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Clarkson University

T ABLE OF C ONTENTS Class of 2018...............................................................................................................................................................................................3 Important Phone Numbers ..................................................................................................................................................................4 Campus Safety...........................................................................................................................................................................................5 Social Media ...............................................................................................................................................................................................6 Speaking the Lingo ..................................................................................................................................................................................7 Living on Campus ....................................................................................................................................................................................8 What to Bring ....................................................................................................................................................................................9 Roommate Conflicts .......................................................................................................................................................................10 Adjusting to College ........................................................................................................................................................................11 Student Life ................................................................................................................................................................................................12 Getting Involved in Student Organizations ...........................................................................................................................13 Greek Life ............................................................................................................................................................................................14 Volunteering .......................................................................................................................................................................................15 Indoor & Outdoor Recreation.....................................................................................................................................................16 Athletics ......................................................................................................................................................................................................17 Dining on Campus ...................................................................................................................................................................................18 Student Success Center .........................................................................................................................................................................20 First-Year Advising ..........................................................................................................................................................................21 Tutoring Services ..............................................................................................................................................................................22 Accommodative Services ...............................................................................................................................................................23 Career Center ............................................................................................................................................................................................24 Study Abroad Exchange ................................................................................................................................................................25 Student Health Services ........................................................................................................................................................................26 Sustainability on Campus.....................................................................................................................................................................27 Technology .................................................................................................................................................................................................28 Transportation ..........................................................................................................................................................................................29 Traditions....................................................................................................................................................................................................30 Alma Mater .........................................................................................................................................................................................31 The University Bookstore .....................................................................................................................................................................32 Campus Map .............................................................................................................................................................................................33

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W ELCOME TO THE C LARKSON F AMILY ! Congratulations on your decision to attend Clarkson University! We’re excited to have you, and look forward to not only what we are able to bring to you in terms of your college career, but also what you are able to bring to us.

This guide has been developed to give you a behind-the-scenes look at Clarkson as a new member of the Clarkson family. You’ll find this information useful in the coming months.

Allow the following pages to guide you in your new adventure, and be sure to take advantage of the resources now at your fingertips.

Updated 7/1/14, with edits by Andrew Haff, Tamera Rizk

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I MPORTANT P HONE N UMBERS Accommodative Services………………………………………………. 315-268-7643 Admissions Office……………………………………………………….….. 315-268-6480 Campus Dining (Aramark)…………………………………………… 315-268-3816 Campus Safety & Security……………………………................. 315-268-6666 Career Center …………………………………………………………….…... 315-268-6477 Counseling Center…………………………………………………….……. 315-268-2327 Dean of Students…………………………………………………….......... 315-268-6620 First-Year Advising………………………………………………………… 315-268-3948 Institute for Sustainable Environment………….………...… 315-268-3856 Residence Life……………………………………………………….………... 315-268-6642 School of Arts & Sciences……………………………..……………… 315-268-6544 School of Business……………………………................................. 315-268-2300 Service Center…………………………………………….…………………... 315-268-6700 Student Administrative Services……………………..…………. 315-268-6451 Student Health Center………………………………………………….. 315-268-6633 Student Mailroom………………………………………………………….. 315-268-6416 Student Life & Engagement…………………………………………. 315-268-6680 Student Organizations………………………………………………….. 315-268-2345 Student Success Center……………………………………………...... 315-268-2209 University Bookstore………………………………………………….…. 315-265-9260 Vice President of Student Affairs………………………………… 315-268-3943 Wallace H. Coulter School of Engineering…………..…… 315-268-6446

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C AMPUS S AFETY EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER SUITE 1200 PHONE: 315-268-6666 http://www.clarkson.edu/campussafety/ Emergency Alert Notification System CLARKSON uses a text alert notification system for which all students have the option of signing up. In the case of an emergency on campus or affecting the Potsdam area, students will receive text messages and emails. A notification will also be posted to the Clarkson homepage. To sign up for this service, students can register in their Peoplesoft account.

Safety on Campus Clarkson is a walking campus, with 26 “blue light” phone systems, as well as 16 residential “house” phones, located throughout campus. These provide rapid push button contact with emergency response 24 hours a day. The campus is also patrolled by 9 full time Safety and Security officers, with 11 total officers on duty.

Knight Watch (University Tip Line) Knight Watch is an anonymous tip reporting tool for all students and staff. Designed to work with mobile technologies, all students are encouraged to report anything suspicious they may see on campus. The tip line is monitored 24/7 and a trained security officer will respond to the student. Students can access Knight Watch online and on their mobile device at: http://web2.clarkson.edu/programs/knightwatch

15 Tips for Staying Safe 1. 2. 3. 4.

Program emergency numbers into your cell phone. Clarkson Safety and Security’s number is 315-268-6666. Use the Buddy System and avoid traveling alone at night. Know where the blue light phones are. Walk on well-lit, regularly traveled walks and pathways. Avoid shortcuts and keep away from shrubbery, bushes, and alleyways. 5. Make sure the door to your residence hall is locked at all times. 6. Don’t let anyone into your residence hall that you don’t know. 7. If you bring a car, make sure you keep it locked and frequently check on it. 8. Do not accept rides from casual acquaintances. 9. When walking to your residence or vehicle have your keys ready in hand. 10. Let at least one person know where you are going and who you are going with. 11. If you are going to wear headphones while walking, keep the volume low and be aware of what is going on around you. 12. Use passwords/PIN to lock portable devices, and never leave them unattended. 13. Program ICE (In Case of Emergency) into your phone with parent or guardian names and phone numbers. 14. Always keep an eye on your drinks. 15. Keep your computer up to date with anti-virus software.

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S OCIAL M EDIA SOCIAL media allow you to connect with classmates and Clarkson both on and off campus! Whether you’re active in student clubs, sports teams or research projects, mention us (@ClarksonUniv) in your tweets and Instagram photos, and we may repost them to our accounts. We are excited to launch a series of Universitywide photo, video and hashtag contests throughout 2014-2015, so be sure to follow us on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr and Pinterest at @ClarksonUniv, and on Facebook, Google Plus and LinkedIn at Clarkson University for the latest announcements. Many departments and offices also have their own social media accounts! Social media provide fun and captivating outlets to express your creativity and interact with others. At Clarkson, you have the freedom to represent yourself as you see fit on social media. As you prepare for a career and the next stages of your life, however, be responsible about what you share on your accounts. Employers often check social media when screening CLARKSON UNIVERSITY job candidates, and what you post shapes how others Facebook: Clarkson University perceive you.

Instagram: @ClarksonUniv Twitter: @ClarksonUniv

At Clarkson, we strive to create a community where all students, faculty and staff feel welcome and CLARKSON ATHLETICS respected. That community extends to social media, Twitter: @ClarksonUSports so we expect you to not post anything that could potentially hurt, insult or harass others at Clarkson. Opportunities to remain anonymous online lead some CLARKSON CAREER CENTER Facebook: Clarkson University Career Center to believe they can post anything without consequence, but all social media activity can leave Twitter: @cucareer trails that trace back to the author of the post. If you see something, say something: contact your resident CLARKSON DINING advisor or the Dean of Students if you notice Facebook: Clarkson University Dining social media activity that harasses or insults members of the Clarkson community.

CLARKSON LIBRARY Facebook: Clarkson University Libraries CLARKSON STUDENT LIFE Facebook: Clarkson Student Life Twitter @clarksonStuLife

Let’s utilize these amazing social media outlets to make the most of our time at Clarkson and put the best versions of ourselves out there for the rest of the world to see!

Clarkson Orientation on Facebook

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S PEAKING THE L INGO AC Aero ARAMARK Bar 9 CAMP ChemE CivE Concrete Café CU CU and Me CUB CUPO CUSA CUSB DB Dead Week E&M ERC FE Forum

Area Coordinator (full-time live-in staff who oversee RDs & RAs) Aeronautical engineer Campus dining service Brilbeck’s Tavern in the Student Center Center for Advanced Materials Processing (Engineering building) Chemical engineer Civil engineer Food service area in 3rd floor Science Center Clarkson University Website for accepted students: www.clarkson.edu/cuandme Clarkson Union Board (campus programming board) Community of Underrepresented Professional Opportunities Clarkson University Student Association (student gov’t) Clarkson University School of Business Declining Balance: money on ID card used to purchase food Week of studying before final exams Engineering and Management Educational Resource Center (library and Student Affairs offices) Fundamentals of Engineering Exam Video wall and stairs/seating in Student Center

Late Knight MechE Moodle MPRs New Dorms New Snell O Chem

OIT Old Snell P Chem PeopleSoft Pit Pit Path POD Quad RA RD

FYS Healthy Pantry Hill Campus IRC ISE ISO ISSO Java

Ro Bro SAS Servery SPEED

First Year Seminar (mandatory class for firstyear students) Food service area in Hamlin Powers Portion of Clarkson University on the "hill" (Clarkson Avenue) Indoor Recreational Center- includes Fieldhouse and Alumni Gym Institute for a Sustainable Environment International Student Organization International Students and Scholars Office Java City

SSC State TAC Walker WCKN WiSE WTSC

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Series of fun/social events on Friday/Saturday nights Mechanical engineer Online classroom- used in FYS Multi-Purpose Rooms- located on top floor of Student Center Graham and Price Hall B.H. Snell (academic building) Organic Chemistry

Office of Information Technology Downtown campus- includes theater Physical Chemistry Database to enroll in classes, view grades, etc. Hamlin-Powers Residence Halls Walking path between HamlinPowers and Moore House Campus convenience store on lower level of Student Center Reynolds, Brooks, Ross, and Cubley residence halls Resident Advisor Resident Director (student staff who oversee RAs) Ross Brooks Dining Hall Student Administrative Services Food service area in Student Center Student Projects for Engineering Experience and Design Student Success Center SUNY Potsdam Technology Advancement Center Walker Arena (next to Kinney) Clarkson Television Station Women in Science and Engineering (theme floor) Clarkson radio station "91.1 The Source"

L IVING ON C AMPUS RESIDENCE LIFE, STUDENT AFFAIRS, EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER 1100 (ERC) PHONE: 315-268-6642 RESLIFE @CLARKSON .EDU LASTING friendships begin in our residence and dining halls for as many reasons as there are students. We strive to help you make your residence days and nights as rewarding as your classroom experiences and believe there is as much to be learned outside the classroom as there is in the classroom. As a first-year student, you’ll live in one of our fully networked residence halls. All the rooms are fully furnished, and most are double occupancy. Clarkson houses most first-year students in the “Quad” which consists of Cubley, Reynolds, Ross and Brooks. This enhances the First Year Experience and promotes cohesiveness of the class. Currently, there are five options for theme housing that include Unity House, FIRST Robotics, Outdoor Enthusiast, Professional Women, and Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE). The goal of theme housing is to bring students together because of common interests and to cultivate lasting friendships. Living on a theme floor is advantageous because residents of these floors interact with faculty outside of the classroom, and get to enjoy social activities such as trips, volunteer activities, and movies.

KnightCard (Your student ID) Provides access into your residence hall.  Allows you to eat on-campus.  Can be used similarly to a debit card at over 20 local locations! http://www.clarkson.edu/sas/ student_accounts/knightcard/locations.html  Access to the Fitness Center.  Check out books from the library.  Free admittance to athletic events! 

You are expected to always have your ID with you. If you lose it report it to Campus Safety and Security. They will deactivate your account, and you can purchase a new card for $25.00. 8

W HAT TO B RING IF you will be paired with a roommate, we highly encourage you to speak with your roommate before you arrive on campus to plan who is bringing what of larger items. Most rooms don’t need two TVs or two minifridges.

 Ethernet cable  TV cable

* If you live in Moore, Ross, Brooks, Cubley, or Reynolds, your residence hall has Wi-Fi.

R OOM E SSENTIALS  Bed Sheets and blankets (Twin XL – mattress is     

36”x80”) Pillow Trash can Towels Toiletries (shower caddy, shower shoes) Personal fan

        

MISCELLANEOUS Laundry bag and detergent Sewing and tool kit First aid kit Coffee/travel mug/water bottle Plastic bowl/plate/utensils Closet organizers & hangers Plenty of storage containers Batteries Sticky tack to hang posters

DISALLOWED ITEMS (SUBJECT TO C HANGE)  Air conditioner, halogen bulbs, toaster/toaster oven,

THINGS TO HELP YOU WORK  General school supplies  Desk organizer  Desk lamp with CFL bulb

full-size refrigerator, space heater, waterbed, grills, candles, incense, extension cords, string lights, weapons of any kind.

ELECTRONICS  EPEAT-certified computer and flash drive,

laptop computer recommended (takes up less space and provides a mobile work environment)  EnergyStar Appliances such as mini-fridge, microwave, TV, and DVD player  Power strip 9

R OOMMATE C ONFLICTS ROOMMATE conflicts are a normal part of college life. For many, this may be the first time they have had to share a room with another person.

Get off to a good start with your roommate. You don’t have to be best friends, but you’ll feel a whole lot more at home in your room if you both get along. Some helpful roommate etiquette tips include: 

Clean up after yourself – keeping your room neat can seem unimportant when you’ve got exams and more important things to do, but you will want to keep things tidy out of respect for your roommate. Keep in mind you will be sharing this space.

If there is a difference in living styles that seem to cause conflict (e.g. noise levels, bed/wake up time, etc.), try to com promise with your roommate. Communication is key in such situations.

Be reasonable about visits. Visits from friends, family, and significant others can cause serious roommate conflicts. Make sure your roommate is okay with visits.

Don’t use your roommate’s belongings without permission, including food.

Talk with your Resident Advisor (RA). Your RA can be a helpful resource when trying to solve a roommate conflict. RAs are student leaders who are trained to assist with problems such as these. Be your own advocate. The roommate conflict is yours to solve, not your parents’. Residence Life does not “prioritize” roommate conflicts when parents are involved versus when parents are not. They are all important to us. Residence Life staff also will not take sides in a roommate conflict and both students involved will be equally supported. The staff will work toward a peaceful compromise. Talk with your Area Coordinator (AC). As a last resort, if you cannot resolve the conflict after talking with your roommate, or speaking with the RA and/or RD, you can speak with the Area Coordinator. ACs are full-time professional staff who live in your residential building and are also available to mediate conflicts. As a last resort, the AC may consider a room change af ter attempting to mediate the situation. ACs rarely force someone to move.

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A DJUSTING TO C OLLEGE HEALTH AND COUNSELING CENTER, ERC PHONE: 315-268-2327 AND 315-268-6683 http://www.clarkson.edu/healthcenter/ STARTING your first year of college can be very exciting. At the same time, students are confronted with academic and social challenges, and the support system they have known their whole lives is under a different roof. Here are some ideas to help you adjust to college life: 

Allow yourself to feel homesick. Some students may not want to admit how much they miss home. They may perceive their feelings as immature and get angry with themselves. If you feel homesick, give yourself a break and understand that your feelings are normal. No matter how old people get, major life changes are tough, and you are going through a major life change.

Keep Busy. Take part in orientation week activities. Get off to a good start in your classes. Find out what kinds of student activities are available and attend some meetings.

Communicate with your family (in moderation!). It’s okay to call and e-mail your family and talk about how you are feeling at college. At the same time, try to understand that it is difficult for them to help you solve your problems from a distance. That’s why we offer you resources here, like the Counseling Center, for you to discuss your feelings and find solutions to problems.

Talk with your Resident Advisor (RA). Every residence hall floor has a student in charge that can help students get adjusted to college. If you feel overwhelmed, stop by for a chat.

If needed, talk to a counselor. If it becomes difficult for you to function in college, or if you are suffering from depression, make an appointment with a counselor at the Counseling Center. It is always better to talk about these issues early on, before they develop into more serious problems.

Decorate! If your room is cozy and comfortable, it will feel more like home.

Give yourself time. It may take a semester or even more before you stop feeling homesick. It takes time to adjust to major life changes like this one. Hang in there!

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S TUDENT L IFE CUSA SUITE, STUDENT CENTER AND ERC 1100 PHONE: 315-268-2345 AND 315-268-6680 http://www.clarkson.edu/campus_life WE encourage you to take this opportunity to test your boundaries, meet new people, and try new things. Almost every weekend, there are fun programs and sporting events to attend. The Men’s and Women’s hockey teams host many Division I games to attend throughout the semester. CUB offers entertainment each weekend when there is not a hockey game, and Student Life and Engagement provides “Late Knight” programs, which are a series of fun and social events on Friday and Saturday nights. Visit the ERC suite 1100 to speak about making your special entertainment interest happen! Additionally, Clarkson boasts over 90 CUSA-recognized student organizations. Clarkson clubs and organizations provide students with opportunities to explore your interests, build your résumé, and meet people at Clarkson. They can also provide opportunities for mentorship and networking. For a comprehensive list of campus clubs and organizations, go to http://knightlife.clarkson.edu. If you can’t seem to find the right club for you, starting your own is easy! Sue Conto in the CUSA Office on the 1st floor of the Student Center will help guide you in starting this process.

Planning to get involved with an on-campus activity or organization? It is a great way to meet likeminded people, find a niche on a big campus, and build up your entry-level résumé for when you graduate. 12

G ETTING I NVOLVED IN S TUDENT O RGANIZATIONS CUSA SUITE, STUDENT CENTER PHONE: 315-268-2345 http://www.clarkson.edu/campus_life/clubs/index.html WHEN choosing what activities to be involved with, be selective and choose wisely. Find activities that you enjoy the most, and that will help you build a résumé. On a résumé or graduate/ professional school application, you can demonstrate commitment by getting involved in one activity for a long time – especially if you take on leadership roles in that organization. Here are some tips for choosing the best campus activities for you: Be sure to attend the Activities Fair on Tuesday, August 26 th at 7pm in Cheel Arena to find out about student organizations you might want to join! 

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Choose activities that serve several purposes. For example, you can choose an activity that allows you to have fun, meet people, and also helps you build your résumé and make contacts for future jobs. If you are interested in law or politics, get involved in student government (CUSA). If you’re interested in writing, join the Integrator – Clarkson’s newspaper. In addition, many majors offer a professional organization on campus that will help you network with students and professionals in the field. One of the best reasons to join a club or campus organization is that it will help you find your niche. Look at groups that reflect your interests or values. Maybe try a bunch of new things, and then narrow down your list to the ones you really like.

G REEK L IFE CUSA SUITE, STUDENT CENTER PHONE: 315-268-2345 http://www.clarkson.edu/campus_life/clubs/ofsa/ GREEK Life is a vibrant part of Student Life at Clarkson University. Clarkson is home to fifteen different national and local fraternities and sororities. Today, Fraternities and Sororities at Clarkson focus on their founding principles of leadership, scholarship, philanthropy, friendship, and personal growth. Although they vary, groups expect that their members will become leaders within the community, abide by the rules and traditions of the chapter and the University, and adhere to the higher academic standards of their organization. Clearly, hazing and substance abuse are not consistent with the values we have been founded on and have no place within our organizations.

FRATERNITIES In general, male students who are sophomores and have a 2.5 cumulative grade-point average are eligible to join a fraternity. Some organizations will receive special permission to recruit second semester first-year students. Alpha Chi Rho Fraternity Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity Delta Upsilon Fraternity Omicron Pi Omicron* Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity Sigma Chi Fraternity Sigma Delta* Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity Tau Kappa Epsilon Tau Epsilon Phi Fraternity Zeta Nu * *Local Organizations

SORORITIES

Female students are eligible to join a sorority during their second semester at Clarkson if they have attained a 2.5 cumulative gradepoint average and are in good academic standing. Delta Zeta Sorority Kappa Delta Chi Sorority, Inc. Phi Sigma Sigma Fraternity Theta Phi Alpha Fraternity For more information about joining a Fraternity or Sorority, visit www.clarkson.edu/ofsa or speak with the Director of Student Organizations and Student Center in the CUSA Office on the first floor of the Student Center. 14

V OLUNTEERING VOLUNTEERING and raising money for local non-profit organizations are significant parts of Clarkson’s campus culture. You can volunteer by joining either Circle K or Alpha Phi Omega, a co-ed service Fraternity. There are also many local organizations that are looking for volunteers. Some community opportunities include, but are not limited to, Adopt-A-Bear Cub Mentoring Program, American Red Cross, Canton-Potsdam Hospital, CORC Thrift Store, Head Start, Hospice and Palliative Care, Planned Parenthood, Potsdam Humane Society, Potsdam Rescue Squad, Reachout, Renewal House, and St. Lawrence NYSARC.

IF you are interested in volunteering, make sure you check out all the organizations at the Volunteer Fair Monday, August 25th! Or, look online at www.clarkson.edu/campus_life/clubs/ volunteering.html

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INDOOR & OUTDOOR RECREATION INTRAMURAL SPORTS AFTER a long day in the classroom, the Clarkson campus offers all kinds of opportunities to run, jump, dive, kick and swing. Our fiercely fun, not-so-competitive intramural teams attract more than 80 percent of Clarkson students. Show off your stick work in roller hockey, shoot hoops in the pool with water basketball, or score a touchdown in touch football. There are more than 100 teams to choose from. For more information, check out http:// www.clarkson.edu/intramurals.

SCHULER INDOOR RECREATION CENTER (IRC)

Whether you’re a tennis player, a jogger, or enjoy taking a fitness class, Clarkson offers a variety of facilities to ensure that there is something for everyone. The IRC houses: Gym 25 meter swimming pool Indoor track Field house for tennis, volleyball, or basketball Racquetball courts Weight room Fitness Center, with full assortment of cardiovascular machines Fitness classes including yoga, Zumba, and aikido

OUTDOOR RECREATION If you like adventure in the great outdoors, Clarkson has one of the best locations you’re ever going to find. Our 640acre campus sits on the edge of a village where the rolling foothills of the Adirondack Mountains meet the St. Lawrence River Valley. The Clarkson Outdoor Recreation Program manages the multiuse trail system on campus, and the Adirondack Lodge provides support and guidance to the outdoor-oriented student clubs, as well as runs the outdoor program that expose students to the natural areas of the Adirondack region. Organizations like Ski Club and Cycling (Bike) Club make it easy to find people who share your adventurous spirit. Clarkson’s Outing Club, one of the largest and most active student groups on campus, organizes excursions near and far that enable you to take advantage of the recreational possibilities in this spectacular environment. 16

A THLETICS WITH 20 Varsity teams, there are plenty of opportunities to enjoy collegiate rivalries. Clarkson’s men’s and women’s hockey teams, which compete in the Division I, East Coast Athletic Conference Hockey League, are the perennial powerhouses at the national level. In 2014, the women’s team became NCAA Champion winners, winning 5-4 against the Minnesota University Golden Gophers, completing their most successful season with 31 wins. The men’s team has traditionally been one of the strongest programs in the country. The women’s volleyball team is also 8th in the country.

Clarkson also offers 18 Division III sports that compete in the Liberty League, with the Alpine and Nordic ski teams belonging to the United States Collegiate Ski Association. The Golden Knights have had athletes compete in the USCSA National Championships for 22 consecutive seasons, and the women’s volleyball team made it to the NCAA Elite 8 in 2013. Clarkson also had more than 60 student athletes named to the Liberty League All-Academic team. Dan Fritz, senior Cross-Country player, made it to the NCAA Division III Cross Country National Championship. You will want to mark your calendar now to attend the home hockey games against our rival St. Lawrence University. The Women’s team will compete October 4th for the National Championship banner raising, and the Men’s on November 1st. The puck drops at 7pm! Students get in FREE to all regular season athletic events with their Clarkson Student ID!

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D INING ON C AMPUS CHEEL CAMPUS CENTER PHONE: 315-268-3816 www.clarkson.campusdish.com

EMAIL: clarksondining@aramark.com FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/campusdining

AT Clarkson, campus dining is an integral part of the college experience and strives to make the dining experience memorable and enjoyable. Our six on-campus dining locations aim to accommodate varying schedules, dietary restrictions, and nutritional needs of all students. Five different meal-plan options are available to help you adjust to changing eating habits and daily schedules throughout your years on campus. All first year students are highly recommended to have The Golden Knight meal plan to ensure they have breakfast, lunch and dinner, 7 days a week throughout the semester. Prior to spring semester, the Dining Office can pull a usage report to show how many meals were used and determine if another plan is more suitable. Students have the first 2 weeks of every semester to change their meal plan. MEAL PLAN OPTIONS

DECLINING BALANCE (DB) Dining dollars that you can spend at any campus dining location. You can add on DB at any time. It rolls over from fall to spring semester and can be used through May graduation.

The Golden Knight  21 board meals per week & $25 in DB The All Northern  200 block meals & $75 in DB Platinum Dining  150 block meals & $225 in DB The Sandstoner  7 board meals per week, 50 block meals & $275 in DB Emerald Dining  5 board meals per week, 20 block meals & $425 in DB

BOARD MEALS Meals that reset each week on Saturday mornings. Can be used to enter the dining hall for an all-you-care-to-eat meal or as a “meal equivalency” swipe at designated retail dining venues. BLOCK MEALS A number of meals that decline as they are used during the semester. Can be used to enter the dining hall for an all-you-care-to-eat meal or as a “meal equivalency” swipe at designated retail dining venues.

You can check the amount of meals and declining balance you have left at any cash register or in the Dining Office, located on the main floor of Cheel Campus Center. Knight Card is also accepted at all of our dining locations.

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D INING L OCATIONS Student Center Servery (Upper level of the Student Center)  A made-to-order retail location including stations with grill favorites, pasta, Panini sandwiches, soup, salad, pizza and International grill entrées. Choose something new every day!  Monday – Sunday 11:00 am – 8:00 pm Java City Café (First floor of the Student Center)  Java City is a café offering a wide variety of hot, cold, and blended specialty beverages, pastries, grab and go salads, sandwiches and snacks.  Monday - Sunday 7:30 am – 8:00 pm P.O.D. Market (Lower level of the Student Center)  A campus grocery store where you can purchase snacks, beverages, frozen meals, F’real milkshakes, rotisserie chicken, toiletries and more.  Monday - Sunday 10:00 am - Midnight Ross-Brooks (Residential Dining Hall)  Ross-Brooks is an all-you-care-to-eat dining hall which offers a variety of cutting-edge American entrées, ethnically inspired foods, and vegetarian selections. Enjoy home-cooked favorites, grilled sandwiches, fresh burgers, specialty fries, pizza, Panini’s, soup, salad, desserts and more.  Open Monday - Friday 7:00 am - 8:00 pm & Saturday and Sunday 9:00am - 8:00 pm Ross-Brooks Late Night  The grill offers a variety of grilled sandwiches, fresh burgers, and specialty fries. Enjoy pizza, rolletos, appetizers, wings, milkshakes and smoothies.  Don’t want to leave your room? No problem, Late Night delivers! Ross-Brooks Late Night accepts Cash, Declining Balance, KnightCard, MasterCard & Visa. Monday - Sunday (Late Night) 9:00 pm – 1:00 am Main Street Café (Main floor of Cheel Arena)  The Main Street Café food court offers several different options. Subway® will make you a world famous sub and the Main Street Grill will be cooking up a variety of specialty burgers, free range chicken, and vegetarian options featuring local, seasonal ingredients under our Adirondack Kitchen brand. "The Smokehouse" has home-style foods such as carved meats, mashed potatoes, gravy and vegetables. For those looking for a lighter meal, Main Street offers homemade soups, specialty salads, sandwiches and snacks, all available to-go for those on the run. Entrepreneur Coffee is proudly brewed here.  Monday - Friday 7:30 am - 8:00 pm

Concrete Café (Third floor Science Center)  Choose from homemade soup, gourmet sandwiches and salads, fruit and cheese or a great cup of Entrepreneur Coffee!  Monday - Thursday 7:30 am - 3:00 pm, Friday 7:30 am – 2:00 pm The Healthy Pantry (Located in Hamlin-Powers)  A convenient café living in Hamlin-Powers or walking to and from downtown Potsdam. Enjoy a variety of grab-n-go breakfast and lunch items, including specialty sandwiches, salads, fruit, cheese, yogurt and homemade desserts. Entrepreneur Coffee is proudly brewed here.  Monday - Friday 7:00 am - 2:00 pm

*Meal Plan is accepted at all locations except Java City and P.O.D. Market. Ross-Brooks Late Night will now feature a swipe option.

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S TUDENT S UCCESS C ENTER EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER SUITE 1400 PHONE: 315-268-2209 www.clarkson.edu/ssc

THE mission of the Student Success Center is to provide structured and effective services, opportunities and experiences in a proactive and supportive environment to help you succeed! Using a collaborative approach within and across the campus community, the SSC offers all students access to academic counseling and advisement, as well as tutoring and accommodative services. We believe in the ability of all well-equipped students to persist and achieve at Clarkson University. The SSC is the centralized location for students to access support and services to ensure a successful academic career. Through workshops, individual meetings, and cultural enrichment events — all at no additional cost— the SSC provides one-stop-shopping for the tools your student needs to be successful at Clarkson. The SSC provides first year advising, accommodative services, tutoring services and new student and family outreach programs. THE FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR All first-year students at Clarkson are required to take this 10 week seminar, which introduces the expectations of the learning process at Clarkson, builds communication and teamwork skills, and provides some fundamental content related to wellness and relationships during the college experience. Discussion, team activities, leadership opportunities, and fall semester interaction with upper-class peer educators form the foundation of the course. CU CONNECT: MENTORING OF ALL FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS Through CU Connect, every freshman student has the opportunity to connect in a meaningful way with a Clarkson University administrative and/or staff member. Students and staff meet several times throughout the first semester and have some continued contact into the second semester. Our semi-structured and flexible outline of contacts help students feel comfortable seeking necessary information about academic and non-academic aspects of college. ACADEMIC RECOVERY C OURSES FOR FRESHMEN & SOPHOMORES Each spring semester the Student Success Center offers “UNIV 100: Project Success Strategies for Academic Success,” an academic recovery course that helps freshmen and sophomores get back on track academically after a weak fall semester. This course focuses on the development and application of study skills required for college-level work, as well as the identification and minimization of barriers that impede individual student achievement. 10 WEEKS OF WORKSHOPS FOR ADDITIONAL HELP Also available in the spring semester are workshops, aimed at sophomore and junior students, to help better assist students as they navigate through college. Available workshops include Time Management, College Reading Strategies, Staying Healthy, and Test Taking Strategies. 10 workshops will be offered in the spring, with a different workshop once a week.

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F IRST -Y EAR A DVISING STUDENT SUCCESS CENTER, EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER 1400 PHONE: 315-268-3948 www.clarkson.edu/firstyear ADVISING is an important function to Clarkson University’s faculty and staff. All students meet with a designated faculty and/or administrative advisor, but First-Year Advising is available for students who seek extra guidance outside of their major department. If you are unsure of your choice of major, or would like to combine another major with your existing major, a First-Year Advisor would be able to assist. Often, the initial meeting deals with the overall adjustment to life on campus and provides information about resources available to assist with academic or other concerns as appropriate. Examples of services: 

Create an academic plan to discover and pursue new  interests. 

Cope with academic difficulties.

Plan major or course selection

Answer questions about degree or program requirements.

Exploring Academic Majors event on campus

Identify independent research opportunities and team-based projects available to students.

Connect with on-and-off campus resources.

Make informed decisions about educational goals.

First-Year Advising helps students identify campus resources so you can take advantage of the opportunities available at the University. For example, we can help you connect with people to answer questions about academic and career options, tutoring, academic programs/majors, residence life, counseling, accommodative services, study abroad opportunities, cooperative education, financial and registration information. It is not unusual for students to experience many changes in their first year on campus, and we provide resources to help you get “connected” to the University. While geared toward first-year students, any student may use the FirstYear Advising services at any point during their college career.

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T UTORING S ERVICES EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER 1400 PHONE: 315-268-4396 http://www.clarkson.edu/ssc/tutoring/

TUTORING CENTER

 THE Tutoring Center is open from 7:00 pm until 11:00 pm, Sunday through Thursday, in the Quad Classroom

200. The center is staffed by 3 tutors per shift, providing help for Calculus, Math, Physics and Chemistry. The tutors who work in the center will be able to tutor multiple courses (primarily first- and second- year).  There is also a Calc/Physics/Engineering Tutoring Lab located in CAMP 178, which is open 7:00 pm until 11:00pm, Sunday through Wednesday. The tutors will be able to help with several sophomore/junior level Engineering courses as well as Math and Physics.  The Tutoring Center is in addition to our assigned small group tutoring format. Signing up for small group tutoring is now available through your Peoplesoft account. Please follow the instructions on the link provided to make requests: https://www.clarkson.edu/forms/tutorial.php? tutorial=Tutor_Request.

BERTRAND H. SNELL ROOM 129 PHONE: 315-268-4439 www.clarkson.edu/writingcenter

WRITING CENTER

THE Writing Center helps students strengthen their skills by developing, organizing, and editing their work. The tutors in the Writing Center help with personal, academic and professional communication tasks including essays, labs, reports and letters. The Writing Center has at least two tutors available the following hours when classes are in session. Students can make an appointment or drop by when the center is open: Monday-Thursday Friday Sunday

12:00-5:00pm & 6:30pm-8:00pm 12:00-2:30pm 6:00-8:00pm

The Writing Center tutors will help your student: Analyze the project’s goals and readers expectations. Research and develop ideas. Organize material according to their discipline’s standards. Learn to edit and eliminate grammar and punctuation errors. Polish tables, figures and graphs. Check citations formats.

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A CCOMMODATIVE S ERVICES EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER SUITE 1400 PHONE: 315-268-7643 www.clarkson.edu/oas

EMAIL: oas@clarkson.edu FAX: 315-268-2400

IN order to ensure equal access for students with disabilities, Clarkson University’s Office of Accommodative Services (OAS) provides reasonable accommodations to qualified students in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, as amended in 2008. In accordance with our mission, OAS determines, coordinates and provides reasonable accommodations, educates and advocates for an accessible and hospitable learning environment, and promotes responsibility and self-advocacy on the part of the individuals we serve. You are encouraged to self-disclose a disability prior to arrival on campus. The sooner the Office is aware of accommodative needs, the better prepared we are for you. Appropriate reasonable accommodations are determined on an individual basis using an interactive process.

HOW DO I KNOW IF I QUALIFY FOR SERVICES? The ADA defines a person with a disability as any person who: 

Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities.

Has a record of such impairment.

Is regarded as having such an impairment

In order for OAS to determine if a student’s condition meets the standard defined by the law, an evaluative intake process will be conducted with the student, and any additional documentation provided will be reviewed. All decisions are made on a case -by-case basis, and any additional information requested during the intake process will be used to determine current functional limitations caused by the disability and reasonable accommodations. For more information about the Office of Accommodative Services, including information for prospective students, please visit www.clarkson.edu/oas. To discuss your individual needs, please contact the Office of Accommodative Services via phone or email. We look forward to working with you!

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C AREER C ENTER EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER SUITE 2300 PHONE: 315-268-6477 www.clarkson.edu/career

EMAIL: career@clarkson.edu FACEBOOK: Clarkson University Career Center Clarkson University KnightLink

The Career Center is a student service that provides linkages between students, alumni, and employers as they prepare to meet post-graduate and hiring goals. Our office provides comprehensive career development and services that include exploration, preparation, experiential education, study abroad exchange and employment opportunities. We utilize an educational placement model/ process that proactively engages students to meet their career-related goals within a global context. One in five Clarkson graduates is the CEO, vice president or owner of his or her own company. Great careers like that don’t just happen — they result from a progressive 21stcentury education, solid career planning, lots of hard work, and plenty of opportunities to acquire meaningful real-world experience. 

 

95% of Clarkson graduates are working in their field of study one year after graduation Career Services provides assistance in discovering self-awareness of interests, values and talents through the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Hosts two on-campus and two virtual career fairs each year, bringing over a hundred employers to campus. Encourage exploration of future career paths through job shadow, mentoring, company visits Assists with finding internship, co-op, projects, regional career experiences Facilitates mock interviews and resume development Maintains KnightLink, an online career resource for all Clarkson students 24 24

S TUDY A BROAD E XCHANGE

http://www.clarkson.edu/career/students/study_exchange/ STUDYING Abroad or completing an Exchange program can be an excellent opportunity to embrace another culture and have a life-changing global experience. The International Study Abroad/ Exchange Program provides all undergraduate students with the opportunity to study and live in another country and culture for a semester or a full year. Clarkson partners with over 39 study abroad programs and 10 Research Partner programs in 26 countries to closely match the academic and cultural needs of students. There are also short-term program options, usually three weeks in length, which students can select if going abroad for a semester or a full year is not feasible. Typically, students begin to apply during their sophomore year to study abroad during junior year. We recommend if you are interested to start researching and planning early. Students must have a 3.0 GPA to study abroad. Students who plan ahead and work with the Career Center and their academic advisor are typically able to graduate in four years. Because each academic program is different and each student’s financial situation is different, we encourage you to plan ahead and to check with your SAS representative, your academic program and the Career Center as early as possible in order to meet your goals. If you are interested in studying abroad, we encourage you to visit the Career Center to get started!

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S TUDENT H EALTH S ERVICES ERC SUITE 1300 PHONE: 315-268-6683, Fax: 315-268-6448 http://www.clarkson.edu/healthcenter/ THE University has a partnership with Canton-Potsdam Hospital (CPH) in which CPH provides professional staffing and services at the University’s Student Health & Counseling Center. Through this partnership, students enjoy a comprehensive health care program and the broad professional capacities provided by the hospital and its highly trained staff. All full-time undergraduate and graduate students who have paid a facility fee are eligible to visit the Health Center. CPH provides clinical services including:  Basic medical care  Preventative care  General physicals for student related activities (additional charge)  Limited urgent care  Students also have access to CPH’s state of the art lab services

Most routine visits to the Health Center are free of charge, with the exception of physicals, STD testing, immunizations, and flu vaccines. Blood work and x-rays are performed at Canton-Potsdam Hospital. If a prescription is necessary, students can have it filled at any local pharmacy. The closest to campus is Kinney Drugs. Other local pharmacies are Wal-Mart and Walgreens which are within two miles of Clarkson University. After-hours non-emergency medical attention is directed to Canton-Potsdam Hospital Afterhours Clinic located in Canton, NY (approximately 10 miles from campus), in the EJ Noble building. If emergency treatment is necessary, Canton-Potsdam Hospital is located on 50 Leroy Street Potsdam. 26

S USTAINABILITY ON C AMPUS INSTITUTE FOR A SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT TAC 122 PHONE: 315-268-3856

EMAIL: sustain@clarkson.edu FACEBOOK: CUSustainability www.clarkson.edu/green

Clarkson University has committed to including sustainability in everything we do. We value our natural environment and the social wellbeing of our students, employees and broader Northern New York community. Accomplishing this requires the support of all members of the campus community. Actions ranging from recycling wastes appropriately and using a re-fillable water bottle to taking a leadership position on a Sustainability Fund grant are encouraged. Students involved in sustainability projects have made a difference! For example, the water bottle refill stations, low-cost water bottles and re-useable to-go box programs are all examples of changes our students have implemented to improve the sustainability of campus operations. Many other opportunities are available to include sustainability in academic or extra-curricular activities as well. Learn how to get involved at www.clarkson.edu/green Consider adopting these green tips to make a difference on campus and in your life! RETHINK WASTE: If you don’t use materials, you do not need to worry about recycling or disposal.  Carry your Own: Coffee mug, water bottle and canvas shopping bags all help to reduce solid waste and save you money!  Swap and Share: Clarkson’s Greencycle, Take it or leave it, and the Annual campus garage sale all provide help to reuse material goods.  Recycle all you can: Zero-sort recycling – it (almost) all goes into one blue bin BE EFFICIENT WITH ENERGY:  Power Down: Set your computer to automatically sleep during inactive periods and use a power strip to turn computers and other electronics off overnight. Cardboard  Cut your driving miles: Combine your travels with healthy living – Packaging, paper bags, milk cartons walk or bike to or around campus. Carpool when you can. Paper  Manage Building heat: Save energy by closing blinds and windows appropriately Empty coffee cups, newspaper, clean take out containers, pizza boxes  Switch Bulbs: Use compact fluorescent or LED light bulbs. VALUE OUR RESOURCES: Our campus’ built, natural and human capital are priceless! Take time to enjoy and respect our setting and those you work or live with. WATCH WHAT YOU EAT: Try a vegetarian or vegan diet for one or two days a week and focus on locally grown or fair-trade food to really reduce your ecological impact.

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Plastic All hard containers #1 - #7 (no bags) plastic food and drink cups and lids

Glass

All in one bin No liquids, ice or food

O FFICE OF I NFORMATION T ECHNOLOGY GRAHAM HALL PHONE: 315-268-6700 EMAIL: servicecenter@clarkson.edu www.clarkson.edu/oit

The mission of OIT is to provide the highest quality IT services to the University Community. Students are able to access their Clarkson University email on the web at: mymail.clarkson.edu, and are able to access PeopleSoft, Moodle, and their MyFiles account online as well.

Clarkson requires you to have antivirus software installed on any computer you bring on campus. For Windows operating systems, Microsoft Security Essentials is available for free on Microsoft’s website.

Each residence hall contains wired network ports for students. Full wireless is available in Moore House and the Quad residence halls. For other locations, students may bring wireless routers.

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T RANSPORTATION IF you’re looking for a way to get home for a long weekend or holiday break, check out the Trailways bus service online at www.trailwaysny.com for ticket prices. This is especially helpful for students who live in New York City or Buffalo. You can even plan a day out with friends in Watertown or Syracuse. For fare and schedule information, or to order tickets, you can contact a representative directly by calling (800) 776-7548. Yet another way to get a ride home is to post on the Ride Board. Clarkson students looking for a ride home can post on the website. Students who want to offer a ride home to other students can also post here. The website connects students who live nearby so they can carpool. Check out more information at www.clarkson.edu/ clarkson_community/ carpool.

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T RANSPORTATION BIG DEAL ON CAMPUS, SMALL IMPACT ON THE EARTH. Need a car? Borrow a Zipcar! Clarkson University has partnered with Zipcar to bring car sharing, a sustainable transportation option, to students on campus. To use Zipcar, simply register as a member, reserve a car online or by phone, use your Zipcard to enter the car, and drive away. When you’re done, return the car to the same location where you picked it up. As a member you get:  Access to Zipcars 24/7. 

Discounted hourly rates for faculty, staff and students age 18 and older: rates start at just $7.50/hour or $69/day.

Gas, insurance and maintenance are included for free! Join for only $25 a year, and receive $35 in driving credit your first month.

Learn more and get started at http://www.zipcar.com/clarkson

Need more information? Find out more about Zipcar What is car sharing? Is car sharing for me? What happens if I return a car late? Zipcar on Facebook Zipcar on Twitter

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T RADITIONS CLARKSON has over 100 years of rich history and tradition. These annual events connect our students with over 35,000 living alumni and weave a fabric of the common Clarkson experience. We have highlighted a few of our Clarkson traditions:

CONVOCATION: Convocations are gatherings of students and faculty at academic institutions, usually to share new

ideas and renew campus spirit. In its early days, Clarkson held Convocations weekly, but that custom fell away during World War I. Since 1991, convocation has been held at the beginning of the academic year. It is now a time for bringing together the community of scholars to explore some fundamental theme, and for the faculty to welcome students to the campus.

LEGENDARY JOE BUSHEY: In 1921, some letters appeared in Clarkson’s student newspaper, the Integrator, referring

to a student by the name of Joe Bushey. The phantom Joe has been a recurring presence on campus ever since. He was first believed to be a member of the Class of 1923. In 1933, the Integrator reported that Joe had been awarded a lifetime scholarship to Clarkson. His picture is reported to have shown up in the 1930 yearbook, and at a 1949 alumni dinner, a recorded speech by Joe was played for the audience. Who knows when and where Joe Bushey, or perhaps one of his grandchildren, may again make an appearance at Clarkson?

ORIENTATION AND “HOLCROFT KNIGHT”: The opening days of the academic year offer the opportunity for new students to be welcomed, introduced to the Clarkson lore, and helped to become acclimated to campus life. It is a time of forging new friendships and building cooperative bonds for facing the academic and personal challenges ahead. It is a time for letting go and looking forward. “Holcroft Knight” offers new students a time for putting their voices behind some traditional Clarkson cheers and the Alma Mater, and for a true celebration of their new status as students at the University.

FALL FAMILY WEEKEND: Over the past century, parents and families have gradually come to play an increasingly

significant role in higher education. Held each fall, Clarkson’s Family Weekend provides an opportunity for parents and other family members to visit students on campus and participate in a variety of events: shared meals, meetings with faculty and staff, theater productions, and athletic events. Dinner at a restaurant is a valued treat during Family Weekend. The members of the parents Committee meet on this weekend as well. 31

A LMA M ATER Hear us, Clarkson, hail to thee. Hear us sing thy praise. We cherish dear the memory of golden college days. Thy banner, green and gold, shall stand until eternity. Alma Mater, strong and grand, Clarkson, hail to thee! (1979) Lyrics by Robert Smith, '37 Music by Guy Lamson 32

T HE U NIVERSITY B OOKSTORE 39 MARKET STREET - DOWNTOWN POTSDAM PHONE: 315-265-9260 www.clarksonshop.com

FACEBOOK: THE UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE @ CU EMAIL: bookstore@clarkson.edu

YOUR EDUCATION. YOUR BOOKSTORE. The University Bookstore: a place you can trust to have the right stuff at the right time and the right place. Our team of experts ensures that we have the course materials and supplies you need to succeed and can assist you with any questions you may have. VALUE AND CONVENIENCE. The University Bookstore offers a number of textbook formats – you can buy new, used, or digital books, and you can even RENT your books. Renting your books through our Rent-A-Text program offers you the lowest upfront cost while still allowing you to use your books like you would if you bought them (highlighting and notes are allowed!). Renting still allows you the option to convert to purchase up until the last day of finals (with no penalty fee), if you decide you want to keep a textbook. Our Rent-A-Text and digital textbook programs, offer serious savings – making learning more affordable for you. We work directly with your instructors, which means we know exactly which materials you need each term and you can be confident you’ll have the right materials at the right time. EFOLLETT.COM = YOUR BOOKSTORE. When you order books from efollett.com, you’re ordering from your bookstore. Shop our store online at efollett.com or directly at www.clarkson.bkstr.com from your computer, tablet or smartphone. No matter how you shop, you will get our top-notch customer support and access to the largest textbook inventory. And for your convenience, you can choose to pick up your order in-store. APPAREL, GIFTS, & MUCH MORE. The University Bookstore isn’t just the place to shop for your textbooks – we offer so much more! Apparel & accessories, supplies, general books, everyday essentials, and many other services. We also offer a full service café!

KNIGHT ARMOR STORE CHEEL CAMPUS CENTER 315-265-0525 For on-campus shopping, visit the Knight Armor Store - our “Spirit Shop” - located in the Cheel Campus Center. The Knight Armor Store is convenient to walk to when you need your Clarkson gear, for any sports game! The place to shop for Clarkson apparel and gifts, on campus – open all year round.

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2014 new student guide