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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, February 8, 2013 • Vol.15, No.6

SCCT LIGHTS UP STAGE WITH ‘GLOW TALES’

GROW YOUR OWN

PAGE 25

NELL NEWMAN RETURNS TO HER FAMILY’S UPSTATE ROOTS TO PLANT THE MESSAGE OF ORGANIC LIVING PAGE 8

AUTHOR OPENS CHILDREN’S EYES TO POVERTY

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JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT

“I want to take some pictures for Mom and bring back some memories of Greenville.” Nell Newman, daughter of once-resident Joanne Woodward and Paul Newman, on her upcoming visit to the Upstate.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“When you’re out, you want to look like everybody else. If you have a fancy pair of athletic shoes, you must be somebody.” Beth Templeton, author of “A Coat Named Mister Spot,” a children’s book about living in poverty.

$31.5 billion Sales of the U.S. organic industry in 2011, according to the Organic Trade Association.

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Teens in the U.S. who have experienced a form of dating abuse, according to Break the Cycle.

4

Number of young performers who share the title role in “Billy Elliot the Musical.”

“He figured there would be a run on ammo, and he was right. Sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good.” Travis Nelson, an ammunition buyer with Allen Arms and Indoor Shooting Range on Poinsett Highway in Greenville, on his store owner’s decision to stockpile ammunition before Election Day.

“I truly do believe we can stop domestic violence from happening, but it rests on the shoulders of the kids and the future generations.” Relationship Education Project educator Amanda Callahan.

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journal news

Rumors, panic buying drive Upstate ammo shortages By CHarles Sowell | staff

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Panic buying based on rumors about President Obama’s plans for new gun regulations have emptied gun store shelves of ammunition across South Carolina and the nation, store owners report. Mark Travis, assistant manager at Grady’s Great Outdoors in Anderson, said his store’s shelves were virtually devoid of ammo, particularly in the calibers used by weapons with highcapacity magazines. “This is purely a function of people everywhere stockpiling ammo,” Travis said. “Big-game calibers like the .35 caliber Remington, a popular bear and hog round, just can’t be found anywhere at any price. That’s sort of surprising, but that bullet is usually hard to find and the ammo makers are concentrating on the popular calibers in order to meet demand.” “No one could have predicted the shootings at Sandy Hook, Conn.,” said Travis Nelson, an ammunition buyer with Allen Arms and Indoor Shooting Range on Poinsett Highway in Greenville. “Frank Allen, the owner of our store, predicted there was a good chance Obama would win the 2012 election and decided to purchase a huge amount of ammunition. He figured there would be a run on ammo, and he was right. Sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good.” Spokesmen for gun shops in Greenville, Anderson and Spartanburg agreed the ammo shortage is purely rumor-driven. “No one expects Obama to take away ammunition,” said a spokesman for Dunbar and Zimmeli, an outfitter in Spartanburg, who refused to be identified. “High-capacity magazines and assault-type rifles are surely targets.” Travis called it “really amazing that the shooting public has virtually bought out the supply of every gun store in the nation and have forced ammo makers into panic mode.” Ammo experts agree that rumors the Obama administration plans to buy out

U.S. Rep. Jeff Duncan looks over his target after firing off a few rounds on the firing range at Allen Arms in Greenville. The congressman explained to the crowd gathered for his “Second Amendment Listening Tour” that the current ammunition shortage was not caused by government procurement but by a run on ammunition by consumers.  

the existing supply of ammunition is the largest driver of the current shortage, but the rumors run the gauntlet from merely strange to truly bizarre. A rumor circulating in the Midlands blames the ammunition shortage on gun makers converting their stock to bullets that have gunpowder with an expiration date. Supposedly, the bullets won’t fire after three months to prevent hoarding. Dennis Chastain, a longtime Upstate bear hunter whose favorite bear gun is a .35-caliber Remington, said the current ammo shortage reminds him of a shortage of toilet paper that happened in the early 1970s. “I don’t remember what set it off,” he said. “Probably some obscure news story about problems at a major paper mill. But virtually overnight it was impossible to buy toilet paper anywhere, at any price.” Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

JOURNAL NEWS

2nd Amendment listening tour touches on more than guns By JEANNE PUTNAM | contributor

February 8

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

U.S. Rep. Jeff Duncan spent the day Feb. 1 traveling through congressional District 3 gathering insights on what he dubbed a “Second Amendment Listening Tour.” His stop at Greenville’s Allen Arms drew a crowd of citizens who were concerned not only about their Second Amendment rights, but the rising cost of ammunition and what Congress can do to prevent executive orders pertaining to gun reform from coming to pass. The congressman emphasized that he was open to any debates on background checks and mental health topics. “The state and the federal government have to work together on background checks,” Duncan said, adding he feels the state needs to come up with a system that reports to the federal government on background checks, but is concerned about people possibly getting put on a “do not buy” list. He told the group the debate’s focus should be on mental health rather than

U.S. Rep. Jeff Duncan talks with his constituents at Allen Arms in Greenville. The congressman was visiting several towns on what he called a “Second Amendment Listening Tour.”

guns. “South Carolina does not have a state mental health hospital. They closed down the Bull Street facility years ago,” Duncan said.

The state should open a new facility to address mental health, and the federal government needs to turn its focus in that direction, he said. While Duncan touched on mental

health as a primary issue for debate, some citizens were concerned about how long Republican leaders could fight stricter gun laws. Participant John Clark told Duncan, “I don’t know how long South Carolina representatives can block President Obama on these new laws. The federal government controls the purse strings of social programs such as Social Security and Medicare. They might threaten to cut us off.” Other attendees discussed the ammunition shortage and the rising cost of ammunition. Duncan told the crowd he believes “the ammo shortage is a supply-and-demand issue because folks are worried about not being able to buy ammunition later and are stocking up now.” Duncan closed the meeting by recommending that all Second Amendment supporters go to a range like Allen Arms and get lessons so they can learn gun safety and proficiency. Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com.

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Sat., Feb. 9 • 11 a.m.-1 p.m. • Embassy Suites GHS clinicians will discuss preventing these conditions. Blood pressure checks and hands-only CPR demonstrations at 10:30 a.m. Lunch provided. Free; registration required.

Tues., Feb. 26 • 6-8 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care (35 Medical Ridge Drive) Learn about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Free; registration required.

Guyology: Just the Facts Sun., Feb. 10 • 2:30-4:30 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus This program for boys in 4th and 5th grade eases the transition into puberty through open discussion. Fee: $50 dad/son. To register, visit the events page at girlology.com.

Understanding Integrative Oncology Tues., Feb. 19 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. • Greenville Memorial Hospital Learn about integrative oncology and how evidence-based complementary therapies impact cancer care. Lunch provided. Free; registration required.

Controlling Asthma Tues., March 12 • Noon-1 p.m. • GHS Life Center® Join GHS physicians from Cross Creek Internal Medicine for a discussion on asthma and the latest treatments. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, visit ghs.org/360healthed or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

Struggling With Weight? Wed., Feb. 20 • 5-6:30 p.m. • Anderson County Library (McDuffie Street) Learn how GHS’ dedicated team of professionals can help you achieve long-term weight loss through surgery. Free; registration required. To register, call 676-1072. 130036

FEBRUARY 8, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 5

JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

All talk on gun control It’s worth remembering, as America’s gun control debate rages anew, that the Land of the Free’s fixation with guns dates back to the spring of 1775, when Paul Revere took to his horse after British Gen. Thomas Gage decided to seize the colonists’ rifles, artillery and ammunition in Concord. Americans have been quarreling about who controls the firepower ever since. Of course, “firepower” 238 years ago did not include magazines that can fire 30-plus rounds in 30 seconds – the truth at the core of the current debate raging in Congress over how to protect both Second Amendment rights and the public. This is an argument both pro- and anti-gun zealots have honed to statistical perfection. For every study finding lower gun-related deaths in states with the most restrictive gun laws, another surfaces to show America’s murder rate has declined as gun ownership soared. And like the nation’s other polarizing issues (immigration, climate change and single-gender marriage come to mind), gun control compels groupthink and punishes anyone who dares to acknowledge a persuasive argument from the other side. Thus, elected leaders have found progress difficult on even the most practical measures to advance public safety, even in areas where public support exists. For example, while a variety of national polls (Reuters, Gallup, Pew) show a majority of Americans oppose gun bans, a high majority (Pew, 85 percent; Gallup, 92 percent) support requiring background checks at gun shows, where 40 percent of gun purchases are made. Gallup also found 62 percent favored banning the sale of high-capacity magazines like those used in the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre or at the Tucson mall where former congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords was shot. Neither measure would permanently solve the problem of mentally ill people – as both those shooters were – killing innocents, but they could limit the toll. Giffords’ shooter hit 19 people in less than 30 seconds; he was stopped when he paused to reload. And as Baltimore’s police chief noted at Senate hearings last week, allowing 40 percent of gun buyers “to bypass checks is like allowing 40 percent of passengers to board a plane without going through security. Would we do this?” But the public’s embrace of background checks presupposes they actually work, which leads to a major caveat: The 14-year-old National Instant Criminal Background Check System is barely functional now, particularly in sleuthing out the mentally ill. The LA Times reports that more than half the states have yet to provide mental health records to the federal database gun dealers use to check out buyers. Many states have yet to figure out which of their mentally ill should be included, or how to gather paper records from courthouses and hospitals. The National Center for State Courts reports as many as 2 million mental health records are missing from the system. Background checks are useless if they can’t reliably sift out mental illness, the central constant in the tragic killings that have rekindled America’s gun control debate. Whether Congress can find the will or consensus for new restrictions, there’s plainly work to be done on the preventive laws we have now. Of course, that requires money and tedious effort by state bureaucracies, which are themselves stymied by this oh-so-typical complication: Before the feds will release grants to help states collect mental health records, the states must set up an appeals process for those mentally ill who might want their gun rights back. All of which explains why so little actually occurs when the national conversation turns to stemming gun violence.

Conservation champions Upstate Forever’s ForeverGreen Annual Awards Luncheon recognizes individuals and organizations that have made significant contributions in the fields of conservation, air and water quality, sustainable development, public service and volunteer work in the Upstate. This year’s event will be held on Feb. 21 at Embassy Suites in Greenville, beginning at 11:30 a.m. Our lead sponsors are BMW, Greenville Journal, TOWN Magazine, and George and Susan Johnson, whose generous support we deeply appreciate. Our keynote speaker this year is Nell Newman, the president and co-founder of Newman’s Own Organics. An ardent supporter of sustainable agriculture, Nell will talk about the importance of organic foods and why leading a more environmentally conscious life helps us all. She has a special connection to Greenville because her mother, the Oscarwinning actress Joanne Woodward, got her start at the Greenville Little Theatre. We will recognize these conservation champions: Shea Airey will receive the Tommy Wyche Land Conservation Champion Award. Shea is a passionate champion for conservation in Oconee County and a leader of the Oconee Forever group, which provides education and information about conservation easements throughout the county. The group also successfully advocated for the Oconee County Conservation Bank, the first local conservation fund in the Upstate. Shea now serves on the Bank’s board. His article on conservation easements won a national award. Our Sustainable Communities Champion is the Greenville Hospital System for its exceptional leadership and funding in support of bicycling in Greenville County. GHS is the principal sponsor of both the spectacularly successful Swamp Rabbit Trail and the upcoming bike-share program in Greenville. It recognizes the critical link between exercise and public health and has shown an unwavering commitment to making active living opportunities more available and affordable throughout Greenville County. Our Clean Water Champion is John Lane. An award-winning author and Wofford College professor, John has devoted much of his life to exploring and writing about our rivers and streams. Water is the focus of all

IN MY OWN WORDS by DICK CARR

his acclaimed books, including “My Paddle to the Sea,” “Waist Deep in Black Water,” “A Stand of Cypress,” and “Circling Home.” John’s current initiative is the innovative Thinking Like A River project at Wofford, where students experience “floating seminars” while paddling and learning about South Carolina rivers. Our Clear Skies Champion, the Community Conservation Corps at Furman University, focuses on weatherizing older, energy-inefficient homes in the Greenville area. Their work involves weather-stripping doors and windows, adding insulation, and installing vapor barriers in crawlspaces. To date, the Corps and its partners have weatherized nearly 40 homes. Our Public Servant of the Year is Paul Agnew, who served with distinction in the South Carolina House of Representatives for eight years (2004 to 2012) as the representative of District 11 in Abbeville County. In the House, he was one of the champions for conservation, earning 100 percent ratings from the Conservation Voters of South Carolina and receiving last year’s Green Tie Award from CVSC. In the 2012 session, he led a strong effort in the House to oppose weakening the South Carolina Pollution Control Act. Our Volunteer of the Year is Jon Schultz. While a senior at Riverside High School, Jon devoted over 200 hours as a volunteer in Upstate Forever’s Greenville office, assisting us on a wide variety of tasks. He is now a student at USC Upstate. Please join us as we recognize this amazing group of champions, enjoy a lunch of local food and hear Nell’s inspiring speech. Tickets are $50 per person, and sponsorships are also available. To purchase tickets or become a sponsor, please contact our event planner, Billie Young with Crawford Strategy, at 864232-2302 or billie@crawfordstrategy.com. Dick Carr is chairman of the board of directors of Upstate Forever. He can be reached at richardcarr@ charter.net.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 8, 2013

JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION

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VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

ReWa has turned water main project into amateur, unsightly mess

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PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Dear Editor, As a 40-year resident of Greenville, I have watched with disappointment the recent water main replacement projects. First, there is an over six-month unfinished project on Pleasant Ridge Drive. It has dragged on since last summer! I called the ReWa (Renewable Water Resources) office only to be told “those people” will be grateful to have a new water main. There are still numerous potholes and a very amateur homemade attempt at repaving. In some areas the paving zigzags into the edges of lawns and over the concrete gutters in a ragged, ugly fashion, lowering property values. This middle-class  neighborhood has a number of homeowners with pride in their yards and homes. While the city has put thousands into repaving and upgrading sev- Pleasant Ridge Avenue eral inner-city neighborhoods, these folks have had to endure months of either dust or mud on their cars and homes, and the final result is a cosmetically ugly mess that downgrades the appearance of the neighborhood.  This neighborhood deserves better. I would have thought it was totally discriminatory until I recently drove down the Southland/Boxwood area and saw that there was a similar mess in an upscale area. We have recently read so much in the paper about the poor state of our South Carolina roads and the lack of funds for their upkeep. Is ReWa going to tear up all the streets in the older neighborhoods of Greenville and repave them in such an amateur fashion, leaving a ragged mess? Surely there is a paving contractor who could do the work neater and faster.   Sincerely, Chuck West, Greenville Southland Avenue

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JOURNAL NEWS

Nell Newman brings message of healthy eating to the Upstate Newman’s Own Organics CEO to speak at Upstate Forever event By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: Upstate Forever’s ForeverGreen Awards Luncheon WHERE: Embassy Suites, Greenville WHEN: Feb. 21, 11:30 a.m. TICKETS: $50, 864-250-0500 INFORMATION: www.upstateforever.org

8 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 8, 2013

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

This month, Upstate Forever is bringing a rock star of the organic food world to the area for its ForeverGreen Awards Luncheon. A 20-year veteran of the organic food movement and daughter of Hollywood celebrities, Nell Newman, will be the keynote speaker for the annual event. The luncheon will honor the Greenville Hospital System, Furman Community Conservation Corps, Shea Airey, Paul Agnew, John Lane and Jon Schultz for championing everything from sustainable communities to clean water. Newman was first known as the daughter of actors Joanne Woodward and Paul Newman, but has gained notoriety as head of Newman’s Own Organics, an offshoot of Paul Newman’s company founded in 1982. Newman’s Own Organics was launched in 1993 and now produces organic, all-natural snacks, coffee, popcorn and pet food. It all started with fundraising, said Nell Newman, who worked for various nonprofit organizations in California. “I talked to my dad a lot about what he was doing at the company and it seemed

from being esoteric, hippie food to people being really interested where their food comes from,” Newman said, pointing to the growing popularity of farmers’ markets. “They want to talk to whoever grows their food and they want to have a relationship with whoever grows their food.” And local consumers Greenville gardener Oliver Earle's Sullivan Street garden was part the are no exception. Many Urban Farm Tour. residents are eschewing a whole lot easier to sell a product and produce that has traveled for thousands of raise money than do it as a development miles over multiple continents in favor of director,” she said. “I got a crazy idea one food produced in the Upstate, flocking to day that Newman’s Own should do an or- Greenville’s TD Bank Saturday Market and ganic line and that was the inspiration for Spartanburg’s Hub City Farmers’ Market, getting Newman’s Own Organics started.” which will offer a new CSA (consumerThe company started making pretzels supported agriculture) where residents because it was her dad’s favorite snack can order produce, protein and other local when she was growing up, Newman said. goods this spring. Some residents are also growing their “It was also easy to convince my father to own food in the backyard. Richey Lando that particular product.” The challenge was finding organic in- cianese, who grew up gardening and was gredients, she said, but once suppliers featured on last year’s Urban Farm Tour, were lined up, the pretzels became the said he raises his favorite foods, like Swiss chard, figs, lettuce and garlic, along with best-selling organic snack within a year. “I can’t believe it’s been 20 years since honeybees and chickens. Recent tough economic times have we started. And 20 years ago, the natural foods stores didn’t really have organics prompted people to reprioritize how they and a lot of what they had wasn’t partic- spend their money, and some have eduularly tasty. It was easy to look at a seg- cated themselves on healthy eating, turnment and say, ‘The cookie aisle looks like ing toward quality rather than quantity it needs a lot of help and the snack aisle in what they consume, said Roddy Pick, looks like it needs a lot of help,’” she said. co-owner of Greenbrier Farms in Easley. Pick and Chad Bishop took over the The organic food movement has “gone

farm in 2009 and brought it to full production, now selling poultry, pork and beef along with produce. In just a few years, Pick said he has seen an increase in the number of people who support their farm, which now sells about half of its products directly to consumers through a CSA and farmers’ markets. Greenbrier Farms is also moving into supplying restaurants, a trend that Pick attributes to the area’s international population. “That’s a great market for us,” he said. “It’s a bit of European influence; they expect their food to be fresh.” The farm also relies on agritourism, providing a space for weddings and farmto-table dinners, he said. Nell Newman says she is an advocate of farmers’ markets because they keep dollars in the community, the food is fresher and buyers can talk directly with the people who grow the food. Visiting the farmers’ market allows consumers to voice their opinions. “It’s really based on consumer demand,” she said. Newman will come from the “Salad Bowl” of California, Santa Cruz, to visit the city where her mother, Joanne Woodward, attended Greenville High School and acted in the Greenville Little Theatre. She said she is looking forward to visiting Greenville for the first time since she was a child. She won’t stay long, though, because she’s returning to California to celebrate her mother’s birthday. “She was very excited that I’m coming down here,” Newman said. “I’m honored to be asked to come back to Mom’s hometown and am really impressed with what I’ve been reading about the changes that have been going on in Greenville and the vision for making it a sustainable city. I want to take some pictures for Mom and bring back some memories of it (Greenville).” Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

JOURNAL NEWS

HOMEGROWN & HEALTHY By Jeanne Putnam | contributor The concept of eating healthy is not a new one, but buying organic, local produce, meat and dairy is not so rare anymore. The Upstate’s private farms, community supported agriculture (CSA) programs and farmers’ markets make it possible for conscious consumers to easily obtain fresh, local and often organic food. Here are a variety of sources to explore: GREENVILLE AREA: Arrowhead Acres 37 Bates Bridge Road, Travelers Rest 864-836-8418 Buffalo Farms 1715 Jonesville Road, Simpsonville 864-553-5500 or buffalofarms@aol.com Fountain Inn Farmers’ Market 102 Depot St., Fountain Inn Saturdays from 8 a.m.–noon, rain or shine. www.fountaininn. org/farmers-market1

Greenville State Farmers’ Market 1354 Rutherford Road, Greenville Open year-round, Monday-Saturday 8 a.m.-6 p.m. 864-244-4023 http://agriculture.sc.gov/greenvillestatefarmersmarket TD Saturday Market Saturdays, May until the end of October, 8 a.m.–noon Main Street between McBee Avenue and Court Street, Greenville www.saturdaymarketlive.com Travelers Rest Community Farmers’ Market Every Saturday, May-September, 9 a.m.-noon, 1 Center St., Travelers Rest www.trfarmersmarket.org Whole Foods Market Tuesday Local Farmers’ Market 10 a.m.-2 p.m. in the parking lot, each Tuesday starting in May 1140 Woodruff Road, Greenville 864-335-2300 SPARTANBURG AREA: Gaffney Farmers Market

501 North Granard St., Gaffney 864-487-6244 www.getintogaffney.com/ farmers-market City of Greer Harvest Market Saturdays 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Greer City Park, downtown Greer 864-968-7005 www.cityofgreer.org/visit/ harvest_market.php Hub City Farmers’ Market Saturdays, 8 a.m.–noon 298 Magnolia St., Spartanburg Wednesdays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Dunbar Street, Spartanburg www.hubcityfm.org

Clemson University Student Organic Farm 190 Field Station Drive, Clemson 864-457-8006 or sjadrnicek@gmail.com www.clemson.edu/sustainableag/student_farm.html

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Greenbrier Farms 772 Hester Store Road, Easley 864-855-9782 or amy@greenbrierfarms.com www.greenbrierfarms.com

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Happy Cow Creamery, Inc. 330 McKelvey Road, Pelzer 864-243-4801 www.happycowcreamery.com

Old Paths Farm 2151 Boiling Springs Hwy., Gaffney 864-487-7352 www.oldpathsfarm.com

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Local GOP faithful examine party’s future “Of course we’ve got to deal with things like Todd Akin’s comments on rape. It served to alienate women, but Mainline business conservatives in the term ‘war on women’ was not a Greenville County met this week to media construct. That was created by discuss how to change the party in the the Democratic Party,” Connelly said. wake of the loss to President Obama in “How well the party countered that argument is evident.” 2012. Nelsen’s agenda for mapping the “We risk becoming a regionalized party of angry old men,” said former party’s future was met with the most Ambassador to Canada David Wilkins, skepticism. His idea that abortion one of a panel of three speakers on the should be legal, safe and unnecessary drew gasps from the crowd. He party’s future. The panel discussion came at the proposed a massive adoption promonthly First Monday meeting of party gram for unwanted children instead of abortion and said faithful at the Poinsett the Hispanic vote Club and included Wilkins, state party “We risk becoming a can be courted and by adopting the Chairman Chad Conregionalized party of won immigration reform nelly and Furman package now being University political angry old men.” promoted by GOP science professor Brent David Wilkins, former leaders in the House Nelsen, who is also a Ambassador to Canada and Senate. former candidate for “It’s very similar state superintendent of to what Ronald Reagan proposed in education. The business-oriented audience was 1988,” he said. “Frankly, that’s the last quite receptive to Wilkins and Con- time the Republican Party reached out nelly’s ideas about tweaking the party’s to the Hispanic voter. We have to do message while holding true to the core it again, and the proposal now being conservative values that have made considered in the nation’s capital is the the GOP the party of record in South best way to do it.” In the future, Nelsen said, rooms Carolina. Absent was any acknowledgement or where the party faithful gather must be discussion on how the party has been populated with more black and brown split along libertarian lines by the emer- faces and more women if the GOP is to gence of the tea party in the 2010 elec- snap back from its defeat in 2012. Connelly said the party’s problems tion, Greenville County Councilman can be traced, in large part, to a lack Butch Kirven said after the meeting. “I think a lot of politicians are afraid of appeal to what has become part of of the tea party and what they can do in its traditional base. “We’ve become too dependent on direction from insiders a primary election,” he said. Deb Sofield, a major GOP leader who from D.C.,” he said. A million fewer evangelicals turned coordinates the First Monday program, said she felt the tea party has become an out for the 2012 election than in the first presidential vote that sent Obama essential part of the Republican Party. Wilkins told the group he is confident to the White House, he said. Romney “Obama will overreach by the 2014 didn’t appeal to that segment of the election and the party will stage another party, he said, and they can’t be ignored if the GOP is to enjoy success in comeback like 2010.” Connelly said much of the party’s the future. “I’m a social conservative, and the problem in the last election and in the current period can be traced to the party can’t forget that message,” he said. “Our ideas are time-proven and they mainstream media and its prejudice against the GOP. He, too, felt the party work,” said Wilkins. “We just need to do could overcome issues with women, a better job of telling it.” blacks and Hispanics by sticking to core Contact Charles Sowell at values and adjusting the way the GOP’s csowell@communityjournals.com. message is presented. By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

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Simpsonville mayor calls in SLED By JEANNE PUTNAM | contributor

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Former Simpsonville Police Chief Keith Grounsell’s battle to get his job back took another turn this week when Simpsonville Mayor Perry Eichor announced he has asked the State Law Enforcement Division to investigate accusations of corruption and impropriety within city government. Eichor said “troubling documents” have surfaced since Grounsell’s Dec. 28 termination that indicate Grounsell collaborated with City Councilwoman Geneva Lawrence to fire a police officer in order to bring a relative of Lawrence’s onto the police force. The documents show the officer Grounsell fired “had good work evaluations until Grounsell had him transferred to another shift and then shortly terminated his employment,” Eichor said. “These documents also show that Grounsell did not follow policy or city ordinances and pushed to hire Geneva Lawrence’s relative to fill the resulting opening.” Eichor said the documents show Grounsell “used his authority to help expunge a criminal record, refused to interview certified candidates and instead offered employment to this relative of Lawrence even though he would have to go through training and recertification and it would be months before he could be certified to be a police officer.” Eichor said Lawrence had previously objected to the hiring of the former officer, who was already certified by the S.C. Criminal Justice Academy (SCCJA). In a letter to City Administrator Russell Hawes obtained by the Journal, Interim Chief of Police Steve Moore said Lawrence’s relative “had a DUI show up on his NCIC (National Crime Information Center) check which would bar him from attending SCCJA, but it was corrected with the assistance of the Chief of Police.” Moore went on to write that Grounsell “did not assign anyone to conduct his (Lawrence’s relative’s) background check and may have possibly done it himself, but the proper paperwork was not filled out.” Eichor said he asked SLED to investigate the effort between Grounsell and Lawrence to hire her relative in violation of state law and city ordinances. Lawrence told the Journal she “did not do what I’ve been accused of. I welcome the SLED investigation if that is what the mayor feels he has to do.”

Burns wins House runoff By JEANNE PUTNAM | contributor

Travelers Rest businessman Mike Burns on Tuesday claimed the S.C. House District 17 seat he missed winning outright by one vote in a five-person primary race two weeks ago. Burns bested fellow front-runner Chris Sullivan by 249 votes in Tuesday’s Republican Party primary election runoff. Barring a write-in candidate announcing before Feb. 21, Burns will be sworn in as the winner, as no Democrat filed for the seat, said Conway Belangia, Greenville County’s director of elections and voter registration. Sullivan expressed gratitude to his supporters, adding “We are proud that we ran a good, clean campaign.” Burns thanked Sullivan for “his energetic campaign,” saying it “helped me stay focused on sharing my vision for more effective government with as many District 17 residents as possible. I hope his supporters will give me a chance to earn their trust by effectively representing them in Columbia.” Burns also thanked the voters in District 17 for going to “the polls twice in a 15-day span when there was no other election to motivate them to turn out.” Going into the runoff, Burns picked up the endorsements of S.C. Senator Tom Corbin and S.C. Reps. Dwight Loftis, Phyllis Henderson, Dan Hamilton and “I can not comment until I sit down with my attorney again,” Grounsell told the Journal. “I would love to talk, but now they are making up false accusations of a malicious and illegal nature. This changes everything. At first it was just slander, but now it is reporting false criminal accusations against myself and another elected official. It is sad that people in public trust positions abuse their powers to this extreme. When the truth comes out, the city will be embarassed at what some elected officials have said and done throughout this process.” Grounsell, a former investigator with the 13th Judicial Circuit Solicitor’s Office, was sworn in on Sept. 18 to replace Charles Reece, who retired in June after 12 years as police chief. Grounsell completed the Criminal Justice Academy on Dec. 21 before the council voted 5-2 to fire him on Dec. 28. Grounsell has said previously that the council and city administrator never gave him adequate opportunity to make departmental changes he considered necessary, pointing specifically to the council’s alleged refusal to allow him to discipline

Phillip Owens, while Sullivan gained former opponent Roy Harmon’s endorsement. The campaign was not without some scandal. On Feb. 4, Burns Burns publicly denied allegations from Sullivan supporters of negative campaigning. In a statement to the media, Burns said, “I have run a positive campaign, one focused on the issues and letting the people of northern Greenville County know that as a resident of the area since childhood I want to represent their best interests in Columbia.” A total of 2,517 voters cast ballots in the special election runoff – roughly 11 percent of the 20,000 voters in the district – compared with a 10 percent turnout two weeks ago, according to Belangia. There were also only two provisional ballots cast this time. South Carolina District 17 encompasses much of northern Greenville County, including Tigerville, SlaterMarietta and Travelers Rest. The House District 17 seat was left vacant when S.C. Rep. Tom Corbin won both re-election and an S.C. Senate seat in the Nov. 2012 election.

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Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com. former Assistant Police Chief Colleen O’Neil over a purported relationship with Fire Chief Wesley Williams. O’Neil stepped down in January and Williams was reinstated by City Council. Eichor said the mayor and council “had solid reasons to terminate the employment of Keith Grounsell. Rather than saying negative things about his employment, we chose to simply state that he did not meet our probationary expectations and that he was not a good fit” for the town. Eichor said Grounsell “would not and could not work with the City Council, the City Administrator and the Human Resources director,” and persisted in actions “that could possibly put the city taxpayers at risk” despite being told “to hold off until we could handle the matter appropriately.” Grounsell has said the council refused to let him discipline O’Neil because she filed an EEOC complaint against the city after she was passed over for the chief ’s job in favor of Grounsell. Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com.

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Greenville Drive aims to make Fluor Field a top destination for amateur baseball By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

There is no off-season for Greenville Drive co-owner and team president Craig Brown. “There’s a baseball season, a postseason, a Christmas season and a preseason, but there is no off-season,” Brown said at a recent work session of the Greenville City Council. Consequently, for Greenville residents, baseball season is just around the corner. As in next week. The fourth annual First Pitch Invitational, a series of games involving six collegiate teams, will be held Feb. 15 though Feb. 17 and Feb. 22 through Feb. 24. All total, 21 different college baseball

programs as well as the Southern Conference baseball championship are headed for downtown Greenville as part of this year’s push to make Fluor Field, the home field for Class A Minor League Baseball’s Greenville Drive, one of the top venues in the country for amateur baseball. “The opportunity to enjoy premier collegiate baseball in downtown Greenville has never been better,” said Greenville Drive General Manager Mike deMaine. Having a successful 2013 collegiate baseball season at Fluor Field could help expand future opportunities as well, deMaine told members of the Greenville City Council at one of their work sessions last month. During the first weekend of the First Pitch Invitational, round-robin play will feature Furman, Michigan State, Miami of Ohio and Northwestern. They will be joined by Cincinnati and Western Carolina the second weekend. Michigan State reached the NCAA tournament last season for the first time in 33 years. The Spartans won the Big Ten championship in 2011. Michigan State and Miami open the First Pitch Invitational at 1 p.m. on Feb. 15. Furman plays Northwestern at 5 p.m. On Saturday, Feb. 16, Northwestern will play Miami at noon and Furman

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two of South Carolina’s historically black colleges and universities, on April 12. A pro-college doubleheader will be held on April 23. The Drive hosts the Lakewood BlueClaws in the Drive Business Downtown at 2 p.m. followed by a Furman-University of South Carolina Upstate game at 7 p.m. To close out the college games in April, Wofford takes on Winthrop at 7 p.m. on April 30. In May, Limestone and North Greenville play on May 3. Clemson and Furman play on May 8. The Southern Conference baseball championships will be held May 22 through May 26. The winner gets an automatic bid to the NCAA tournament. The tournament was held at Fluor Field in 2009 and 2012. “2013 will be a watershed year,” deMaine said. Tickets for the collegiate games, with the exception of the South CarolinaClemson game and the Southern Conference tournament, are on sale now at the Fluor Field Box Office, over the phone at 864-240-4528 or at GreenvilleDrive.com. The Greenville Drive open their 2013 season on April 4 at home.

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goes against Michigan State at 4 p.m. Michigan State and Northwestern play at 11 a.m. on Feb. 17. Furman and Miami play that same day at 3 p.m. The second weekend has a slate of eight games, seven at Fluor Field and one at Furman’s Latham Stadium. Furman will play three additional regular season games at Fluor Field: Davidson on March 17, South Carolina on April 3 and Clemson on May 7. South Carolina and Clemson play each other in the Reedy River Rivalry on March 2 at 2 p.m. The two previous Reedy River Rivalry games, played in 2010 and 2011, were the second- and third-largest crowds in Fluor Field’s seven-year history. The first was the Greenville Drive game on May 31, 2009, when 7,129 attended to see former Atlanta Brave John Smoltz make a rehabilitation start before returning to the Boston Red Sox. Tickets for the USC-Clemson game can be purchased through the schools’ ticketing offices only. Next month, North Greenville will play Southern Wesleyan on March 13 and Presbyterian College will play the University of Connecticut on March 16. April’s collegiate games include Anderson University and Lander University on April 9 and the HBCU Classic, featuring

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Greenville Tech requests funds from council To make a new enterprise campus a reality, Dr. Keith Miller, president of Greenville Technical College, asked Greenville County Council’s help with bankrolling the new campus. At the council’s regular meeting Tuesday, Miller requested that Greenville County issue $37 million in bonds to help fund the enterprise campus and the Student Success Center. Dubbed the Carolinas Institute for Training and Innovation, the enterprise campus will offer a manufacturing accelerator where fledgling companies could have access to equipment, as well as provide space for industry to create prototypes and for students to train in high-tech manufacturing techniques, Miller said. “The skills gap that we’re facing in Greenville County is not unique, it’s a challenge nationally,” said Miller. “The race is on (to close the gap) and the winner is going to be who is most creative at addressing the shortages.” The location of the new campus has not been determined, he said, but the college is looking at several sites. He said the plan’s first phase would include the Greenville Tech portion at the National Guard facility at SC Technology and Aviation Center (SCTAC), the enterprise campus, the addition of the Student Success Center for support services in the current library, a new arts and sciences building, renovation of the University Transfer building and construction of a bridge on campus. Funding for some projects will come from the Greenville Tech Foundation, state funds and private-sector donations, he said. In later business, council members split on reappointing former council chairman H.G. “Butch” Kirven as a representative to the Greenville Area Development Corporation (GADC). County council’s chair and vice chair have seats on the board along with one other council representative. Kirven lost his seat on the GADC board when Bob Taylor was elected council chairman, and Willis Meadows’ GADC seat came open when he was elected vice chairman. Councilman Jim Burns opposed appointing a GADC representative before the council had a chance to make rule changes for the new year, saying, “The risk of one representative missing one meeting is not enough to circumvent the rules.” Kirven lobbied to fill the GADC seat, saying there was a critical timing issue in the GADC board’s business and the committee of the whole could appoint a replacement. County attorney Mark Tollison said the committee of the whole could appoint a new representative or wait. A motion to hold the appointment failed and both Burns and Kirven were then nominated to serve on the GADC board. The vote, 8-4 in favor of Kirven, was then referred to full council. However, during the regular council meeting, Burns moved to hold Kirven’s appointment to the GADC board, and the motion carried in a 7-5 vote with Burns, Meadows, Xanthene Norris, Liz Seman, Lottie Gibson, Dan Rawls and Joe Dill in favor and Kirven, Joe Baldwin, Sid Cates, Fred Payne and Bob Taylor opposed. Council will take up the nomination at its next meeting along with any rules changes suggested by members. Greenville County Council is scheduled to meet again on Tuesday, Feb. 19 at 6 p.m. at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Greenville. The committee of the whole meets that same day at 4:30 p.m. in University Ridge’s conference room D. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

16 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 8, 2013

JOURNAL COMMUNITY ‘A Coat Named Mr. Spot’ Book opens children’s eyes to poverty By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Beth Templeton’s newest book stemmed from a child’s honest questions: “Why does my classmate smell funny?” “Why does Johnny wear his coat all the time, even when it’s not cold?” Such questions indicate a child is noticing socioeconomic differences between himself and some of his classmates, Templeton says. She wrote “A Coat Named Mr. Spot” to give children a better understanding of poverty – and to help parents and grandparents guide them toward a sense of empathy for classmates who live in poverty. They will have many opportunities to learn, for a lot of children in Greenville County fit that category. During the 2011-12 school year, 49.1 percent of Greenville County’s 69,322 students qualified for free or reduced price school meals. Eligibility is based on the total household income. MR. SPOT continued on PAGE 18

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MR. SPOT continued from PAGE 17

Ten schools had poverty rates of 90 percent or more. Alexander Elementary’s poverty rate was 99 percent. The school district’s poverty rate could actually be higher. Participation in the free and reduced-price lunch program often declines as students advance through the grade levels. Templeton, the former executive director of United Ministries, founded the poverty education program Our Eyes Were Opened in 2007. Our Eyes Were Opened began as an outreach of United Ministries but is now an independent organization. She has worked for 30 years with people who are poor and those who want to help people who have minimal resources. Templeton had already written the manuscript when Roxanne Cromartie, the vice president of planned giving major gifts for the United Way of Greenville County, approached her for some help. A child of a member of the United Way Young Philanthropists had asked his parents why everybody hasn’t flown on an airplane, and the young professional was looking for an age-appropriate way to talk about poverty. Templeton showed Cromartie the manuscript and the United Way paid

for Dana Thompson, an illustrator who has worked for Disney Press, Random House and Scholastic and is a regular contributor to Nick Jr. and Clubhouse magazine, to illustrate “A Coat named Mr. Spot.” A parents’ guide is included in the back of the book to help adults guide the conversation. “In reality, we’re all exposed to people who live in poverty,” Templeton said. “We may ignore it or not think about it, but a lot of people in Greenville are living close to the poverty line or struggling.”

The story grew out of the questions and comments Templeton routinely hears about the poor – why do they smell bad in the winter; why do they buy big-screen televisions, nice expensive cars and designer brand clothes; why do they buy steaks at the grocery store? “Once you start thinking about it, a lot of it makes rational, logical sense,” Templeton said. “There are practical reasons.” Templeton said big-screen TVs often provide an escape for somebody struggling every day to put food on the table and keep a roof over their family’s head or can serve as a babysitter to children who are told to lock the door behind them when they come home from school and not to leave while the parents are at work. As for the expensive luxury cars, Templeton said it is easier to get a car loan than a house loan. People may not know where a person they work with lives, but they do know which car they drive, she said. And wearing an expensive pair of athletic shoes or a name-brand pair of jeans can help make children feel important and more like everybody else, she said. “When you’re out, you want to look

journal community

like everybody else,” Templeton said. “If you have a fancy pair of athletic shoes, you must be somebody.” As for buying the steak on food stamps, we all treat ourselves sometimes, Templeton said. “Many of us live in blissful ignorance,” she said. “One of the reasons poverty exists is many of us have no idea it’s there. Our churches, our neighborhoods, where we shop are places where we more or less see people like us. We walk down nice, pretty Main Street and are unaware of the poverty that is just two blocks away.” Templeton said her partnership with the United Way gives “A Coat Named Mr. Spot” a national network. “I don’t know of any other resources that address poverty the way this book does,” she said. “It is not a romanticized story. This is an honest way of looking at it without making it more or less than it is.” The book is on sale at Ten Thousand Villages in Lewis Plaza on Augusta Street and at the United Ministries office on Pendleton Street in Greenville. Books will also be available at Fiction Addiction and through online sellers. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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FEBRUARY 8, 2013 | The Journal 19

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North Greenville University gets largest single gift ever By Cindy Landrum | staff

A $6.25 million gift to North Greenville University from a longtime supporter – the largest single gift ever received by the school – has pushed the college in Tigerville over its $25 million capital campaign goal. The gift from Georgia T. Roberson, announced at a press conference Thursday, put the school over its announced goal in just 2 1/2 years, half of the campaign’s designated time. The school announced a new “Hallelujah Goal” for the campaign that runs through 2015 – $42.7 million. The campaign’s revised priorities include a $4.8 million addition to the school’s endowment, $4.8 million for a multi-purpose indoor athletic and worship center, $3.5 million for the Academic Village at Tigerville, $1.2 million for a science building renovation and addition, $1.5 million for residence halls, $650,000 for athletic complex additions and $750,000 for a building endowment. Roberson bequeathed the school approximately $6.25 million of her estate, her third gift to the school since 2003. Her first gift allowed the school to build the Marshall H. and Georgia T. Roberson Residence Hall, which currently houses 68 female students on campus. In 2006, Roberson established a scholarship to assist full-time students who maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher. Her bequest designated two-thirds of

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her estate for student scholarships. The rest will be used where needed by the school. “With the current economic climate, we have been truly blessed with friends like the Robersons who realize the importance of Christ-centered higher education,” said Dr. Jimmy Epting, school president. “This is a historic day in the life of his institution.” When the school publicly announced the campaign in October 2012, it had already raised $18.1 million, or 72 percent of the goal. Roberson worked for Clemson University with the cooperative extension service for 34 years. She was also vice president, secretary, co-founder and a partner with her late husband, Dr. Marshall H. Roberson, at American Sentry Burglar and Fire Alarm Co. Roberson’s husband, Marshall, who died in 2002, was a lifelong advocate of Christian education. He received his undergraduate degree from McMasters University in Hamilton, Ontario; a masters of theology from Immanuel Bible College; and a doctorate of theology from the University of Marietta in Georgia. He served as pastor of Central Baptist Church in Anderson for 14 years before resigning from the ministry to go into business. Roberson sold American Sentry, now known as Blue Ridge Security, in 1997. He also owned the Carolina Institute of Aeronautics, where he was a flight instructor. That is where the Robersons met.

With spring approaching, Upstate residents are trying to find more excuses to get outside and enjoy nature.

One opportunity is the upcoming Great Backyard Bird Count. Every year, the National Audubon Society and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology promote this four-day bird count to aid in their research and data retrieval. The count begins on Feb. 15 and continues through Feb. 18. Sponsors say it’s a great chance to go out and take advantage of the beautiful Upstate scenery. “The GBBC is an ideal opportunity for young and old to connect with na-

journal community

Safe Harbor educates to prevent dating violence The Upstate’s most prominent champion against domestic abuse is priming the youth for a future free of relationship violence. Safe Harbor is known for assisting domestic violence victims, but with a revamped teen dating violence education program, the new year is focused on prevention. The Relationship Education Project, R.E.P., reaches out to high school students of Greenville, Anderson, Pickens and Oconee counties to talk facts about relationship abuse – what it is, what it looks like and what to do if experiencing it. Julie Meredith, Safe Harbor’s volunteer and communications director, said, “So much of what we do at Safe Harbor is intervention: We have shelter, we have counseling, we have legal advocacy for people who are already experiencing violence. And so, when we are doing this education with young people, we are really hoping that it is providing some prevention before it has happened.” Dating violence is defined as a pattern of abusive behaviors used to control a partner. Unfortunately, it’s no peripheral issue: According to Break the Cycle, one in three teens in the U.S. has experienced a form of dating abuse. In a 2012 survey completed by R.E.P. at two Upstate high schools, nearly 20 percent of the freshture by discovering birds and to participate in a huge science project,” said Gary Langham, Audubon’s chief scientist. Participants reported 17.4 million bird observations in last year’s count. New this year: After a successful 15 years in North America, the Great Backyard Bird Count will be open to the entire world for the first time. By spending 15 minutes watching and tallying birds in a single location, participants can submit their data to www.birdcount.org, which offers various interactive qualities such as maps, real-time cataloguing and the ability to view other participants’ checklists. The endgame is not to compare year-to-year changes but general patterns over time of bird migrations and populations. Dr. Paul Serridge, a member of the Greenville County Bird Club, recently led a workshop at Lake Conestee Park on bird observation and identification. He said he used “eBird.com data to show

man classes reported experiencing dating violence, 30 percent reported experiencing controlling behaviors from a partner, and 50 percent reported knowing someone who had. R.E.P. is a revision of the Megan Project, a basic teen dating violence awareness program begun in 2000 and named after Mauldin High School student Megan Ridgeway, who lost her life to an abusive boyfriend. While the Megan Project featured a simple, solitary presentation, R.E.P. offers high schools the option of adding five to eight class multi-sessions. R.E.P. educators visit assemblies and classes to discuss the issues surrounding dating violence, the warning signs of abuse, safety planning and the nature of healthy relationships. “Our main goal when going into a classroom,” said R.E.P. educator Mills Tate, “is to leave the students with the knowledge of the small warning signs that you see in the beginning of a relationship that you should pay attention to so you can get out of the relationship early on.” Statistics provided by the National Center for Victims of Crime show teen dating violence cuts across race, gender and socioeconomic lines. “Dating and domestic violence does not discriminate,” Meredith said. “Both genders can be victims and both genders can be perpetrators.” There is no form of abuse that takes quite clearly that the resident mallards at Conestee are joined by many more migratory mallards which spend the winter there before leaving for their breeding grounds in more northern area.” The Greenville County Bird Club also offers monthly morning bird walks on every third Saturday. The data gathered in the bird count projects is integral to studies and research. With reports of more than 600 different bird species in the United States and Canada and more than 10,240 bird species worldwide, experts need all the help they can get through bird counts.

precedence over another, said Tate. “We see it all. The only thing that makes dating abuse different from domestic violence is that domestic violence is a legal term. Domestic violence is between two people who are married, have a child together or live together. But the types of violence that we see in domestic violence and dating violence are exactly the same. Emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse – with teens we see a lot of pressure to engage in sexual activity.” Yet, there are trends, she said. “Major warning signs in teen relationships are definitely jealousy, constant calling and texting, always having to know where the boyfriend or girlfriend is, what they’re doing, who they’re with, and trying to keep them away from friends and family.” Safe Harbor has recently adapted R.E.P. to fit the middle school audience, an answer to the ever earlier developing violent tendencies. Why are proclivities for dating violence developing at such early ages? The R.E.P. educators attribute the phenomenon to both parental and media influences. “A lot of teens grow up in abusive

homes,” said R.E.P. educator Amanda Callahan. “So many of us saw it growing up, we saw our parents being abusive towards each other, and we think, well, that’s just what a marriage looks like. The other part of it is we are constantly bombarded by images in the media about what a relationship is supposed to look like, from Rihanna songs to violent videogames. When you are bombarded with all these things you learn it and the behavior becomes normalized.” Safe Harbor believes the power to alleviate dating and domestic violence is in the hands of the youth. “I truly do believe we can stop domestic violence from happening, but it rests on the shoulders of the kids and the future generations,” said Callahan. “If we can get this information and these resources in their heads and in their hands, then they can make the choices older generations couldn’t make because we didn’t understand or didn’t know the difference.” Contact Shelby Livingston at slivingston@communityjournals.com. David McGee knew, at a very young age, what career path to follow – indeed, he was only six years old when he discovered his heart’s calling. A death in the family exposed him to grief but also to the soothing comfort of sincere compassion. Thus he determined to one day help others, too. As a child, David served as unofficial caretaker to the local historical cemetery, tending flowers, tidying gravestones, learning the tales of his hometown’s forefathers. “I felt drawn to tradition,” David recalls. “I had a respect for reverence.”

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FEBRUARY 8, 2013 | The Journal 21

journal community

our community

community news, events and happenings

This August, Spartanburg Community College will celebrate its 50th anniversary and seeks to capture the college’s history in a pictorial book. The school invites the community to share information, photographs, graduation programs, T-shirts, uniforms, trophies and student and alumni success stories that showcase the past 50 years. Individuals wishing to share can email Dr. Jenny Williams at williamsj@sccsc.edu. Email all student success stories to Dr. Bruce Dillenbeck at dillenbeckb@sccsc.edu. Led by trained and experienced facilitators, three support groups, Divorce Care, Divorce Care for Kids and Grief Share, will meet at First Presbyterian Church on Sunday evenings, 5-7 p.m., Feb. 10-May 19. There is no charge and workbooks are $10. Childcare is available by request. Advance registration is required. To register and for more information, contact Tammy Burkhalter at 864-672-0327 or tburkhalter@firstpresgreenville.org.

Two team members of the South Carolina Search & Rescue Dog Association, Nancy Jocoy and Sarah Hey, have attained national certifications in cadaver detection and area search (air scent) respectively from the North American Police Work Dog Association. The South Carolina Rescue Dog Association is a volunteer professional search and rescue team with highly trained search dogs dedicated to helping find lost people, including children, hikers, drowned victims or those with Alzheimer’s.  Sarah Hey and Brand The SC Native Plant Society is holding a Jack-in-the-Pulpits Workday on Feb. 9, 9 a.m.-noon. Participants will help clear English ivy that is taking over the native Jack-in-the-Pulpits in a cove near the Reedy River and Swamp Rabbit Trail in Greenville. Long pants and sleeves are advised to protect against poison ivy. To attend, email Dan Whitten at sdwhit10@ aol.com and provide a name and phone number. Participants will meet in the

lower parking lot of YMCA on Cleveland Street in Greenville at 9 a.m. Roper Mountain Science Center presents Engineer-It family day on Feb. 9, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., focused on how engineers “make a world of difference.” The event will feature demonstrations on cryogenics, robotics, engineering design and more. Visit www. ropermountain.org for details and cost. The event Preventing Heart Attacks, Strokes and Vascular Disease will allow attendees to learn how to prevent heart attacks, stroke and vascular disease on Feb. 9, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at Embassy Suites. Blood pressure checks and hands-only CPR demonstrations will be at 10:30 a.m. Lunch is provided. To register, call 1-877447-4636 or visit ghs.org/360healthed.

The SC Native Plant Society invites Upstate residents to hear Janisse Ray on Feb. 19 at 7 p.m. in the J. Verne Smith Technical Resource Center Auditorium on Greenville Tech’s Main Campus. Award-winning writer and activist Janisse Ray’s discussion is titled “How Clear Does It Have To Be?” For more information, visit www.scnps.org.

St. Mary’s Catholic Church will host a lecture entitled “Evangelical Catholicism: Deep Reform in the 21st Century Church” by George Weigel on Feb. 9 at 10 a.m. in the parish athletic center at 125 Hampton Avenue in Greenville. Tickets are available at the parish office at 111 Hampton Avenue. For more information, call 864-271-8422 or visit www.stmarysgvl.org. The Mauldin Garden Club will meet on Feb. 12 at 7 p.m., to hear guest speaker Evelyn Onofrio present the topic of “How to Attract Birds to Your Yard.” The Garden Club meets in the Mauldin Cultural Center on East Butler Road.  To learn more, visit www.mauldingardenclub.org or contact Ann Smith at jerryannesm115@charter.net. The Greater Greer Chamber of Commerce recently announced that the Marshall Tucker Band will be the headline performer for the 29th Annual Village Hospital Greer Family Festival on May 4 at 7:30 p.m. The festival will be held throughout downtown Greer and Greer City Park on May 3-4. Sponsorships and craft, business and restaurant vendor applications are available at www.greerchamber.com or by calling the Greater Greer Chamber at 877-3131. For more information, visit www.greerfamilyfest.com in mid-April.

If you are sponsoring a community event, we want to share your news. Submit entries to email: community@communityjournals.com.

our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

Chapman Cultural Center is holding “Read for the Science of It,” a free continuing education seminar for kindergarten through second-grade teachers. It will focus on integrating science and language arts in the elementary classroom. The event will be held Feb. 15 from 9 a.m. to noon in the Spartanburg Science Center. A second session for third- through fifthgrade teachers will be held 1-4 p.m. Teachers may enroll by calling 864-583-2777. St. Joseph’s Catholic School Middle School Chess Team captured first place in the South Carolina Independent School Association Chess Championship for the second consecutive year. Individual trophies went to Elias Longenecker (first place) and Joey Schmidt (second place).

22 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 8, 2013

erator Joseph Dylong and Middle School chess club coach Doug Ragan. Briana Hunt, Jalyn Haynes and Madeline Corvin of Riverside Middle School recently qualified for the All State Orchestra. They will travel to Columbia on Feb. 22-24 to participate in the All State Festival with other top players in the state. Traveling to Sumter, S.C., to compete were Andrew Armstrong, Brendan Cummings, Charlotte Gayle, Charlie Henderson, Elias Longenecker, Alex Malvern, Robby Matlock, Gabi Sammon, Joey Schmidt, Megan Seidel, Jackson Soapes, Jacob Soapes, Emilio Trocha and Adrianna Vandross. The team was accompanied by SJCS Middle School math teacher/chess club mod-

Tamara Berry of Greenville, a Mauldin High School student, has been nominated to represent South Carolina as a National Youth Correspondent to the 2013 Washington Journalism and Media Conference at George Mason University. Berry will participate in an intensive weeklong study of journalism and media.

The St. Joseph’s Catholic School High School Chess Team recently placed second in the South Carolina Independent School Association State Chess Tournament. Competing were Jake Armstrong, Martin Cordi, Luke Lepak, Andrew Schatteman, Matthew Schmidt and Caleb Smith. Lepak, Schatteman, Schmidt and Armstrong placed in the competition. Accompanying the students was math department chair and high school chess club moderator George Carr. Virginia Military Institute cadet Jacob M. Pullias of Greer was among the approximately 1,500 who marched in this year’s presidential Inaugural Parade on Jan. 21. Cadet Pullias’s parents are Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Pullias.

journal community Whether they have studied their world language for years or don’t even know how to say “hello,” young students can come study world languages and cultures at the Language Academy at Wofford College, June 22-July 6. The twoweek language immersion residential programs in French, German and Spanish are open to rising ninth-graders to recently graduated high school seniors. For more information, visit www.wofford. edu/languageacademy. Southside Christian School and the College Board recently recognized

Luis De Castro and Nichole Santana as scholars by the 2012-2013 National Hispanic Recognition Program. In addition, nine seniors have earned Palmetto Fellows Early Awards candidacy: Marshall Bozeman, Luis De Castro, Joseph Dib, Kira Ford, Stephen Henderson, Joshua LaFlam, Sydney Newsom, Parker Pitts and John “Jake” Welsh. Three Southside High School students were recently named to the All-County Band: Zeke Parsons, trumpet; DelShaun Talley, clarinet; and Ann-Elise Siden, oboe.

Jordan Morgan, Kian Razzaghy, Elena Bourne and Blake Rogers.

Matthew Loewer recently became St. Mary’s 2013 Geography Bee Champion. The 2013 finalists who participated in the Geography Bee are: Gracie Marlowe, Matthew Loewer, Ava Fisher, Cailin Sullivan, Caroline Collins, Matthew Marchal,

Elizabeth Piper’s class and two other classes from Washington Center went to the Children’s Museum of the Upstate. The students had been studying about the food groups, magnets and electricity, along with probability and charts. All of the topics came alive through exploration. Submit entries to: Community Journals, Our Schools, 148 River Street, Ste. 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or email: community@communityjournals.com

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FEBRUARY 8, 2013 | The Journal 23

journal community

the good

events that make our community better

The Junior League of Greenville will hold its first annual Big Night Out, a themed, black-tie fundraiser to benefit local charities, on  Feb. 9  at The Greenville Country Club. Inspired by Cirque du Soleil, the event will feature roaming entertainers, live music and elaborate decor. Tickets are $65 in advance and $75 at the door. Visit jlgreenville.org/bno for tickets and more information. Old Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard only to discover the cupboard was bare. To help everyone have a meal, Mast General Store is partnering with Loaves & Fishes to raise hunger awareness in Greenville with the tenth annual “Be a Sweetheart...Feed the Hungry” event on Feb. 9 and 10. This year, Mast Store will contribute $1 to Loaves & Fishes for each pound of candy purchased on Feb. 9 and 10. For more information, visit www.loavesandfishesgreenville.com. Junior Achievement of Upstate SC will hold its annual BIZ Bowl “FUNdraiser” on Feb. 22, Mar. 1 and Mar. 15 in Greenville at Star Lanes, and on Mar. 8 in Spartanburg at Paradise Lanes. The public is invited to join other businesses, organizations, schools, families and individuals in forming five-person teams to bowl for two hours in a fun environment with good-natured competition. Prizes will be given at each session for Most Spirited Team, Most Creative Attire and Best Decorated Bowling Pin. BIZ Bowl participants ask co-workers, friends and family members to sponsor their efforts. For more information, visit www. jaupstatesc.org or contact Susan Spencer at 864-244-4017, susan.spencer@ja.org. The International Center’s 2013 International Gala is the official kick-off event for Upstate International Month. It will be held on Mar. 1, 7-11 p.m. at Zen Greenville, 924 South Main St. The gala will be filled with entertainment, delicious authentic cuisine and drinks from around the world, a silent auction and a few surprises. Tickets are $80-$95. Visit www. internationalupstate.org/events/international-gala for more information and to register.

Repair

David’s Table will have a fundraiser called “Walk or Roll” on Apr. 13 at 10 a.m. at Conestee Park to help send children with disabilities to Camp Spearhead. Cost is $5 to participate. Zoie Garver, a student at Sara Collins Elementary, is partnering with the Greenville County Recreation District to do an additional fundraiser that will feature food and drinks, games and a prize drawing. For more information, contact Lyn Purkerson Garver at lpg576@yahoo.com or Skeeter Powell at skeeter.powell@gmail.com, visit www.davidstableonline.org, or call 864-901-3323 or 864-915-2479.

The South Carolina Association of Community Development Corporations has approved 12 Community Impact Fund grants totaling $100,000 to member organizations – Community Development Corporations and Community Based Organizations across the state. Grants will fund a variety of projects, including affordable housing development and rehabilitation, workforce development, community training programs including financial literacy and housing counseling, and microloan programs to support small business development and youth entrepreneurship. Local awards included: Community Works Carolina-Greenville, $11,000 for Microloan Program; Genesis Homes-Greenville, $5,000 for Annie’s House; Homes of HopeGreenville, $13,000 for LoCAL Housing & LEED Job Training; and Soteria CDC– Greenville, $12,000 for Green Start Recycling Program.

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24 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 8, 2013

Michael’s Way will host ’70s Disco Fever on Mar. 8 to benefit the nonprofit, which offers educational opportunities for low-income adults. The event will feature heavy hors d’oeuvres, music and a silent auction. Cost is $40 per person or $75 per couple. For more information, visit www.michaelswayupstate.org.

North Greenville Rotary Club recently presented its annual Vocational Service Award to Scott Kilgore, a local architect, for his service to youth as a Boy Scout leader, his service to third-world countries through his church and his service through various Rotary projects.

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Pictured, left to right:  Billy Hough, TFTS founder; Max Fain, TFTS president; John Combs, Woodfin Ridge general manager and head golf professional; Dennis Pruitt, TFTS vice president; Audrey Church, Woodfin Ridge assistant golf professional and TFTS affiliate coach.

At its recent annual meeting, The First Tee of Spartanburg presented the “All-In” Award for outstanding board service to John D. Combs, PGA. In his second year as a TFTS board member-at-large, Combs played a key role in the organization’s programming and fundraising success. He also volunteered more than 100 coaching hours at TFTS affiliate Woodfin Ridge, where he is general manager and head golf professional.

The Michelin Soccer Program and Warren’s Tire on Wheels donated more than $450 in funds and equipment to Carolina Elite Soccer Academy. The funds provide scholarships, uniforms and other soccer essentials for participating leagues. The Michelin Soccer Program partners tire dealers with local youth soccer organizations, providing the dealers the opportunity to reach out to the community. The leagues in turn receive funds and equipment. The Institute for Child Success, a research and policy organization working across South Carolina to create a culture that facilitates and fosters the success of all children, is convening a working group to explore new ways to scale and sustain high-quality, evidence-based interventions that meet the needs of South Carolina’s youngest children through social impact financing. For more information, visit www.instituteforchildsuccess.org. Send us your announcement. Email: community@communityjournals.com.

Journal culture

Greg Beckner / Staff

Kim Granner with some of the characters in her show “Glow Tales.” By Cindy Landrum | staff

lights out continued on page 26

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SCCT’s ‘Glow Tales’ uses black-light puppetry

February 21

Lights out

“Glow Tales,” South Carolina Children’s Theatre’s next Second Stage production, is literally lights out. It’s a black-light puppet show. “We’re used to ‘seeing is believing,’” said Kim Granner, a Greenville resident and longtime director of SCCT productions, who wrote “Glow Tales.” “In the case of black-light puppetry, it’s a case of seeing it and not believing.”

Black-light puppetry blacks out the performance venue and uses ultraviolet lighting to make fluorescent puppets appear to glow in the dark. The puppeteers are dressed in black from head to toe, donning hoods with a sheer black screen that covers the eyes. Because the UV light only illuminates items that have been painted with fluorescent paint, the puppeteers can literally be feet away from the audience without ever being seen, Granner said. “It is magical how it works,” she said. “Glow Tales” is a show that evolved from Granner’s fascination by black-light puppetry and the start of Greenville’s nationally acclaimed fine arts festival, Artisphere, in 2005. Artisphere representatives approached Greenville’s performing arts organizations and asked them to offer something free to the public. Granner, who had used blacklight puppetry in a couple of short scenes

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FEBRUARY 8, 2013 | The Journal 25

JOURNAL CULTURE A character from the show “Glow Tales.”

LIGHTS OUT continued from PAGE 25

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: “Glow Tales” WHO: South Carolina Children’s Theatre Second Stage WHERE: SCCT Headquarters 153 Augusta St., Greenville WHEN: Saturday, Feb. 16, 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 17, 3 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22, 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24, 3 p.m. TICKETS: $7 INFORMATION: 864-235-2885

26 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 8, 2013

PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

in SCCT productions she had directed, saw the perfect opportunity to write an original, short black-light puppet show. So Granner wrote “Charlie and the Little Splash,” a story about a fish that wanted to make a bigger splash but comes to realize the impact he’s made despite his size. The next year, Granner wrote “Benjamin Bee’s Secret Wish,” a story about a day in the life of a honeybee. The SCCT decided to offer “Glow Tales” as a bonus to the 2007 season after Granner wrote the third and final part, “Rosie Bloom’s Dream,” a story about a girl who doesn’t want to go to bed. Granner made the 60-plus puppets herself, mostly out of foam rubber and fabric. “Some fabrics work better than others,” she said. “I took a battery-operated black light to the fabric store with me to make sure what I bought would work.” Most are rod puppets, although there are some hand puppets as well. Some can talk, and others have string-operated

body parts such as wings and arms. “Black-light puppetry has a limited color palette,” she said. The three tales – ranging in length from 13 minutes to 25 minutes – are underscored with music and sound effects that Granner got from the sound library at the Williamson Evans recording studio. “They had four walls of CDs from floor to ceiling,” she said. She put together the “Glow Tales” soundtrack, using a minute from this CD, four seconds from another, 15 seconds from a third. She used people who had been involved with the SCCT for the voice talent. They all jammed into the recording studio and recorded the vocals in one day. “Glow Tales” will use nine puppeteers ranging in age from nine to adult. Puppet-passers will be in the wings so they can switch between puppets. Presenting the tales in black light is a lot like choreographing dancing in the dark.

“In theater, you can have improvisation,” she said. “You can’t here.” A body of one puppet cannot pass in front of the body of another or the illusion will be broken, she said. The puppeteers have to know where the others will be on stage despite their limited fields of vision. “You have to have great physicality,” Granner said. The puppeteers have to learn lines even though the voices of their characters are pre-recorded. “It is all in how you move the puppet,” Granner said. “If a scene is melancholy, you don’t move the puppet as fast. If the fish is happy, it swims at a different pace. The underscoring of the music helps set the tone and the mood.” And there can be no light other than the UV light to help the puppeteers find their way. “Any light other than black light would just kill it.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

journal culture

Growing into ‘Billy Elliot’ By Cindy Landrum | staff

so you know

kyle froman / contributing

What: “Billy Elliot the Musical” Ben Cook grew into the role of Billy, Where: Peace Center Concert Hall the title character in “Billy Elliott the Musical.” Now, he hopes he doesn’t outWhen: Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, grow it before the end of the traveling 7:30 p.m. Broadway production’s current tour. Friday, Feb. 15 and Saturday, Feb. 16, 8 p.m. “I’m hitting a spurt and am really startSunday, Feb. 17, 6:30 p.m. ing to grow,” said Cook, one of four boys Tickets: $50 to $80 who alternate in the title role in “Billy Information: 864-467-3000 Elliott,” which opens a six-show run on Note: Show contains some strong language. Tuesday at Greenville’s Peace Center. May be unsuitable for children under 12. “Billy Elliot” has four young dancers, including Cook, who alternate in the title role. Each one performs twice a week but no more. “It’s a very challenging role,” said Adam Pelty, resident choreographer for the show. “It is taxing physically, emotionally and vocally.” “Billy Elliot” tells the story of one boy’s journey to make his dreams come true. Set in a small town, the story follows Billy as he stumbles out of the boxing ring and into a ballet class, discovering a surprising talent that inspires his family and whole community and Four young dancers alternate playing the title role in “Billy Elliot the Musical.” changes his life forever. More than 60 boys have played Billy “It’s not really just a story about a boxer turned dancer,” said Cook, who is the since the musical made its world preNEXT miere. YOU The average Billy staysYEAR in the role production’s most veteran Billy. “It’s re- SEE ally more of a story of against all odds.” for 1.5 years. “It’s painful for the whole company to Cook, 15, has been with the show for two and a half years, first as a ensemble see Billy grow up,” Pelty said. “It really dancer, then as Michael and, for the last takes a special person to play the role.” Every Billy is assigned four pairs several months, the lead character. He says he started dancing mainly because of ballet slippers at a time – the show pair, a backup pair, a rehearsal pair his sisters did. Keeping up his stamina is the most and a promotions pair. In each show, challenging part of the role of Billy, Billy will wear seven pairs of shoes – Cook said. “There are eight really big a pair of sneakers, three pairs of tap dance numbers ranging from five min- shoes, a pair of ballet slippers, a pair of utes to 12 minutes long. You have to bedroom slippers and one pair of tap learn when to give more energy here covers. Each boy outgrows his shoes at and relax a little there. It’s a lot of hard least once, often twice, during his time work, playing Billy, but it’s just such a with the musical. Pelty said Cook is an amazing pergreat payoff. It’s a great feeling.” In addition to performing no more former and has an understanding of than two times a week, the four Billys the show that few people do because of take three ballet classes per week. They the time he spent in the ensemble and also take an acrobatics class, a tap class as Michael. But that doesn’t mean those and a core cardio class. They also have attending shows in which Billy is played by one of the show’s other boys will be rehearsals and 15 hours of school. For Pelty, the challenging part is to missing anything. “All of them are exceptional enough maintain consistency no matter which one of the Billys takes to the stage any to get the part,” Pelty said. “It takes a given night, but to also tailor the role to special dancer and a special personality to play this part.” each of the boy’s strengths. “There is some leeway,” Pelty said. “Some Contact Cindy Landrum at turn well to the left, others to the right. We clandrum@communityjournals.com. want to bring some creativity to it.”

BECOME PART OF HISTORY Leadership Greenville Class 39 is working with Greenville County Recreation District to refurbish a 70-year-old boxcar and create a unique destination that will be a resting/gathering point along the Greenville Hospital System Swamp Rabbit Trail. Swamp Rabbit Station will be at the center of the 17-mile trail, a heavily used resting and turn-around spot for families, cyclists and runners. You can be a part of this trail’s history by buying, or gifting, an engraved brick for $50. To buy your brick or learn more, visit www.SwampRabbitStation.com or snap the QR code below.

EYE CANDY for art lovers.

Greenville County

Museum of Art 420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864-271-7570 gcma.org

Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm free admission

Journal and egreenville Art in the Air Ad.indd 3

FEBRUARY 8, 2013 | 2/6/13 The Journal 27 3:15:53 PM

JOURNAL CULTURE

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Kid Rock Rap-rock superstar. Tickets $30-$89. Call 864-241-3800 or visit www.bilocenter.com.

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Kodo Drummers Japanese taiko drumming ensemble. Tickets $35-$45. Call 864-467-3000 or visit www.peacecenter.org.

Mark Dye Trio Bassist for The Work brings the jazz. Call 864-250-9193 or visit www.brownstreetclub.com.

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28 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 8, 2013

JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK

FREE PREMIERE FILM SCREENING

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Chase away the blues Belton native Holloway sings of the ‘power in being quiet’

TASTELESS PHOTOGRAPHY

On February 15 at the Handlebar, Loretta Holloway will make her second headlining appearance on behalf of Compass of Carolina, an Upstate organization that offers affordable financial and family counseling, along with truancy and violence prevention services. Holloway will appear as part of Compass of Carolina’s 16th annual “Chase Away the Blues” festival, a two-day event to raise money for the center. Holloway was born in Belton, but this is no typical local singer. She has played everywhere from Las Vegas to Chicago to off-Broadway shows and beyond, sharing the stage with entertainers like Bill Cosby, Whoopi Goldberg and Jay Leno. Holloway’s voice is a stunning instrument, capable of belting out lyrics to the back of the theater and then shifting to a painfully intimate whisper, sometimes in the same verse. She is every bit as much of an actress as a singer, living out the lyrics she sings onstage, whether she wrote them herself or is interpreting a decades-old standard. But just because Loretta is playing the “Chase Away the Blues” festival, don’t expect her to whip out a Muddy Waters chestnut. “I’m not really a blues singer,” Holloway says. “You can chase away the blues in many different forms, with many different kinds of music. And I’m delighted to be able to do what I do: Sing and Loretta Holloway try to lift people up in song.” Holloway speaks with passion and pride about both the festival and Compass of Carolina’s purpose. “It’s a very worthy cause, dealing with spousal abuse and families who are in abusive environments, dealing with second-chance programs for kids who are at risk, doing counseling for abused and battered women,” she says. “Sometimes people find themselves in unfortunate circumstances or relationships, and they need help, and they don’t know where to go. Compass of Carolina provides the means. They provide a safe haven for people who have experienced these tragedies. And The Handlebar has been very generous in donating their space and time for 16 years.” Holloway is just as passionate about her album, “Quietly,” a project that was very much a labor of love. After attending Claflin University in Orangeburg with the intention of becoming an English teacher, Holloway discovered her true calling singing at night with a jazz band. She followed her new dream to entertain and achieved a great deal of success onstage, playing in Australia for Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip in a Royal Command Performance and appearing in an off-Broadway production of “Mama I Want To Sing II.” Even so, success in the recording studio eluded her. “I’d gone through three recording situations with some major entities, and they all fell apart,” Holloway says. “The funding fell away, or something happened internally on their end. So I said to myself, ‘Just once, before I die, I want to see my face on the cover of a CD, even if I have to produce it myself.’ And that is what I did.” The result is an all-ballad tour de force, recasting standards from “Ol’ Man River” to “I Can’t Make You Love Me” in hushed, intimate arrangements that bring Holloway’s voice and the lyrics to the forefront. Holloway says the inspiration to make such a stripped-down recording came from playing shows that were far from minimal. “I was living in Las Vegas at the time, doing six nights a week, two shows per evening,” she says. “I had a four- or five- or six-piece band, or an orchestra, and I did songs pretty big, because I had a lot of people onstage. But some of the songs, I wanted to contain them and make them quiet.” Holloway says she learned a lot from making the album, about the songs and herself. “There is just a power in being quiet,” she says. “I learned control. I learned to whisper. But I also learned a lot about Loretta; I learned that there is a lot of strength in Loretta.” For more information, visit www.lorettaholloway.com or www.handlebar-online.com. Contact Vincent Harris at vharris@communityjournals.com.

Upstate Film Society presents the Premiere of

“AMOUR”

Golden Globe winner for Best Foreign Film Academy Award Nominee for Best Film

Friday, February 15th at 7:25 PM SHARP Regal Cherrydale Cinemas

UPSTATE

FILM

SOCIETY

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Free tickets available in the lobby at 7pm on first come, first served basis. FEBRUARY 8, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 29

JOURNAL CULTURE

Converse’s ‘Love-In’ takes on bullying School’s Diversity Initiative sponsors screening of ‘The Bully Project’ By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Thirteen million kids will be bullied this year. Bullying is the most common form of violence experienced by young people, according to StopBullying.org – and thanks to social networking and text messaging, bullying is no longer restricted to playgrounds, school hallways and bus strops. Bullying will be the subject of Converse College’s third annual “LoveIn.” The community event will feature a screening of the film “The Bully Project,” a documentary that follows

three victims of bullying through the 2009-10 school year and talks to two sets of parents whose children were bullied and committed suicide. A discussion will follow the film screening, led by Dr. Sheryl Moss of Converse’s School of Education and Graduate Studies and Desmond Cato, coordinator of student services for Spartanburg School District 7 and a school resource officer from Greenville County. The free event will be held in the Barnet Room of the Converse College Montgomery Student Center at 6:30 p.m. on Feb. 12, the DVD release date for the film. Bullying is a problem that affects everyone, whether they’ve actually been bullied or not, said Caitlin McAlhany, a member of the Converse Diversity

Canine convention Pedigree dogs gather at TD Center for three days of competition By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

A furry four-legged crowd, from spaniels and retrievers to mastiffs and Pomeranians, will fill the TD Center on Feb. 15-17 for one of the largest dog shows in the region: the

Carolina Foothills Dog Show Cluster. For three days, the center will serve as the stage for dramatic competition and a showcase for gorgeous breeds vying for award ribbons and the prestigious Best in Show. Members of the Greenville, Spartanburg and Hendersonville Kennel Clubs bring their show dogs out for the event twice a year, in February and July, said Trevor Butler, breeder and member of the Greenville Kennel Club. This year, about 2,000 dogs are expected to participate each day throughout the weekend.

Coalition and president of the school’s Interfaith Council. “The more people who are aware of how often this happens, the sooner we can do something about it,” she said. “At Converse, we have a passion for taking a stand against social injustice.” For Alex, a 12-year-old featured in the documentary, the slurs, curses and threats begin before he even boards the school bus. Alex is just starting middle school and he wants to fit in, but kids tease him relentlessly, calling him “fish face” and ramming his face into the seats on the school bus. After Kelby, 16, came out as a lesbian, she and her family were treated as pariahs in their small town. The all-star athlete was forced to leave her sports teams because of attacks. The event happens just after what has been called the “dog show world’s version of the Super Bowl and Academy Awards”: the celebrated Westminster Dog Show at Madison Square Garden in New York City. This timing means that some of the top dogs from Westminster will be stopping by on their way back home, said Butler. “This is the first show after the Garden, so the dogs you saw on TV, you can see in person,” Butler said. A member of the Greenville club, Robert Vandiver, is also judging the working group at the Westminster show, he added. Butler, a Simpsonville resident who

And Ja’Meya responded to being picked on during her hour-long bus rides by taking a loaded gun out of her mother’s closet to scare off her tormentors. “We hope the film will spark the flame needed to not only create open communication between students, parents and teachers, but also make a difference in the schools that we send our children to every day,” said McAlhany, a junior who is majoring in elementary education. McAlhany said some children and teens who witness the bullying of others are afraid to do anything because they fear they’ll be treated the same way. “We want people to realize that they have the ability to change this,” said McAlhany, a graduate of Greenville County’s Blue Ridge High. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: Carolina Foothills Dog Show Cluster WHEN: Feb. 15-17 WHO: Greenville on Friday, Spartanburg on Saturday, and Hendersonville on Sunday WHERE: TD Convention Center COST: Free INFORMATION: www.greenvillekc.org, www. spartanburgkc.org or www.hkc-nc.org

has been a part of the breeding and showing world for 45 years in four different countries, said the free event is

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The Hub City Writers Project will offer a spring workshop series for writers of all levels on Saturday mornings in The Showroom: March 2, April 20 and May 11. Each workshop runs 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and is $30-$35. The series features editor and journalist Lyn Riddle; Rebecca McClanahan, author of ten books in multiple genres; and Susan Tekulve, winner of the 2012 South Carolina First Novel Prize for “In the Garden of Stone.” For more information, visit www.hubcity.org or call 864-577-9349. John Shain, acoustic guitarist, will perform blues and folk music at Music Sandwiched In on Feb. 13, 12:15-1 p.m. at Spartanburg’s main library downtown. This is a free lunchtime concert presented by The Music Foundation of Spartanburg. Bring your lunch or buy one there. For more information, call 542-ARTS. The Thompson Gallery in the Roe Art Building at Furman University will host Jeff Jensen’s work Feb. 14-Mar. 15. The Roe Art Gallery is open to the public 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, contact Furman’s Art Department at 864-294-2074. Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra will celebrate Valentine’s Day on Feb. 14 at 7 p.m. with a Valentine Pops Concert featuring selections from Duke Ellington, Allan Gilliland, George Gershwin, and other popular jazz and Broadway favorites. Guest artist Jens Lindemann is hailed as one of the most celebrated trumpet soloists in his instrument’s history and has played in every major concert venue in the world. Tickets cost $10-$35 and can be purchased by calling 864-596-9725. In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the celebrated children’s book, The Spartanburg Youth Theatre will present “Harold and the Purple Crayon” on the David W. Reid Theatre stage at the Chapman Cultural Center on Feb. 8 at 4:30 and 7 p.m. and Feb. 9 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $9-$12 and can be purchased at 864-542-2787 or at www.chapmanculturalcenter.org.

Spartanburg Youth Theatre auditions for “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs of the Black Forest” will be held Feb. 11-12, 5:30 to 7:15 p.m., and are open to third- through 12th-graders. To audition, bring a headshot of yourself and be prepared with a one-minute monologue. All auditions are held at the Chapman Cultural Center Youth Theatre Classroom in the David W. Reid Theatre. For more information, call 542-ARTS.

Ulla Schaefer’s Botany Bay Storm

The Artists Guild Gallery of Greenville recently announced February guest artist photographer Ulla Schaefer’s show entitled “Trees - Coast and Rock.” The exhibition is a selection of photographs that puts an emphasis on trees, standing solitary, in alleys, or on the coast exposed to the sea. Like the images of landscapes, seascapes and rocks, the motifs were found in the Northwest and Southeast of the United States as well as in the Northeast of Germany. Kim Granner’s “Glow Tales” will be performed on weekends Feb. 16-24 at the SC Children’s Theatre. Three short tales told through black-light puppetry and pre-recorded voices, sound effects and narration create a magical theatre experience for younger audience members. For tickets or more information, visit www.scchildrenstheatre.org. The Furman Symphony Orchestra will present the Concerto Concert in its Sound Quality Concert Series on Feb. 15 at 8 p.m. at McAlister Auditorium at Furman University. Thomas Joiner is the conductor with Peter Dimery on saxophone; Alex Jenks on trombone; Alexander Rice on cello; Scott Strickland on marimba; and Deborah York on piano. Admission is $12 for adults, $10 for seniors, and $5 for students.

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Hub City Bookshop, 186 W. Main St. in Spartanburg, will host the Bearded Men Poetry Reading on Feb. 8 at 6 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. The featured poets are Eric Kocher, John Lane and Patrick Whitfill. For more information, contact Kari Jackson at 864-577-9349 or kari@ hubcity.org, or visit www.hubcity.org.

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Send us your arts announcement. Email: arts@communityjournals.com a chance for residents to witness the judging, along with agility trials and vendors for canine products. Jim Rathbun, Spartanburg show chairman and vice president of the Spartanburg Kennel Club, said the size of the show also offers fantastic diversity for everyone interested in dogs. The rally class events featuring obstacle courses are excellent to watch, he said, not to

mention the breed standard judging: “somewhat of a beauty contest.” “There’s something there of interest for everyone to see. It’s a family sport, it’s meant for all,” added Rathbun, who has been a professional dog handler since the 1960s. “It’s a human interest sport.” Young dog owners get into the action, too, with ages 10-18 showing off their canines in a dog-handling skills competi-

tion. In addition, visitors may learn about various breeds from members of the club and the competitors, said Butler. 12 Sevier Street The more than 100 breeds aren’t the -just off Augusta only diverse group at the show, Rathbun Sevier Street 1212Sevier Street said. “You will see people of every size,864.282.8600 -justoff offAugusta Augusta -just shape and description at a dog show.” embassy-flowers.com Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

864.282.8600 864.282.8600 embassy-flowers.com embassy-flowers.com FEBRUARY 8, 2013 | The Journal 31

journal culture

Arts Calendar

Feb. 8 – 14, 2013

Fountain Inn Arts Center James Gregory Feb. 8 ~ 409-1050

Greenville Little Theatre Emile Pandolfi in Concert Feb. 14 ~ 233-6238

Carolina Ballet Theatre at Fountain Inn Arts Center Made in the Carolinas Feb. 9 ~ 409-1050

Metropolitan Arts Council Gallery Counterpoints: Form & Space Through Feb. 15 ~ 467-3132

Greenville Chautauqua Society Benedict Arnold Feb. 9-10 ~ 244-1499 Greenville Symphony Orchestra Romantic Nights Feb. 9-10 ~ 467-3000 SC Children’s Theatre Charlotte’s Web Through Feb. 10 ~ 467-3000 Peace Center Billy Elliott Feb. 12-17 ~ 467-3000

Furman University Theatre Doubt Through Feb. 16 ~ 294-2125 The Warehouse Theatre Eurydice Through Feb. 16 ~ 235-6948 Centre Stage Rock ‘n Roll Forever: The ’80s Edition Through Feb. 23 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art Here’s Your Freedom Through Feb. 24 ~ 271-7570 The Art of Helen Moseley Through Apr. 14 ~ 271-7570 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Works by Lynn Greer & Liz Rundorff Smith Through Mar. 1 ~ 242-1050 Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Georgia Harrison Through Mar. 4 ~ 233-6733

Don’t let cataracts slow you down! The surgeons of Palmetto Eye & Laser Center are excited to introduce the state-of-art, FDA approved, LenSx® laser to Spartanburg for precise, customized, and BLADELESS cataract surgery! If you are ready to put your cataracts behind you, now is the time to see one of our highly skilled surgeons to discuss BLADELESS LASER OPTIMIZED CATARACT SURGERY! Robert J. Haas, M.D. Michael W. Holmes, M.D. Billy J. Haguewood, Jr., M.D. David W. Nicholson, M.D. Brice B. Dille, M.D. K. Leanne Wickliffe, M.D. 479 Heywood Avenue, Spartanburg www.palmettoeyeandlaser.com 864.583.6381

32 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 8, 2013

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5 BRIERFIELD WAY - $259,900 3BR/2.5BA. Energy Style qualified superior quality home. Hdwds, 9 ft clgs, deep crown mldgs, scrnd prch.385 S to Exit 23, Hwy 418. Go approx 1/2 mile- turn L. R at light on S. Main, Go 1/2 mile - turn L into SD Kate Anderson/Kristin Brady, 363-3634 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1250930

CHARTWELL ESTATES SUN 2-4PM (2/10)

AUGUSTA ROAD AREA SUN 2-4PM (2/10)

39 DOUGLAS DR - $235,000 3BR/2BA. Cute bungalow home with huge fenced backyard. Updated with many extras for this size home. Assigned to Blythe. Updated kitchen, lights, paint. Augusta Road to Douglas, Home on left. Phyllis MacDonald, 313-3753 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1246298

MAPLEWOOD

SUN 2-4PM (2/10)

806 CHARTWELL DR - $126,500 423 MAPLEWOOD CIRCLE - $124,900 3BR/2BA. Master on main, formal DR, private 3BR/2BA. Great location, Don’t miss out. backyard, loft area, great location. Pelham Immaculate ranch. Wide open split floor plan. Rd, Left on Parkway, Right on Batesville, I-85 North to Exit 58 Brockman-McClimon Left on Gibb Shoals, Right on Chartwell. See Rd, L on Highway 101. R on Maplewood signs. Lana Smith, 608-8313 Prudential C. Cir. First L on Maplewood Cir. Home on R. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1249451 Bob Schmidt, 313-4474 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1251976

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

R EA L E STAT E DIGEST Coldwell Banker Caine Names Upstate’s Top Producers from December January 16, 2013 – Coldwell Banker Caine recently recognized its top producing agents in property sales and listings from each of its five offices – Easley, Greenville, Greer, Seneca and Spartanburg – for the month of December. The top producing agents from each office are ranked by the total volume of business closed last month and include: · Easley: Susan McCoy, Heather Parlier, Melissa Hall · Greenville: Sharon Wilson, Jacob Mann, Berry Gower · Greer: Charlene Panek, Faith Ross, Alicia Waynick, · Seneca: Pat Loftis, Jere duBois · Spartanburg: Annette Starnes, Lori Thompson, Donna Morrow Top listing agents in each office are recognized for listing the highest total volume of residential properties last month and include:

ate Est C A 10

NG

LLO EBE T N MO

116 Ridge Glen

$895,000 • 4 BR/3.5 BA • 1252670 5 car gar. w/2 BR, 1.5 BA apt, 2 sty barn & pool Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Chuck Miller 864.293.4778 e s u Ho tom s u C The

820 S Main Street Unit 204

$599,000 • 2 BR/ 2.5 BA • 1253397 Downtown, Historic West End, ≈ 2000 sq ft, pvt elevator, 2 car garage Joey Beeson 864.660.9689 T. NS CO W NE

300 Waccamaw Ave.

$569,000 • 4 BR/ 3.5 BA • 1250575 August Rd. Custom, MBR on main, scn porch, walking distance to Augusta Circle. Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

USE PM HO , 2-4 N 0 E OP , 2/1 Sun

W NE 115 Siena Drive

· Greer: Faith Ross, Alicia Waynick, Linda Wood · Seneca: Brett Smagala, Pat Loftis, Jere duBois

203 Trinity Way

$309,000 • 4 BR/4.5 BA • 1247968 ≈ 3400 sq ft, add’l living suite, granite c’tops, hardwoods Kathy Slayter 864.982.7772 ake eL l i fM Hal

· Spartanburg: Holly West, Steve Hammett, Eva Sandfort

801 Half Mile Way

BEFORE YOU BUY OR SELL, DO YOUR

HOME WORK

$169,000 • 3 BR/2.5 BA • 1252081 Upgrades, lrg corner lot, mature landscaping/irr. sys Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin 864.230.5176 G TIN LIS W NE

1903 Spring Wood Ct.

$67,500 • 2 BR/1.5 BA • 1253360 Lrg downstair living area, fenced patio, minutes to 385/85 James Akers 864.325-8413

447 Longview Terrace $297,000 • MLS 1253407

108 Augusta Court

1140 Parkins Mill Road $925,000 • MLS 1251004

$574,500 • 4 BR/3.5 BA • 1252698 Great street, 4 yr old custom built home, hdwds on 3 levels, 2 car detached garage Anne Marchant 420.0009 | Jolene Wimberly 414.1688 G TIN LIS W NE

1724 Parkins Mill Road $639,900 • MLS 1251080 G IN T S LI W E

100 Kettle Oak Way

$390,000 • 4 BR, Bonus/3.5 BA • 1253406 Simpsonville Custom Home, hdwds, granite, ss appliances,scrn porch, whole house stereo Tom Marchant 864.449.1658 E IC PR W E N

N

28 Quail Hill Drive $1,045,000 • MLS 1253667

11 Beaver Run Drive

$212,000 • 4 BR/ 3 BA • 1248432 TR, lower lvl can be separate apt, wkshop or studio Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Chuck Miller 864.293.4778 E OM Y NH UNIT W TO MM CO

119 Carolina Oaks $285,000 • MLS 1249827

97 Jamestown Way #77

$87,900 • 3 BR/2.5 BA • 1244961 Great investment, Eastside, scn porch, Updates: HVAC, Refrigerator & micro Anne Marchant 420.0009 | Jolene Wimberly 414.1688 FANNIE MAE OWNED PROPERTY 51 Park Vista Way

$245,900

1253415

407 Fairview Drive

$244,900

1253293

206 Wilton Street

$178,500

1253402

5733 Locust Hill Road $109,900

1252003

10 Cottingham Circle

1253183

$56,500

Helen Hagood

Selling Greenville for 28 Years!

www.Homepath.com Kathy Slayter • 864.982.7772

Mobile: 864-419-2889 hhagood@cbcaine.com M23A

www.marchantco.com 864.467.0085

See these homes and more at cbcaine.com/agents/HelenHagood

M13A

Agent on duty: Anne Marchant 864.420.0009

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

L

$749,000 • 4 BR/4.5 BA • 1240775 1 story w/lower level walkout, ≈ 5000 sf, lake front Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin 864.230.5176 D R TA US G AU

· Easley: Heather Parlier, Debbie Clark · Greenville: Helen Hagood, Sharon Wilson, Nick Carlson

I IST

FEBRUARY 8, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 35

www.cdanjoyner.com

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at

Agents on call this weekend

PAT SCHERZ 901-3865 PELHAM RD.

KIMBERLY ARNOLD 616-7310 SIMPSONVILLE

WANDA REED 270-4078 WOODRUFF RD.

JADA BARNETTE 879-4239 GREER

R E A L

PAUL CAROL HOUSTON GALLUCCI 346-7289 607-3833 EASLEY/ PLEASANTBURG POWDERSVILLE

E S T A T E PEOPLE,

AWARDS,

STACEY BRADSHAW 230-1314 AUGUSTA RD.

cdanjoyner.com.

D I G E S T HONORS

The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents for Excellent Perfor mance in December 2012 January 14, 2013 – The Marchant Company is known as the Upstate’s local “Signature Agency” in Real Estate, representing buyers and sellers of residential, land, and commercial Marchant 36 T H E J O U R N A L | FEBRUARY 8, 2013

properties. Seabrook B ro k e r- i n - C h a rg e , recently recognized several agents for their outstanding performance during the month of November.

Marchant,

Tom Marchant was Slayter

recognized as Volume Listing Agent of the month.

Volume and Unit Agent of the month. Nancy McCrory & Karen Turpin were recognized as Sales Team of the month.

Kathy Slayter was recognized as Unit Listing Agent of the month. Kathy Slayter was recognized as Sales

McCrory

Turpin SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

R EA L E STAT E D I G E ST PEOPLE,

AWARDS,

HONORS

N E I G H B O R H O O D

P R O F I L E

CREEKWOOD

Hocker Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®

Hocker

January 17, 2013 – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Jennifer Hocker has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Pelham

Road office. An Upstate native, Hocker graduated from Dorman High School in Spartanburg and earned her degree at University of South Carolina with a double major in Marketing and Real Estate. Her minor studies were in Hotel/ Restaurant/ Tourism Management. Following college, Hocker gained seven

years experience working locally in new homes sales. “We are excited to have Jennifer join our family of Realtors,” said Tim Toates, Broker-in-Charge. “We look forward to working with her.” Hocker currently lives in Greer and enjoys tennis, college football, Kentucky basketball, traveling, and spending time with family and friends. She is an active volunteer in the community and a member of the Junior League of Greenville. A member of the Spartanburg Association of Realtors, she has served as Service Committee Chairman for 2012 and Education Committee member in 2012.

The Marchant Company Announces Agency Leaders for 2012

Top Sales agents for 2012: Kathy Slayter - Volume Sales Award & Unit Sales Award Valerie Miller - Highest Average Sales Price Award Seay

Slayter

Marchant

easy. The whole family will enjoy the playground, swimming pool, walking trails and basketball court. Creekwood offers a great variety of floor plans from seven of McCar’s Home Collections, so everyone will find a plan to meet their needs.

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO 12 Month Average Home Price: $233,876

Slayter

Miller

Top Sales Team in 2012: Karen Turpin and Nancy McCrory.

McCrory

Turpin

Rapp

Amenities: Basketball Court, Playground, Swimming Pool, Walking Trails Rudolph Gordon Elementary Riverside Middle School Mauldin High School

Turpin

McCrory

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

Riggs

McDowell

Wagoner

HISTORIC HOME SALES $2

50

0 $2 $1 $1

,00

0,0

50 00

0

00

,00

0

,00

0 0 20

07

20

08

20

09

20

10

$222,336

Miller

Creekwood, Simpsonville, SC Enjoy the quiet of the countryside with the convenience of the city: restaurants, shopping, entertainment, schools and more. With an array of resort style amenities, spacious home sites and a great location, finding your perfect home at Creekwood will be

$220,615

Slayter

1) Gordon D. Seay – 20 years; 2) Kathy Slayter – 20 years; 3) Brian Marchant – 17 years; 4) Nancy McCrory – 16 years; 5) Karen Turpin – 16 years; 6) Joan Rapp – 16 years; 7) Barb Riggs – 16 years; 8) Lisa McDowell – 16 years; and 9) Nellie Wagoner – 10 years

$223,246

Marchant

Also, the following agents and staff were recognized for their commitment and Miller years of services with the Marchant Company.

$233,844

Top listing agents for 2012: Tom Marchant- Volume Listings Award, Kathy Slayter- Unit Listings Award, Valerie Miller- Highest Avg Listing Price Award

Signature Agent of the year: Valerie Miller

$239,536

January 30, 2013 – The Marchant Company recently announced the leading agents for the 2012 sales year at their Annual Meeting in January.

20

11

Over 1,900 neighborhoods online at FEBRUARY 8, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 37

GREENVILLE TRANSACTIONS JANUARY SUBD.

PRICE

$1,825,000 NORTH PARK $545,000 $446,000 GRIFFITH FARM $440,000 PARK HILL $435,000 GOWER ESTATES $420,000 THE VALLEY AT TANNER ESTATES $415,595 MCRAE PARK $391,221 SYCAMORE RIDGE $383,000 STONEHAVEN $367,500 WETHERILL PARK $360,750 RICHLAND CREEK @ NORTH MAIN $342,500 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $340,000 BRAEMOR $339,900 GARDENS AT THORNBLADE $336,500 SUMMIT AT CHEROKEE VALLEY $320,000 PELHAM FALLS $307,000 PELHAM FALLS $285,000 PLANTATION GREENE $282,000 STONELEDGES $268,675 RIVERSIDE $265,000 SHENANDOAH FARMS $260,550 $258,000 NEELY FARM - DEER SPRINGS $250,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $243,000 POPLAR FOREST $240,000 $240,000 GLASTONBURY VILLAGE $235,000 SAVANNAH POINTE $230,228 LAKE FOREST $226,000 $225,500 WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE $218,338 HEARTHSTONE AT RIVER SHOALS $218,170 PEBBLECREEK $218,000 RAVENWOOD $215,981 HERITAGE CREEK $206,795 VICTORIA PARK $201,753 THE HEIGHTS $198,086 CAMELOT $198,000 AVALON ESTATES $194,000 AVALON ESTATES $192,500 NEELY FARM - DEER SPRINGS $190,000 DEVENGER PLACE $184,900 KELSEY GLEN $184,465 $180,960 $179,800 IVYBROOKE $176,500 PARKSIDE AT LISMORE $175,236 KNIGHTS BRIDGE $171,220 FORRESTER CHASE $168,000 INDIAN RIDGE $165,000 CLIFFS VALLEY-STONE CREEK $165,000 WINDSOR FOREST $162,500 ROCKY CHASE $161,000 CHARTWELL ESTATES $159,000 WINDSOR FOREST $159,000 HOLLY TREE PLANTATION $158,172 TWIN CREEKS $156,770 LANSDOWNE AT REMINGTON $156,470 TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD $155,150 NORTHCLIFF $154,900 EASTRIDGE $154,000 WINDSOR FOREST II $154,000 BRYSON CROSSING $153,000 PARKSIDE AT LISMORE $149,506 HUNTERS WOODS $149,500 MOUNTAINBROOKE $149,000 FAIRBROOKE $145,000 FAIRVIEW CHASE $140,840 BUTLER STATION $140,000 $140,000 LANSDOWNE AT REMINGTON $137,790 BURDETT ESTATES $136,000 BRYSON HOLLOW $136,000 $135,000 NEELY FARM - LAUREL BROOK $132,195 ROSEDALE $132,000 $130,000 SHEFFIELD FOREST $127,500 SHELBURNE FARMS $127,000 RIVERSIDE CHASE $125,000 ISAQUEENA PARK $124,900 WILDFLOWER MEADOWS $123,000 PROVIDENCE SQUARE $120,000 CARDINAL CREEK $120,000 LAKEWOOD $118,000 WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE $117,260

14-18,

2013

SEPTEMBER

SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

518 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT MORRIS HARRIS H MCGINNIS JODY M TOW JUNE G PSALM 127 LLC KARRER BERT R BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT CLARK JOANN B OLENDER JAMES D REDUS SC HOUSING LLC MANNING NATHAN E AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R GIANAKAS ALISON RUTH RABY K MICHAEL CVH-PB CONSTRUCTION LLC GUTTA RICHARD F HINZE KATHY ELLEN COUCH TIMOTHY (JTWROS) SK BUILDERS INC ROGERS GEORGE F BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BARKER JEFFREY H BUTTS JAMES C ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC TRIPLE B COMPANY INC BLACK BENJAMIN D WEIGAND GORDON H ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC COMBS KEVIN M FURMAN DOROTHEA C ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC NVR INC FIRST CAROLINA TRUST OF D R HORTON INC S C PILLON HOMES INC MUNGO HOMES INC NVR INC COVER EVA T SCOTT DANIEL E HARTLEY MICHAEL DOWNING CURTIS REID TUOHY PATRICIA A NVR INC SUNSET HILL LLC SPRINGFIELD PATRICIA W HARRIS SUSAN F EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL CLEAR FOCUS HOLDINGS LLC MUNGAI ETHAN M TOMLINSON BART J ALEXRULES LLC FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG BARTLETT KRISTEN CRUICE DANIEL J HICKS SARA M HUNTER PHILLIP M NVR INC D R HORTON INC BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG GLEASON MICHAEL J SR FAULKENBERRY JENNIFER S RELIANT SC LLC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL MOON PAMELA D STANDRIDGE MARSHA L SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND MUNGO HOMES INC BARNES JENNIFER PAIGE RJI PROPERTIES LLC D R HORTON INC BESHAY TONY F FIRST COLONIAL PROPERTIE GEDOSCH STEPHEN J MACEY JOSEPH F ODOM AILEEN KRAMER ROBERT W HORACE JONATHAN C MACK JOSEPH M PAINTER DEBBIE S DUNBAR INVESTMENTS LLC DAVIS ANNESSIA D SAH HOLDINGS LLC GRIFFIN JASON J GEORGE DOUGLAS C SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND

CENTURY 3 GLOBAL PROPERT HORTON DEBRA LYNN (JTWRO JENNINGS MARY M REVOC TR DUGGAN DANIEL S (JTWROS) JELKS-JOHNSON NINA ELIZA MANNING NATHAN E (JTWROS CHAPMAN JOAN BEUKEMA MITCHELL DAVID P KRICHBAUM EILEEN SABATER BELTRAN JOAQUIM OLESTI ( S C PILLON HOMES INC WITTE ASHLEY E (JTWROS) BUI CALVIN M (JTWROS) JUSTICE HEATHER C HUNT DALE E (JTWROS) BUFFINGTON DOUGLAS A KING TRACY B (SURV) HINZE KATHY E (AKA)KATHY GARNER CATHERINE BALLEW COZAD KRISTOPHER (JTWROS WALLS ANDY J (JTWROS) REYES PETER G GUTTA KATHY (JTWROS) TEACHEY JOELLE MCCULLOUGH CHARLES A (JT HARTLEY PINKNEY M (JTWRO WILSON WILLIAM NEIL PYJAS ERIC CHARLES (JTWR VIVEROS DIEGO BAYNE SUZANNE B BENNETT JOSEPH BRADLEY BURSING JERRYLEE A DAVIS HARVEY T CRUICE DANIEL (JTWROS) MOORE JENNIFER SUZANNE MOLINA ERNESTO CORRAL KESSLER CHRISTOPHER L MORRIS CYNTHIA C JAMES CAROL A (JTWROS) LOKESH VINEETHA (JTWROS) LOPEZ JONATHAN D SR (JTW PATTERSON ANDY L (JTWROS HANSON ALLAN H (JTWROS) BARKER JUDY A PLATING JENNA K (SURV) MCKINLEY ROBERT M (JTWRO FIORILLE TODD A DEWINTER BRENT L BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT DOERFLER MICHAEL J LEWIS GARY T (JTWROS) DE GREEF-SAFFT ANNE SCHULZ ANDREAS TRIF ADRIAN L (JTWROS) IYER KARTHIK (JTWROS) BOOTH JODY L (JTWROS) STC PROPERTIES INC LI PENG SHOU (JTWROS) DEAVER CHARLES STEPHEN GACHAGO NJERI M (JTWROS) JOHNSON CLINTON D RUSSELL SUSAN WASKOVICH JASON P (JTWRO HENDRICKS BENJAMIN A BROWN DAPHNE J APONTE WILSON R PYLE CALEB N (JTWROS) COX DANIEL (JTWROS) BLACKWELL ANDREA K HOWARD WENDOLLYN MARIE CALLAWAY GRAHAM T LATIMORE JASON CLARK AARON S MINYARD MARIO G DAVIS WYATT AIKEN SECRETARY OF VETERANS AF MARTIN DONALD J (JTWROS) PENLAND CODY A (JTWROS) LYNN MARY JACK SEARLE PROPERTIES LLC REMENTERIA DANIELLE (JTW REEVES EDWARD E HAMLIN HANNAH B BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND BALAN CHRISTOPHER J HAIGLER BRIAN

1 CENTURY PL 1103 N MAIN ST 210 W PRENTISS AVE 10 KINGSWAY CT 5639 STONEWAY TRL 206 BUCKINGHAM RD 364 ABBY CIR 25 MCRAE PL 38 SYCAMORE RIDGE DR 316 ENGLISH OAK RD 1371 DOGWOOD DR SW 35 RICHLAND CREEK DR 22 OSSABAW LOOP 205 YORKSWELL LN 110 LATOUR WAY 6 CLUB CART RD 309 RIVER WAY DR 421 RIVER WAY DR 15 FIRNSTONE CT 9 STONELEDGES LN 120 PIEDMONT RD 323 STRASBURG DR 161 ROLLING GREEN CIR 509 FARMING CREEK DR 228 ASHLER DR 105 LEDGE RUN CT 22 CURETON ST 1 BILBURY WAY 100 EAGLE CREEK DR 105 SHANNON DR 101 W PARK AVE 35 ARBOLADO WAY 14 SANTEE CT 307 PEBBLE CREEK DR 137 RAVEN FALLS LN 275 OAK BRANCH DR 2 GLENMORA RD 206 SHALE CT 512 LANCELOT DR 6 COLLINGSWORTH LN 523 COLLINGSWORTH LN 6 WEATHERLY CT 314 LONGSTREET DR 115 CHAPEL HILL LN 23 GIBSON OAKS DR 105 RAMBLEWOOD LN 323 IVYSTONE DR 613 MILLERVALE RD PO BOX 1039 105 SWEETLAND CT 252 SWEET WATER RD 7 FARNHAM WAY 203 MONCTON PL 8 BROOKFORD CT 411 CHARTWELL DR 103 BATHURST LN 5 HILANDER CT 18 YOUNG HARRIS DR 6 SHEFLEYS RD 46 BAY SPRINGS DR 2 WINDY BLUFF DR 21 GLENCOVE CT 327 STILLWATER CT 22 EVENTIDE DR 23 PARKWALK DR 902 WILLOW BRANCH DR 4805 APPLETREE CT 10 CANTERBROOKE CT 311 RIVERS EDGE CIR 110 SHEARBROOK DR 403 PINCKNEY ST 109 SHEFLEYS RD 144 OAK PARK DR 12 CHELSEABROOK CT 1 BRITON WAY 4100 INTERNATIONAL PKWY STE 10 203 ROSEMARY LN 217 ELAINE AVE 9 CONFEDERATE CIR 106 WOODWAY DR 1313 ST TROPEZ CIR APT 1514 33 KIRKWOOD LN 8 GENTIAN CT PO BOX 1039 4400 WILL ROGERS PKWY STE 300 220 BALCOME BLVD 4704 KIDDLE LN

38 T H E J O U R N A L | FEBRUARY 8, 2013

S PA RTA N B U RG T R A N SAC T I O N S SUBD.

1-7,

2012

PRICE

SELLER

BUYER

$310,000

COBB, GRANT S

ABLES, ADRIENNE Z

ADDRESS 540 POPLAR ST

PLANTERS WALK

$222,000

CANTRELL, JEREMY S

MCNALLY III, CONVERSE

107 SILVERDALE DR

CROOKED CREEK

$218,500

PARADISE HOME BUILDERS LLC

TABER II, BILLY J

3317 OLD FURNACE RD

$195,100

DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST KELLY, SHEILA

SWEETWATER HILLS

$156,000

ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC

SCHAD, WILLIAM

860 BAYSHORE LN

BRASHERS COMMONS

$153,900

SPAULDING QUALITY HOMES

LEONARD, DOUGLAS M

255 MOTLOW SCHOOL RD

BRADFORD CROSSING

$152,000

CREEK, MARY EVELYN

SKATES, KIMBERLY D

722 HERNDON TER

$150,000

FOWLER, PHYLLIS E

CARROLL, VAN

160 WYATT RD

COBBS CREEK

$141,830

NVR INC

HARRIS, CHERYL M

502 ELLERSLY CT

GREEN RIDGE

$140,000

MOHLER, LORRAINE M

PECK SR, CLIFFORD J

102 NETHER LN

BOWEN ACRES

$139,750

STEWART, JONATHAN DALE

DANIELS, WESLEY

210 FRALEY DR

HAWKCREEK NORTH

$135,000

MUNSON, SUSAN I

ROBINSON, TIMOTHY G

264 DELLWOOD DR

145 DEYOUNG RD

$134,900

BIJEAU, ARLENE R

LEONARD, LAWRENCE W

129 GREEN VALLEY DR

DOGWOOD FOREST

$134,900

LINDSEY, JEFFREY B

COVENEY, CHARLES

130 BENTWOOD DR

LYMAN FARMS

$129,900

DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC

WENGER, DAVID A

814 EFREN PT

PEACHTREE ESTATES

$129,612

DAVIS, JASON I

US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 150 SHADY VALLEY DR

SEAY RIDGE FARMS

$120,000

MARTIN, MILLARD DWAYNE

SANDHU, AMANDEEP

HAMPTON RIDGE

$118,750

WORTMAN, CYNTHIA A

CRIPE, ALEX

283 MYSTIC CT

CRESTVIEW HILLS

$116,900

FLEMING, WILLIAM H

BISHOP, JONATHAN T

106 APOLLO AVE

ROGERS MILL

$116,000

THE RYLAND GROUP INC

MUNGO HOMES INC

LOT NUMBER: 73

STONE STATION

$115,000

MURDOCH JR, ROBERT W

WEST, JENIA

3814 STONE STATION RD

STONE STATION

$115,000

MURDOCH JR, ROBERT W

WEST, JENIA

3814 STONE STATION RD

PHIPPS POINT

$114,000

DALE, JONATHAN

CHRISTIANO, JOSEPH R

35 BARNETT RD

WESTON TOWNES

$109,900

SILL, M TODD

GREER, JENNIFER

245 WESTON VALLEY DR

RIDGEWOOD HEIGHTS

$105,000

ROBINSON, LAURA BOYD

HOSCH, TIMOTHY J

111 OVERHILL DR

HUNTWOOD

$102,400

SILVERS JR, DAVID W

KING, KAREN E

125 HUNTLEY DR

TRINITY GATES

$100,332

LEWIS, AMANDA M

VERICREST OPPORTUNITY LOAN TRUST 298 PROMISED LAND DR

WESTON TOWNES

$95,900

RODGER C JARRELL REAL ESTATE STEINLY, JEWEL

240 WESTON VALLEY DR

SPRINGFIELD

$95,900

WATTS, MATTHEW K

LAWSON, JOSHUA W

314 SHADY DR

WINDRIDGE

$95,699

THE BANK OF NEW YORK

ALLEN, BOYCE GARY

227 BETHANY CT

CEDAR ACRES

$90,000

MAY, JAMES A

NEUSE JR, RAYMOND E

305 FRANCIS MARION DR

CEDAR ACRES

$90,000

MAY, JAMES A

NEUSE JR, RAYMOND E

305 FRANCIS MARION DR

PACIFIC MILLS

$85,000

BONNER, STEVEN

SITMAN, THOMAS WAYNE

9 SPUR ST

$84,000

WILLIS, BOBBY J

WILLIS, ADAM D

299 MCABEE RD

MAXWELL HEIGHTS

$83,375

WOODWARD, K E

BOITER, BRUCE

474 STEWART ST

SHALLOW CREEK

$82,000

EARLIN, LAWRENCE M

STALVEY, SHAWNA D

228 RED RAVEN DR

MIDLAND ESTATES

$80,000

QUINTON, AMYM

US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 210 KENNETH DR

WOODBURN RIDGE

$75,000

SCBT

ZIMMERLI, MARK J

10 CATESWOOD DR

WOODBURN RIDGE

$75,000

SCBT

WOFFORD, KATY Z

10 CATESWOOD DR

RIDGECREST

$71,250

SDI FUNDING LLC

HERAM K LLC

781 JOHN B WHITE SR BLVD

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS

$70,400

RMJ ENTERPRISES LP

WILDS, BRANDON J

248 SKYLINE DR

LANIER HEIGHTS

$70,000

HALL JR, WILLIAM T

PONDER, SUZANNE K

145 EDISON CIR

MAYFAIR ESTATES

$69,900

LEE, FRANCES B

EDWARDS, PATRICK

1068 MAYFAIR ST

CONVERSE COLLEGE

$69,900

RODGER C JARELL & REAL ESTATE BATTERTON, ANN

$69,900

RODGER C JARRELL REAL ESTATE SILLS, LARRY

277 IRBY RD

$67,500

WILLIS, JIM

LAWSON, TABITHA LYNN

610 THOMPSON CHAPEL RD

135 SUMMER LADY LN

542 DRAYTON AVE

$67,500

WILLIS, JIM

LAWSON, TABITHA LYNN

610 THOMPSON CHAPEL RD

CINNAMON RIDGE

$66,500

LEVERETTE, GERMAINE GERARDINA

BASSETT, HAROLD W

194 JARVIS RD

MAYFAIR ESTATES

$61,130

GRIFFIN, ALTA H

HALEY, DEBORAH L

1068 MAYVIEW ST

BROOKSIDE VILLAGE

$57,000

PRERMIUM HOMES LLC

YOUNG, QUINNEL T

16 ANDERSON CT

BROOKSIDE VILLAGE

$57,000

PRERMIUM HOMES LLC

YOUNG, QUINNEL T

16 ANDERSON CT

STONECREEK

$45,425

PROFESSIONAL REAL ESTATE

SOLID GROWTH LLC

145 WILLOWOOD DR

$40,000

WILLIAMS, MATTHEW D

HENSLEY, RODNEY

160 BREWSTER ST

$32,500

GREENE, JOEL C

ANTLEY II, ROBERT LEWIS

207 TIMBERLANE RD

$28,000

BALLEW SR, CHARLES G

HUYCK, KENNETH W

SELLARS DR

BROOKSIDE VILLAGE

$25,750

HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOP

STEEL, ALICE CARTER

20 BROOKTOWN CT

FORTENBERRY

$25,001

GOODWIN, DENNIS

TEP, KERRY

210 FORTENBERRY RD

KINGSWOOD

$23,750

SDI FUNDING LLC

HERAM K LLC

115 HARMONY DR

THE WOODLANDS AT THE 3 PINES $23,500

JONES, G P

KOTACKA, JERRY

801 THREE WOOD LN

FERNBROOK

$23,000

HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOPMENT BLALOCK, BENNIE M

124 FERNRIDGE

$22,000

WOODFIN, PAUL J

RIDGEVILLE CHURCH RD

THE COURTYARDS AT MADISON

$20,000

Y & Y DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

SK BUILDERS INC

420 MADISON CREEK CT

RIVER ROAD HEIGHTS

$20,000

LANGSTON PROPERTIES LLC

CANNON, KENNETH S

1728 RIVER RD

CLARADON HILLS

$15,000

HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOPMENT MARTINEZ, JESSE

7409 GRAVELY CT

RIVER VIEW ESTATES

$14,000

CLOSE, TASSILO A

LANIER JR, CURTIS

RANDOLPH CT

STRATTON PLACE

$14,000

GARY, SYLVESTER

WILSON, JEFFREY W

153 HEARTHSTONE LN

$13,000

GOOD, WILLIAM D

HOGAN, SUE ANN

150 WALNUT ST

ALBERTA HILL

$11,900

SKINNER ESTATE LLC

CMH HOMES INC

784 BUMBLEBEE LN

BONDALE

$5,500

FIRST CITIZENS BANK & TRUST

SANTIAGO, NESTOR L

BONDALE DR

BONDALE

$5,500

FIRST CITIZENS BANK & TRUST

SANTIAGO, NESTOR L

BONDALE DR

MEADOWBROOK

$5,000

HARLEY, G R

PEARSON, ALEXIS D

HARLEY, G R

OAKLEAF VILLAGE

$4,500

IKON CONSTRUCTION INC

TOWER TIMBER INDUSTRIES LLC LOT NUMBER: 3&4

SUNNYDALE ACRES

$4,000

THE PALMETTO BANK

BALLEW, KYLE E

309 SUNNYDALE DR

ABNEY MILLS

$1,500

CROOKES, GARETH A

MATTISON, BOBBIE

339 BUNCOMBE ST

PALMETTO FARMS

$700

VILLEGAS, RAFAEL

RLH GROUP LLC

PALMETTO FARMS RD

BROOKSIDE VILLAGE

$500

WIESS, CAROL

TURNAGE, IVAN

206 PENROSE LN

RIDGEVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

journal culture

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

Crossword puzzle: page 42

Sudoku puzzle: page 42

Upstate UpstateFoodie .com Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

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To feature your own business or to suggest a business you would like to see in

Behind The CounTer,

SUMMONS AND NOTICE (JURY) IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE Case No: 2012-CP-23-6277 Bryan Leppard, Plaintiff, v. Antonia Avila and Emilio Perez, Defendant(s). TO: THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint and to serve a copy of your Answer upon the subscriber at 1007 East Washington Street, Greenville, South Carolina, within thirty (30) days after the service heron, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. By: Richard V. Davis 1007 East Washington Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601 (864)232-7363 Attorney for Plaintiff

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Azteca Mauldin, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 114 W. Butler Road, Mauldin, SC 29662. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than February 24, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.79 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145

tel 864.679.1205 fax 864.679.1305 email aharley@communityjournals.com

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Basilio’s Bar and Grill, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 6300 White Horse Road, Suite 106, Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than February 17, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Brewery 85, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON AND OFF premises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 6 Whitlee Court, Greenville, SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than February 17, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Presents Presents Presents

call today 864-679-1205.

COMING BEHIND

2013

THE COUNTER

Saturday, February 9 • 11am-6pm

Satuday, Feb 99 Satuday, Feb Satuday, Feb 9 11am-6pm 11am-6pm 11am-6pm

This event will feature: Sweetheart Adoption Specials • Sweets Bake Sale Pet Photos (12-4pm) • $5.00 Nail Trims (12-4pm) www. greenvillepets.org

328 Furman Hall Road, Greenville, SC 29609 • 864-467-3986 FEBRUARY 8, 2013 | THE Journal 39

JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Bob Hogan, left, and Mark Escude, center, of Toyota of Greer, and Robyn Zimmerman with the Greenville Hospital System present a check for $75,000 to the March of Dimes. The hospital system is a presenting sponsor for this year’s event and gave a gift of $50,000. Toyota of Greer is one of the sponsors this year and gave $25,000.

People attending the kickoff of the March of Dimes 2013 March for Babies fundraising campaign and 75th anniversary of the March of Dimes line up at the reception table at the Greenville Hilton.

A large crowd was on hand for the kickoff event.

JOSHUA BELL Sunday, Feb. 24 3:00pm One of the world’s most celebrated violinists performing pieces by Schubert, Strauss, Prokofiev and more. JoshuaBell.com

Members of the circle of champions are recognized and have their photograph made during the luncheon

WSPA-TV’s Christy Henderson welcomes everyone.

BOSTON POPS

with KEITH LOCKHART Tuesday, Feb. 26 7:30pm The world-renowned pops orchestra will be joined by singer Ann Hampton Callaway. BSO.org

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Tune Into These Classics 40 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 8, 2013

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Washington Center student Quindaris Spurgeon has fun learning about the color white.

Students in grades three through six at St. Anthony’s School participated in a poetry workshop with performance poet Vera Gomez. This workshop is part of a yearlong art and social studies infusion project and is underwritten with grants from the Metropolitan Arts Council, the NAESP and Crayola.

When we needed help, Always Best Care was there for us! Assisted Living • Free Personalized match to the best Assisted Living Community option in the area • Family needs, goals & budget considered • Tour scheduled • Personally driven from your home to the tour • Your personal advocate throughout the entire process!

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Caroline Starnes, the 2012 homecoming queen at Spartanburg Day School, crowns the 2013 homecoming queen, Ashley Oakes.

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journal culture Martha Franks Baptist Retirement Community Laurens, South Carolina

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often wish we had come sooner. It is a little piece of Heaven on Earth. We were impressed by the beautiful grounds that are well kept, the delicious meals and Tour Now andour Receive a FREE MUG activities. We love patio homeCOFFEE at Martha Franks and hope you will come for a tour soon. You just CALL LISA YARBER TODAY FOR A FREE BROCHURE! might want to stay! —Franklin & Janie Harkins

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42 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 8, 2013

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Across 1 Drift, as smoke 5 Macbeth’s hallucination 11 Pearly entrance? 16 Pedicure place 19 That girl, in Quebec 20 Plaza Hotel girl 21 Performer with a whip 23 Poker, e.g. 24 Jaw-dropping reaction to butterflies? 26 Bellyacher 28 Auth. unknown 29 Within reach 30 Birthday tiara, e.g. 32 Mike who married Liz Taylor 34 Gets out of shape? 36 Legal deg. 37 Backwash creators 39 Bi- halved 42 Uncommon 43 Salutation to an outof-shape friend? 47 Animals 49 Beat it 50 Like some beans 51 Tripoli’s country 52 Outrageous ice cream concoctions? 54 Mobile phone site?: Abbr. 55 Neuter, as a horse 56 __ Na Na 57 Research foundation, often

58 Barrel cleaner 60 Like pitfalls 63 George who plays Stokes on “CSI” 64 Dough hoarder 65 Masters of the felttipped pen? 67 Hunter’s trick 71 Israel’s Netanyahu, familiarly 73 It helps dough rise 74 Climbers’ spikes 75 Officer’s ornament 78 Future father’s sch.? 79 Flower bed wetter 81 Ex halved 82 Bulletproof linen fiber? 84 Scrub the mission 86 What’s needed for the job 87 Scrap for Rover 88 Going on, to Holmes 89 Cowering caterpillar? 91 Unspecified degrees 93 Boffo abbr. 94 Happiness 95 “The Good Wife” fig. 96 Some crash programs 98 1957 war movie title river 100 Hoi polloi 105 “I Have __”: 1963 speech 108 Costly

110 Aquamarine 112 Cuban tortilla king? 115 Macbeth’s burial isle 116 Nuclear family? 117 Faddish 118 Some state-spanning rds. 119 Postal motto word 120 Big name in vacuums 121 Accent 122 In __: actually Down 1 Prepares for shampooing 2 Throw for __ 3 Botany major’s hurdles? 4 Work for the small screen 5 Table 6 God of Islam 7 Big wheel in delis 8 “Beat it, ya varmint!” 9 This, to Juanita 10 Pre-splashdown stage 11 Pancreas, for one 12 End 13 Horned __ 14 Carmaker Ferrari 15 Power plant output 16 Harbor suspicion 17 Get behind, as enemy lines 18 Met acquisition

22 Insect preserver 25 Aussie hoppers 27 Lang. of Israel 31 Belch in “Twelfth Night” 33 __ citizenship 35 Common quality? 38 95-Across’s org.

Hard

40 Pokes 41 Structural opening? 43 __ Lama 44 Beat it 45 Like Abner — but not really 46 Season 1 judge on “The X Factor”

47 Betrothed 48 Folk tale rubber? 50 Affectionate 52 Thresher grain 53 Dawn 55 Animal named from a Greek word meaning “tribe of hairy women” 56 Shot contents 59 Prove otherwise 61 Pesters persistently 62 Big name in coffeemakers 65 Made to suit 66 Bankrupt energy giant 68 Turkeys no one knows about? 69 Late retirement time 70 River of Flanders 72 Bellyaches 74 Central part 75 WWII Treasury offering 76 Especially fond of 77 Where you might experience hard knocks? 80 Arrow’s path 83 Take a gander 84 Canterbury quaff 85 Cologne quaff 86 Raided the fridge 89 Parts of darts 90 Hard or soft ending 92 Doodle on the guitar 94 Advance 97 __-Croatian 99 Beat in the kitchen 101 Birdbrained 102 Comes across 103 Criticizes harshly 104 Depressions 106 Love, to Luis 107 “We Need a Little Christmas” musical 109 Partner of Rodgers 111 Mollify 112 Source of support 113 “Football Night in America” network 114 Part of KJV: Abbr. Crossword answers: page 39

Sudoku answers: page 39

journal culture

life is so daily with steve wong

Calendar reminder: Time for a little PDA It was more than a little embarrassing, it was downright uncomfortable: my wife, my teenage daughter and me having to share a train car with a young and horny Italian couple traveling north through the olive groves of Tuscany from Rome to Florence. It started nice enough with this naïve American family of tourists meeting a couple of 20-something Italians. All smiles and handshakes. We didn’t speak any Italian; they didn’t speak much English, so it was an unspoken decision early on in the train ride to keep to ourselves and our own interests in the tight and face-to-face quarters of the car. My wife and I were interested in the historic countryside. My daughter was interested in her iPhone. The young man was interested in the young woman’s thighs and breasts, and she was interested in being the center of his amorous intentions. Yes, it was all very

interesting. It was a long and hot ride through the heart of Italy that day. I saw some beautiful sites, not all of which were in the passing landscape, what with all the sitting/lying/jostling/wrestling/pinching and slapping within arm’s reach of the close quarters of a train berth. It was a good preview to our seeing Botticelli’s “The Birth of Venus” (naked on the half-shell) and  Michelangelo’s David (just plain naked). With my liberal views on just about everything, I have never been called a prude. I’m all about “live and let live,” “do your own thing” and “to each his own.” Public displays of affection (PDA) have never been a problem for me. Back in my day, I was not above a smooch or a pat in public. These days, however, just holding hands is more about the discomforts of trigger finger and arthritis than any

feelings of inverse invasion of privacy onlookers might have. In most cases, if I don’t want to witness an exchange of spit by strangers, I can just close my eyes and think of England. I do think the age of those engaged in PDA has a lot to do with the public’s tolerance or intolerance of not getting a room. When teenagers lip-lock in public, we chalk it up to the uncontrollable passions of youth. My head turned a bit differently recently when I left a cosmopolitan concert hall and found two well-dressed (well, mostly dressed) greyhairs entangled in the shadows of the parking lot. Yes, we did just hear Ravel’s  “Boléro”  paired with Stravinsky’s  “Rites of Spring,” but really? At what age should we know better? Preor post-menopause? With Valentine’s Day flashing on my PDA’s (personal digital assistant, or my iPad) calendar screen, I am reminded

that the annual day of romance needs my attention unless I want to sleep alone on the couch. I’m thinking red roses sent to her office (gets lots of public attention) … jewelry (the bigger and flashier, the better) … dinner (center table with lot of oysters, asparagus, wine, and chocolate) … and dirty dancing. There’s a time and a place for everything. When it comes to true love, the here and the now say it all. Who cares who’s watching (drooling, panting) on the sidelines? Steve Wong is a writer living in the peach orchards of northern Spartanburg County. His lopsided opinions and strange ideas are all his own, and this publication takes no responsibility for them. He can be reached at just4wong@gmail.com.

FEBRUARY 8, 2013 | THE Journal 43

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Feb. 8, 2013 Greenville Journal