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The Civil Scoop www.d.umn.edu/civileng

The Department of Civil Engineering The University of Minnesota Duluth V O L U M E

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US Steel Donation 4

Class Highlights

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and Research CE Student News

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In Print

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UMD Excels at ACI Convention

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: Faculty & Staff

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Eight UMD Civil Engineering students attended the 2011 American Concrete Institute (ACI) international conference. Organized into two teams, the sophomores and juniors competed against 40 national and international university teams in the student "fiber reinforced polymer beam" category and won second place in strength, third place in prediction, and an overall "Outstanding University" title based on the service and professional activities of the student chapter. A banner was presented to the students, and it will be displayed in the UMD civil engineering office. Team members included Matt Fournier, Dan Abramson, Chelsea Hanson, Allison Carlson, Justin Baker, Andrew Venaas, and Kyle Berg. The

From L-R: Advisor Eric Musselman, Students Matt Fournier, Kyle Berg, Justin Baker, Dan Abramson, Chelsea Hanson, Andrew Venaas and Allison Carlson

faculty advisors were Eric Musselman and Eshan Dave. ACI is the code writing body for the national Concrete Building Code

and has over 14,000 members worldwide. More on ACI on pg. 10

OUR MISSION The mission of the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Minnesota Duluth is to prepare graduates for professional practice and graduate study through a program firmly based in strong technical skills, fundamentals, hands-on learning, sustainability, and professionalism.

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Faculty and Staff A Message from the Department Head We are so excited to have just completed our third year of the Civil Engineering program at UMD. This was a challenging year with nearly everyone teaching new courses and lab sections that were full to the brim. It’s been a remarkable year in so many ways. We’ve completed our initially planned hires in all of the areas, so are now fully staffed (by the original plan of 30 students per year entering the program). The program continues to be a huge draw for students with 60-70 students entering the program each fall and admissions closing early because we get to those numbers so quickly. We are awaiting final approval from the Provost and Board of Regents at the Twin Cities campus for a proposed Master of Science program to start this fall. We have a large number of excellent students waiting to apply for this program. It seemed that every month this spring our students were winning scholarships and awards and showing that our program is a contender nationally. Our students attended several national conferences and represented UMD in the best way possible. I was exceedingly proud when the American Concrete Institute President came up to me at the conference to tell me that our students were the most professional group of students at the conference he’d seen. By the middle of the conference, everyone knew that UMD stood for the University of Minnesota Duluth. The students are already receiving interview requests for jobs after graduation and we still have a year to go for the first graduates. The program is already gaining recognition and stature beyond my biggest hopes and it’s due to all of our local support plus our great students, staff, and faculty. Thank you! We will be having our first Senior Design capstone course in the spring of 2011. I will be coordinating this course and would like to involve local companies to work with the student teams as their client. Please email me if you would like to participate (aschokke@d.umn.edu) because I would like to start putting some details in place late this summer. Have a great summer and we’ll be looking forward to our first graduating class in just one more year! Andrea

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Dr. David Saftner Dr. David Saftner will be joining the Civil Engineering faculty in the area of geotechnical engineering in August 2011. He obtained his Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York in 2000. Following graduation, David served in the US Army as an engineer officer in Missouri, Colorado, California, Kuwait, and Iraq. He received his PhD in Civil Engineering from the Uni-

versity of Michigan in the summer of 2011. David’s research has focused on a variety of issues, i n c lu di ng : t i me - de pe nd en t strength gain in sands, in-situ and laboratory geotechnical testing, spatial variability of soil properties, and wireless sensing applications in geotechnical engineering. He will teach CE 3426 Soil Mechanics and CE 4415 Geotechnical Design in the fall.

Dr. Katherine Acton Dr. Katherine Acton will begin a tenure-track position in the Civil Engineering Department in the fall of 2011. Dr. Acton has been teaching at UMD since the fall of 2010; her courses include Structural Analysis, Statics and Mechanics and Finite Element Methods. Prior to her 2010 appointment, she performed postdoctoral research at the University of the Pacific studying viscoelastic-

ity in polymers. As part of a project sponsored by the Information Storage Industry Consortium (INSIC) from 20092010, she worked to develop analytical and computational modeling techniques to simulate stress fields in wound rolls of magnetic tape. Her postdoctoral research followed upon her doctoral research in nonlinear behavior of composite materials; she graduated

2011 North Midwest Section Outstanding Educator Award For 2011, the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) North Midwest Section Outstanding Educator Award recipient is Eric Musselman, Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at University of

Minnesota Duluth. Eric will be attending and presenting a paper at the 2011 North Midwest Section Conference in October. At the conference, he will receive a plaque and a check for $500.

from Johns Hopkins University in 2009. Dr. Acton’s current research focus is on the development of constitutive models of materials with random micro-scale fluctuation. She is developing techniques for multi-scale material modeling, which optimize accuracy and computational efficiency.

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U. S. Steel Makes Generous Donation The United States Steel Foundation made a generous gift to UMD’s Civil Engineering Department. In honor of the donation, the beautiful corner classroom will now bear the name of the United States Steel Corporation. As students pass the USS plaque several times throughout their day, they have a daily reminder of the commitment U. S. Steel has made to the Civil Engineering program and their education. Andrea Schokker, Department Head, Civil Engineering, said, “We are putting out high quality students who will begin entering the workforce in the spring of 2012. Support shown by U. S. Steel contributes to the success of the program.”

U. S. Steel Classroom

L-R John Skube, Dr. Schokker, Dean Riehl, Susan Wiirre The cost for outfitting laboratories is expensive and donations help to offset some of those costs. The Swenson Civil Engineering Building was finished last spring, but the labs were still in their infancy. There is a misconception that labs are finished, even though there is still a tremendous need for additional equipment that will provide the students with the best educational experience possible. Generous donations, like the one received from U. S. Steel, have an enormous impact on the students’ education. “We are in the process of equipping the structures lab and hope to purchase the actuators and pump necessary to do the largescale structural testing that the lab is designed to accommodate. Future donations will be used to make this dream a reality,” said Schokker. The Civil Engineering Department held a room dedication ceremony and lunch on January 27, 2011. John Skube, Manager, Employee Relations, U. S. Steel, and Susan Wiirre, Coordinator, Human Resources, U. S. Steel,

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presented a check to James Riehl, Dean, Swenson College of Science and Engineering, and Schokker. Lendley (Lynn) Black, Chancellor; Vince Magnuson, Vice Chancellor; Stan Burns, Associate Dean, SCSE; and Tricia Bunten, Director of Development; attended the ceremony and lunch. Chancellor Black was pleased and said, “I am so proud of the success of the new Civil Engineering program.” Chancellor Black expressed that he is honored that the U. S. Steel Foundation chose to make this generous gift, which will benefit students and faculty. Their gift demonstrates their strong commitment to our engineering program. Each student that enters the U. S. Steel Classroom knows that this is a company that values the engineering program and students at UMD. Skube said, “United States Steel Corporation values the relationship we have with UMD and look forward to

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continuing our partnership, and in particular the Swenson College of Science and Engineering.� Skube said the caliber of engineers U. S. Steel has recruited from UMD is excellent and they fit very well within our organization. These engineering graduates have demonstrated effective problem solving skills, sound judgment, and dedication to quality standards and continuous improvement. They fit into the framework of cooperation and teamwork within their assigned area of responsibility and support the commitment to our primary core value - safety. “UMD has done an outstanding job preparing their engineering students for the workplace,� Skube said. Schokker said the commitment of our outstanding faculty and the dedication of our students have added to the success of our program. The number of enrolled students and development of the program moved much quicker than our original plan. There was a need for the program in our region and we recognized that we must ramp up our efforts to meet the demand. Susan Mack, Director of Development, SCSE, remarked at the ceremony, "We are extremely grateful to U. S. Steel. Gifts of this nature are vital to Swenson College of Science and Engineering and allow us to continue to drive excellence and provide for our students so they can compete in a global economy." Donations of this magnitude are instrumental in developing a program that is able to compete with other top ranked colleges. The students in the Civil Engineering laboratories have hands-on learning opportunities, not only in the course work, but also while working on research projects

L-R John Skube, Dr. Schokker, Chancellor Black, Susan Wiirre with faculty. They are being taught technical skills that will be used throughout their careers. The equipment the students have access to provides experiences that are significant to understanding real life situations and adds essential value to their education. A Master of Engineering program began this past fall. The department recently submitted a Master of Science program for Civil Engineering proposal in the anticipation that the program will be in place in the fall of 2011. A vast number of Civil Engineering students have expressed an interest in a graduate degree program.

Faculty have been working to secure research funding so top ranking students will have an opportunity to vie for fully funded research positions. Donations, like the one received from U. S. Steel, contribute to the education and research that are happening in our classrooms and laboratories. The faculty and students thank U. S. Steel for their commitment to the program and look forward to working with them in the future. Submitted by Jill Bergman

Dr. Schokker leads the group on a tour of the laboratories

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Class Highlights & Research Projects CE 3221 Fluid Mechanics Dr. Rebecca Teasley introduced students from CE 3221 Fluid Mechanics to concepts of open channel flow and basic surface and groundwater hydrology. The flume and hydrology table offer the students an excellent, hands-on tool for understanding these concepts, which are explored in-depth in CE 3225 Hydrology and Hydraulics.

Demonstration of flow around a submerged cylinder Discussion of overland flow and groundwater interaction demonstrated with manometers

CE Students Gain Hands-on Experience Below: Kyle Huerd and Jacob Lepisto in CE 3016 Surveying

Students from CE 3027 Infrastructure Materials work in the High Bay Lab

Jay Dailey and David Nadeau learning how to run a level loop in CE 3016 Surveying

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Left: TA Mike Kleven assists student Brock Rysdahl in lab

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Design of Concrete Structures Beam Demonstration

Beam without reinforcement as the initial load is applied Students watch as the beam with reinforcement approaches failure

back in to place the concrete in the forms. Many people from around the university came to watch the crane being used, allowing this event to highlight many of the exciting features of the Swenson Civil Engineering Building.

Failure in the beam without shear reinforcement

The students of Dr. Eric Musselman’s CE 4126 Design of Concrete Structures class had the opportunity to help construct and test a 10 inch wide, 18 inch deep, 20 foot long beam this spring. The students built the forms, bent the bars, tied the cage, and helped pour the concrete. In order to pour the beams, a concrete bucket was attached to the crane. The crane walked outside the building to pick up the concrete and

Two beams were cast: one that was designed according to code, and another that was designed to fail in a brittle manner. Before the beams were tested, the students were asked to determine the maximum design load that each beam could support according to the code, the load at which they thought the beam would fail, and the predicted deflection of the beam at a specified load level. On different days, the beams were tested using a single hydraulic cylinder that applied the load at the midspan of the beam.

The students observed each beam’s behavior at different load levels and were able to go and look for cracks in the beam. This demonstration provided the students with valuable hands-on experience in constructing a concrete beam. From this they gained an appreciation for the importance of minimum spacing of reinforcement and producing a design that is practical to build. It also allows the students to observe the behavior of a beam as it approaches failure. This provides a visual representation of many of the concepts discussed in class and provides an important reference for inspection of structural concrete.

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Green Roof Flow Monitoring System Students of CE 3225 Hydraulics and Hydrology, continued to work on the design for a flow monitoring device to measure runoff from the CE building roof. Due to the drastically different flow rates expected from the conventional (20+ L/sec) and green roofing materials (<0.2 L/sec), two

different designs are necessary. During the laboratory exercise, students from the “Hydrology” group made estimates of the runoff from each portion of the building roof based on roof dimensions, expected time of concentration, and historical precipitation data. Students

Figure 1 – Large Scuppers (conventional roof)

from the “Hydraulics” team designed weirs to accommodate water flow considering differences in scupper dimensions, resolution of measurements, and ease of installation and removal.

Figure 2 – Small Scupper (Green roof) Designed weirs for large scuppers (top) and small scuppers (bottom)

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Sediment Collection at UMD Stormwater Ponds Members of Dr. Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research group braved the elements in January to extract sediment cores from four frozen storm water ponds on UMDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campus. Sediment collected from the cores will provide preliminary data to support a pending project which would investigate the risk due to sediment-associated contaminants in storm water ponds in the Duluth area. L-R: Xianben Zhu, Abdiqadar Mohamud, Brian Beck, and Paul Kimpling

Assistant Professors Dr. Eshan Dave, and Dr. Eric Musselman, and Lab Coordinator Mark Roberts escorted 15 students on a tour of the US Steel Minntac mine in Mountain Iron, Minnesota. The students were able to observe and tour the mining pit, crushing, and processing facilities. They also met with key personnel on site and were able to get questions answered and discuss employment opportunities with US steel. Lunch was provided by US Steel after the tour. It was a great experience for the faculty and the students.

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Civil Engineering Student News ACI Student Competition Fellowship recipients Dan Abramson and Kyrstyn Haapala

Justin Baker and Kyle Berg hold the winning beam prior to testing

Award-winning beam during compression testing

End result from testing

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Twice a year the American Concrete Institute (ACI) holds an international conference for the concrete industry. Faculty, students, practitioners, suppliers, and many others attend the conference that includes workshops, committee meetings, sessions, and student competitions. UMD Civil Engineering Juniors participated in the student FRP concrete beam competition at this spring's conference in Tampa, Florida. The FRP beam contest requires the design and fabrication of a small concrete beam reinforced with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) as an alternate material to steel reinforcement. Awards are given in two categories: highest strength to weight, and best prediction of the deflection (sag) at failure. UMD sent 7 students (2 teams) to compete with 36 other teams from across the world. Most teams have been competing regularly for many years and the top teams are often similar from year to year. UMD had an amazing performance on their competition debut. Despite a mishap during

transport (aggressive luggage handling) that damaged one of the beams, UMD's damaged beam still took 2nd place in strength and 3rd place in prediction -resulting in the overall best beam entry. No other teams placed in both categories. At the ACI Convention, two UMD students interviewed for fellowships. Civil engineering sophomore, Kyrstyn Haapala, was honored with the Baker Fellowshipâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a $7,000 award, a paid summer internship, and all expenses paid for the next two ACI conventions. Civil engineering junior, Dan Abramson, received the Pankow Fellowship. This award is the highest dollar amount fellowship with a $10,000 award plus a paid summer internship with all expenses paid for the next two ACI conventions. In the past, the Pankow Fellowship recipients have been current or beginning PhD students for the fellowship year. This is the first time that an undergraduate has been honored with the award.

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UMD CE Students Win Scholarships MN Space Grant: Kelsey Holthaus UMD Civil Engineering student Kelsey Holthaus received a $1,500 scholarship through the Minnesota Space Grant Consortium.

Scholarship recipients were selected from among those applicants who have been very successful in their past edu-

cational endeavors (GPA 3.2 or better on a 4.0 scale) and whose area of interest is related to the space sciences and engineering.

44th Annual Engineering William C. Bailey PTI Scholarship UMD Civil Engineering student Matthew Fournier attended the Post Tensioning Institute ( PTI) annual conference in Kansas City, MO on May 1-3, 2011. Last year Matthew was awarded the William C. Bailey PTI

Scholarship and attended this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conference as a student member. He actively participated in PTI committee and session meetings, as well as shared how the Bailey Scholarship has benefited him over the past year.

Three UMD Civil Engineering students received scholarships at the 44th Annual Engineering Excellence Awards sponsored by the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC).

Matthew Fournier received the Don Stormoe Scholarship. Christopher Bruhn and Waylon Munch each received a general ACEC scholarship of $2500.

Internship With World Block Inc. In July of 2010, I was hired as an intern by World Block Inc. World Block produces large steel forms for the concrete industry. They sell their forms to concrete producers around the world who make large concrete blocks from them. These blocks are predominantly used to make retaining walls, but are also used in other applications such as product divider bins. World Block was in need of design specifications for the blocks, so they brought me in for one task: design and write an installation manual for their product. Working extensively with AutoCAD software, this taught me all about retaining wall design, especially large scale walls. I learned all the challenges that arise when

designing World Block walls, even some that had previously gone unseen. While designing inside corners, I discovered there was a fault in the current design. An overlap made the corner impossible, so I designed a new block to solve the problem. The owners approved the design, and my Inside Corner Blockout package will be available for purchase starting fall of 2011. What I liked most about my internship was that the task was mine only. I had complete control of the project. When finished I would have a manual I could call my own- and now I do. After 10 months of hard work, I have finished writing the World Block Installation and Engineering Manual. It is now in circulation, and will be sent to World Block customers around the world. I owe a big

thank you to owners Rod Johnson and Dan Stocke for this exceptional opportunity. The task was one of the truly great experiences of my life. My manual will soon be presented on the front cover of World Blockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bi-monthly magazine. I designed the cover with a drawing showing my work. The magazine will have a circulation of over 12,000 customers and will be published in fall of 2011. My manual and magazine cover can be received or viewed for free online at www.worldblock.com. Sudmitted by Philip Koktan, UMD Civil Engineering class of 2012

Student Philip Koktan with owners Rod Johnson and Dan Stocke

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UMD Women Engineers Form SWE Collegiate Interest Group Faculty Advisors: Dr. Katherine Acton and Dr. Rebecca Teasley Though new to UMDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campus, the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) is most definitely not a stranger to the engineering world. With a mission to â&#x20AC;&#x153;stimulate women to achieve full potential in careers as engineers and leaders, expand the image of the engineering profession as a positive force in improving the quality of life, and demonstrate the value of diversityâ&#x20AC;?, SWE has become one of the most well known and respected organizations for women in any STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) field. SWE is a nonprofit educational service organization, which strives to establish engineering as a highly desirable career for women. SWE challenges women to succeed and advance in a male dominated field and allows them to be recognized for their remarkable achievements. The group

L-R: Members Kyrstyn Haapala, Tiffany Smith, Becky LaCasse, Sara Lindberg, and Kayla Claassen

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encourages women through various training and development sessions, networking, scholarships, and outreach and advocacy programs. The program has a series of events throughout the U.S. as well as a website to share the value of engineering and target more women at a young age. Today, SWE has 20,000 members, 55 percent of which are students. The national scholarship program is able to award more than $400,000 to those students each year. There are SWE members communicating and engaging in activities similar to in the states, in over 30 countries. Other than informing girls of what engineering is and why it is important for them to join, an equally important mission of the SWE organization is to maintain their status in a large number of corporations across the world. Most management teams of businesses, large or small, which involve STEM related jobs, are familiar with SWE and think highly of women who are involved. A new SWE Collegiate Interest Group emerged at the University of Minnesota Duluth this past school year. Currently we have about 10 members who represent a variety of engineering fields and we meet twice a month. Our main goal this year was to meet all the re-

quirements to officially become a SWE group and begin planning some volunteering and educational activities. We have been volunteering at the middle school in town, Woodland Middle School, helping with the Lego Robotics program. Also, we have begun building a Rube Goldberg, a machine that takes the longest time to do the simplest task. We hope, next year, to put it on display for students to see and to attract more women for the club. Some other plans for next year include volunteering at Woodland Middle School to help students with the science fair, attending an elementary school to introduce them to the engineering field, and expanding our group. Currently women in science and engineering fields at UMD are very poorly represented. I hope that someday our SWE organization could lend a hand in evening out the male to female ratio and be recognized by young women and families in the community as an inspiration. I would like to help carry out the mission of SWE and encourage girls to take on whatever challenges they may face and to strive to live to achieve their full potential. Submitted by Becky LaCasse, Student President, SWE

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ASCE Duluth Section Scholarships: Chelsea Hanson and Matt Fournier

L-R: Board member Cindy Voigt, students Chelsea Hanson and Matt Fournier, board members Craig Bursch and Ron Laliberte

Two UMD students were recently honored by the American Society of Civil Engineers Duluth Section. At the first annual awards banquet held on May 17th, Matt Fournier and Chelsea Hanson were each awarded generous scholarships from this organization. ASCE is a civil engineering society with over 140,000

members worldwide. The support of civil engineering students by the local chapter through these annual scholarships is greatly appreciated. The UMD student chapter was also highlighted at the banquet. The welcoming atmosphere to the students made it a great event for everyone.

ASCE Toothpick Bridge Competition High school students gathered in Duluth to see what they can do with toothpicks and architecture on a small scale. Students from a dozen regional high schools competed in the 18th Annual Toothpick Bridge Competition at UMD. The competition was held for the first time in the High Bay Lab, in the Swenson Civil Engineering Building. It is organized by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) as

a fun way of teaching structural design.

structural capacity of the bridges,â&#x20AC;? said Hinzman.

"We believe this is an excellent learning experience for students who possibly want to get into engineering or understand engineering a little better," said John Hinzman, a member of ASCE.

The bridges weigh only about a third of a pound, but some can hold 150 pounds. Students were also judged on their bridge's appearance. Some put so much work into their project that they did not want the bridge tested, which would destroy their creation.

"We teach a lot about the geometry of the bridges and the

UMD Civil Engineering Attire For Sale A few options of UMD Civil Engineering attire are available for purchase. A lightweight pullover jacket (black, $40), a cotton polo (maroon, $25), and a work shirt (tan, black, or maroon; short sleeve $25, long sleeve $30). All are embroidered as shown on the left. To place an order, contact Waylon Munch (munch010@d.umn.edu) or go in person to the main office (Room 221) of the Swenson Civil Engineering Building.

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In Print A Sample of Recent Faculty Publications Carlos Carranza-Torres is co-author of the paper "Estimation of support requirement for large diameter ventilation shaft at Chuquicamata Underground Mine in Chile" with Esteban Hormazabal from SRK Consulting, Chile. The paper describes the process of determining the support needs for a ventilation shaft of 22 m diameter and 970 meters depth to be constructed in the new Chuquicamata Underground Mining project, in Calama, Chile. Hatch Ltd. (a company with headquarters in Toronto, Canada) and SRK Consulting (a company with headquarters in Johannesburg, South Africa) are partners with CODELCO (the National Chilean Copper Company) for the engineering design of all underground infrastructure for the new mine development. Carlos Carranza-Torres has collaborated as external geotechnical consultant for the project. The paper will be presented at (and published in proceedings of) the 12th International Congress of Rock Mechanics, in October of 2011, in Beijing, China. Eshan Dave’s paper titled “Viscoelastic functionally graded finite element method with recursive time integration and applications to flexible pavements” is in press in the International Journal of Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics. The paper describes a novel finite element analysis scheme that is applicable for viscoelastic functionally graded systems, such as aged asphalt pavements. The proposed method yields greater accuracy, and lower computational costs as compared to traditional finite element approach. Co-authors of this work are Glaucio H. Paulino and William G. Buttlar. The paper will appear in the journal later this summer. Andrea Schokker co-authored a paper entitled “LPR Tests on the Corrosion Protection Degree of Post-Tensioning Grouts,” that will be published in the ACI Materials Journal this summer. Co-authors are Dr. Alex Pacheco (Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil), Dr. Jeff Volz (Missouri University of Science and Technology), and Dr. Trey Hamilton (University of Florida). Drs. Pacheco and Volz are former PhD students of Dr. Schokker and now hold faculty positions. The paper outlines a new test method for rapidly determining corrosion resistance of grouts for post-tensioning applications. Rebecca Teasley, with co-author Dr. Daene McKinney, had their paper “Calculating the Benefits of Transboundary River Basin Cooperation: The Syr Darya Basin” accepted for publication in The Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management. This paper used cooperative game theory to evaluate a draft agreement on water and power sharing among four countries in the Syr Darya basin in Central Asia. Rebecca Teasley was co-author of “Groundwater Banking in the Rio Grande Basin” with colleagues Dr. Samuel Sandoval-Solis, Dr. Daene McKinney and Dr. Carlos Patino-Gomez from The University of Texas at Austin. Published in January 2011 in The Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, this paper describes a method of storing groundwater in aquifers for improved water management.

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Pledge Card Pledge amount $______________ _______ Check if you are interested in a named option (named labs or logo display) Donor Name(s) __________________________________ Address___________________________________________

A donation to the CE program in any amount is greatly appreciated â&#x20AC;&#x201D; our hands-on type of program requires a significant amount of equipment to properly train students. Named giving options are available as well. Please contact Susan Mack with any questions (address at the bottom of this form).

City ____________________ST _________ Zip __________ (For named giving options, Susan Mack will contact you for plaque and/or logo information)

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Named Giving Options: High Bay Lab $300,000

Credit Card Number ____________________________________________ Structures Lab Exp. Date ______________Security Code _________________ Name on Credit Card ___________________________________________

$300,000 Construction Material Lab $100,000

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Soils Lab $75,000

I would like to be reminded of my pledge ____ quarterly Classroom (1 remaining) ____ semi-annually or ____ annually. ____

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gift with securities). Model Shop Signature _________________________________________ Date ____________

$10,000 Conference Room

Please return completed form to: Susan Mack Senior Development Director 102 Engineering Building, 1303 Ordean Crt Duluth, MN 55812 218-726-6984 or srmack@d.umn.edu

$10,000 Logo Display in Hallway (large company logo in hallway between Engineering Building and Civil Engineering) $5000

Department of Civil Engineering 221 SCiv 1405 University Drive Duluth, MN 55812 Dept of Civil Engineering 218-726-6444 221 SCiv 1405 University Drive Duluth, MN 55812 Civileng@d.umn.edu

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