter, is another style. “Fitting to the name, it has a really waxy consistency and will get all over your fingers,” York said. “It looks like a little chunk of butter and it comes right off and you can spread it on anything.” Butane hash is consumed through a process called dabbing. A quartz or titanium piece called a nail fits into a classic water pipe, or bong, in place of the flower bowl that’s normally there. Using a small torch, the nail is heated, and then the wax is touched onto the nail using a dabbing tool. As the hash wax comes in contact with the nail, it immediately sublimates and is inhaled through the water pipe.

420 - 2014 37

COUNTER CULTURE

INDICA • SKYWALKER KUSH COMPOSITION: 100 percent indica AROMA: Spicy earthiness FEATURES: Kush is kind of a distinct flavor in and of itself, York said, but its aroma is more of a spicy earthiness, rather than the sweetness you would find in other strains. Cultivators haven’t been growing Skywalker Kush as long as some other strains, but it’s already in the realm of popular nomenclature that people recognize and desire, which is why Alpenglow chose to add it to the shop’s repertoire. The buds are heavily coated in THC crystals, and this kush has been popular with customers and staff members, York said.

STEPPING INTO a recreational marijuana store can be overwhelming. Shops can carry dozens of different plant strains and phenotypes at any given time, some specific to that region or even that particular store. Not all buds are created equal, either. Some shops will grade each plant harvested according to its physical properties. This is not an indication of the level of THC in each plant but, rather, whether it reflects the desired attributes of a given strain, just as particular wines are a reflection of their varietal. “We grade each plant individually by visual aspects,” said Zach York, processing supervisor at Alpenglow Botanicals in Breckenridge. “Fuller, more developed plants will be the top shelf, and then we’ll downgrade it a step to A grade or two steps to B grade as we find flaws.” Though strains of marijuana are classified as either indica or sativa, it’s rare that a plant will be 100 percent of one or the other. Hybrids are common, and the composition of each plant dictates the type of high you will feel. “Indica is easier to grow in the sense of yield, as well as that full bud development,” York said. “It gives you more of a body high, as opposed to the head high of the sativa.” Whether you’re choosing your product based on grade, price or other factors, when shopping for a particular high, it’s good to know the basics. Here, York breaks down the two main categories of marijuana - indica and sativa - and the various strains therein.

38 Rocky Mountain Marijuana

• PINEAPPLE EXPRESS COMPOSITION: 80 percent indica, 20 percent sativa AROMA: Hazy fruitiness FEATURES: You may have heard of this strain from the movie of the same name. York said that familiar moniker also makes this product popular with a lot of consumers. The aroma of the flowers translates very closely to what they will taste like when smoked, and this one is very aromatic. York said its high indica content makes Pineapple Express good for pain treatment or those who are looking to relax or go to sleep. • MANGO KUSH COMPOSITION: 80 percent indica, 20 percent sativa AROMA: Mixture of spicy sweetness FEATURES: This strain is a phenotype that was cultivated from a Pineapple Express seed, a variation of the original. Alpenglow Botanicals co-owner Justin Williams explained how particular phenotypes are developed. “Parents have 10 kids, but they aren’t all exactly the same,” he said. “Close, but not exact.” Mango Kush placed highly in the recent Cannabis Cup and has a dense structure, York said, with a light-green appearance and lighter colored hairs on the flowers.

SATIVA • STRAWBERRY COUGH COMPOSITION: 75 percent sativa, 25 percent indica AROMA: Fruity, with some spice, fitting to its name FEATURES: Like most sativa-dominant strains of marijuana, Strawberry Cough is characterized by its fluffy buds, which are typically less dense than those of its indica-heavy cousins. A phenotype of the Strawberry Cough, called Strawberry Blue, placed ninth at the Cannabis Cup. York describes the sativa high as “motivational, uplifting, a head high as opposed to a body high, with a little bit more creativity or psychoactivity” than an indica. • JUICY FRUIT COMPOSITION: 90 percent sativa, 10 percent indica AROMA: Much sweeter in the aroma, compared to Strawberry Cough FEATURES: York said the Juicy Fruit is a little bit heavier than other sativa strains, with really nice bud development. “In terms of how the flower fills out, basically with any plant, it can be healthier or not quite as healthy,” York said, describing how plants of this strain are graded. “It will be fluffier or leafier, and more dense, top-shelf flowers have dense, compact buds.” • JACKS CLEANER COMPOSITION: 90 percent sativa, 10 percent indica AROMA: More toward spicy, like a classic Middle Eastern hookah spice FEATURES: Another popular product, this strain is named for Jack Herer, a famous marijuana strain breeder and seed grower. “That’s one of those that when it’s more fully developed, more desirable, it’s that fluffy, not quite as dense, light green with orange hairs,” York said.

PHOTOS BY: NICK YOUNG LEFT: A RANGE OF MARIJUANA STRAINS IS DISPLAYED AT THE BRECKENRIDGE CANNABIS CLUB. RIGHT: PINEAPPLE EXPRESS.

retail marijuana store

open to all adults

21+

with valid id tourists welcome

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locally owned and operated

all organic flowers wide selection of loose & prepackaged cannabis, premium extracts and concentrates over 100 different cannabis infused products, as well as smoking & vaporizing accessories variety of apparel, stickers, gifts & more!

Breckenridge Cannabis Club 226 S. Main St. | 970.453.4900 Open 7 Days a Week | 8am-10pm 420 - 2014 39

EXCLUSIVE COLORADO CANNABIS EXPERIENCES Cultivating Spirits is a multi-faceted Cannabis company that sets itself apart by providing a responsible, educational and spirited experience. SILVERTHORNE & ALMA, CO

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40 Rocky Mountain Marijuana


Rocky Mountain Marijuana