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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, November 1, 2013 • Vol.15, No.44

Sprague, Foster face off in city council elections PG 4 Poll says Graham’s star falling, Haley’s rising PG 7 GHS becomes academic center PG 11

FLU FACTOR This yearly bug can be more than a simple sickness SEE STORY ON PAGE 8

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

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greenville Journal locally owned and operated since 1999 For delivery requests, call 679-1240 Publisher

Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com Executive Editor

Save money on your mortgage with our lower rates and options.

Susan Clary Simmons ssimmons@communityjournals.com MANAGING editor

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Cindy Landrum clandrum@communityjournals.com Sherry Jackson sjackson@communityjournals.com April A. Morris amorris@communityjournals.com photographer

Greg Beckner gbeckner@communityjournals.com

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SUNDAY

Don’t forget to turn your clocks “back 1 hour before going to bed Saturday night. Say goodbye to Daylight Saving time!

“ Showers, possible thunder

2 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 1, 2013

Sunshine, breezy, cooler

Sunny, but chilly

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JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Fifty years ago, we were locked out by race. Today, we’re locked out by resources.” Civil rights activist Jesse Jackson, speaking to Greenville reporters before his speech at Furman University.

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“At least we finally got some attention one way or another.” Greenville County Councilman Butch Kirven, to the crowd in attendance at the council’s recent debate over a one-percent sales tax to fund road improvements.

“We don’t expect them to be quiet or still, because they aren’t going to be.” Librarian Terri Keaney, on the Greenville County Library’s Sensory Story Time for special needs children.

“We have to play a very fine line because we don’t want to offend people – but we do want to get them talking.” Maureen West, vice president of marketing for OneMinuteNews, on engaging the audience through social media.

“People seem really cool with it.” Daniel McCord, former Dark Room co-proprietor, on booking musicians for house shows in his home after the Wilton Avenue music venue closed down.

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NOVEMBER 1, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 3

journal news

City Council election q&a:

time to plant TREES

At-large candidates Sprague, Foster address the issues sjackson@communityjournals.com Election day is Tuesday, Nov. 5 and area races are hurtling towards the finish line. In the city of Greenville, council members Lillian Brock Flemming (District 2) and David Sudduth (District 4) ran unopposed and were certified by the Municipal Election Commission in September. One City Council seat is on the contested ballot next week: the at-large position currently held by engineer Gaye Sprague, who is opposed by Greenville businessman Matt Foster. The Greenville Journal asked each candidate to respond to questions of interest to voters.

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What are the most important issues facing the city of Greenville now? How will you address those issues? G ay e S p r a g u e :

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Infrastructure. It is expensive, and our needs are great in sanitary sewer, street maintenance and sidewalks. I will address these through implementing carefully planned sewer improvements, maximizing state matching funds for streets,

ADMIT ADMIT ONE ONE WEDNESDAY WEDNESDAY

OV. 6 OV. 6

2013 2013 00PM

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m at t f o s t e r :

The biggest concern I’ve heard from Greenville citizens is safety. Sprague City Council must be prepared to tackle the tough issue of safety without pushing the problems elsewhere. I am ready to do that. Public safety is a community effort and needs to be addressed Foster alongside the Greenville Police Department by building stronger relationships between the police force and business community, promoting neighborhood watch programs that have proven results as a strong deterrent to crime, and exploring investments in new technology. Are there unique issues facing you as an at-large representative? How will you address those?

G ay e S p r a g u e :

As an at-large representative I address universal needs like reliable police and fire services as well as issues unique to individual areas such as affordable housing, infill development, flooding, noise, cut-through traffic, park and trail security, and others. I will continue to address these by listening to all ideas, identifying solutions, seeking partnerships for implementation, and balancing the needs of all citizens in setting priorities for funding. m at t f o s t e r :

One of the more unique issues facing Greenville is lack of young professionals’ involvement in government. We must make sure that young professionals want to stay in Greenville and start a business in Greenville. As a young professional myself, I will be able to bridge that gap with young people by establishing a youth council (ages 18-39) to participate in local government and the decisions that are made, coordinating with young professional groups, and utilizing new media communication to get young adults involved. What are your qualifications for

ONE NIGHT ONLY! ONE NIGHT ONLY! 30 CITY LEADERS TELL “MY FAVORITE JOKE”

PRO PRO

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30 CITY LEADERS TELL “MY FAVORITE JOKE”

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MIT ONE MIT ONE DNESDAY DNESDAY

and continually looking for ways to save money in other areas.

SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

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30 CITY LEADERS TELL “MY FAVORITE JOKE” WEDNESDAY WEDNESDAY DONATION: 30 CITY LEADERS TELL $30 “MY FAVORITE JOKE” WEDNESDAY DONATION: $30

PURPLE PURPLE ONE NIGHT ONLY! ONE NIGHT ONLY! ONE NIGHT ONLY!

ADMIT ONE PROCEEDS BENEFIT MILITARY ORDER PROCEEDS 7:45PM –––– PROCEEDS 30 CITY LEADERS TELL “MY FAVORITE JOKE”BENEFIT 501 River Street, Downtown Greenville, SC 29601 ADMIT ONE PR ADMIT ONE–– SHOW SHOW WEDNESDAY 7:45PM –––– ADMIT ONE OF THE ADMIT ONE 501 River Street, Downtown Greenville, SC 29601 MILITARY ORDER MILITARY ONE NIGHT ONLY! 30 CITY LEADERS TELL “MY FAVORITE JOKE” 30 CITY LEADERS TELL “MY FAVORITE JOKE” MILITARY ORDER 30 CITY LEADERS TELL “MY FAVORITE JOKE” WEDNESDAY 30 CITY LEADERS TE OFM T WEDNESDAY OF THE MILITARY ORDER WEDNESDAY PURPLE 30 CITY LEADERS FAVORITE JOKE” OFTELL THE “MY NOV. 30 CITY LEADERS TELL6 “MY FAVORITE JOKE” WEDNESDAY WEDNESDAY PURP NOV. 6 WEDNESDAY OF THE COMBAT HELPING PURPLE

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ONE NIGHT ONLY! HEART HEA NOV. 6 PURPLE NOV. 6 P 2013 , 2013 COMEDY NOV. 6 PURPLE WOUNDED VETS NOV. 62013 HELPING COMBAT HEART 7:00PM 7:00PM HEART H

2013 7:00PM 2013 7:00PM

GHT 2013 $30 N WOUNDED VETS 7:00PM HEART DONATION: 7:00PM

HELPING COMBAT

DONATION: $30 (tax deductible)

DONATION: $30 (tax deductible)

DONATION: $30 DONATION: $30 (tax deductible) DONATION: $30 (tax (tax deductible) deductible)

WOUNDED VETS HELPING COMBAT

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HE PRESENTED BY UPSTATE WOUNDED VETS HELPING COMBAT CENTRE STAGE SOUTH CAROLINA CAROLINA UPSTATE SOUTH W –––––––––––– 501 River Street, Downtown Greenville, SC 29601

PRESENTED BY UPSTATE UPSTATE SOUTH SOUTH PR PRESENTED BY (tax deductible) CENTRE STAGE SOUTH CAROLINA CAROLINA CHAPTER (tax deductible) UP CENTRE STAGE SOUTH CAROLINA CAROLINA CHAPTER PRESENTED BY CA 7:00PM CENTRE STAGE DONATION: $30 (tax deductible) 7:00PM –– RECEPTION RECEPTION CENTRE –––––––––––– STAGE SOUTH CAROLINA UPSTATE SOUTH #845 7:00PM – RECEPTION UPSTATE SOUTH PRESENTED BY CENTRE STAGE (tax deductible) ––– –––––––––––– 501 River Street, Downtown Greenville, SC 29601 7:00PM RECEPTION 501 River7:00PM Street, Downtown Greenville, 29601 CENTRE STAGE SHOW 7:45PM CENTRE STAGE SOUTH CAROLINA #845 CAROLINA CHAPTER 501 River Street, Dow SHOW 7:45PM – RECEPTION CENTRE STAGE–––SC SOUTH CAROLINA CAROLINA CHAPTER UPSTATE SOUTH 7:00PM RECEPTION CENTRE STAGE

7:00PM DONATION: $30 DONATION: $30 (tax deductible)

7:00PM – RECEPTION 7:45PM – SHOW

7:00PM – RECEPTION 7:45PM – SHOW

HELPING COMBAT CAROLINA CHAPTER WOUNDED VETS –––––––––––– #845 PRESENTED WOUNDEDBYVETS

7:00PM – RECEPTION CENTRE STAGE SOUTH CAROLINA 7:45PM – SHOW DONATION: 501 River Street, Downtown Greenville, SC 29601 $30

7:00PM

7:00PM – RECEPTION 501 River Street, Downtown Greenville, SC 29601 7:45PM – SHOW

7:45PM –– SHOW 501 River Street, Dow – SHOW 7:45PM –––––––––––– 7:00PM – RECEPTION CENTRE STAGE CAROLINA SHOW 7:45PM PM – SHOW 501 Greenville, RiverSOUTH Street, Downtown Greenville, SC 29601 –––––––––––– CAROLINA #845 501 CHAPTER River Street, Dow 501 River Street, Downtown SC 29601 4 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 1, 2013 DONATION: $30 – SHOW 7:45PM 7:45PM – SHOW –––––––––––– 501 River 501 River Street, Downtown Greenville, SC 29601 #845 Street, Dow

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journal news

City Council election q&a: this position? Why should voters choose you? G ay e S p r a g u e :

In my engineering career I work with cities across the southeast and therefore understand how all the aspects of city government have to work together to provide a high and sustainable quality of life. I use my expertise to be a leader on crucial issues, work cooperatively with the mayor and the rest of council, and represent all the citizens of our city. I will continue to work hard to keep Greenville moving forward, and I have a proven record of success. m at t f o s t e r :

The single most important qualification for a city councilman is to be an active listener of the community – to have first-hand knowledge of the concerns of Greenville. I have a MBA from Clemson University and I am an innovator of successful ideas, solutions implementer, and have the ability to think outside the box. Voters should ask themselves if good is good enough because I want Greenville to be great! What do you expect to accomplish if elected? G ay e S p r a g u e :

I will work with staff to further engage our law enforcement partners throughout the county to refine our police strategies to be sure they address our changing community and eliminate crime, not just move it to other jurisdictions. Cooperating with others, I hope to complete the first round of sewer fixes, increase redevelopment of the city’s commercial corridors, provide standards which better buffer neighborhoods from commercial areas, develop a plan for an east side fire station, and host a summit with city, county and state officials to address Woodruff Road traffic.

PASSIONATE ABOUT TASTE?

m at t f o s t e r :

The first thing I plan to do when I reach office is outreach to the community. For any city council to operate efficiently, transparency should be evident and the community should have their voice heard. Specifically, I will hold town hall meetings for the community. Another key focus is that revenue is appropriated to Greenville and not other areas of the state. These are vitally important to the future sustainability of the city of Greenville.

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What personal background should voters know about you?

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G ay e S p r a g u e :

I am a 30-year resident of Greenville with bachelor and masters degrees from Clemson in civil engineering and have owned Sprague & Sprague Consulting Engineers since 1985. I have served our community by being PTA co-president at two schools, a Cub Scout leader, chair of the Board of the Greenville Transit Authority, chair of the Greenville Chamber’s Transportation Committee, on the Board of Piedmont Health Foundation, on the Board of Greenville Forward, on the education committee of Greenville Women Giving, and on the Session of Westminster Presbyterian Church. I am married to Joel Sprague. Our son Jay, his wife Mollie Hardaway Sprague, and their eight-month old son Colson also live in Greenville. m at t f o s t e r :

I am responsible for business development at M33 Integrated Solutions, a Greenville-based corporation. I have a deep heart for service among the Greenville community, serving on the St. Joseph’s Alumni Board, Commerce Club Board of Governors, and as a member of Rotaract. I earned a B.S. from the College of Charleston in Business Administration, International Business, and an MBA in Entrepreneurship from Clemson University.

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NOVEMBER 1, 2013 | the Journal 5

journal news

opinion voices from your community, heard here

Open Studios has arrived Once out, don’t go back Scheduled for Nov. 2-3, Greenville Open Studios is one of the most dynamic and diverse weekends for the visual arts in the area. During the last 12 years, more than 350,000 people have experienced the event, and more than $1.80 million in art has been sold. In 2012, 40,834 visits were recorded and sales were $271,466; these outstanding results are indicative of Greenville’s continually expanding support of our visual arts community. Greenville Open Studios greatly enhances the quality of life for all residents and visitors. Greenville’s arts community has significantly diversified over the past several years, and the weekend event showcases the talent of the visual artists who live in our community. Each year, Greenville Open Studios expands to include new artists in virtually every neighborhood throughout the county. We welcome 21 new artists this year, and we ensure that the weekend promises something for everyone from the avid art collector to the first-time buyer or observer. We welcome Regions Bank, a new presenting sponsor that is joining SEW Eurodrive this year. Regions South Carolina President Chris Riley has been an avid supporter of Greenville’s visual arts community for many years, and we look forward to working with him in the future. The event guarantees free and convenient access to the visual arts by creating opportunities for interaction between artists and the general public. In just 11 years, Greenville Open Studios has evolved into the premier sales and marketing event for artists living and working within a 15-mile radius of downtown Greenville. The weekend also provides an excellent way to learn more about artistic processes and inspirations. There are several ways to select the studios you would like to visit. For an official catalogue, please call MAC at (864) 467-3132 or visit www. greenvilleARTS.com. All Squared Away, an exhibit at the MAC Gallery consisting of one work of art from each of the artists, provides an overview of the event. The exhibit runs from Oct. 25 through Dec. 6, and the gallery is

Speak your mind The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters

6 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 1, 2013

in my own words by ALAN ETHRIDGE

open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. Our web app allows you, through your cell phone or through www.greenvilleopenstudios.com, to access information on the participating artists by name, medium, location and artist statement. This feature also lets you to create a list of artist studios you would like to visit and plan your travel route with a mapping feature that is integrated with Google Maps and GPS devices. Also featured are hyperlinks for users to visit sponsor websites. This application was designed and implemented by Merge, and we greatly appreciate the time and investment that this company has provided for the past four years for the app. It is imperative that we continue to support the arts that make Greenville a remarkable place to live. The arts throughout Greenville County account for an estimated overall economic impact of over $210 million annually, and play a major role in attracting new businesses and tourists to the area. If the arts are to serve the public, then the public should, in turn, support the arts so that our quality of life is maintained. The hours of Greenville Open Studios are Saturday, Nov. 2 from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 3 from noon until 6 p.m. Please feel free to contact the MAC office at (864) 467-3132 at any time throughout the weekend if you need information. The famed English novelist E.M. Forster once said, “Works of art, in my opinion, are the only objects in the material universe to possess internal order, and that is why, though I don’t believe that only art matters, I do believe in Art for Art’s sake.” Greenville Open Studios provides you with 124 distinct opportunities to interact with artists who add greatly to the community and who recognize the importance of art for the sake of art.

Alan Ethridge is executive director of the Metropolitan Arts Council.

should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short

What if (heaven forbid) your mother recently suffered a heart attack? She stayed in the hospital to receive treatment and soon came out, much improved, to recover at home. But within the next 30 days, for some reason, she wound up going back into the hospital. That’s exactly what happens all too often across Greenville and elsewhere. Patients are re-admitted within a month of being discharged from a hospital. But as the healthcare profession has discovered, many of these so-called bouncebacks are avoidable. To start, stay in touch with your physician. All too often, patients recently discharged from a hospital delay a visit to the doctor for longer than a week. Visits early and throughout recovery are essential, enabling physicians to evaluate your progress. Face-to-face appointments may ensure better treatment. Taking all prescribed medications exactly as directed is key, too. Patients freshly discharged may either consider those drugs unnecessary or simply forget. Skipping medications is an especially serious oversight for elderly people on multiple medications for chronic conditions. Readmissions are a major issue in healthcare reform. In fact, the federal government imposes a penalty on hospitals that fail to lower readmissions for three major conditions: heart attack, heart failure and pneumonia. That cut in hospital reimbursement revenues, via the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), just doubled to up to 2 percent on October 1. Clearly, hospitals continue to struggle to meet this challenge. In South Carolina, 34 of 57 hospitals – 60 percent – incurred such fines. Patients can take on just so much medical care all by themselves, of course. Most hospitals partner with home health specialists and follow a protocol for a smooth transition to healthcare delivered at home. Some hospitals in your region already are succeeding with such partnerships. We know how this goes. Last year our organization served 27,662 patients in

bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

in my own words by GERALD HARMON, M.D.

South Carolina. In a recent one-year period, 1,439 South Carolina physicians and 64 hospitals referred patients to us. So our advice to patients is this: before discharge, ask your doctor if your hospital has forged such a partnership. We just conducted a nationwide survey about readmissions with a group known as HealthLeaders Intelligence Unit. As it turns out, the number-one strategy that seven in every 10 senior hospital leaders (73 percent) adopt to lower preventable readmissions is to partner with home healthcare. In the ideal scenario, a home health specialist will dispatch healthcare professionals – nurses, therapists, social workers and others – directly to your home to provide skilled healthcare and help your physician monitor your recovery. A nurse should visit within 24 hours of discharge. They should take your vital signs, review your medications and discuss any questions or concerns you have about your health status. Of course, most of the responsibility here lies with healthcare professionals. A follow-up visit with your primarycare physician, who will receive an account of your experience in the hospital, should take place within a week of discharge. Engage a friend or family member to listen to discharge instructions along with you. Above all, speak up. Only if you tell your care team what you expect and need can the team accommodate your wishes. In the end, lowering readmissions is good to help the nation reduce its skyrocketing healthcare costs. But most important, it’s good for your personal health, too.

Dr. Gerald Harmon is regional medical director for Amedisys Home Healthcare and a practicing family physician in coastal South Carolina.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of

organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@ communityjournals.com.

journal news

Winthrop poll shows Graham approval rating drops A Winthrop University poll released this week revealed that U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham’s approval rating has slipped and South Carolina residents overwhelmingly disapprove of Congress and blame Republicans for the federal government shutdown. The Winthrop poll interviewed 887 adults living in South Carolina Oct. 1927 on subjects ranging from President Obama and Gov. Nikki Haley to interracial marriage and marijuana use. Nearly half of respondents, 47.3 percent, blamed Republicans in Congress for the government shutdown. However, 29 percent blame the president and 20 percent blame them equally. The poll reported that approval ratings for the president and Congress are the lowest yet in South Carolina, with only 6.7 percent of respondents approving of Congress and 40.7 percent approving of Obama. Poll director Scott Huffmon said national and statewide figures cannot be compared because of the “few people with no opinion at the national level compared to the larger number of those with no opinion in state offices,” according to the report. “The most relevant comparison for a statewide figure is their approval to disapproval,” said Huffmon. Since the February Winthrop Poll, Gov. Nikki Haley gained approval, moving from 44.1 percent to 44.5 percent. Sen. Lindsey Graham’s approval rating slipped between February and October: from 71.6 percent among Republicans and GOP-leaning independents to 45.2 percent among that same group. Among registered voters, the approval rating is 37.4 percent. S.C. poll respondents did not over-

whelmingly support the national Republican Party. Among the Republicans and GOP-leaning respondents, the party was viewed positively by 45 percent, but one-quarter is negative and one-quarter is neutral. Some respondents are still forming an opinion of U.S. Sen. Tim Scott, 29 percent are not sure about him. Scott has a 53.7 percent approval rating among Republicans. Democrats and Democratic leaners who were surveyed reported more than 60 percent support, according to the poll. Support for the Tea Party was low among the general population, with only 28 percent of South Carolina residents viewing the movement in a positive light. South Carolinians were also surveyed about social issues. Nearly half said having a child without being married is acceptable, while 83 percent said that interracial marriage is acceptable and roughly 42 percent said smoking marijuana is acceptable. Visit winthrop.edu/winthroppoll to see the poll.

the winthrop poll 887 South Carolina residents surveyed

44.5% approve of Gov. Nikki Haley (among registered voters) 39.4% approve of S.C. General Assembly 37.4% approve of U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham (among registered voters) 40.6% approve of U.S. Sen. Tim Scott (among registered voters) 40.7% approve of President Obama 6.7% approve of Congress

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JOURNAL NEWS

FEAR OF THE FLU Health care experts prepare for seasonal sickness, watch for pandemic

Those who get the vaccine can help to protect those who don’t get vaccinated, said Dr. Juan Teruel of Bon Secours Express Care. And for those who are reluctant, Teruel added that the vaccine not only prevents sickness in that one patient, but “it’s very APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF important to prevent the spread of influamorris@communityjournals.com enza in the household, the workplace and The mantra begins this time every year in the community.” Teruel debunked the common myth that – “Get your flu shot” – accompanied by the flu vaccine can actually temporary signs outside cause flu. The vaccination drugstores proclaiming flu does not give you the flu, he clinics and the option of a said, but can produce side quick needle stick. effects. Some people may It’s the opening of influhave gotten the vaccine enza season and healthcare – approximate number and then contracted the providers are urging resiof doses of flu vaccine flu because it takes about dents to protect themselves. two weeks for antibodies to distributed nationwide However, last year, only build up, he said. about 41.5 percent of U.S. as of Oct. 18 Another consideration residents got a flu shot, acis that those who contract cording to the Centers for influenza can be contagious Disease Control and Pre– estimated percentage 24 hours before they show vention (CDC). Last week, symptoms and 24 hours afthe CDC reported 42,135 of Americans who ter the fever is gone, Teruel confirmed seasonal flu got a flu shot in the said. cases worldwide and the 2012-13 season first South Carolina cases NEW DEVELOPMENTS emerged in late September. This year, a new vaccine, Beyond the seasonal flu, there is another version of the familiar virus that’s far more quadrivalent, that contains four different worrisome to healthcare providers and those strains of flu has been introduced, but will CDC scientists: pandemic flu. Very few peo- not be available everywhere. Manufacturple have an immunity to this virus, meaning ers estimate that up to 32 million doses of the vaccine are available out of this year’s it can spread globally, sickening millions. In the early 20th century, an influenza 139 million doses. In addition, the U.S. Food and Drug Adepidemic killed more than 600,000 in the ministration (FDA) approved a new vacUnited States and an estimated 25 million died worldwide. So are we due for another cine created without using eggs that can be given to adults aged 18 to 49 who may have killer outbreak? egg allergies. Its production also does not use the weakened influenza virus or thiVIRAL EVOLUTION Each year, manufacturers create a vac- merosal (mercury-derived preservative). Most practices choose one type of vaccine to battle the seasonal flu from several previous strains. The virus is a moving tar- cine to offer, so patients should do research get and can mutate between seasons. Pub- and decide what is most appropriate for lic health experts who develop the vaccine them and their family, Teruel said. In the 2012-2013 season, the CDC eschoose which virus strains to include up timated that getting the vaccine reduced to nine months before the season patients’ risk of having to go to the starts to account for production. doctor for flu by 56 percent for all ages. The vaccine still provides some VACCINATION CHOICES protection against the current year’s The CDC encourages everyviruses, according to the agency. Terone who can to get a flu shot, uel agreed: “Even if it’s not a perfect especially children, the elderly match, there’s still some immunity and pregnant women. that you can retain from prior vaccination or the vaccine can limit how bad the case of the flu is.”

GOOD NUMBERS:

110.5 million 41.5

PANDEMIC INFLUENZA

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

8 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 1, 2013

Two other flu pandemics followed the 1918 pandemic, one in 1957 and another in 1968. The most recent pandemic flu showed

PANDEMIC FLU VERSUS SEASONAL FLU PANDEMIC FLU

SEASONAL FLU

Rarely happens (three times in 20th century)

Happens annually and usually peaks in January or February

People have little or no immunity because they have no previous exposure to the virus

Usually some immunity built up from previous exposure

Healthy people may be at increased risk for serious complications

Usually only people at high risk, not healthy adults, are at risk of serious complications

Health care providers and hospitals may be overwhelmed

Health care providers and hospitals can usually meet public and patient needs

Vaccine probably would not be available in the early stages of a pandemic

Vaccine available for annual flu season

Effective antivirals may be in limited supply

Adequate supplies of antivirals are usually available

Number of deaths could be high (The U.S. death toll during the 1918 pandemic was approximately 675,000)

Seasonal flu-associated deaths in the United States over 30 years ending in 2007 have ranged from about 3,000 per season to about 49,000 per season

Symptoms may be more severe

Symptoms include fever, cough, runny nose, & muscle pain

May cause major impact on the general public, such as widespread travel restrictions and school or business closings

Usually causes minor impact on the general public, some schools may close and sick people are encouraged to stay home

Potential for severe impact on domestic and world economy

Manageable impact on domestic and world economy

up in 2009 with the H1N1 strain, which sickened children and young adults. CDC estimates that between 43 million and 89 million cases occurred between April 2009 and April 10, 2010, and between 8,870 and 18,300 people died as a result. H1N1 is now part of the seasonal vaccine. However, experts are always watching a new strain of flu: the current cause for concern is a new avian flu, H7N9, which emerged in China this spring.

WORLDWIDE SHUTDOWN According the CDC, the reality of another flu pandemic is not if, but when. They say it will unroll just like Hollywood portrays it: residents will be forced to stay home, schools could close, the healthcare system will be overloaded and governments will try to stem the flow of infection through travel restrictions. “A pandemic is a reality that communities should prepare for, just as we prepare for natural disasters and other emergencies,” said Dr. Joe Bresee, head of epidemiology and surveillance in the CDC’s influenza division. “It’s the CDC’s job to move quickly whenever there’s a potential outbreak.” How many people get sick depends on how many people become infected, the virus’ strength, population vulnerability and preventive measures, he said. People should prepare for it just as they would for a natural disaster. Doing so could “limit the effects of the next pandemic,” he said. “The World Health Organization, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and countries throughout the world have developed pandemic plans, and people should stay informed and prepare as they would for any emergency.”

PREPARATION IS THE KEY When a flu pandemic surfaces, it likely will not be as devastating as the 1918 flu, Bresee said. “While increased travel and greater populations could speed the spread of the virus, better detection and medical treatments could lessen the potential impact.” The world has seen many medical advances since 1918, he said. “Global detection and tracking of influenza viruses has expanded greatly, diagnosis and care of patients has improved, and now we have technology to produce pandemic vaccine and antiviral drugs to treat influenza illness.”

FAST FLU FACTS People with flu can spread it to others up to about 6 feet away National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW) is December 8-14

FLU SYMPTOMS

– Sudden onset of fever – Dry cough – Headache – Muscle aches – Tiredness – Sore throat – Nasal congestion or stuffiness

VACCINE OPTIONS • Inactivated virus vaccine, trivalent (ages 6m+) • Inactivated virus vaccine, quadrivalent (ages 6m+) • Egg-free trivalent (18-49 years) • High-dose trivalent (for ages 65+) • Intradermal trivalent, injected into the skin • Live virus, quadrivalent nasal spray (2-49 years)

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Disabilities Board seeks ways to address aging fleet APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

House Open . 7 Nov 11 9:30 & 5-6

The interim board of directors for the Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board heard the good news and the bad news at their monthly meeting last week. The good news was that the agency’s financials were looking up – however, the agency is still operating on a lean budget with little room for capital expenses and building a reserve. Greenville DSN is paying the state Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (DDSN) back on an advance at the rate of $10,000 per month. DDSN will not excuse the debt, said executive director John Cocciolone. The board approved the approximately $19.8 million budget for the 2013-14 fiscal year. Members discussed the expense of maintaining an aging fleet of more than 100 vehicles, only three of which have fewer than 100,000 miles on them. Due to budget constraints, the previous administration had not kept up with replacing vehicles and repair costs had been upwards of $233,000 in 2012, said Cocciolone. “The problem is we’re still paying for past sins,” he said. Operations Director Al Hill said the agency fleet is “way overused and worn out” and his goal is to steadily phase out the worst vehicles from the fleet. The board approved a capitalization policy that would replace vehicles every eight years. Cocciolone said he is

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investigating getting rid of some vehicles and drawing federal funding to run a “jitney service” that would transport clients. In addition, the board approved purchase of a used van to replace one that had been damaged in an accident. It also approved funds for web development and branding, training software and a comedy night fundraiser.

3

number of vehicles with fewer than 100,000 miles in county Disabilities and Special Needs Board’s fleet

Auditor Chris Clark presented the annual audit and said the agency received a clean opinion and did very well on a review of Medicaid billing and managing clients’ funds. He said that the debt to DDSN is a significant liability, as the state agency could recall the entire amount at any time. Depreciation is an issue that the agency has had since 2009 and Clark recommended new software for tracking. The agency should also be generating its own financial statements from a certified accountant, he said. Clark’s firm created the statements for the audit. In addition, Clark recommended the agency review the direct deposit procedure and verification. The Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board is scheduled to meet again on Nov. 21, 6 p.m., at 1700 Ridge Road, Greenville.

Salvation Army Christmas Assistance to help 1,650 The Salvation Army completed its Christmas Assistance applications for Greenville County and more than 1,650 families were approved. The Salvation Army invites schools, churches, businesses and civic organizations to consider adopting a child with the Angel Tree program, competing in the fun Battle of the Bells or hosting a toy drive. For details call 864-232-9027 or visit salvationarmycarolinas.org.

Healthy Young Athletes expanding

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Special Olympics announces the national expansion of its Healthy Young Athletes program, which provides healthcare services and support, early childhood intervention and preventative education to children with intellectual disabilities ages 2-7. The expansion is made possible through a $50,000 grant from  CVS Caremark All Kids Can. The funding will also support the development of resources that will be distributed to all Special Olympics programs. Additionally, Healthy Young Athletes will offer two new types of health screenings: FUNfitness, which focuses on physical therapy, and Health Promotion, which focuses on nutrition and sun safety.

GHS becomes academic center Partners with three universities to improve healthcare and create jobs BENJAMIN JEFFERS | CONTRIBUTOR

bjeffers@communityjournals.com

Greenville Health System (GHS) announced this week that it has joined the Association of Academic Health Centers, creating a “first of its kind” model that partners three South Carolina universities with GHS to study health care delivery. The recent partnerships with Clemson University, Furman University and the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville will create an academic health center with a clinical university model, according to officials. GHS Vice President of Academics Dr. Spence Taylor, who constructed the collaboration, said this approach flips the standard model on its head. Rather than center around a university, which then affiliates with several hospitals, the Greenville model has GHS serving

as the hub in collaboration with multiple universities. The academic health center will leverage the resources of the institutions instead of creating new infrastructure such as laboratories and clinics, Taylor said. The model is intended to effectively meet the Upstate’s healthcare and workforce. Speaking to more than 150 people at the partnership’s unveiling, Taylor said the academic health center will focus on a “singular vision of transforming and fixing healthcare.” Mike Riordan, GHS president and CEO, said the purpose of the health center is to “transform healthcare for the benefit of the communities and people we serve.” Greenville Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Ben Haskew said the program will economically benefit the region and marks a “great day for the Upstate of South Carolina.” Haskew said he and 50 business leaders traveled to Pittsburgh, Penn. to see the positive effects that the University of Pittsburgh health center had on that community. He said that model has been used as a benchmark for the

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impact of the academic health center in Greenville, predicting the Greenville partnership will lead to long term job creation and “growing human capital through education.” Representatives from the three partnering universities also spoke at the press conference. All stressed their excitement for the academic health center and belief that it will help educate medical students and reform healthcare. “Ultimately, we believe this will help us increase research funding, recruit outstanding faculty and students and, more importantly, improve healthcare and drive economic growth in the Upstate,” said Larry Dooley, vice president for research at Clemson. Interim Furman President Carl Kohrt said students will not only gain clinical experience, but experience in nonclinical areas such as public relations, marketing and information technologies. Dr. Jerry Youkey of the School of Medicine Greenville said the world is rapidly changing and this new model of an academic health system will best prepare students to meet future healthcare needs.

GET YOUR SPARKLE ON AND YOUR ANGRY RESTING FACE GONE!

Are you ready for the holidays? Do you ever look in your mirror and wonder who is looking back at you? Do friends or family often ask you “what is wrong” why do you look so stressed? Ann-Marie Stillion, a communication strategist and artist from Seattle, says she’s recently made an effort to wear a smile when in public after having her resting face repeatedly misinterpreted by strangers, friends, and colleagues. “All these things added together, make us look grumpy, mean, and yes, even angry, when we don’t mean it.” You may suffer from angry resting face. You are not alone, millions of men and women suffer silently from (BRF). What is angry resting face? when a woman or man looks “thoughtfully sad or angry for no reason.” This has been confirmed by experts as a very real phenomenon. “Sometimes we have a permanent frown when the corners of our mouth droop,” explained plastic surgeon Dr. Anthony Youn, to the Today show. “And sometimes it’s because our brows are a little bit decreased or a little bit low. Our JCSC team refers to the frown lines between the eyes as ‘number 11’s’ or as one of our clients commented ‘are you kidding I have one hundred and eleven’s’, 111.” Time to lose that angry resting face and get your sparkle on. Your diet is crucial to ensure vibrant skin. If you are consuming more alcohol during the holidays than usual, try NAC (N-ACETYL CYSTEINE) before you drink, it assists your liver in processing the alcohol. Watch the foods that deplete your immune system. Sugar, dairy and wheat. These foods can accelerate aging and leave your skin looking dull, dry and grey. Be sure and get enough sleep, lack of sleep will fast forward aging as well. Drink half your body weight in alkaline water per day. JCSC has the solutions to restore that angry resting face to a youthful radiant face. We have expert injectors that will consult with you about removing those lines and furrows that can cause you to look stressed or angry. Call JCSC today and let us guide you through the best solutions for you! Let us help you look your holiday best! You will end up with a “happy resting face.” and a sparkling holiday glow. Stay tuned. . . .

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Identity protection enrollment underway

it’s that time of year again!

More than 56,000 enroll in first days JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com Enrollment is currently underway for an additional year of free credit protection monitoring through Texasbased CSIdentity Corporation (CSID) for state taxpayers affected by the state Department of Revenue (DOR) security breach last year. In October 2012, South Carolina offered taxpayers free protection through a $12 million emergency contract with Experian after it learned that 3.8 million taxpayers’ Social Security numbers were compromised, along with 387,000 credit and debit card numbers. However, Experian opted not to bid to extend its contract in 2013. Approximately 1.5 million South Carolinians signed up for the protection through Experian last year. Coverage will be available for eligible individuals along with minor dependents, adult dependents and those with no credit history. Businesses whose information was compromised are also eligible. Residents who signed up for credit protection through Experian can register with CSID. In addition, those who responded to an offer from Experian to renew protection for $11.88 per year can also sign up for the free CSID coverage. Taxpayers can enroll for protection through Oct. 1, 2014, according to CSID. As of Tuesday morning, roughly 53,000 adults, 3,000 children and 540 businesses had signed up for CSID services since enrollment opened on Oct.

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eligible list,” he said. “Some folks may think they are eligible and they are not. Some of the data may not match, like the address that they are at now and where they filed taxes from is different.” SCID will not only cover the children, businesses and taxpayers affected, but also children who have become adults since the tax information was compromised, said Hjelm. SCID will contact the estimated 1.2 million out-of-state taxpayers who are available to receive this service. Those with questions can call a CSID hotline at 855-880-2743. Taxpayers can enroll at csid.com/scidprotection.

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24, said Bryan Hjelm, CSID vice president of products and marketing. In addition, Hjelm said SCID received a file from the DOR, which lists state businesses and residents whose information was known to be compromised. “We are averaging three- to fiveminute hold times with the talk time of each call being six to seven minutes,” said Hjelm. “A bulk of the enrollments are coming in through the website.” Some residents have reported difficulty with signing up for the service. Taxpayers can contact CSID to determine their eligibility, said Hjelm. “You call the call center or log online and they can match you up against the

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Jackson urges Upstate to fight poverty, ‘racial divide’ CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

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14 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 1, 2013

Greg Beckner / Staff

The Rev. Jesse Jackson grew up just blocks from the campus of Furman University. While the civil rights leader could park the cars that transported people to Sirrine Stadium in his family’s yard and he could sell peanuts and Cokes to people attending the football games, he couldn’t attend the school of his boyhood dreams because of the color of his skin. Young people today find their dreams shattered because of poverty, said Jackson, who spoke at Furman Wednesday night. “Fifty years ago, we were locked out by race,” he said during a media availability Wednesday morning. “Today, we’re locked out by resources.” Jackson, who played an integral part in the civil rights movement in Greenville before working with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, said today’s young people must continue to work for racial and economic equality. Jackson said those locked out of Southern universities because of skin

color made the new South possible. “Mason and Dixon were brought together.” But while the racial divide has been narrowed, the divide between the haves and have-nots has widened, Jackson said. “This generation must move forward by hope and inclusion rather than moving backwards because of fear. There is too much racial divide. There is too much poverty.” Jackson said Jesus of Nazareth started his own movement when he cared for the poor 2,000 years ago, and “those who embrace the legacy of that Jesus must care for the poor and that’s not limited to race and gender.” Jackson said one in four people in South Carolina live in poverty, yet the governor and Legislature “send $11 to $12 billion back to Washington because of an anti-federal government ideology.” Jackson said the nation today is different from 50 years ago, when black uniformed soldiers had to ride behind Nazi prisoners in the bus. “The humiliation has ended,” he said, “but the social and economic structure is much like they were always.” Jackson attended Sterling High

Reverend Jesse Jackson speaks with reporters during a press conference at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Greenville.

School, where he was student body president and earned letters in baseball, basketball and football. He was actively involved in the civil rights movement in Greenville. He attended the University of Illinois for one year on a football scholarship before transferring to North Carolina A&T in Greensboro. While on break as a college freshman, Jackson participated in a sit-in that

helped integrate the Greenville library. “Lunch counters were the symbol in Greensboro, North Carolina,” he said. “The library was the symbol in Greenville, South Carolina.” Jackson founded Operation PUSH in 1971 and the National Rainbow Coalition in 1984. The two organizations merged in 1996 to become the Rainbow PUSH Coalition. Jackson made presidential runs in 1984 and in 1988. Jackson’s Furman speech is part of the Year of Altruism and was sponsored by Furman’s history department, the A.J. Head Fund of the Endowed Lectures Committee, the Humanities Development Committee and the Student League for Black Culture. Furman will commemorate the 50th anniversary of its desegregation next year. Jackson has lectured at numerous colleges and universities, including Yale, Princeton and Harvard, and has lectures scheduled at Cambridge and Oxford at the end of the month. “That is no higher an honor for me than speaking at Furman,” he said. “At one level, Furman has been in my life all of my life.”

journal news

crime briefs

reports from local law enforcement

To the Upstate Community, Nurses, Professional Counselors & Therapists, Social Workers & Clergy we invite you to

Clemson University police arrested a man they say followed a female student from downtown, entered a student residence hall and entered a woman’s room. The man was not a student or a university employee. Police said somebody let him in the residence hall without proper authorization. The woman fled to a friend’s room. Quincy Lashaxie Burt, 21, of Central, was charged with first-degree burglary.

Hope and Help for the Holidays and Beyond

A former football player for the University of South Carolina says the NCAA “breached its duty to protect NCAA football players.” In a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Columbia former Gamecock defensive lineman Stanley Doughty is asking the NCAA to provide a medical monitoring fund for all former college football players who did not play in the NFL. Doughty, who lives in Louisiana, has “limited use of his right arm and a burning sensation, anxiety, irritability, depression, mood swings, inability to concentrate and sleeplessness,” according to the suit. The lawsuit also claims Doughty is at increased risk of latent brain injuries caused by repeated head impacts in his college football career and is “in need of medical monitoring.” The lawsuit claims Doughty twice suffered temporary paralysis after collisions on the football field, once during practice and the other during a game. Doughty entered the NFL draft after his junior year and went undrafted. The Kansas City Chiefs signed him as a free agent, but team doctors told him he could no longer play football because of a spinal injury that needed surgery to correct, the lawsuit claims. The lawsuit says the NCAA should have been aware of a growing body of research that links repeated head trauma and concussions with immediate and future medical problems. The NCAA failed to educate college football players about the risks, the lawsuit said.

An inspirational seminar for loss, hope and healing.

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9 a.m. to 3 p.m. & 6 to 8 p.m. A complimentary light lunch will be served. You are welcome to come to any of the talks listed below or join us for all.

FEATURING: The Rev. Dr. Kathleen Rusnak, Ph.D., author of Because You’ve Never Died Before: Spiritual Issues at the End of Life David B. Gladson, M.Div., CACII, Interim Hospice Bereavement Manager Allyson Helvie, LBSW, M.Div., AnMed Palliative Care Chaplain Judge Debora Faulkner, Greenville County Probate Judge Beth Marshall, author of A Time to Heal, a grief journal Nigel Robertson, WYFF News Anchor Elizabeth Berrien, author of Creative Grieving—A Hip Chick’s Path from Loss to Hope Mandy Eppley, M.A., LPC, Director of Services & Programs, The Respite: A Centre for Grief & Hope

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DAY SESSION: 8:30-9:00 Registration* 9:00-10:15 Grief During Difficult Times The Rev. Dr. Kathleen Rusnak, Ph.D. 10:35-11:55 Move to choice of Session A or B (A) Loss, Grief and Faith The Rev. Dr. Kathleen Rusnak, PhD. (B) Putting the Tinsel Back on the Tree: Practical Ideas for Hoping and Coping David B. Gladson, M.Div., CACII & Allyson Helvie, LBSW, M.Div. 12:00-12:45 Lunch provided 12:45-1:30 Navigating Probate with the New Provisions Judge Debora Faulkner 1:30-2:00 This Wasn’t Supposed to Happen Beth Marshall 2:00-2:35 From Loss to Purpose Nigel Robertson 2:35-3:00 Closing Exercise The Rev. Dr. Kathleen Rusnak, Ph.D EVENING SESSION: 5:30-6:00 Registration and light refreshments* Transforming Your Grief for the Holidays 6:00-8:00 Elizabeth Berrien & Mandy Eppley, M.A., LPC

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NOVEMBER 1, 2013 | the Journal 15

JOURNAL NEWS

Furman, Wofford make Kiplinger’s list of best values CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Two of the country’s best values in private colleges are in the Upstate, according to Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. Furman University and Wofford College made the magazine’s annual ranking of private universities for their academics and affordability. Wofford was ranked 32nd among private liberal arts schools, while Furman ranked 74th. Kiplinger’s rankings, which will be published in the issue that hits newsstands next week, measure things such as student admission rates, test scores of incoming freshmen, student-to-faculty member ratio and graduation rates. It also measures colleges’ sticker prices, the availability of financial aid and the average student debt at graduation. “With President Obama’s recent emphasis on rating colleges and universities based on their value, our rankings serve as a valuable resource to help

TEEN ARRESTED ON MURDER CHARGES

One teen is dead and three in jail after a shooting at a Greenville students and families make more in- dential educational program, and foapartment complex last weekend. formed choices,” said Janet Bodnar, cusing on affordability for a wide range Raekwon Ny-Allah Mclean, 18, of Kiplinger’s editor. “Combining a high- of students and families.” Apt. 239, Fairway Club Apartments, Sticker prices at private schools typiquality education with an affordable 55 Villa Rd. was arrested in DeKalb price tag is a challenge, but the col- cally are higher than in-state prices at County, Georgia and booked into the leges on this year’s list offer the best of public campuses, but private schools Greenville County Detention Center often offer more financial aid. For exboth worlds.” on charges of murder, two counts of atFurman and Wofford both have 79 ample, Wofford distributed almost $45 tempted murder and one count each of percent four-year graduation rates, ac- million in aid from all sources to its armed robbery, discharging a firearm 1,600 students in 2012-13. About 90 cording to Kiplinger’s. into an occupied vehicle and possession Kiplinger’s lists Furman’s sticker percent of its students received some of a weapon during a violent crime. price as $55,208 and listed students’ type of aid. Police say Mclean shot into in a car The top 10 “Best Values” for private average debt at graduation at $26,661. parked at the apartment complex on Wofford’s sticker price was $45,795, schools were Yale, Princeton, Rice, Oct. 26 that left 18-year-old Carolina Kiplinger’s said. The average Wof- Harvard, Duke, Columbia UniverHigh senior Gregory Shaquan Sandford student graduated with a debt of sity, Stanford, Massachusetts Institute ers dead and a second person injured. $22,118. of Technology, California Institute of Two other teens also have been ar“It is gratifying to receive yet another Technology and the University of Pennrested in connection with the case. recognition as one of the nation’s high sylvania. Andre Christian Knox, 16, is The top 10 liberal arts private value liberal arts colleges,” said Wofcharged with murder, attempted ford President Nayef Samhat, who schools in Kiplinger’s rankings are murder, armed robbery and possesmentioned U.S. News & World Report’s Washington and Lee University, Posion of a weapon during a violent listing the school among its “40 Great mona College, Swarthmore College, crime. Knox, a student at J.L. Mann Schools at Great Prices” list. “Such rec- Williams College, Amherst College, High, is charged as an adult. ognitions reflect our long-term com- Bowdoin College, Middlebury College, A 15-year-old was arrested on the Davidson College, Haverford College aId.same charges. mitmentIntroduce to balancing two important your ears to the fIrst and only InvIsIble 24/7* hearIng priorities: offering an outstanding resi- and Grinnell College.

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journal news

Former Greenville teacher’s certificate suspended CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com A former Wade Hampton High teacher’s certificate has been suspended by the state Board of Education due to allegations that he had an inappropriate relationship with a female student. Allegations of an inappropriate relationship between David Lawrence Linderman and a Wade Hampton student first surfaced in October 2012 after a custodian reported seeing Linderman

go into a restroom near the football field with a female student, according to a Board of Education order. A district investigation determined Linderman used “extremely poor judgment.” Linderman was instructed not to communicate with students by phone, email or electronically, the order said. The district then received an anonymous tip that Linderman was having an inappropriate relationship with a different female student, the order said. Linderman then resigned.

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Last month, the parent of the student involved in the October 2012 incident reported her daughter was seen with Linderman on numerous occasions and that cell phone records showed the two communicated with each other on an almost daily basis ranging from one to 29 times a day. The student told state educators that she initially regarded Linderman as a mentor but the relationship became sexual, the order said. According to the order, the student told the state that Linderman provided alcohol to her

when they spent the night in a hotel. Linderman had been teaching at Hilton Head High this school year. Linderman’s certificate was suspended after the state department determined Linderman “may pose a threat to the health, safety and welfare of students that may be under his instruction and that emergency action is required.” Linderman’s teaching certificate is suspended until “a due process hearing is held and /or this matter is otherwise resolved,” the order said.

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journal news

County Council ponders sales tax referendum APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

During a special meeting this week, Greenville County Council vigorously debated whether to move forward with consideration of a potential referendum on a 1 percent sales tax to fund improvements to roads within the county. Debate was punctuated by applause and calls from the audience, which included those protesting any tax hike and alternative transportation advocates. After much discussion, council members voted 8-4 to approve a resolution to consider the transportation facilities tax option. This option creates a Greenville Citizen Roads Advisory Commission to hear citizen input and draft a list of road improvement projects that might be funded by a sales tax referendum. Council must decide if it wants to form the commission, how many members it will have and how members will be selected. The project list would be included on the referendum if council decides to put the question to a vote in 2014. A potential referendum has attracted advocates like Upstate Forever, which wants to see improvements be-

yond roads included, as well as detractors, including No Tax Hike SC, which mounted a protest before the meeting. Councilman H.G. “Butch” Kirven told the large crowd that the council had been debating the issue for several months and he feels it is his duty to offer options because the roads are in such disrepair. “At least we finally got some attention one way or another.” Council members debated whether a vote would “start the process” toward a referendum or be exploratory. Several council members voiced concern over creating a larger tax increase than what was recently levied by the Greenville County School District. Members also debated whether a sales tax amount could be less than one percent. Council members say the additional 1 percent sales tax would generate around $65 million to $70 million per year in Greenville County for up to eight years, at which point it would have to be reapproved by both council and the public. According to the resolution, the sales tax if approved would be used to improve “highways, roads, streets, bridges and related facilities” in Greenville County. Councilman Joe Dill wanted to re-

move the language referencing the state statute and a one-percent tax. He and Kirven verbally sparred over the change and Dill’s motion was voted down 5-7 with Liz Seman, Lottie Gibson, Butch Kirven, Fred Payne, Jim Burns, Bob Taylor and Xanthene Norris against and Dill, Joe Baldwin, Sid Cates, Dan Rawls and Willis Meadows in favor. While it is allowed by state statute, Dill said he does not support the county using sales tax money to fix state roads. “The state has enough money. They are just not allocating it right.” Councilman Meadows said telling residents that the vote was exploratory was disingenuous. “We are starting down the road to a referendum,” he said. He added that he leaned toward the transportation facilities option because it would allow council more latitude. The resolution to consider the transportation facilities option passed in an 8-4 vote with Rawls, Dill, Meadows and Cates opposed and Seman, Gibson, Kirven, Payne, Burns, Taylor, Norris and Baldwin in favor. Council voted unanimously to review the resolution and offer amendments during the next meeting.

A CH

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18 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 1, 2013

IC BOUTIQUE

Greenville County Council is scheduled to meet on Nov. 5 at 6 p.m. at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Greenville.

how they voted The resolution to consider the transportation facilities option passed in an 8-4 vote.

C C D D C C D C C D C C

Joe Baldwin: Jim Burns: Sid Cates: Joe Dill:

Lottie Gibson: Butch Kirven:

Willis Meadows:

Xanthene Norris: Fred Payne: Dan Rawls: Liz Seman:

Bob Taylor:

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5K Run/Walk 1 Mile Fun Walk Children’s Fun Run Saturday, November 9, 2013 Caine Halter YMCA Greenville, SC

Dontavis Brown watches librarian Terri Keaney as she reads from the book ‘Hooray for Fish’ while fellow librarian Lila Boynton looks on during Sensory Story Time at the Greenville County Library System’s Hughes Main Library.

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Library broadens its reach Monthly Sensory Story Time event designed for kids with special needs LEIGH SAVAGE | CONTRIBUTOR

lsavage@communityjournals.com Jonas Mills was grinning ear-to-ear, alternately holding hands with the child next to him and clapping along to a song about fish splashing in a pond. His mom, Crystal Mills, clapped alongside him, watching him enjoy the Greenville County Library’s Sensory Story Time, a new program developed to allow more children to take part in the library’s popular learning activities. Jonas, who is 2, has Angelman syndrome, a neurogenetic disorder that causes developmental disabilities. Crystal Mills has taken Jonas to other library programs, including Musical Jamboree and story time events, but found

they weren’t a good fit. “It was a little much and too many people,” Mills said. “He has sensory issues like those on the autism spectrum,

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and it was just too overwhelming.” Mills’ issue was exactly what Youth Services Manager Karen Allen had in mind when she asked youth services librarians Terri Keaney and Lila Boynton to create a story time for children with special needs. Allen had heard about similar programs in other cities, and several families had approached the library about adding it to the list of offerings. Keaney and Boynton conducted research over the summer, including working with Lisa Krutchik, occupational therapy supervisor at Kidnetics, the therapy department of the Greenville Health System’s Children’s Hospital.

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SENSORY STORY TIME continued on PG 20

NOVEMBER 1, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 19

journal community The first Sensory Story Time was held in September with about 10 children and their families in attendance. At the Octo“She gave us lots of ideas and sugges- ber event, Boynton and Keaney handed tions about how to modify our story time out a paper telescope for each child to peer with songs, activities and finger play and through as they read the book “Shark in to let the kids have things in their hands,” the Park.” The staff also makes sure to feaBoynton said. “We let them participate, ture activities that keep the kids moving, handing out story props they can wave including balls, cars and climbing tunnels. around.” They created a stockpile of ideas to “We don’t expect them to be quiet or entertain and educate kids on the autism still, because they aren’t going to be,” spectrum or those with sensory issues, Keaney adds. incorporating beanbags and “hand fidgets.” Something as simple as rolling a child up in a blanket like a hot dog goes a long way to helping them pay attention, said Krutchik, who helped the staff find ways to incorporate supplies they already had on hand to keep costs down. The staff chooses music that is upbeat but not too loud or raucous to make sure it doesn’t overstimulate the children. They Lisa Krutchik, occupational therapy supervisor at Kidnetics can also lower the brightness of the lights and avoid serving any food or drinks, since many of the children have allergies or need to avoid certain ingredients. Many of the children do well with visual cues that let them know what’s coming up, so at the beginning of each class, the leader goes over a timeline of symbols and discusses what will happen. After a 30-minute program, the kids do crafts and activities, “which gives the parents some networking time,” Boynton said. The events offer a fun and educational activity for the kids, Krutchik said, but also enrich the lives of the parents by helping them meet others who face similar issues and by making them feel included. “A lot of our families with kids Dontavis Brown, left, and Jonas Mills listen as librarian Terri Keaney reads from the book ‘Hooray for Fish.’ with special needs feel like they SENSORY STORY TIME continued from pg 19

“The library offering story time designed to help kids with these difficulties is a huge benefit from a social standpoint.”

PHOTOS BY Greg Beckner / Staff

Librarian Lila Boynton sings the finger fish song to Dontavis Brown during Sensory Story Time at the Greenville County Library System’s Hughes Main Library.

can’t take advantage of what’s out there, because they might be afraid their child will disrupt story time,” Krutchik said. “The library offering story time designed to help kids with these difficulties is a huge benefit from a social standpoint.” The next Sensory Story Time is scheduled for Nov. 14 at 6:30 p.m., with the same program being repeated Nov. 21.

The library will not host one in December, but will resume in January on the third Thursday of each month. The staff has been encouraged by the reaction so far and hopes that more families find out about the new offering. “We want to make everyone happy the best we can,” Keaney said. “Everyone is always welcome at the library.”

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Television gets social With social media, TV viewing is no longer ‘just a monologue,’ experts say SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com

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In this age of the Internet and all things wireless, television is not just sitting down on the couch watching a TV program anymore. Not only are fewer people watching content delivered via a traditional TV set, today’s approach is all about interaction and social engagement while watching a program. Jeff Fluhr, co-founder and CEO of Spreecast, a social video platform, says that “more and more original programming is being delivered only over the Internet.” Fluhr Cable and broadcast infrastructure “are only built for oneway traffic, ” he said, while the Internet is well suited for interaction. Shows such as Netflix’s House of Cards and Arrested Development Season 4 and Amazon’s Alpha House demonstrate a trend that is “definitely taking hold as it allows for more interactivity,” he said. “There are still people that view media in the traditional way,” says Maureen West, VP of Marketing for OneMinuteNews, a Greenville-based online news organization that produces seven to nine news videos each weekday for its YouTube channel. “But more are looking to other avenues.” She noted as examples TV shows like The View and American Idol, which use Twitter hash tags and encourages their viewers to interact with programming via Twitter. One type of media is not sufficient anymore, said Jan Rune Holmevik, an associate professor and English department chair at Clemson University who specializes Holmevik in interactive and social media. “People like to choose their own channels – or way – they consume media. There is not one that fits all anymore.” Holmevik teaches a class at Clemson titled “The Walking Dead: Literary

Convergence, Trans-Media Storytelling and Participatory Culture in the 21st Century.” In the class, students study not only the AMC TV series The Walking Dead, but also Walking Dead comic books by Robert Kirkman, the video game of the same name and the novel, “The Rise of the Governor.” “Walking Dead was based on comics, but then they created something different with the TV show because TV medium can do that,” Holmevik said. “Then, in the games, people can be active in the story and make their own choices.” This all adds to the franchise and to the greater phenomenon that goes way beyond just the TV show, she said. “It highlights the power of social media with other media platforms.” Last year, Clemson established a social media listening center that enables students to monitor thousands of online conversations about organizations, brands, products and services on a global scale in real time. University officials say the center allows for more sophisticated review, routing and response to social media posts and content. “We are early, possibly the first, academic adopters of this technology and approach,” said Clemson Chief Information Officer Jim Bottum. It’s not just TV shows that are getting more social. Amy Wood, a news anchor with WSPA, has garnered a national reputation for being an early adopter of plat- Wood forms that allow her to increase engagement with her Seven on Your Side audience, says Becky Pittman, a social media consultant and Wood’s volunteer Spreecast producer. Wood says that using Spreecast has allowed her “to really connect with viewers.” The platform also builds trust with her audience and provides more transparency, she said. “It’s more real. More raw.” Fluhr says with Spreecast, viewers can actually speak face-to-face with media talent, which enables an even higher level of engagement and interaction than other text-based asynchronous platforms like Twitter or Facebook.   More engaged audiences are good for advertisers and good for TV networks he says. Pittman agrees. “The combination of the behind-the-scenes look at the station set, the live news feed, commu-

journal community nity chat and Amy’s professionalism blended with down-to-earth humor is what brings them back for more,” she said. “You might be surprised to learn that some of the regular newsies live in Connecticut, Maryland, Ohio, Arizona, California, Canada, the Philippines, Spain and Australia. In fact, one Maryland viewer reminded us that she became a regular one year ago after Amy hosted a ‘giraffe watch’ Spreecast as we awaited the arrival of Kiko at the Greenville Zoo.” Throughout the Spreecast, Pittman will add Seven on Your Side website

links to complement the top news stories and assist Wood with community management while she is on air. Pittman says she “occasionally become a second set of eyes – grabbing Twitter content from field reporters – when regional or national breaking news stories emerge just prior or during her newscast.”   Wood’s social TV skills have garnered her speaking spots at journalism conferences across the U.S. in order to share her innovative thinking regarding social TV, which she also refers to as two-way TV. Wood has also partnered with Clemson’s social media listening

center for large events such as 2012 election coverage and Super Bowl XLVII. Wood has multi-tasking down to a new level. She is a solo anchor, runs the foot pedal for the teleprompter and updates Twitter and Facebook while doing the newscast. It’s worth it, she says. “People relate to people” and see social TV as yet another means for more exposure and to get information out, she said. Wood has about 24,000 Twitter followers and uses Twitter and Facebook to not only post news stories, but also personal aspects about her life.

TV news stations and other news media need to learn to take advantage of social media dimensions to connect with their audience, says Holmevik. “There is no longer just a monologue. There’s now a dialogue.” Not all comments will be good, she warned, but that’s the nature of social media and it encourages people to speak back. “It’s difficult with news because people do have opinions,” West agreed. “We have to play a very fine line because we don’t want to offend people – but we do want to get them talking.” Said Fluhr, “I’m confident that this trend is here to stay.”

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JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com

si p Pe day h t r Bi y ! t r Pa age k c Pa If you live in Greenville or Laurens County and your child will be 6 years old in November, bring your child’s birth certificate to the Pepsi Plant and receive a FREE Pepsi Birthday Party Package!

Listen to the Ellis and Bradley Show on 100.5 WSSL or visit www.wsslfm.com for more details!

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November 4th-8th, Mon.- Fri. 1pm-5pm & November 9th, Sat. 10am-12pm 751 State Park Road, Greenville, SC • 864-672-2060 ext.2057

The SC Dialogue Foundation is currently accepting entries for its fourth annual art and essay contest. The contest is open to middle school and high school students and the top three finalists in each category will win a trip to Turkey. The trip allows for the winners, sponsoring teacher, and local superintendent to take an almost all-expenses paid trip to Turkey, with the travelers responsible only for the cost of international airfare. Last year’s third place essay contest winner, 10th grade student Abdullah Kose, traveled to Turkey during the summer with his brother Muhammed, a high school senior. “I was taking a SAT prep class at the SC Dialogue Foundation and was told to enter the contest and see what happens,” Kose said. The homeschooled student wrote an essay entitled “The Human Footprints on the Environment.” “When I was little, we would go on trips and I saw factories with clouds of smoke,” he said. “It looked like a cloud factory and I looked into it and found

out it was bad for the environment.” After learning he won, he and his brother made the trip to Turkey, where they traveled with the other contest winners. This trip was the first time that the Koses traveled without their parents. “It was the best vacation ever,” said Muhammed Kose. “It gave me a good preview of college and we saw more of Turkey in 10 days than our father did in 20 years of living there.” Both brothers said their travels in Turkey taught them the importance of persistence and patience. “I learned persistence and patience because the man who conquered Instanbul took two years to plan the seizure,” said Muhammed Kose. “I enjoyed visiting the holy relics museum and riding on the bus with the other winners. It was the best experience.” Abdullah Kose said his “favorite part of the trip is there is so much to see I didn’t know about. The buildings are 900 years old and are still being used. The trip was worth a lot more than an essay and even if you think your writing isn’t good, you should enter.” For more information on the art and essay contest, visit scdialogue.org. Eleven students from Riverside Middle School were accepted into Region Orchestra: Louise Averitt, Haley Howell, Cindy Li, Alexandra Lanning, Madison Bevan, Ikumi Chigusa, Samantha Stocking, Angela Ashe, Caden Hoxworth, Stephan Voelk, Emmy Klaeser. Two were selected as alternates: Joe Abadeer and Angus McCord. They will go on to participate in the Region Orchestra at Anderson University Nov. 15-16. They are all qualified to try out for All-State Orchestra in January.

Start your holiday season off right and give thanks to God for His many blessings by joining us for the 4th Annual YMCA of Greenville Prayer Breakfast. november 21, 6:45AM - 8AM

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Tails will wag at Simpsonville’s Dog Spot JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com The Golden Strip’s only dog park, the Simpsonville Dog Spot, should give pets and their owners a doggone good time when it opens Nov. 9. According to Simpsonville city councilwoman Geneva Lawrence, the dog park has been a topic of discussion for a number of years, but the idea came alive in January 2012 when Mayor Perry Eichor appointed her to spearhead a committee of community members to work on the dog park. The committee membership has changed over time, but currently joining Lawrence on the committee are community residents Catherine Jacobson and Elizabeth Braswell. Jacobson said she became involved with the Dog Spot due to her dog and cat rescue efforts and her affiliation with the Meals on Wheels Pet Food program. She and her husband, Bill, were surprised when they moved to Simpsonville 10 years ago to find the

JUST LISTED

nearest dog park was in Greenville. Jacobson spearheaded fundraising for the dog park and worked with the mayor and council to make it happen. Braswell said she began advocating for the dog park due to “the lack of ability to walk dogs in Heritage Park (where dogs are banned). From this grew the intention to make a place for our special family members in the form of a dog park.” According to Lawrence, Heritage Park originally allowed dogs, but the owners were not cleaning up after them, so the City Council decided to ban dogs and make the park more kid-centric. However, the city does allow for performers in the Charter Amphitheatre to bring their dogs and for the rescues to bring in animals for Aloft, but they have to give the city notice.

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The Simpsonville Dog Spot will feature separate sections for large and small dogs. Braswell said she feels this will reduce conflict and “should prevent Chihuahuas from taking advantage of Dobermans.” The park will feature a motion activated water fountain for the dogs rather than a bowl station. The Simpsonville Dog Spot is sponsored by Simpsonville’s Parks and Recreation Department and Lowes of Simpsonville through materials contributions.

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NOVEMBER 1, 2013 | The Journal 27

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our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School will hold an open house on Nov. 6, 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Interested students and their families can to tour the school, ask questions, and meet faculty and staff. For more information, visit stanthonygreenvillesc.org or call 864-271-0167. The Prince of Peace Beta Club has welcomed 15 new members. The National Beta Club purpose is to encourage and reward academic achievement and promote character that makes for good citizenship. New members are Prince of Peace students from Greer, Greenville and Simpsonville. Teacher Chris Martinez serves as the club sponsor.

Students in Susan Babb and Caroline Keck’s third grade classes at Mitchell Road Christian Academy enjoyed reading the novel “Treasure of Pelican Cove.” They created story banners to display their favorite scenes from the book and presented them to their class.  (In the photo right to left: Mandalyn Pearson, Gabriel Reinhardt, and Peter Pundy)

Representative Dan Hamilton spoke with a group of students in Katie Porter’s Legislative Research and Debate Team at Sevier Middle School on Friday, October 25.  These students are participating in the South Carolina Youth in Government Middle School Mock-Legislature next month.

Students at St. Anthony of Padua School welcomed local artist, Charlie Pate, as a guest instructor for their art class this past week. Pate taught the students about the secret color of clouds, pushing them to look beyond the white that is usually attributed to clouds and widen their color palette.

Families interested in St. Mary’s Catholic School (K3-8) for the 20142015 school year are invited to attend an open house on Nov. 3, 3 p.m. Parents can tour the facility, meet faculty and ask questions about the school. The open house will begin in Gallivan Hall, 101 Hampton Ave., Greenville. Contact Nelle Palms with questions, 864-6794117 or nelle.palms@stmarysgvl.org. The Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine – Carolinas Campus recently held its third White Coat Ceremony honoring the Class of 2017. VCOM students were formally cloaked during the ceremony, shortly after completing the first block of medical education on campus. The ceremony is a rite of passage, marking each medical student’s progress toward his or her career as a physician.

Thomas Gasque and Sam Smith also participated in the YIG planning conference. Blue Ridge High School was recently selected by Wal-Mart for the Adopt A School Program. Wal-Mart presented Blue Ridge teachers with 20, $50 gift cards and 10 totes filled with school supplies. In August, Wal-Mart also provided faculty and staff with a “Back-to-School” breakfast. Additionally, the Blue Ridge High School Corps of Cadets placed first at the 2013 AAA Upper State Championships, giving them their 19th appearance in a row at the State Championship playoffs. The Call Me MISTER (Mentors Instructing Students Toward Effective Role Models) program recently inducted five new Southern Wesleyan University education students: Shaquille Brown, Danny Hall, David Rogers, Dorian Raines and Byron Smith, a junior Elementary Education major. Call Me MISTER selects college students from underserved, socioeconomically disadvantaged and educationally at-risk communities who have high academic potential, a commitment to teach and a potential to be servant-leaders. A goal of the program is for graduates receiving financial aid commit to teach in a South Carolina public school.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.

Two students from the Fine Arts Center who won the Clemson University Symphony Orchestra’s Young Artist Competition recently performed in the Brooks Performing Center at Clemson. Stephen Hawkey performed as soloist in Dvorak’s Concerto for Cello and Orchestra in B minor, and Yu-Jung Jeon played Rachmaninoff ’s Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor in concert with the orchestra. Riverside High School was recently named to the top 100 schools in the nation by The National Forensic League, the honor society for middle and high school speech and debate. Riverside was ranked 54 out of more than 3,000 schools in the nation. Members earn points and degrees through the honor society by participating in competitions and service-related activities. Sawyer Norman, an eighth grader at Shannon Forest Christian School, recently attended the 2013 YMCA Youth in Government Leadership Conference in Pawley’s Island as Lt. Governor and conference planner. Norman and other middle school students interested in developing leadership skills helped plan and set goals for the 2013 Middle School Model Legislature on Nov. 2123 in Columbia, S.C. Fellow classmates

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our community

community news, events and happenings

Greenville County Recreation has five Park Hero volunteer opportunities in November. These days are: Nov. 2 at the Pavilion Recreation Complex; Nov. 9 at David Jackson Park; Nov. 16 at Piedmont Athletic Complex; and Nov. 23 at the Brutontown Community Center and the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail. All of the projects will be outside focused on beautification and site improvements. For more information, contact Mike Teachey at miket@gcrd.org or at 864-288-6470 ext. 133. Greenville Natural Health Center and Complete Life Coaching will host the first in a film series on Nov. 5, at 6 p.m., as they present the documentary, “May I Be Frank.” The free film and discussion will be held at Greenville Natural Health Center, 1901 Laurens Road, Suite E, Greenville. Those wishing to attend are asked to call 864-370-1140 to reserve a seat. Hospice of the Upstate offers support to those who have experienced a loss by helping them cope during the upcoming holidays and throughout the year. They are offering the following workshops: Holiday Joy? How Is That Possible? on Nov. 11, 10 a.m.; Healing Memories on Nov. 18, 2 p.m.; and Music & Memories…Holiday Favorites on Nov. 25, 10 a.m. in the Sadler Center. On Dec. 2, 6 p.m., What About the Children?...A Parent’s Guide to the Holidays: Memory Making for Children will be in the Rose Hall. All workshops are held at Hospice of the Upstate, 1835 Rogers Road, Anderson. For more information, call 864-224-3358. Emory alumni are invited join the newly-formed Greenville Area Emory Alumni Association Chapter and participate in the Emory Cares International Day of Service. All divisions and class years are welcome to serve at the Ronald McDonald House, 705 Grove Road, Greenville, Nov. 9, 9 a.m. to noon. Sign up under the events calendar at alumni.emory.edu or call Heather Cripps Williams at 864-901-8824 with questions.

The Mauldin Garden Club will meet on Nov. 12, 7 p.m., at the Mauldin Cultural Center to hear special guest speaker, Tom Harvey, talk about the advantages of raised bed gardening. To learn more, visit mauldingardenclub.org or contact Garden Club President, Ann Smith, at jerryanne115@yahoo.com. On Nov. 9, Upstate Forever will host its annual membership meeting at the Glendale Outdoor Leadership School in Spartanburg County. The meeting will begin at 10:10 am, with a special presentation highlighting Upstate Forever’s accomplishments over the past 15 years. Afternoon activities include a high ropes course, climbing wall and guided hiking tours. For more information, visit upstateforever.org. Geoffrey M. Gabriel, MD, FAPA, of Psychiatry Innovations, in partnership with the MDVIP Family Medicine Practice of William M. Scott, MD, FAAFP recently announced the opening of the TMS Center of Greenville. The center will host an informational seminar on Nov. 12, 6 p.m., 208 Wall Street, Piedmont, on TMS (Transcranial magnetic stimulation), a method used to treat depression. This event is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Interested individuals can reserve a place in advance by calling 864-404-9706. The Piedmont Woodcarvers Club and the Office of Cultural Affairs for the COMMUNITY LLC City of Mauldin present “South Carolina Carvin’: Designs &JOURNALS, Sculptures in Wood” at the Mauldin Cultural Center on Nov. 9, 10 2.3875 a.m.-6xp.m., and Nov. 10, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 5.4450 Admission is $2 per person. For more information, visit mauldinculturalcenter.org. baf/baf/baf/baf/baf

The PJ Library Herschel and the Hanukkah Goblins Event will be on Nov. 17 at 1:30 p.m. at Sears Shelter, 100 E. Park Ave., Greenville. Traysie Amick, principal teaching artist with the S.C. Children’s Theater, will lead children in a dramatic

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community news, events and happenings

adaptation of “Herschel and the Hanukkah Goblins.” All are invited to this free family event. For more information, visit jewishgreenville.org/pj_library. html or contact pjlibraryupstate@gmail.com. Book Your Lunch with debut author Tara Conklin on Nov. 15, noon, at City Range. Tickets are $25 per person and must be purchased in advance at bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540. The Simpsonville Garden Club will meet on Nov. 19, 2 p.m., at the Simpsonville Rotary Hall, 126 S. Main St. The program will be Getting Ready for the Holidays. Members will make arrangements for Thanksgiving and Christmas or share a family tradition.

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Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Upstate recently announced the 5th Annual Carolina/Clemson Pep Rally will be in downtown Greenville this year with a new schedule of events. The Pep Rally is set for Nov. 21, 6-11 p.m., at the Old Cigar Warehouse, 912 South Main Street, Greenville. Tickets are $50 per person and children under 12 are free. For more information, visit bbbspeprally.com. Disney On Ice presents “Princesses & Heroes” Nov. 27-Dec. 1 at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena. Tickets are now on sale and are $15-$45. For more information, visit disneyonice.com. Tickets are available now for the Miniature World of Trains’ 2013 Christmas Model Train Display. The display opens Nov. 29. The Miniature World of Trains Beta “Sneak Peek” runs from Nov. 29 until the grand opening on Feb. 1. To purchase tickets and for more information, visit miniatureworldoftrains.com. The S.C. Children’s Theatre, located at 153 Augusta St. in Greenville, will host the Princess Academy on Nov. 23 at 1, 3 and 5 p.m. For more information, visit scchildrenstheatre.org. Book Your Lunch with South Carolina artist Mary Whyte and art historian Martha Severens on Nov. 23 at noon at City Range, Greenville. Tickets are $25 each and must be purchased in advance at bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540. Fiction Addiction will host Stories and Sweets with Terry Kay to feature his new children’s novel on Dec. 1, 2 p.m., during National Take Your Child to a Bookstore Day. Each $10 ticket admits one adult and any accompanying children. Tickets are redeemable for $10 off any store purchase that day. Refreshments will include homemade sweets. Reserve tickets by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540.

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Qi Works Studio & The Rising Lotus Qigong will offer Advanced Qi Gong Training on Dec. 14-15 at Qi Works Studio, 404 N. Pleasantburg Drive, Greenville. Offerings include 8 Silk Brocade Practice, Neigong Fundamentals, Daoist Five Practice and Yi Quan suitable for non-martial artists and led by Christina Barea and Peyton Young. Cost is $55-$100. For more information and to register, visit qiworksstudio.com or call 864-420-9839.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

InDwellings will host a fundraiser, The Blueberry Hill Bash, at Thornblade Nov. 7, 6:30-10 p.m. The fundraiser will help families waiting for a home for their adult children with special needs. The event will feature 1950s food, cash bar, classic car show, carnival games, auctions and live music. Dress is business casual or a 1950s outfit. There will be a live auction and live music by Jack ‘n’ Diane’s. For tickets, call 864-283-6080. The North Anderson Relay for Life committee will hold a Community Yard Sale for the Relay teams on Nov. 9, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., at Ingles in Powdersville. There will be baked goods, crafts, yard sale items, a car wash and barbecue. All proceeds will benefit the teams participating in the Relay for Life event at Wren High School in May. The Junior League of Spartanburg invites holiday shoppers to the 25th Annual Santa’s Shoppe, Nov. 8-10, at Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium. This year’s will feature three days of Shop ‘Til You Drop, a Lady’s Night, a visit from Santa and Santa’s Silver Jubilee. More than 60 specialty merchants and boutiques will be featured. All proceeds benefit local JLS community projects. For information call, 864-583-5842 or visit jlspartanburg.org. The Seneca community has been raising funds for a Safe Harbor shelter for Oconee County and proceeds to date total approximately $744,000. The Seneca Zaxby’s contributed nearly $7,500 to the effort. Safe Harbor offers assistance to victims of domestic violence in Greenville, Pickens, Anderson and Oconee counties. Frank Hagen (left), area development Manager, Zaxby’s; Kay Davis (center), capital funds campaign volunteer, Safe Harbor; Oconee County sheriff Michael Crenshaw (right).

LiveWell Greenville recently honored 23 before school, afterschool and summer child care providers at the first annual Out of School Time Healthy Awards & Celebration. The award recognizes excellence for creating a healthy environment for children. Each of the providers received a plaque and $250 from the LiveWell and the Piedmont Health Foundation. The top three award winners included, City of Greenville’s David Hellams Community Center, Communities in Schools at Duncan Chapel Elementary School and the Caine Halter YMCA.

Charter has donated $5,000 to Miracle Hill Ministries to purchase turkeys for the organization’s annual Turkey Fry, which will help feed more than 2,000 homeless individuals in the Upstate. The annual Turkey Fry will be held Nov. 26 at Miracle Hill Rescue Mission. The organization will serve the turkeys as part of a complete Thanksgiving dinner taking place at its nine shelters.

Charter presents Miracle Hill with the check at the shelter in Spartanburg. Pictured from left are Bonnie Lopez-Crowe, director of field operations, Charter; Mark Spilman, vice president and general manager for Charter’s operations in the Carolinas; Frankie Powell, vice president of development, Miracle Hill Ministries; Susan Pottberg, development, Miracle Hill Ministries; Calvin Vinson, director of Miracle Hill Rescue Mission, Spartanburg.

Leadership Greenville has chosen to work on a new South American aviary for the next 10 months after an application from the Friends of the Greenville Zoo was selected. Leadership Greenville, which is a LEAD program of the Greenville Chamber of Commerce, picks two to four projects annually in an effort to better the local community. More than 50 nonprofits groups and other agencies applied for Leadership Greenville support in 2013. Rehinge announces a new online forum for the mental health community and shares the personal story local mental health advocate and speaker Paton Blough. The site provides a list of resources for those affected by mental health issues, connects users to mental health organizations and recovery resources, offers a forum for sharing personal stories and provides links to advocacy organizations. For more information, visit rehinge.com. The Junior League of Greenville’s Nearly New Shop is celebrating 65 years in business and 10 years at its current location. From now until Nov. 9, the shop will be offering Shop Bucks that can be redeemed for merchandise, excluding furniture, Nov. 11-23. When shoppers spend $10, they get $2 in Shop Bucks and $5 in Shop Bucks if they spend $20. For more information, visit jlgreenville.org or call 864-232-1051

Jackson Marketing Group celebrated its 25th anniversary this year and partnered with Hands on Greenville and Habitat for Humanity in a 25-hour Serve-A-Thon to commemorate. JMG employees worked in shifts around the clock, from 11 a.m. on Oct. 22 to 12 p.m. on Oct. 23, to help construct a house for a deserving family. The company also held a birthday party following the completion of the Serve-A-Thon.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL CULTURE “Music is an international language understood by everyone. It goes directly to your heart and soul and is such a powerful medium to express the idea of humanity. For this reason, a concert themed to altruism seems natural; music selections came fast and easy.” Greenville Symphony Orchestra conductor Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel

PHOTO PROVIDED

Greenville Symphony Orchestra conductor Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel

From Ashes to Rebirth Year of Altruism concert celebrates acts of unselfish kindness CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Greenville Symphony Orchestra conductor Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel knows what a difference unselfish kindness can make. It was the kindness of friends and people he didn’t even know that allowed Tchivzhel and his family to defect from the Soviet Union, the oppressive nation that executed

his grandfather under the Stalin regime, in 1991 and build a new life in Greenville. “Our defection is an excellent example of how people can make a difference,” Tchivzhel said in an interview published on the website for the Year of Altruism, a yearlong celebration of human goodness. “Our new life here would not have been possible without the help of others.” Organizers of The Year of Altruism be-

lieve Tchivzhel’s experience was part of the reason he agreed to conduct a commemorative concert on Nov. 9, the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht, known as the “Night of the Broken Glass” and regarded by many to be the start of the Holocaust. During Kristallnacht, Jewish synagogues, businesses and homes in Germany and Austria were destroyed, more than 90 GSO continued on PAGE 34

NOVEMBER 1, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 33

JOURNAL CULTURE

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Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel will lead the Year of Altruism concert commemorating the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht with the Greenville Symphony Orchestra and the Furman Singers. GSO continued from PAGE 33

Jews killed and 30,000 Jews were transported to concentration camps. By the time the organizers of the Year of Altruism approached the Greenville Symphony about making one of the symphony’s Masterworks concerts around the theme of altruism, the season lineup had already been set and the brochures sent to the printers, making it too late for changes. But during a meeting with members of the Year of Altruism leadership committee, Tchivzhel pulled a piece of paper with musical selections out of his pocket and said, “This is the concert I will perform for you.” The concert’s music progresses from the darkness of the Holocaust to the triumph of faith and humanity over hatred and intolerance. The opening piece, “A Survivor from Warsaw,” tells the story of Nazi cruelty in a concentration camp. Next is the theme from the soundtrack from “Schindler’s List.” The first half of the concert will close with selections from “Fiddler on the Roof,” which Tchivzhel describes as the story of survival through faith and traditions. The second half of the concert features three movements from Gustav Mahler’s Fifth Symphony. “Mahler himself struggled against hatred and prejudice. He experienced many personal tragedies,” Tchivzhel said in the Year of Altruism interview. “In his music, he expressed these struggles and showed his true belief in the goodness of mankind.” The Year of Altruism grew out of a 70th anniversary commemoration of Kristallnacht. But organizers didn’t want to focus on the tragedy this year. Instead, they wanted to concentrate on the good that’s possible, said Don Kilburg, a member of the Year of Altruism leadership committee. “We wanted the focus to be on the righteous Gentiles who put themselves at risk, like Schindler, for example,” Kilburg said. “The Year of Altruism is trying to provide the focus that good comes from individuals who take action.” Tchivzhel said music expresses perfectly the whole idea of tolerance, altruism and humanity.

“There are so many great composers who wrote about the goodness of humankind. Even in tragic pieces which describe dark events, at the end there is a catharsis and they turn it around for good,” he said in the Year of Altruism interview. “In fact, all the great music, in one way or another is about humanity – from tragedy to triumph.” Tchivzhel said the challenge was not to find the music, but to decide what to play. “Music is an international language understood by everyone. It goes directly to your heart and soul and is such a powerful medium to express the idea of humanity,” Tchivzhel said in the interview. “For this reason, a concert themed to altruism seems natural; music selections came fast and easy.” The concert is not the only Year of Altruism event at the Peace Center next weekend. Duo Amal – international concert pianists Yaron Kohilberg and Bishara Haroni -- will play a concert on Nov. 10 at 3 p.m. in the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre. At Kohilberg’s suggestion, the pianists – an Israeli and a Palestinian – joined forces in 2008 for a concert at the New Opera house in Oslo. After the concert drew an enthusiastic response from the audience that included many musicians and diplomats, the pair decided to form a permanent piano duo. They have performed in the United States, Europe and Asia. Their repertoire is varied and includes works by Israeli and Palestinian composers. Tickets are available for both concerts.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: “From Ashes to Rebirth” WHO: A Year of Altruism concert commemorating the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht, “The Night of Broken Glass” by the Greenville Symphony Orchestra and the Furman Singers. WHEN: Nov. 9 at 8 p.m. WHERE: Peace Center Concert Hall TICKETS: $45, $60 and $75. Tickets are Buy One, Share One. Ticket buyers will receive one free ticket for each ticket purchased INFORMATION: 467-3000

journal culture

MAC exhibit gives quick glimpse of visual arts in Greenville ‘All Squared Away’ features works of Open Studios artists CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com This weekend, 124 artists all over Greenville County open their studios and invite the public in. But members of the public who are short on time can get an idea of which studios they want to visit by first seeing “All Squared Away,” the Metropolitan Art Council’s exhibit that showcases the work of most of the participating artists. MAC Executive Director Alan Ethridge called “All Squared Away” an ideal showcase for the artistic talent located within 15 miles of downtown Greenville. “Greenville Open Studios is a major MAC event as it accomplishes the many aspects of our mission – awareness, education and marketing of the arts,” he said. “It is also an excellent vehicle for

arts enthusiasts to build a collection. Anyone is able to interact with artists at work in their studios to gain a greater understanding of many creative processes and sources of inspiration.” One hundred five of the 124 visual artists participating in Greenville Open Studios 2013 have work in the exhibition that gets its name because all of the pieces are 12-inches by 12-inches. The exhibit features watercolors, acrylic and oil paintings, photographs, monotypes, stoneware, mixed media, pen and ink drawings, collage, ceramics, encaustic paintings, fiber

art and jewelry. In 2012, the 140 participating artists recorded nearly 41,000 visits and sold more than $271,000 in art. The exhibit is open Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 6 p.m. during Open Studios hours. Open Studios catalogs listing participating artists and their studio addresses and other contact information will be available at the MAC office. After Open Studios, “All Squared Away” will be open for viewing during MAC’s regular business hours, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m.

More in arts T.L. Norris Gallery is showing “A Classic Perspective” by representational painter Jeanne Leemon through Nov. 16. A show closing event will be held on Nov. 15, 5:30-9 p.m. T.L. Norris Gallery is located at 1 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville. For more information, visit tlnorrisgallery.com or call 864-991-8645.

So you know What: All Squared Away Who: Exhibit of work by 105 of the artists participating in Greenville Open Studios 2013 Where: Metropolitan Arts Council Gallery, 16 Augusta St., Greenville When: During Open Studios (Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, noon to 6 p.m.) and then during MAC Gallery regular hours (Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) through Dec. 6. Information: 467-3132

"Oh, What the Flock" by Pat Cato. 36 x 36. Mixed Media on Canvas. Can be viewed at the Artists Guild Gallery of Greenville at 200 N. Main St. patcatoart.com

NOVEMBER 1, 2013 | The Journal 35

journal culture

A r t s Calendar nov. 1-7

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Foothills Philharmonic Stories of Mystery Nov. 2 ~ 268-8743 Younts Center for Performing Arts Fountain Inn Chorale Fall Concert Nov. 2 ~ 409-1050 Greenville Symphony Orchestra Fantastic Symphony Nov. 2-3 ~ 467-3000 Metropolitan Arts Council Greenville Open Studios 2013 Nov. 2-3 ~ 467-3132

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The Warehouse Theatre The Tempest Through Nov. 2 ~ 235-6948 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Photography by Shane Orr Through Nov. 4 ~ 242-1050 Greenville Little Theatre Walking Across Egypt Through Nov. 10 ~ 233-6238 Centre Stage Lend Me a Tenor & Unnecessary Farce Through Nov. 16 ~ 233-6733 Metropolitan Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Brian S. Kelley Through Nov. 18 ~ 233-6733 Metropolitan Arts Council Open Studios Exhibit Through Dec. 6 ~ 467-3132 Greenville County Museum of Art Wizards of Pop: Sabuda & Rinehart Through Dec. 29 ~ 271-7570 Main Street Real Estate Gallery Photography by George Lee Through Dec. 31 ~ 250-2850 Greenville County Museum of Art David Drake: Potter & Poet Through Jan. 19 ~ 271-7570 Andre Wyeth: Selected Watercolors Continuing ~ 271-7570

listen up

best bets for local live music 11/1, Gottrocks

Children Of The Grave Black Sabbath tribute band. Call 864-235-5519 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/255976 1 1 / 1 , B l u e s B o u l e va r d (Greenville)

Sonny Thornton Legendary Upstate jazz percussionist. Tickets: $5. Call 864-242-2583 or visit www.bluesboulevardjazz.com 11/2, Gottrocks

The Six-Shot Revival Southern stoner boogie band. Call 864-235-5519 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/255976 11/2, Ground Zero

Six Feet Under Best-selling death metal offshoot of Cannibal Corpse. Call 864-948-1661 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2 11/2, The Handlebar

Dangermuffin Multi-genre trio combines everything from reggae to roots-rock. Tickets: $8 ADV/$10 DOS. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com/index.asp 11/2, Horizon Records

Missy Raines & The New Hip Star bluegrass bassist goes electric with new album. Call 864-235-7922 or visit blog.horizonrecords.net/ 11/4, Ground Zero

The Bunny The Bear Post-hardcore band from New York. Call 864-948-1661 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2 11/7, Radio Room

Pan Heavy-but-anthemic instrumental rock. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com/home/ 11/7, Smiley’s Acoustic Café

Classic Carpets & Interiors www.classiccarpetsgreenville.com 167 Verdin Road | Greenville, SC | 864.527.5555 36 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 1, 2013

The Accomplices Low-country string band. Call 864-282-8988 or visit smileysacousticcafe.com

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journal culture

Byrnes Football

Dark Room’s closing led to booked-up house shows for music spot’s co-proprietor When I spoke with Daniel McCord, the co-proprietor of Wilton Ave.’s Dark Room, a few months back, he was optimistic about the future of his endeavor. The venue, which started out as a space for his partner Shea Bahnsen’s theater troupe of the same name, had expanded its reach considerably since opening earlier in 2013. They were hosting local and national bands and art shows alongside plays, and the Dark Room seemed like part of a Mountain Homes plays at Daniel McCord's home near growing grass-roots movement in downtown Greenville. Greenville to spotlight under-theradar musical and artistic talent. As it turns out, a few months can make a world of difference. The Dark Room closed its doors in October, after months of trying to acquire a business license from the city. “We basically didn’t have all of our paperwork in line,” McCord says. “We’d been going back-and-forth with the city for about six months trying to get a business license, and we just couldn’t do it. We couldn’t get any sort of occupancy permit. Ultimately we realized that if it’s a problem now, it’s always going to be a problem, so it was less ‘closing down’ and more like ‘folding your cards at the right time.’” In the wake of that disappointment, McCord says he not only thought of giving up on running a venue, he toyed with leaving town entirely. “There was a point that I thought that, ‘If they don’t want this in the neighborhood, then maybe this isn’t the place I need to live,’” he says. “We thought about just taking our show and leaving town with it.” That mindset was short-lived, however, due to two interesting developments. The first was that the Independent Public Ale House, located on Poinsett Highway, stepped up to take on some of the Dark Room’s existing bookings under the banner of “The Dark Room Presents.” The second was that McCord had a performance venue ready to go in his own house. McCord’s day job is as a filmmaker and music videographer, and as such, he had both the equipment and the contacts to put on “house shows.” The only question was if musicians and fans would be willing to scale down along with him. “I’ve shot performance videos on our porch for the last three years, so we had this performance space all set up,” McCord says. “And people seem really cool with it. When we were looking to book a show at The Handlebar for Josh Dillard, he said he was really just looking for a house show. I talked to Bombadil’s booking agent and he said they’d love to do a house show. I feel like some of these musicians are used to playing smoky clubs late at night, and they don’t want to be out all night. They prefer a smaller venue; something that’s more intimate. Belle Adair said it was the most fun they’d had in a while; it was a real change of pace for them.” The response of the musicians he’s brought into his home prompted McCord to do a little research. “I see it as a trend,” he says. “I’m seeing more house-show venues pop up. There are some musicians who are doing entire house-show tours. I think it’s because they know there’s going to be a dedicated audience there to see the music, rather than just hanging out. It’s a really great thing while we’re looking for a new venue.” New venue? So the Dark Room hopes to one day open its doors again? “That’s the plan,” McCord says. “We’ll see what happens (laughs).” VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

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journal culture

scene. here.

the week in the local arts world

"Greenville" by Mark Mulfinger. Linocut using the reduction method of printing. Mulfinger’s work can be viewed at the  Artists Guild Gallery of Greenville, 200 N. Main Street, markmulfinger.com. Want to see your artwork here? Send a high-res image to arts@communityjournals.com.

The Crescent Music Club of Greenville will celebrate the National Federation’s observance of Parade of American Music at its meeting on Nov. 1, 11 a.m., at the Woman’s Club of Greenville, 8 Bennett Street. The North Greenville University Brass Quintet will feature American music along with a tribute honoring veterans with students from Greenville High’s JR ROTC color guard and more. Coffee Hour begins at 10:15 a.m. followed by the program. The event is free and open to the public. Greenville Little Theatre is looking for strong singers for the spring production of Les Miserables. They are searching for 16 men, 14 women, three girls (ages 8-10), and two boys (ages 8-12). Those interested are asked to prepare a song from the show to sing with an accompanist in a five-minute slot. Call GLT at 864-233-6238 for an appointment. Men will audition on Nov. 3 starting at 6:30 p.m., women on Nov. 4 starting at 6:30 p.m., and children on Nov. 5 starting at 5 p.m. Callbacks will be on Nov. 6. Les Miserables rehearsals will begin March 24 and will run May 30 - June 22. Carolina Foothills Artisan Center, 124 West Cherokee Street, Chesnee will hold a Holiday Open House on Nov. 7, 5-7:30 p.m. Special artisan items will be on sale for the upcoming season at 20 percent off. To learn more, call 864-461-3050 or visit CFAC.us. Throughout the month of November, a collection of new paintings by Suzanne Zoole, “Kitchen Chronicles: Paintings of the Foods We Love,” will be on display at the Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg Gallery at Chapman Cultural Center. The opening reception will be Nov. 8, 5-7 p.m. An encore reception will be on Nov. 21 during ArtWalk. The public is invited. The exhibit may be viewed at no cost Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, 1-5 p.m. For more information, call 864-542-ARTS.

Saffron’s Catering For Life’s Simple Pleasures 864.241.0401 saffronscafe@yahoo.com 38 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 1, 2013

Florida Georgia Line will perform at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena on Nov. 9 as part of their first major headline run: Here’s to the Good Times Tour 2013. Opening the show will be Colt Ford and Tyler Farr. For more details, visit bilocenter.com. Pan Harmonia presents Chansons for flute and piano on Nov. 15 at 7 p.m. at East North Street Concert House in Greenville. For more information, visit pan-harmonia.org. The Arts Council of Henderson County will hold its second annual YART Sale on Nov. 16, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Area artists will be cleaning their studios of paintings, pottery, older works, unsold artwork (framed and unframed) and unneeded art supplies. The YART Sale will take place at the First Congregational Church Hall, Hendersonville. For more information, email acofhc@bellsouth. net, call 828-693-8504, or visit acofhc.org.

Send announcements to arts@communityjournals.com.

JOURNAL HOMES

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

DETAILS

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

Plantation on Pelham- A Gated Community

HOME INFO Price: $84.9,900 | MLS: #1263630 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4.5 Square Footage: 5200–5399 Schools: East North Street Academy Greenville Middle | JL Mann High Contact: Melissa Morrell | 864.918.1734 mmorrell@cdanjoyner.com | Prudential C. Dan Joyner To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

Breathtaking views of Paris Mountain from your roof top paradise in the heart of the city of Greenville! A private oasis surrounded by lush landscaping and brick privacy walls. And don’’t worry about stairs...just take your own elevator to each level! Among the most magnificent selling points are the gourmet kitchen - complete with glazed furniture grade cabinetry, granite countertops, a center island, high-end appliances (all to convey), a gracious serving bar and a nearby covered porch. A master suite boasting an enormous sitting area and luxurious master bath and closet fit for royalty! Plus you’’ll enjoy the conveniences of your own private wet/coffee bar and a home office/study on the same level. There are two large secondary bedrooms on the main level, each with their own private bathrooms and WICs. Ceramic tile flooring and surrounds in each bathroom. And in the lower level you’’ll find a guest suite or 4th bedroom with a full bathroom plus a spacious den/recreation area. Intricate custom moldings & Custom shelving throughout, in-ground irrigation, surround sound & central vac.

Custom Build – Renovations – Design

TURNING DREAMS I N T O R E A L I T Y SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

C111R

highlandhomessc.com – 864.233.4175

NOVEMBER 1, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 39

journal Homes

Pe ople, Award s, Honor s

Ope n T h i s W e e k e n d

Open Sunday, november 3 from 2–4pm

Munn Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®     Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®  is pleased to announce that Amanda Munn has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Simpsonville office.  Munn graduated Munn from the College of Charleston with a Bachelor of Arts in English, cum laude.  She interned at the Charleston Home Magazine  and was a contributor to Lonny Magazine.  Prior to joining C. Dan Joyner Co, she worked for the Communications Department at the Greenville County Library System . “We are excited to have Amanda join our family of Realtors,” said Donna Smith, Broker-in-Charge.  “We welcome her to the Simpsonville office.”

Ellis Crigler Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®     Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®  is pleased to announce that Ellis Crigler has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Augusta Road office.  Crigler graduCrigler ated from Greenville High School and received her degree at University of South Carolina.   She was previously an administrative assistant at Holliday Dental. “We are excited to have Ellis join us at the Augusta Road office,” said David Crigler, Broker-in-Charge.  “We look forward to working with her.” Crigler currently lives in Greenville with her husband, Alex, Manager of  Joyner Property Management.   They have two children, Bo, almost 2 and Mary Ellis, 2 months.   Ellis is a member of Westminister Presbyterian Church and enjoys watching sports and spending time with her family.  

40 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 1, 2013

114 Anna’s Place, Kilgore Plantation Incredible 5 bedroom 5 and 1/2 baths with 4 car garage. This kitchen is truly a cook’s delight! Large eat-on granite island with prep sink offers a great work space for the gourmet chef. This eat-in kitchen has an additional triple sink, great butler’s pantry, and opens into the beautiful keeping room and great room both of which have a fire place with gas logs. Fabulous floorplan for living and entertaining including a formal dining room! Mother-in-law suite tucked away from the living area with its own private bath and spacious closet. Master suite on the main floor opens onto the 15x19 covered porch overlooking the back yard. Large tiled shower, jetted tub, dual vanities and his/her walk-in closets. Great office space with cubbies located just off the kitchen. Dual staircases lead to the second floor offering 3 additional bedrooms with spacious closets and large baths, as well as a laundry room and 2nd kitchen just off the bonus room/den. Top floor features a great recreational/media room with private bath, exercise room and wet bar. An abundance of storage space throughout the home with additional laundry hook-up in garage.

Home Info Price: $989,000 | MLS: #1262361 Bedrooms: 5 Baths: 5.5 Square Footage: 6800-6999 Schools: Bells Crossing Elementary Riverside Middle | Mauldin High Directions: Take 385 South to Woodruff Road. Left onto Woodruff Rd, crossing Highway 14. Left on Batesville Road. Right into Kilgore Plantation. Turn left onto Anna’s Place. Home will be on your right. Contact: Charlotte Sarvis | 864.346.9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty To submit your Open House: homes@greenvillejournal.com

special to the journal

JOURNAL HOMES

F E AT U R E D N E I G H B O R H O O D Leafmore Woods, Simpsonville Leafmore Woods, nestled along the Reedy River, is a New Home Community in Simpsonville, SC.  Just minutes from Fairview Road and I-385, this small enclave of homes with just 30 wooded home sites is convenient to shopping, dining, entertainment and more! Our craftsman style homes range from 3300 – 4700 sqft and feature 2-3 car side entry garages.  These homes are smartly designed with interiors for enjoying family and friends with generous family rooms, incredible kitchens with keeping rooms and luxurious master suites and bedrooms. Our interior finishes are second to none with rounded corner sheetrock, archways, extensive trim work, and custom built-ins. These homes are impressive inside and out! Legendary Communities has been named the Upstates #1 Builder.  With over 50 communities, you are sure to find your ideal home! Stop by today to learn more about Legendary Communities and Leafmore Woods!

Preferred Lenders

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO Directions: From Greenville take 385 South to exit 29 West Georgia Rd. Turn right onto West Georgia Rd and drive approximately 3 miles. Leafmore Woods will be on your left. Schools: Ellen Woodside Elementary Ralph Chandler Middle Woodmont High Contact: Sheridan Stoddard 864-313-4456 www.legendarycom.com Like us on Facebook.

Agents on call this weekend

SANDY PATTERSON GRETCHEN STATHAKIS REGINA SALLEY 979-9646 421-4198 640-9008 PELHAM RD. GARLINGTON ROAD EASLEY/POWDERSVILLE

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

JOHN BENNETT 915-8738 SIMPSONVILLE

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com.

ASHLEY R. BEHLKE RON MASON COURTNEY THOMPSON 915-0253 879-4239 421-4040 AUGUSTA ROAD N. PLEASANTBURG DR. GREER

NOVEMBER 1, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 41

journal Homes

oPEN THIS WEEKEND

O p en S u n d ay, november 3 f rom 2 – 4 p m

Blackstone

The Oaks At Roper Mountain

10 Angel Oak Ct . $590,000 . MLS#1261993 5BR/4.5BA Home under construction in gated community. This home has everything you could want! I-85 to Pelham Road, Exit toward downtown Greenville, Go approximately 1 mile, Left on Blacks Rd, SD on Left.

4BR/4.5BA Beautiful custom garden home Under Construction. Main level Master retreat, elegant gourmet kitchen w/expansive island. 385 S to Roper Mtn Exit, turn Left, Cross over Garlington Rd, Left into SD

Contact: Carole Atkison 787-1067 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Cynthia Rehberg 884-9953 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

104 Bamber Green Ct . $759,000 . MLS#1260544

Sycamore Ridge

Kilgore Farms

Whitehall Plantation

401 Kilgore Farms Circle . $394,900 . MLS#1262144 5BR/4BA Woodruff Road past Five Forks. Kilgore Farms will be about 2 miles past Five Forks. Take 1st entrance on Kilgore Farms Circle. Contact: Clay Hooper 864-905-9990 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Willow Creek

6 Legends Way . $448,500 . MLS#1264927

123 Indigo Ct . $299,999 . MLS#1263259

5BR/4.5BA This uniquely designed, custom built home in popular & convenient SD awaits you here! 385 S to Left on Hwy 417, Left on Curtis, Right on Howard, Left into SD, Right on Player, Left on Legends.

3BR/2BA Lovely all brick home in golf community. From Greer or I-85 take Hwy 101 South toward Woodruff, SD on Right, Turn Left on Sandy Run, Left on Indigo Ct, Home on Left.

Contact: Judy Tancibok 616-8740 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Judy Albert 905-4675 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

42 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 1, 2013

39 Waters Reach Lane . $319,000 . MLS#1264870 50 Take 385 to Woodruff Road, turn east for 7.2 miles. Turn right into Whitehall S/D. Go to end and turn left then left again to SIY. Contact: Tal Cloud 864-477-8327 Carol Pyfrom Realty

special to the journal

journal Homes

oPEN THIS WEEKEND

O p en S u n d ay, november 3 f rom 2 – 4 p m

Country View

Couch Place

124 Tupelo Lane . $209,900 . MLS#1230950 3BR/2.5BA Beautiful home. Open floor plan. Master on main. Wonderful details throughout. Situated on quiet cul-de-sac. Wade Hampton Blvd, turn by Post Office on Wood River, home on right

2BR/2BA New patio home. Carefree living in Easley. Yard maintenance include in amenities. Hwy 123 to Easley, Left on Powdersville Rd @ Jimmys Restaurant, right on McCalister Rd, Left on Couch, Right into SD

Contact: Tim Keagy 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Joanne Beresh/Bob Martin, 5051646/979-9544 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

406 Wood River Way . $237,500 . MLS#1266729

Fairview Pointe

Orchard Farms

Harts Lane

34 Valley Bluff Ln . $205,900 . MLS#1268738

116 Sentinel Ct . $199,500 . MLS#1265978

110 Shae Ct . $184,999 . MLS#1265949

5BR/3BA The Magnolia. So much room is such a great location. Don’t miss this opportunity. I-385 to Fairview Rd Exit, head South on Fairview Rd, R on Ashington Dr, 1st R on Heathermoor Ct, L on Valley Bluff

4BR/2.5BA Lovely Orchard Farms home in cul-de-sac fenced large yard. Bonus room. Neighborhood pool + tennis. Oakview Elementary. Batesville Rd to Left into SD, Left on Sentinel. Open Sunday, Nov. 3, from 3 to 5 p.m.

3BR/2.5BA This lovely home on cud-de-sac & conveniently located to Hwy 14 with easy access to everything! Woodruff Rd to Right on Hwy 14, Left on Harts Ln, Left into SD on Paranor Dr, Right on Shea

Contact: Sandra Whiting 616-4113 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Erin Foster 386-9749 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Linda Brown 884-0966 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Morning Mist

Four Oaks

Westwood

400 Tulip Tree Lane . $171,000 . MLS#1264525

99 Falcon Crest Dr, #27 . $118,500 . MLS#1266226

501 Willow Branch Drive . $110,000 . MLS#1259498

3BR/2.5BA GREAT HOME, GREAT LOCATION, MOVE IN READY! Hwy 385 South to Exit 29 (W. Georgia Rd), Right on W. Georgia Rd, Left into SD, Left on Tulip Tree Ln

3BR/2.5BA Townhome with many updated ad freshly painted. 2 screened porches. Quiet & private.N Pleasantburg near I-385 turn on Century Dr, turn on Falcon Crest, dead ends to Four Oaks, 1st Left, Townhome is #27

3BR/2BA Charming meticulously maintained home. Rocking chair front porch & great deck for entertaining. Right on Fairview Rd, Right on Grandview, Left on Davenport, Left on Vinewood, Left on Willow Branch

Contact: Janie Gibbs 901-3403 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Mary Ann Linning 346-2039 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

special to the journal

NOVEMBER 1, 2013 | The Journal 43

journal Homes

on the market Kingsbridge

4 Dempsey Glen Lane . $585,900 . MLS#1255181 4BR/3.5BA REDUCED!! Gorgeous 4 BR, 3.5 bath home on private cul-de-sac lot in gated neighborhood! HW throughout main, MBR on main. Beautiful kitchen w keeping room, new ss appliances, center isle. 3 car garage! Contact: Pam McCartney (864) 630-7844 Spaulding Group at Prudential C. Dan Joyner

G r e e n v i l l e T R A N S AC T ION S o c t ober 7 - 11, 2 013 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$2,810,456 $1,179,000 $1,071,353 $712,000 CHAUNESSY $549,000 MCBEE STATION RESIDENTIAL $495,000 HAMMETT CREEK $478,000 WEATHERSTONE $470,000 HAMPTON TOWNES $457,660 $450,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $424,089 POINSETT CORNERS $412,000 FOREST HEIGHTS $411,000 ASHETON SPRINGS $390,500 BRADLEY OAKS $380,000 ROPER MNTN ESTATES $367,000 $350,000 WHITESIDE ACRES $348,000 CARISBROOKE $340,000 VALLEY@TANNER ESTATES $335,000 CREEKWOOD $327,500 GOWER ESTATES $295,000 ROCKWOOD PARK $285,000 $273,000 $272,500 SILVERLEAF $270,000 CREEKWOOD $269,900 SHENANDOAH FARMS $265,000 FOREST HILLS $265,000 CARILION $265,000 CARILION $262,500 PEGGY J KELLY $260,000 KELSEY GLEN $255,513 $255,000 MORNINGSIDE $252,000 VILLAGE@WINDSOR CREEK $250,279 MCBEE PARK $250,000 GRESHAM PARK $249,532 COUNTRY VIEW $245,000 $241,800 VALLEY@GILDER CREEK FARM $235,000 BUTLER FOREST $235,000 BRENTMOOR $233,653 CAMDEN COURT $230,600 $227,331 FORRESTER HEIGHTS $225,000 GRESHAM PARK $221,034 TWIN CREEKS $219,368 RICHLAND CREEK@NORTH MAIN $217,000 $217,000 LANDING@SAVANNAH POINTE $215,246 MALLARD CREEK $210,000 GRESHAM PARK $206,000 OAK POINTE $205,000 $205,000 BOYCE-LAWN ADD. $201,000 CHANTICLEER $200,000

BUYER

ADDRESS

FCHUX LLC ARC DB5PROP001 LLC 106 YORK RD PHOENIX INN LAND PARTN S BIRD INVESTMENTS LLC 4113 E NORTH ST UPSTATE RETIREMENT PROPE SPRING PARK ALF LP 35 BRENDAN WAY OREGON REFLECTIONS LLC OWEN BRIAN B (JTWROS) 307 WACCAMAW AVE ADAMS JENNIFER J ALEKSINAS MARC A 4 WEATHERBY DR TDL WCOT GREENVILLE COND VALDEZ FAMILY LIVING TRU 500 E MCBEE AVE #5205 METZ AMY E HRADEC MICHAEL (JTWROS) 9 CLAYMORE CT KENNEDY IDA E BAUMAN RICHARD A (JTWROS 15 OAKLYNN CT ARSCOTT GREGORY J FISHER BRIAN J (JTWROS) 204 HAMPTON AVE JOLLY ANNE B BOOZER ALLISON 137 WILDERNESS LN NVR INC ALTON DIANE MARY (JTWROS 3 ELLICOTT HILL LN COGDILL KRISTA CONSTANTINE LISA D (JTWR 406 RIVER ST DAVIS GLEN S JR HIPP WILLIAM R 405 LONGVIEW TER SMITH HENRY J DAVIDSON BENJAMIN KENNET 15 RED FERN TRL BRIERTON MICHAEL K HIBBARD KAYLI ELIZABETH 108 WOODBRIDGE WAY BALLARD DAVID A JOHNSON DANIEL E (JTWROS 11 W CRANBERRY LN PROSPERITY JOCKEY LOT IN WFC PROPERTIES LLC 120 W WHITNER ST YOUNG JEFFREY RYAN BLANCHARD TRACY D (JTWRO 30 JABEZ TRL FRAZIER DONALD W MASTROGIACOMO ANTHONY (J 809 LADYKIRK LN SANTANGELO CHRISTIAN J CARMACK NADINE DORIS 42 ROCKHAMPTON DR MEILINGER PENNY R JOHNSON ROB ANDREW DECLA 200 W PRENTISS AVE ADAIR ELIZABETH S NUTTALL LESLIE 133 WINDFIELD RD MCLAUGHEN JANE HADDOW HYNUM DANIEL ALAN (JTWRO 119 ROCKWOOD DR ALDRIDGE DEBORAH A FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA 3415 VISION DR BEASON KARL C JR GORDON ROBERT L (JTWROS) 105 PEACHTREE DR FISHER JAMES D PEREIRA ADRIENNE C 105 CHIPPING CT PHILLIPS CHARLES E VAN DE MERWE GEOFFREY M 412 RIVER SUMMIT DR FITCH CHANDRA A MULLINS WILLIAM C 360 STRASBURG DR REINI NEIL HENRY WALKER DONALD J (JTWROS) 311 AMERICAN LEGION RD LACKEY ANGELA G STROTHER ROBERT M (SURV) 300 RIDENOUR AVE CARILION PROPERTIES LLC DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH 318 PRADO WAY KITTS JOSEPH D REGIONS BANK 215 FORREST ST NVR INC BELCHER JOHN D (JTWROS) 4 VELMERE DR DECKER ELIZABETH R ROE CARROLL H JR 5 LANDSDOWN AVE BOWATER CHRISTINE TRUSTE MAMMARELLA DAVID H 714 RICHBOURG RD EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL HETU ROBERT 112 WINDSOR CREEK CT MCBEE PARK LLC METCALF DONALD B (JTWROS 201 ROCKY SLOPE RD APT 1501 EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL MARSH JAN L (JTWROS) 4 KERSEY GALE CT DAVIDSON BENJAMIN K CATRON BRADLEY H (JTWROS 16 STONE MILL CT WESTGATE MOBILE MANOR IN WESTGATE MHP LLC 4799 STATE PARK RD JONES JENNIFER JOANNE JONES JENNIFER JOANNE 9 REDFREE DR JANIK ROBERT J BARBER BERNARD E JR (JTW 22 WOODHEDGE CT D R HORTON INC HELLAMS BRENDA 109 MACINTYRE ST TESZLER ROBYN MARANGONI RAFAEL STUDART 322 BELLARINE DR GRAY DAVID J FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA 350 HIGHLAND DR SMITH ANDREW D BARNHILL PHILLIP M (JTWR 2 RIVANNA LN EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL HORVAT LINDA 10 KENTON FINCH CT NVR INC ALLMAN HAROLD T (JTWROS) 90 YOUNG HARRIS DR PETTIT KENNETH A STC PROPERTIES INC 1025 MEARS DR READ MARY C MEHAFFEY ERIN J (JTWROS) 415 CROFT ST D R HORTON INC BARTON TANGINICA PO BOX 674 MCDONALD EMMY S MCLEOD JOHN D 220 SANDY RUN DR GEHMAN JASON PRICE FRANK D (JTWROS) 204 ALLENDALE ABBEY LN PESCHKE DIANNA AVERY PAUL M (JTWROS) 62 OAK GROVE LAKE RD GREER STATE BANK CLG PROPERTIES LLC 910 E WASHINGTON ST MCCUTCHEON JANE A FORTNER JAMES D (JTWROS) 118 WILLIAMS ST WYATT MARGARET L REV TRU RALLIS RONALD D JR 209 N MAIN ST APT 204

44 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 1, 2013

SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

FARM @ SANDY SPRINGS ORCHARD $199,894 MEADOWS@GILDER CREEK FARM $196,000 MAGNOLIA PLACE $196,000 $195,000 PEBBLE VALLEY $189,000 $187,552 FOX TRACE $186,635 PELHAM FALLS $183,000 PARKER’S PLACE $180,000 VERDMONT $180,000 TREYBERN PLANTERS ROW $179,900 $179,200 PARKER’S PLACE $177,500 DEVENGER PLACE WADE HAMPTON GARDENS $177,500 ALMA EUNICE JONES $175,000 CASTLEWOOD $175,000 $174,500 FOREST LAKE $173,766 STONEGATE ESTATES BEREA FOREST $172,662 GRANITE WOODS SOUTH $172,000 LANDING@SAVANNAH POINTE $171,266 DEVENGER PLACE $166,961 THORNBLADE CROSSING $165,000 GRESHAM WOODS $165,000 $165,000 CHURCHILL FALLS $164,000 FOX TRACE $163,421 REVIS FALLS EDWARDS LAKE ESTATES $162,500 EASTCREEK $159,000 $157,942 BRUTON WOODS WATERTON $155,917 WINDSOR FOREST II $155,069 HAMPTON FARMS $150,000 HAWTHORNE RIDGE $150,000 $150,000 CRESCENTWOOD VILLAGE $148,620 ASHLEY COMMONS $148,000 TOWNES AT PINE GROVE $148,000 COURTYARD@ORCHARD FARMS $148,000 ENOREE TRACE $148,000 TOWNES AT PINE GROVE $147,000 WESTCLIFFE $145,900 BALDWIN FOREST $145,000 MEADOW@BLUE RIDGE PLNTN $144,900 ONEAL VILLAGE $140,000 TIMBER TRACE $139,500 CRESCENTWOOD VILLAGE $137,895 WESTVIEW $136,000 AVONDALE FOREST $134,000 RIVER RIDGE $130,000 OAKLAND HEIGHTS $130,000 MERRIFIELD PARK $130,000 WOODWIND TOWNHOUSES $129,858 CRESCENTWOOD VILLAGE $129,345 MOSS CREEK $129,201 KING ACRES $128,500 SUGAR CREEK VILLAS $127,000

BUYER

ADDRESS

D R HORTON INC KOLANS THOMAS J 31 AYLESTONE WAY HAND CHRISTOPHER G AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 30601 AGOURA RD STE 200 MARKUS JOHN B PLASTER LOYD D (JTWROS) 5 MAGNOLIA PLACE CT SEIGWORTH ROBERT B CORMIER STEVEN A JR 4 STATEN LN PHILLIPS COURTNEY S SCBT PO BOX 118068 S C PILLON HOMES INC SMITH-KNUCKLES IKEISHA L 163 BORDER AVE GRAMLING KAREN JEAN WILEY HELENA BETT 10 WOODWAY CT CLARK LAUREN S STEPHENS EMILY R (JTWROS 212 PEAKS CT SHADWELL PROPERTIES LLC DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH 318 PRADO WAY ALBERT PAMELA W FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG 14221 DALLAS PKWY STE 100 HAFER MARY R ENGLUND GARY M 110 SEA OATS INLT ROJAS MIRANDA N COCKCROFT ROBERT C (JTWR 118 ROBERTS HILL DR MUNOZ JESUS A VOLPE KIMBERLY (JTWROS) 326 LONGSTREET DR BRUCE RENA C YATES REBECCA D 103 W STONE AVE CORN MICHAEL LEROY ALEXANDER CAROLYN H 130 RAGSDALE RD PRICE PENNY J QUICKEN LOANS 1 MIDDLEWICK CT MARTIN DIANNE LOVE MORRIS ASHLEY GRUGAN 135 FOREST LAKE DR WILLIAMS DANA M FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA 350 HIGHLAND DR MILLS ROBERT B FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG 7105 CORPORATE DR GORKA VICTORIA M HAUSSLER ROBERT 114 GRANITE WOODS WAY D R HORTON INC WALCOTT LAWRENCE 55 RAMAPO CT RUSSELL MICHAEL J (SURVI FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA 350 HIGHLAND DR TRETOLA BARBARA LATINI PEGGY S (JTWROS) 316 ROCKBROOK CT SCHWASNICK JOCELIA F GILMER GREGORY WAYNE (JT 1 E FAIR ISLE DR KNUFF JESSICA M LACKEY JON C 108 SEATTLE SLEW LN TRIMBLE JAMES A (JTWROS) GILLILAND THOMAS M (JTWR 301 AIRDALE LN BECHTEL JOHN L FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG 7130 GOODLETT FARMS PKWY TIMBERTOP ENTERPRISES SOUTHERLIN STEPHEN A (JT 2037 EDWARDS LAKE RD ZELICKSON MARC S ALBER DAVID M 18 BUTLER CROSSING DR FRYMAN DONALD K SECRETARY OF VETERANS AF 4100 INTERNATIONAL PKWY STE 10 HUTTO HEIDI KAY FIST FRANKLIN MORTG LOAN 3815 S WEST TEMPLE PNC BANK NATIONAL ASSOCI SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND 451 7TH ST SW DELATEJA ROLAND NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC 350 HIGHLAND DR MARK III PROPERTIES INC HAWTHORNE LOT HOLDING CO PO BOX 170248 UPSTATE RETIREMENT PROPE GRAYCLIFF CAPITAL SENIOR 35 BRENDAN WAY NVR INC DEFFIBAUGH JASE D (JTWRO 458 WOODBARK CT FITCH ELIZABETH S TAYLOR TROY E 210 SAINT CROIX CT COLWELL JAMIE R KAKUSKE DEBORAH KAY 113 PINE WALK DR VRANA CAROL LYNN MOFRAD ALI A 211 E CRANBERRY LN KONDAUR CAPITAL CORPORAT MARKS JULIE A (SURV) 15 SAFFRON WAY BHANDARI DHRUV ENGLISH AMY L 340 JUNIPER BEND CIR ELLIOTT RUPERT RANDOLPH STEVENSON DAVID A 415 WESTCLIFFE WAY HYNUM DANIEL A AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 30601 AGOURA RD STE 200 SK BUILDERS INC PINTO ANDREA MARIA GARCI 52 SAINT MARK RD OV VENTURES LLC DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH 318 PRADO WAY HILL JAMIE D LINDY OFFIK LISA C 3 ROCK SIDE CT NVR INC FLORENDO JOSEPHINE C 454 WOODBARK CT FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG SNOW LAURA J 107 SPINDLEBACK WAY VESS MARTHA S SCHUYLER TIMOTHY 3 DREWRY RD GOGGINS JARVIS PATTERSON SHAEFTEN (JTWR 412 KINGFISHER DR SCHUYLER HEATHER PATTON JAMES W 20 ZELMA DR NELMS MABRY ERCELLE KING SHIRLEY D 6 HILLSBOROUGH DR IANNITTI GENE M PNC BANK NATIONAL ASSOCI 3232 NEWMARK DR NVR INC LEPAGE MARIO (JTWROS) 15 FLAT SHOALS CT MATHUR SHAHZAD B A-1 PROPERTIES LLC PO BOX 25804 MARKS MATTHEW H HAMBY SARAH BROWN (JTWRO 111 BOXWOOD LN FULTZ LILA J SEAY ROSA LEE 125 TANAGER CIR

special to the journal

JOURNAL HOMES

REAL ESTATE NEWS RELEASE

Bruce Pasquarella, a well known custom builder in the Upstate area, has teamed with Prudential C. Dan Joyner to promote his acquisition of the Upstate franchise for Arthur Rutenberg Homes. Customers interested in building a custom home anywhere in the Upstate will benefit from their streamlined approach to the building process with architects and interior designers on staff. Pricing for custom changes are readily available. Bruce and his sales team are seen here with some of the C. Dan Joyner staff at a grand opening event for their Somerset Model in the community of Claremont.

Meet

CONVERGENT PROPERTY GROUP.

Don’t miss this one!

BOTANY WOODS | 4BR/4BA | 4,000+/-SQ FT | $449,000 | MLS#1267825 This Virginia Traditional Tidewater home is situated on a beautifully landscaped .71 acre lot. Have your morning coffee outside on the large private deck or inside in the octagon gazebo type sunroom filled with sunlight from Pella windows spanning from the floor up to the 12 foot ceiling. Above the garage enjoy a spacious bonus room with a full bath. A newer kitchen with Corian countertops, 3 gas fireplaces, hot tub on the deck, smart wired, upgraded brass exterior light fixtures, hardwood flooring upstairs under carpet, crawl space ventilation, fenced back and side yard, garage with workshop, are just a few of the many fine features.

Lee

Lee Bowman, REALTOR®

864-420-7540

lee.bowman@allentate.com www.allentate.com/leebowman

Residential Property Management | Residential + Commercial Real Estate Brokerage | Investment Analysis + Advising

Greenville’s Partner for Property Management Our dynamic team of property management and real estate professionals specializes in converging properties for lease or sale with qualified tenants and buyers. Voted Best of the Upstate 2013, we help you capitalize on the value of your real estate with income-producing solutions backed by our 10-Point Promise. Contact us today for a free consultation! (864) 751-1000 | www.convergentpg.com James McKissick, MBA Broker-in-charge james@convergentpg.com

Katie Braeunig Walsh Property Manager / REALTOR® Katie@convergentpg.com

From left to right: Wade Zebro, Dan Lemanski, Trey Varn, Barb Turner, James McKissick, Katie B. Walsh

728 N. Pleasantburg Drive Greenville, South Carolina 29607 Where Relationships Meet Results

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

/ConvergentPropertyGroup /ConvergentPG www.Convergentpg.com

NOVEMBER 1, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 45

journal Homes re atu n Sig

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116 Ridge Glen - Harrison Hills $830,000 • 1252670 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

Under appraised value! ≈8 acre country estate, 5C gar. w/2 BR, 1.5 BA apt, 2 story barn, salt water pool and more Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

119 Sherwood St. #101 - Ridgeland at the Park

12 Valley Oak - Valley Oaks

4 Phillips Ln. - Augusta Rd.

$649,000 • 1267735 • 2 BR/ 2.5 BA

$599,000 • 1265636 • 3 BR/3.5 BA + lrg rec. room

$594,000 • 1265590 • 4 BR/3.5 BA + Bonus

Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

Premier location in the Alta Vista neighbor. 2011 construction offering upscale luxury, xtra storage, 1-C garage. Walking Distance to downtown

Custom built on a pvt acre+ golf course lot. Offers: Main lvl MBR, granite, built-ins, pool & more.

Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

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New Construction, ≈ 4000 SF, 10’ ceiling down & 9’ ceiling ups and 2C garage.

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112 Chantilly Dr - Botany Woods

7 Clarendon Ave. - Greenville

3 Dillworth Ct. - Highgrove Estate

715 Neely Farm Dr. - Neely Farm

$329,900 • 1267513 • 6 BR/3.5 BA

$295,000 • 1259435 • 4 BR/2 BA

$288,000 • 1267198 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

$258,900 • 1268912 • 4 BR / 2.5 BA + Bonus

One of Eastside’s best neighborhoods! Lovely 3200+/- sq ft on ≈.60 acs.Hdwds, cath ceiling, sun rm, fenced yd and formal LR/DR, Den w/fpl

Beautifully manicured home! Main flr MBR. Hdwds, 9’ ceilings, granite, partial fenced yd & New paint.

Immaculate ≈3000 sq ft brick townhouse, offering: granite, main flr MBR, w/in laundry rm, son porch.

Hdwd flrs on main ,french doors, some glass cabs in kit, new carpet upstairs, new stainless appli., scr porch. Newer upds: arch. roof & sod

Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly 864.414.1688

Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

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1 Matteson Brook - Matteson Brook

1511 E. North St. - E. North St. Area

300 Fairview St. - Downtown - Ft.Inn

$247,900 • 1268724 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

$207,000 • 1268843 • 3 BR/1.5 BA

$199,921 • 1262445 • 4 BR/1 BA

209 Marefair Ln. - Remington $184,900 • 1266946 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

2600+ s/f custom home w/hard to find features incl.: Lrg BRS & unique sq. windows. Upds: Stainless appl. carpet, facets/lighting. Irr.. & Fenced yd.

Great house, close to downtown, recently renovated, hardwood floors, Rocking chair front porch and garage!

1500+ SF res. home approved for commercial use, 2 outbuildings, 1 mile from 1-385, _ acre w/ hardwoods. 200 yds from d’town Fountain Inn

Highly sought after Remington SD, with amazing curb appeal and second floor deck. Open flr plan, great for entertaining. Won’t Last!

Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

James Akers 864.325.8413

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10 Arbordale Ln. - Martin Grove

108 Maravista Ave. - Glenlea

32 Bradley Blvd. - University Park

$159,000 • 1268624 • 3 BR/2 BA

$124,900 • 1268565 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

$119,000 • 1266748 • 3 BR/2 BA

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309 Pineview Dr. - Off W. Main St. Pickens $99,900 • 1267991 • 2 BR/2 BA

Hard to find, 1 Level living! Extra insulated attic/crawl space, lrg kitchen, part. covered deck & fenced yd. Upds: Carpet and paint.

Fannie Mae owned. ≈1880 s/f, MBR on main, vaulted ceilings, hdwd laminate flrs, New stainless appli, & C’tops, Walking dist. to Furman

Adorable 1300+/- SF bungalow, near downtown. fenced bkyd, open DR/LR. Updates: hdwds, new stainless appliances and paint

Great start home w/part. Finished basement! Hdwds, fpl, fml DR, LR, lrg deck with wooded area and 1 car garage. Priced to Sell!

Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

Kathy Slayter 864.982.7772

Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly 864.414.1688

James Akers 864.325.8413

RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com

www.marchantco.com

46 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 1, 2013

|

864.467.0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Valerie Miller 864.430.6602

J53

Decades of Trust. Confidence in the Future. special to the journal

journal culture

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Courthouse Cooling Towers Replacement, November 21, 2013, 3:00 P.M. A mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held at 9:00 A.M., EST, November 7, 2013 at Greenville County Procurement Services Office, County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Purchasing_Dept/Bids. asp or by calling 864-467-7200. SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Slider Doors Replacement Greenville County, RFP #2111/20/13, 3:00 P.M. A mandatory pre-proposal meeting will be held at 9:00 A.M., E.S.T, November 12, 2013 at Greenville County Procurement Services Office, County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Purchasing_Dept/RFP.asp or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SUMMONS NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS Case No. 2013-CP-23-_______ Latasha R. Vernon, Plaintiff, vs. Gustavo C. Cazarin, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANT(S) ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscribers at their office, 611 North Main Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days, after service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for judgment by default for relief demanded in said Complaint. Respectfully Submitted, Michael A. Hart (#11997) THE DICK JAMES LAW FIRM 611 North Main Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 298-0000 Attorney for Plaintiff (JURY TRIAL DEMANDED) July 25, 2013

PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on 11/9/13, at 9:00 a.m. at East North Storage, 4329 East North Street, Greenville, SC, the undersigned, East North Storage will sell at Public Sale by competitive bidding, the personal property heretofore store with the undersigned by: 1. Unit: A025, Monica C. Beggs, 5 Blairhunt Dr. Taylors, SC 29687 Toys, totes, chair, misc. 2. Unit: A040, Telisa McAlister, P.O.Box 342, Mauldin SC 29662 Furniture, bins, boxes. 3. Unit: A058, Zelinda Jackson, 25 Pelham Rd. Apt, 210, Greenville, SC 29615 Furniture. 4. Unit: A093, Cathy G. Grasso, 271 Mansville Rd. Apt 8C Union, SC 29379 Boxes 5. Unit: A134, Jessica M. Spurgeon, 2103 E. Lee Rd. Taylors, SC 29687 Furniture, totes, misc. 6. Unit: A157, Heather Mclean, 428 Wheeler Ln. LaFollette, TN. 37766 Furniture, boxes, misc 7. Unit: B043, Terry W. Yeargin, 102 Forest Dr. St Matthews,SC 29135 Office furniture 8. Unit: B233, Heriberto Salado, 909 Strange Rd. Taylors, SC 29687 Table, tools, boxes, shelves, misc 9. Unit: B312, Juan A Villegas, 302 Rockmont Rd, Greenville, SC 29615 Tv, furniture 10. Unit: B316, Jimmy L. Stephens, 24 Cunningham Rd. Apt H24, Taylors, SC 29687 Briefcases, boxes, chair 11. Unit: B346, Lisa Logan, 3900 East North Street, Apt F83, Greenville, SC 29615 Furniture, Toys, Exercise equipment, misc. 12. Unit B348, Jimmy L. Stephens, 24 Cunningham Rd, Apt H24, Taylors, SC 29687 Clothes, chair, door, misc.

GREENVILLE COUNTY ZONING AND PLANNING PUBLIC HEARING SUMMON There will be a public hearing before County Council on Monday, November 18, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. in County Council Chambers, County Square, for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the following items: DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-47 APPLICANT: Michael F. Barnes CONTACT INFORMATION: barnestowing@yahoo.com or (864) 877-3309 PROPERTY LOCATION: Alexander Road and Picket Road PIN: T035000101513 (portion) EXISTING ZONING: R-15, SingleFamily Residential REQUESTED ZONING: R-S, Residential Suburban ACREAGE: 6.04 acres COUNTY COUNCIL: 18 – Baldwin DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-48 APPLICANT: David Sarkela CONTACT INFORMATION: david@dsrbuilders.com or (864) 270-8373 PROPERTY LOCATION: E. Coleman Road, Roberts Circle, and River Road PIN: 0534010100800 (portion) EXISTING ZONING: R-S, Residential Suburban REQUESTED ZONING: R-15, Single-Family Residential ACREAGE: 3.78 COUNTY COUNCIL: 21 – Burns All persons interested in these proposed amendments to the Greenville County Zoning Ordinance and Map are invited to attend this meeting. At subsequent meetings, Greenville County Council may approve or deny the proposed amendments as requested or approve a different zoning classification than requested.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Zoe’s South Carolina, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1130 Woodruff Rd., Suite C, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than November 17, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

WHO TOPS THE CHARTS IN GREENVILLE’S FINANCIAL MARKET?

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Stax Grill, Inc, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 850 Woods Crossing Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than November 17, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145

WHO DOES?

The UBJ’ upcoming event, Who’s Who recognizes the people in our community who are committed to advancing their fields. Whether new on the scene or veterans in the trenches, they’re the professional to look out for and look up to. Many have gone uncelebrated. Until now.

tel 864.679.1205 fax 864.679.1305 email aharley@communityjournals.com

NOMINATE SOMEONE TODAY! Nominations will be accepted from

SEPTEMBER 20–DECEMBER 16

Also including

The first place to go if your pet goes missing.

A third party panel of Community Leaders will select 8 “Who’s Who” recipients, from the nominations submitted, that will be announced in February 2014. Self Nominations are also encouraged.

FORMS CAN BE FILLED OUT HERE: upstatebusinessjournal.com/whos-who

Greenville County Animal Care 328 Furman Hall Road Greenville, SC 29609

www.greenvillepets.org NOVEMBER 1, 2013 | THE Journal 47

journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville students lend aid to multiple victims during a drill. World War II veterans Bucky Smart and Hugh Brown stop for a photograph in front of the Collings Foundation Consolidated B-24 Liberator heavy bomber during its recent visit to the Greenville Downtown Airport. The three-day stopover at the airport was part of the annual Wings Of Freedom Tour. In addition to the B-24, a B-17 bomber and P-51 Mustang were also at the airport as part of the tour. 

A large crowd was on hand to look over the vintage World War II aircraft, a B-17 on the left and a P-51 on the far right. 

48 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 1, 2013

A mock car accident victim is helped by University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville students during EMT training final exam drill. This year’s drill featured two scenarios, a car accident with multiple injury victims and an active shooter scenario.

The Woodlands at Furman’s dining room manager Chris Landreth and sous chef Amelia Boley pose with Mr. Skel E. Ton, the senior living community’s Halloween answer to the Elf on the Shelf.

Clemson University running backs’ coach Tony Elliot discusses a play with Roderick McDowell on the sidelines of Byrd Stadium at College Park during the Tigers game against the University of Maryland.

photos by zachary hanby / contributing

University of South Carolina’s Connor Shaw throws a game-tying pass to #3, Nick Jones, leaving 42 seconds on the clock in the fourth quarter.

PHOTOS BY BRIAN KIRMSE, MISSOURI PRESS ASSOCIATION / contributing

USC running back Mike Davis is tackled by Missouri defensive back, Randy Ponder, Sr. in double overtime. The play helped stop a touchdown drive, but a field goal by South Carolina’s Elliott Fry proved to be enough to win the game 27-24, handing Missouri their first loss of the season.

University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville students comfort an accident victim during their final exam drill. USCSOM-Greenville is the only medical school in the country to require medical students to complete a 200-hour EMT training course, become certified EMTs and maintain their certification for two years.

Clemson safety Jayron Kearse makes an interception in the end zone. Clemson beat Maryland 40-27 in the ACC match-up.

journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

photos by gwinn davis / contributing

photos by gwinn davis / contributing

B93.7 FM’s Tom, left, and Hawk have some fun at the Bee Boo Bash Halloween Party at the Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium.

Crossword puzzle: page 50

A wide variety of costumes were seen at Boo in the Zoo.

Vince Dorsey, costumed as Alan from the movie “The Hangover” won the $1,000 costume contest at the 93.7 FM People lined up for Kona Ice during Boo in the Zoo. Greenville Zoo Director Jeff Bullock Boo Bee Bash. came dressed for the occasion.

Sudoku puzzle: page 50

NOVEMBER 1, 2013 | THE Journal 49

journal culture

figure. this. out. The Doctor Is In

By Arthur S. Verdesca

Pendleton Place

for CHILDREN and FAMILIES

Please join Pendleton Place for Children and Families for the

4th Annual Benefit Breakfast Making Connections Through Stories Thursday, November 14, 2013 7:30–8:45 am TD Convention Center 1 Exposition Drive Greenville, SC There is no cost to attend RSVP by November 11th to Lauren Scoggins 864.516.1227 or lscoggins@pendletonplace.org

Presented by:

Sponsored by:

Please join us as we celebrate the stories that connect our community and create meaningful change in the lives of children and families. We know it’s early, but we promise it will be a great way to start your day!

50 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 1, 2013

Across 1 Obama attorney general Holder 5 Rattle 9 Bros 13 Online letters 19 Commandment opener 20 One missing roll call, perhaps 21 Per person 22 Deadhead’s idol 23 Perry Mason story, e.g. 26 Insatiable 27 Some deer 28 Shorten, as a skirt 29 Bad acting 30 Onetime Rus. state 33 Busy buzzer 34 Strains 35 Restraint usually seen in pairs 39 Montana motto metal 41 Yemen’s capital 42 Do clerical work 43 Stimpy’s pal 44 Zest source 45 Symbol of a bettor’s certainty 48 SFO listing 49 Everyday connectors 50 Jesus of baseball 51 Durban dough 52 Bloom holder 53 Fight stopper 54 Post-hurricane assessment 58 Disney king

59 “Fearful” feature of Blake’s Tyger 61 Tasman and a Genesis shepherd 62 Sneeze cause 63 Took the plunge 64 Tapestry behind which Polonius hid 65 Abstain from 66 “The Weaver of Raveloe” 68 Unit or sect suffix 69 Surgical tie 72 Oil well firefighter Red 73 Like some locomotives 75 Catch 76 Shooting marbles 77 Stub __ 78 Voyaging, say 79 Scorch 80 Letters seen before Fridays 81 Coen or Stone 85 Where TV’s “Charlie’s Angels” was set 86 A, for Mozart 87 Riles up 88 Gets ready to shoot 89 Dick Tracy creator Chester 90 Access, in a way 92 Cats in Cádiz 93 Seek redress 95 Rope on the briny 96 Classic auto 97 Irish tenor Tynan 98 Brazilian range __ do Mar

100 Minor league baseball level 103 Made-to-order 108 House minority leader 109 ‘40s film critic James 110 Nihilistic art movement 111 Follow 112 Carl with Emmys 113 Supply in a farm country store 114 Certain terrier’s isle 115 Big wind

Down 1 And so on: Abbr. 2 Letter after pi 3 Signed promise 4 Restrain 5 Wilde’s “The Importance of Being Earnest,” e.g. 6 Stirred 7 Madhouses 8 Disease-struck tree 9 Legal hurdle 10 Toward the front 11 Stadium protectors 12 Cyberjunk 13 Deli sandwich 14 Coleridge storyteller 15 __ football 16 Curling surface 17 Eye protector 18 Utter 24 Big wind 25 Pipe cleaner 30 Jack and the missus

of verse 31 Spring toy 32 Winners can be determined by one 34 “The Genius of Keyboard” jazzman 35 “Toad of Toad Hall” playwright

Medium

36 Coffee break treat 37 Doesn’t disturb 38 Make cherished 40 NFL six-pointers 41 It may be long 42 Loses strength 45 Baker’s preparation 46 Prayer opener

47 Scary tests 52 20, in Toulouse 54 Lop off 55 “Beavis and Butthead” spin-off 56 Milhous : Nixon :: __ : Garfield 57 Lennon’s “Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except __ My Monkey” 58 Kitchen wrap 60 Revealing garb 62 Mark for future reference 64 Thin as __ 65 McGarrett’s outfit, familiarly 66 Hot Wheels maker 67 Slow work 68 Basic building material 69 Leans 70 “No kidding” 71 Online financial site 73 Pope in Attila’s time 74 Book displays 77 Like a dogfight missile 79 AFL partner 81 Tactful handling 82 Song title words before “for Miles” 83 Took turns in succession 84 Budget, in brand names 89 Spice Girl Halliwell 91 Small-screen Bean 92 Overcharge 93 Run-down 94 Bears, to Ovid 97 North Amer. WWII fliers 98 The Missouri R. runs through it 99 All excited 100 ER procedure 101 Dixie general 102 Poetic fighter 104 Puzzle title people hidden in eight long answers 105 Bird’s org. 106 Slippery one 107 Salon stock

Crossword answers: page 49

Sudoku answers: page 49

journal culture

60 & Beyond with peggy henderson

Necessary peace of mind One would think that since I write a newspaper column for seniors that I’d accepted by now my place in the “no longer spring chicken” apparel department. Merchandise relegated for groomed, sensible ladies that prefer comfort over fashion, that happily purchase aqua, fleecy warm-ups instead of designer tee shirts layered over black leggings; and, have no problem hearing in a crowded eatery while their senior sisters like me put off buying a hearing aid. I also confess to tee shirts and black leggings. I still can’t digest that I’m approaching 70 sooner rather than later. This is pitiful. Just when I feel like I’ve accepted my certain age status, bingo, I slip off the wagon again, regroup and press ahead. For instance, last week I had my presession physical exam with my primary physician’s nurse that involved updating my health status on the computer. Before we began the normal process of meds and blood test results, the nurse shot me an amused grin and handed me a piece of paper and a pen. “Peggy, I’m going to tell you three words to say back to me while you draw a clock on the paper that shows 10:20. After we chat a minute or two, you will repeat the three words back to me.” Shocked, I said, “You have got to be kidding.” She wasn’t kidding. I felt like I was back in kindergarten and realized that, forget kindergarten, I was being tested for short-term memory. I remembered a friend told me that is the first thing to go. I didn’t fail the park-turkey-radioclock sketch but once again, I was raddled that my age qualified me for such a test. Hello. We both giggled and moved on to more serious matters. Such as a living will. A living will is a legal document easily created without the aid of a lawyer and without question, one the most valuable gifts you can offer your loved ones at the end of your life. And it’s absolutely free. No lawyer’s fee. It takes a little coordination in getting the document legally signed with an agent, (spouse or relative), two unrelated witnesses and a notary’s seal. The will should be kept in a safe place known

to the agent, and friends of the agent should be aware of the document’s contents. If a person becomes terminally ill, brain dead, permanently unconscious or otherwise incapacitated, the living will dictates the person’s personal wishes about life-sustaining procedures. Simply put, does the person desire not to be kept alive on medical equipment? Provided food and water? Given pain relief? Recently a friend suffered a devastating stroke and there was no living will to be found or knowledge that one had been made. His wife had passed away several years before and his adult children experienced the unnecessary anguish of jointly making the decision to end their father’s life. Their father was a dynamic financial consultant who was surely cognizant of living wills; but as we know, knowing and doing are two separate animals. I processed my living will by going to Goggle Search and typing Legal Documents & Legal Forms > Living Will. Up popped a long list of legal/lawyer consultant web sites. I chose TotalLegal.com. As promised it took about 10 minutes. I vacillated on the question whether I wanted food and water. I can understand no food, but no water? I checked no to both. I must add however, that on the question about pain relief, I wanted to type in permission for high levels of morphine but only one check was allowed. It helps to know that a living will can be legally revised. Meaning that, yes, you can change your mind. And, of course, if your agent dies, a fresh one needs to be redone and notarized. This exercise in facing and deciding my death and life-sustaining wishes has forced me to be honest with myself about where I am in this present life and where I am heading. It’s the ultimate gift I can give myself and my loved ones. Peace of mind. Just three words – like, I love you.

Peggy Henderson is a 60 & Beyond former freelance writer turned newspaper columnist. Besides appearing in the Greenville Journal, her column is syndicated with Senior Wire News Services. In addition, she’s a staff writer for the website Go60.us. Contact her at peg4745@aol.com

NOVEMBER 1, 2013 | THE Journal 51

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Nov. 1, 2013 Greenville Journal