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Shellbrook

Chronicle

The Voice Of The Parkland Since 1912 VOLUME 100

SHELLBROOK, SASKATCHEWAN

PMR #40007604

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2011

No. 40

HBC drops the ax on Shellbrook Fields store

The Shellbrook Fields department store is closed and will likely be closed for good according to Hudson’s Bay Company representative. The fully stocked store was locked up last week with a sign placed in the window informing the community that the store was closed effective immediately. According to HBC External Communications Manager Tiffany Bourre there were multiple factors that played a part in the store’s closure but did not specify what any of those factors were. “As part of our normal course of business, the Company conducts regular reviews of our store portfolio. After careful study of all the factors involved, it was decided to close the (Shellbrook) store,” said Bourre in a statement. She stressed that the closure was completely independent of the acquisition of 220 Zellers store leases across Canada by American company Target in January. Zellers, Fields and Home Outfitters are all part of the HBC family of companies. That acquisition of the Zellers stores involves the store building leases only and the name remains with HBC. According to Bourre, the company does not have immediate plans to relocate the store or open a new one in the Shellbrook area. “The company HBC is always looking for new opportunities to bring to Canadian consumers. At this time we do not have any plans for a new location, however if an opportunity becomes available we will consider the option. Fields in Prince Albert is approximately 30 minutes from Shellbrook and welcomes the Shellbrook customers,” said Bourre. There was speculation last spring that the store, which opened in February of 2007, was set to close but that never came to pass.

CANWOOD SCHOOL TERRY FOX RUN - Front Row - Kayleigh Eberts, Cassidy Anderson, Selena Andersen, & Casey Kvinlaug. Behind Tylen Reimer, Demery Bischler, Caylah Nelson. Story and photos on page 8

PAPHR rolls out seasonal flu vaccination clinics Flu clinic season begins across the Prince Albert Parkland Health Region starting Tuesday, October 11. This year, anyone interested in getting the flu shot will be able to access the influenza vaccine, free of charge, at clinics held throughout the Prince Albert Parkland Health Region. “Being vaccinated is one of the most important steps individuals can take to protect themselves against influenza,” said Dr. Khami Chokani, Prince Albert Parkland’s Medical Health Officer. “We strongly encourage people to at-

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tend an immunization clinic this fall to help protect themselves and their families.” Risk groups include adults over the age of 65, people with chronic health conditions or severe obesity, pregnant woman and children under the age of two. It is also recommended that people in contact with high-risk groups also get vaccinated. This year’s flu shot will protect against the same viral strains as last year -- H1N1, H3N2 and a B strain of virus. Clinics in the Shellbrook region take

place as follows: (All clinics are on a drop in basis unless otherwise specified) Blaine Lake, at the Blaine Haven Lodge October 18, 2011 from 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm. Big River, at the Big River Public Health Office October 14, 21 and 31 from 9:00 am – 12:00 pm and 1:00 – 4:00 pm. Canwood, at the Canwood Community School October 19 and 28 from 9:30 am – 12:00 pm and 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm.

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Continued on page 9

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Shellbrook Chronicle

October 7, 2011

Roughriders stars and War Amps ‘CHAMP’ debut PSA

Losing part of her right leg in a boating accident has given Rebecca Mideros, 7, a special interest in spreading The War Amps PLAYSAFE message to other children. This past summer, Rebecca, who has been named The War Amps National Safety Ambassador, joined Saskatchewan Roughrider

stars Darian Durant, Weston Dressler, Chris Getzlaf and Lance Frazier to film a new War Amps PLAYSAFE public service announcement at Regina’s Mosaic Stadium. The PSA will begin airing this Thanksgiving Monday during TSN football telecasts and will continue through the CFL Playoffs and the 99th Grey Cup®.

POWER SKATING & Shellbrook Skating Club Registration

Wed., October 12th Shellbrook Rink

5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Limited Power Skating Spaces Available!

It can also be viewed on The War Amps YouTube channel at youtube.com/ warampsofcanada. Rebecca was enrolled in The War Amps Child Amputee (CHAMP) Program shortly after her accident and now uses her experience to pass on the PLAYSAFE message to other children by riding the Association’s P L A Y S A F E / DRIVESAFE float in parades and through this PSA. “We are so excited and proud to see Rebecca in this public service message. The War Amps has helped our family so much to cope with Rebecca’s injury in such a positive way,” said Rebecca’s mother Sandra. “We are honoured that she

CHAMP Safety Ambassador Rebecca with Saskatchewan Roughriders stars Chris Getzlaf, Darian Durant, Lance Frazier and Weston Dressler at the filming of The War Amps 2011 CFL PLAYSAFE PSA.

was chosen as National Safety Ambassador for the Association.” For more than 30 years,

The War Amps and CFL® have shared a special tradition - the annual CFL PLAYSAFE PSA, saluting the League’s support of The War Amps safety program. Like all War Amps productions, the PSA is funded by corporate sponsors. “The Roughrider organization is thrilled to be partnering with The War Amps this year,” stated Roughrider President/ CEO Jim Hopson. “The message they deliver is so vital to the health and safety of kids everywhere and we are pleased to assist in helping kids PLAYSAFE.”

General Proficiency award

Congratulations to Emily Willoughby on receiving the Saskatchewan General Proficiency award. With this award comes a $400 contribution for her post secondary education. Emily is attending the U of S in Saskatoon in the Education program. Emily is the daughter of Jim and Shelly Willoughby of Shellbrook.

Football Aardvarks 2-1 The Shellbrook Aardvarks came out on the winning end two days in a row this weekend. The Aardvarks opened their weekend with a 59-13 win over Hafford at home Friday night before heading out to Carrot River Saturday for a Junior Jamboree where they finished with a 2-1 record. The Junior Jamborees are geared toward grade 9 and 10 players who may not get regular playing time in league games. Saturday the Shellbrook juniors defeated Tisdale and the host Carrot River club but lost to Porcupine Plain. The juniors will take part in the final jamboree of the year October 15 in Porcupine Plain. The Aardvarks hosted Spiritwood Wednesday night but details were not available at press time.

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Erwin Tiessen Emily Willoughby.

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October 7, 2011

Shellbrook Chronicle

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Playoff hopes slim after blowout loss to Stamps

As long as there’s still a glimmer of hope, there’s no use in examining where this 2011 season for the Saskatchewan Roughriders went so horribly wrong. But we’re getting close to that point. In another game which the Green & White could barely afford to lose, they were blown out again this weekend. A week after suffering a devastating 42-5 home loss to BC, the Riders were pulverized 40-3 by the Stampeders in Calgary Saturday afternoon. Things looked good early when the Riders won the coin toss and got the ball to start the game. However as has become the custom, the team couldn’t get anything going on offense and was unable to stop the opposition on defense. Back-toback fumbles in the second quarter directly led to 14 points for the Stampeders who had a 23-3 lead at halftime. They were

Rider Insider

With the Voice of The Riders, Rod Pedersen allowed to put in cruise control in the second half as they sailed to the lopsided victory. It dropped Saskatchewan’s record to a West Division-worst 4-9 and has left them in a position where they need to win their final five games to have any hope at making the playoffs for a tenth straight season. “It sucks to be honest with you,” revealed Rider kick returner/cornerback Tristan Jackson. “This is a great organization. It sucks. It really, really does. It’s just one of those seasons. We got five games to go. We have to look forward, not look

back.” The team has really no hope at catching Calgary or BC and now their only chance at the post-season lies in catching 7-6 Edmonton whom the Riders will visit twice in October including this Thanksgiving Day Monday at Commonwealth Stadium. However it’s this blogger’s fear that this team is going the wrong way as they plunge down the homestretch. They seemed considerably uptight going into the Calgary game, perhaps too focused on the mountainous task which lay before them. It also appears they may even be

Program, modeled after programs operated at several other facilities in Saskatchewan, enables the sending of e-mails to inpatients at the Region’s inpatient facilities. Individuals who want to send well wishes to a loved one or a friend who is a hospital patient or long-term care resident simply can do the following: Go to: www. princealbertparklandhealth.com Click on “Well Wishes to a Patient” button (on the left-hand side of the screen) and follow the instructions, including selection of the facility. Include the patient’s first and last name, room number (if known), comments and your full name. When received, your e-mail is sent to the appropriate facility for printing and delivery to your love one. E-mail is checked at 1

p.m. every weekday and hand delivered to patients after 2 p.m. Any e-mail that is received after 1 p.m. or on weekends will be delivered the next business day. There may be a delay in delivery for e-mail received during holidays. E-mail received after the intended recipient has been discharged will not be delivered. All messages received are handled confidentially. Upon receipt, the e-mail is printed and placed in a sealed envelope and delivered to the patient’s room. The e-mail system is set up only to receive e-mail. The Region cannot send outgoing replies or confirm that a patient or resident is registered. The Volunteers Services department will be monitoring the incoming e-mails and be responsible for delivering the messages at the Victoria Hospital, Herb Bassett Home and Mental Health Inpatient Unit. The remaining messages are forwarded to the appropriate facility, with each facility ensuring delivery. While the Region makes every effort to ensure all messages are delivered, privacy laws and policies mean the Region cannot contact the sender of the message to confirm if an individual is in care at a Prince Albert Parkland hospital or long-term care facility.

PA Parkland Health Region extends Well Wishes program Family members and friends of patients at any of the hospitals or residents of long-term care facilities in the Prince Albert Parkland Health Region will now be able to send messages to loved ones thanks to the expanded capacity of the Region’s Well Wishes program. “In the past year we have seen the value of this program at the Victoria Hospital, as we have delivered about 100 messages since it launched in December 2010,” said Sonya Jahn, Director of Volunteer Services, which oversees the delivery of the program. “The Well Wishes program gives people an opportunity to send messages of support to their family members and friends from any computer with internet access.” The Well Wishes

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doubting their own abilities, which is a first around here for a long, long time. “You gotta go home tonight and check yourself in the mirror and make sure you’re playing your heart out,” said Rider slotback Chris Getzlaf after the game. “A lot of guys are. We have to regroup obviously.” Orchestrating it all is Rider Vice President of Football/Head Coach/ Offensive Coordinator Ken Miller who seemed as much at a loss for an explanation as anyone else after Saturday’s game. “No it wasn’t a pretty sight,” Miller stated. “We got beat on both sides of the ball. We couldn’t stop ‘em on defense and then we moved the ball but couldn’t score. It’s been two games without a touchdown and that’s intolerable.”

And that’s where things have gone so intolerably wrong. Miller fired coaches Greg Marshall and Doug Berry with 10 games left and replaced them with himself. If the team had put forth a gutsy effort in each game under Miller’s guidance, perhaps missing the playoffs could be excused by the team’s 1-7 start under Marshall. However the blowout losses eclipse any defeats suffered under Marshall

and the powers-that-be are now scratching their heads looking for answers. While there’s still a chance, that’s all the club can cling to. But all signs point to an early winter. “There’s always next week but we have to find a way to get this team playing to the level which it’s capable of,” Miller explained. It has left us wondering just what this team is capable of?

Canwood Fall Supper

SUN., OCT. 16 4 - 7 p.m. Canwood Elks Community Hall

Admission: Adults $10.00 Students 5-12 years $5.00 Preschool & Under FREE

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Sponsored by Canwood Curling Rink

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Shellbrook Chronicle October 7, 2011

Opinions Brad Dupuis News Editor

What to do about headshots in the NHL Questions are abound as the new NHL season kicks off this week. We will see if newly appointed league disciplinarian Brendan Shanahan will stay the course of predecessor Colin Campbell or make an actual effort to rid the game of unnecessary headshots. I think the loss of the league’s golden boy (or golden goose) for the bulk of the regular season and last years playoffs has the NHL’s attention in this regard but whether that attention will be focused through an 82 game season and playoffs remains to be seen. Rule changes and “crackdowns” are nothing new to the NHL we see them at the beginning of each season. What would be new would be the same measure of rules tolerance used at the end of the season as used in the beginning. If the preseason is any indication of how the year is going to go, it will be another hit and miss year as we saw some big suspensions and a few non-calls. But then again, the preseason has never been much of a predictor of anything as 6-0 preseason teams have gone on to miss the playoffs while scoring leaders have gone on to a-goal-in-20-games clip in the regular season. The best thing for the league would be to come to a standard and stick to it – no variance, no looking at the name on the sweater and no looking back. If they are serious about getting headshots out of the game they have to hammer it into the heads of the players that they won’t get away with it. If they call all headshots, even the accidental ones, it will create a sense that this behaviour will no longer be tolerated. Yes every incident will be different and yes the odd innocent check gone bad will be punished but players will eventually learn from these indiscretions or they will lose pay from being suspended. If they are a player worth playing they are likely more good to their team on the ice than in the press box. Referees may not catch the initial infraction but these days there are hits in almost every game that could be up for review. Reviewing video from all angles would determine if there was contact to the head and that would determine whether or not a suspension would be handed out. If the whole idea of intent is taken out of the equation the rule becomes pretty much black and white. The only area up for discussion would then be how long to suspend the player. If intent was not obvious a single game would do but more would be tacked on if it was determined that the contact to the head was intentional. With the number of high calibre players injured or retiring due to concussions, this is the route the league ought to go. I would think it would be better to suspend dirty players than to lose more man hours to injury.

The Paul Martin Commentary Canada is on the edge of an infrastructure bonanza. One of the biggest growth periods in the nation’s history followed World War Two when the returning troops sparked an economic renaissance that led to the development of everything from the suburban shopping mall to rural electrification. Sixty-five years later, we’re poised to go through another period just like it. That comes from the number two guy at CIBC, Jim Prentice, a former federal cabinet minister. He told an economic conference in Atlantic Canada a bank study on the impact the renewal of existing energy projects and development of new ones will create more than 300,000 new jobs as a result of power generation. And when the oil sands are added, the number could top one million over the next two decades. Here in Saskatchewan the story is quite similar. SaskPower is embarking on a renewal of its aging plants with clean coal technology and is looking at new units to meet the needs of our growing population resulting in forecasts of billions in new investment in the next decade. *** Saskatchewan’s population reached a new record high on the first of July continuing the growth trend that has been in place since the middle of 2006. In other words we have now completed five years of positive numbers on the population front. This is quite a contrast to the previous 25 when the number of residents in the province declined. The latest population estimates for the country also show that the West continues to be a dominant player in the country with the Prairies outpacing the national

Paul Martin

growth rate and BC matching it. Saskatchewan also returned to positive territory in terms of inter-provincial migration in the second quarter of the year as we were once again luring more Albertans than we were losing to that province. In Q1 we actually were exporting people to other parts of Canada while international migration to the province was in ascension. But these latest figures show we have all three categories – births as well as inter-provincial and international migration – now working in our favor. *** There is, by definition, no replacement for a first impression. Just about all of us, at some point or another, are faced with that daunting assignment of making a presentation in public. Whether its performing for a job interview or delivering a speech to hundreds of conference delegates, the basic principles of making a powerful impression are the same. Mikki Williams, a Chicago-based professional speaker who was short-listed as a potential personality for the new Oprah TV network, offers any presenter a few tips on how to improve. First of all, she explains, don’t let the butterflies roost. All of us get nervous before a presentation and brooding over the situation or going over the material one more time will just make it worse. She suggests mingling with the audience as an alternative. And here’s another basic rule that seems to apply to a lot of things in life. Keep it simple. Most speakers try to cram too much into a presentation. Three primary themes are more than enough and the best way to deliver your message is by telling personal stories to explain your messages.

October 7, 2011

Shellbrook Chronicle

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Viewpoint First Nations issues not so different Rural Saskatchewan people and First Nations people have often found themselves at odds, although it’s not as bad as it used to be. The first time I explored this issue in depth was for a book entitled “Writing off the Rural West.” My chapter was called “Uneasy Neighbours” that explored the sometimes-difficult relationship between the two sides. In that book chapter I explored how relationships are often stronger in communities where First Nations and white communities are economically independent in communities. (Prince Albert and Meadow Lake come to mind.) But I also explored how difficult this relationship can be and cited the town of Punnichy next to the Gordon First Nations. One homeowner told me that in Punnichy at the time, homeowners would often buy cheap houses around them just to tear them down to prevent Sask. Housing from purchasing them and renting them to Indian families. Since the writing of that book, it’s likely fair to say that even more progress has been made, although progress has often been slow. More and more

economic participation by First Nations in local communities has meant more cooperation and better relations. One example I can remember writing about in the past decade involved the Thunderchild band need Turtleford where both sides became active participants in the hospital. Another example that has struck me in recent years is the entries in the Saskatchewan Municipal Awards that see local communities and First Nations jointly working co-operatively. But what has struck me of late is how problems of First Nations and rural communities tend to be common ones. And this thought really crossed my mind last week when about a thousand First Nation’s people marched down Regina’s Albert Street in a day of protest against the provincial government. Admittedly, I’m rather skeptical of most legislative protests and especially

this one. That it was organized about the time the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations (FSIN) was taking heat for dumping former grand chief Guy Lonechild, despite a court ruling suggesting they couldn’t do that. It was a bit too much for this old cynic. Add to the fact that I’ve seen all too many protests at the legislature over the years demanding more support for agriculture, a lack of health and education funding, less interference in local government issues, less taxation and more equitable resource sharing. But it’s also about here where it struck me that rural folks from the local farms, villages, towns and small cities and First Nations folks from the reserves, villages, towns and small cities may have a lot more in common than they recognize. For example, for years rural folks have made the point that the oil, natural gas and

Murray Mandryk

potash is produced right under their feet and that should entitle them to a fair share of royalties so they can fix the roads or keep their schools and hospitals open. Interestingly, this was also one of the major themes behind the First Nations protest march in Regina, albeit with added dimension of treaty rights. First Nations argue the original treaties they signed 140 years ago with the new white federal government (remember, this was the northwest territory and Saskatchewan wouldn’t become to be a province for another 30-plus years) talked about sharing the land to the “depth of a plough shear”. First Nations say this means that they never gave up the right to natural resources buried much deeper. Or at least, they view this as grounds for a bigger share. And while some might rightly view this is a specious argument, it’s quite similar to the argument rural communities make for a bigger share of the natural resource pie. So perhaps we’re all not so different. Perhaps our biggest challenge right now is recognizing our similarities.

Your Two Cents

“Serving the Communities of Shellbrook, Canwood, Debden, Big River, Parkside, Leask, Marcelin, Blaine Lake, Holbein, Mont Nebo, Mayview” A Division of Pepperfram Limited Publications Mail Registration #07621

Published Every Friday Morning, P.O. Box 10, Shellbrook, Sask. S0J 2E0 Phone 747-2442 or Fax 747-3000 Editorial: chnews@shellbrookchronicle.com Advertising chads@shellbrookchronicle.com C. J. Pepper, Publisher, Brad Dupuis, Editor, chnews@shellbrookchronicle.com Madeleine Wrigley, Advertising Sales, chroniclesales@sasktel.net Kathleen Nording, Composition/Pagination, chnews@shellbrookchronicle.com Patt Ganton, Composition/Pagination, chads@shellbrookchronicle.com Cheryl Mason, Bookkeeping/Reception, Office Hours: Monday.-Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. & 1 to 4 p.m.; Advertising Deadline: Mondays at 5:00 p.m. The contents of the Shellbrook Chronicle are protected by Copyright Reproduction of any material must be done so with expressed permission of the publisher. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: In the interest of readers of this newspaper, we will publish opinions of our readers. Letters To The Editor are most welcome; however, they must be signed. and include writer’s contact information and will only be published with the writer’s name on it. Letters should be limited in length and be typed or clearly written. We reserve the right to edit letters depending on available space. Member of

What I learned this summer about nuclear Editor: As a past educator for 18 years, this time of year always reminds me of that first day back in the classroom. With a new group of faces it gave me an opportunity to assess a number of skills by just asking them to write about their summer holidays. Well, I thought it only fair that I share what I did on my summer holidays with the whole “Saskatchewan classroom”. I especially do this in light of the opportunity to exercise my democratic right to choose the leader that will represent my best interests in the upcoming election. On July 27th, I left Pinehouse on a walk to Regina to collect petitions to ban nuclear waste storage and transportation of nuclear waste into, out of and through Saskatchewan, a walk that was over 850 km. What was I thinking? Over- weight, limited in my knowledge and like other women, lots of other things to do. But, I had lived most of my life in an area that most people only dream of: clear, clean water, air without impurities, smells of pine and birch as the wind whistles over the willows, birds that sing their morning song,

cranes, pelicans, loons and eagles that talk to me throughout the day, every day! Pristine beauty, this was a land that I wanted to share with my children, grandchildren and their children, a land that they had every right to. So, we marched, about ten of our core group, but we grew as we travelled and we learned as we met others who have travelled this “nuclear road” for over 30 years. They supported us, educated us and walked along side of us. I was inspired to continue, inspired to educate friends, family and surrounding communities, inspired to walk on. We met people from each community that fed us, gave us water, held rallies, gave and collected donations, offered their homes, gathered signatures for the petition and thanked us for awakening the people of this province. But that little, awaking poke is not enough. The people of Saskatchewan need to know the truth, the conspiracy that was unveiled to me as I walked and became educated. • I learned that the nuclear industry is huge and interconnects the uranium mining corporations, power companies, and

nuclear plants, plants that are looking for ignorant communities or even provinces that will buy their propaganda to store nuclear waste. • I learn that the uranium mining was initiated in Northern Saskatchewan in the 1950’s under the secrecy of the nuclear arms race. Aboriginal rights were ruled out of the 1978 Cluff Lake Inquiry, which made uranium mining more appealing to uranium multinationals. While other provinces were holding moratoriums, Saskatchewan people never had a chance. The northern communities never gave, “prior informed consent”. • I learned that this industry can say whatever they want, even if it’s not the truth, that they have the money and influence to pay media, politicians, governments, communities and individuals. • I learned that there have been several continued attempts to cover up the impact of uranium spills in our northern province and the impact of the 3 major nuclear accidents: Hiroshima, 3 mile island, and Chernobyl. • And now Japan, the nuclear plant in Japan

is melting down as we speak and leaking into the ground water and ocean. Their nuclear scientists went to the government of Japan on July 28th, 2011 and reported that the radiation seeping out of the plant is equal to 168 Hiroshima bombs. One reporter said it was like a Hiroshima bomb going off every day since the original accident. Why isn’t this all over the media? • I learned that Northern Saskatchewan holds 1.5% of the world fresh water supply, a resource that will be worth its’ weight in gold in the very near future. If the uranium mining is not stopped, or one accident happens with the proposed repository of nuclear waste, Saskatchewan’s whole watershed will be contaminated and we too will be looking for water. • I learned that our leaders can manipulate policy so that organizations like NWMO (Nuclear Waste Management Organization) can negotiate with one small community in our north to become the waste deposit site for the province, our nation and possibly the world. Continued on page 6

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Shellbrook Chronicle October 7, 2011

ST. ANDREW’S A.C.W.

Soup, Sandwich & Dessert Luncheon Shellbrook Senior’s Hall

Friday, October 21 11 a.m. to 1:30 pm. - Everyone welcome

BLUEGRASS from Nova Scotia

THE SPINNEY BROTHERS Wed., Oct. 19, 2011 Shellbrook Theatre 8:00 p.m. - $20 northernlightsbluegrass.ca

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Groenen wins community service award A Shellbrook resident was recently recognized for her service to the community at an industry conference in Las Vegas. Yvonne Groenen, owner of Groenen Accounting, received one of two Community Service Awards at the Sage/Simply Accounting conference in Las Vegas. Groenen was nominated by fellow Simply Accounting partner Carol Ann Brouwer, of Ontario. She passed the information onto Groenen’s staff who gathered a letter from Shellbrook Mayor George Tomporowski, a letter from the Business Improvement District (BID) Committee and compiled a letter of their own for the application. Winning the award was a complete shock to Groenen as she had no idea she had even been nominated. “I had absolutely no idea that they had done that. They did it all behind my back those conniving people,” laughed Groenen. Groenen estimates that there were 300 Canadian Simply Accounting part-

Local business person, Yvonne Groenen, middle, receives a community Service Award during a recent Sage/Simply Accounting Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada.

ners present at the convention. Partners are those who use purchase memberships into Simply Accounting/ Sage for use with their clients. What made receiving the award extra special was that she didn’t just receive it in front of her fellow partners but her

staff made the trek with her to Las Vegas as part of a staff outing -- the first time they had attended the conference. The company departed from their typical script this year as two community service awards were given. On the average year just one of the awards is given out.

“All the stuff we do is fun. We don’t do it because (we might receive an award). We do it because that’s what people in communities should do,” said Groenen. Events like the After Tax Party, Shellbrook Street Fair and Pumpkins in the Park all came from ideas Groenen had. It wasn’t until she heard mention of the annual “After Tax Party” fund raiser during the lead up to the presentation that she even knew that she was nominated for the award. Each year, the Groenen Accounting staff choose three beneficiaries of funds raised from the annual After Tax Party. Those three groups are charged with the task of selling tickets for the event and providing items for the evening’s raffles. In the end, those three groups split the proceeds from the event. Groups involved in the past include the Shellbrook First Responders, the Rhythm Works Dance Studio and the Shellbrook Elks Hockey Club.

Your Two Cents What I learned this summer about nuclear Continued from page 5

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• I learned that NWMO changes their own policy to meet their needs. Originally, they stated that they would have to have willing consent with the host community. If the population of that community is just over 600 voting members and you have almost 400 people who have signed a petition to stop Nuclear Waste storage in their community, aren’t they . . . shouldn’t they remove themselves from that negotiation. What percentage of people from the community do they need? But, they change the terms of this “Willing Consent” as they see fit. • I have watched many people die of cancer in our northern communities; a lot of them were young. It’s been an epidemic lately; most of them worked in these northern uranium mines, yet no inquiries, no investigations. But there has been a huge media blitz on all the wonderful jobs they provide and trades they support. We’ve all seen them! • As Ed Benoanie, past chief of Hatchet Lake, stated, “A few people from the community work there, but we have 80% unem-

ployment. We do approach them every now and then. And they come back with little handouts every now and then – to keep you quiet”. Is this happening in any of the communities that are being targeted for a nuclear waste site? Makes you think! • At the end of the walk and since the walk the most powerful thing that I’ve learned is that the nuclear industry had no plan for its’ waste and still refers to this energy as the cleanest form of all energy. That is the biggest lie of them all! The waste from these plants will remain radioactive and hazardous for at least 100,000 years. It’s too dangerous and our world is too unstable: wars, economic crashes, terrorism, and natural disasters to leave the 250,000 tons (and growing) of these rods on the earth’s surface. So, we bury it and hope for the best. The scientists don’t even agree on whether it’s safe to bury or whether we should let future generations even know where we are going to bury it. My learning curve went off the charts this summer and although the information was extremely terrifying, and moving me to give up at times, I

always came back to my beliefs. The creator has blessed me with a wonderful world, beautiful children, and a country where I can voice my opinion. I am obligated as a mother, educator and human being to work as hard I can to stop this insanity and protect the blessings that have been given to me. There are other renewable, sustainable energy sources that we should be using . . . . other countries are. It is the way of the future. I am not an activist and I’ve never taken on any cause with this magnitude, just a northern women who realises that sometimes you have to stand up for your beliefs. So, let’s stand together, stand up tall and say “NO” to Nuclear and “Yes” to these other sustainable, renewable sources or our civilization as we know it will cease to exist. I know that that is not the Legacy that I want to leave! What about you? Educate Yourself, Take a Stand and Sign our Petition so this craziness stops. Make this an election issue and hold our leaders accountable for the Legacy they want to leave. Doreen Docken Committee for Future Generations

October 7, 2011

Shellbrook Chronicle Page 7

Agriculture The real threat of climate change Climate change is one of those issues which held media attention for a time, and while very little has been resolved regarding its impact, is now garnering less attention because public interest is fleeting on almost everything these days. As a result, media tends to act much like a bunch of hummingbirds, flittering from one story to another in order to try to hold public attention. In the case of climate change the public has not just turned off interest in the situation, but has actually been left questioning the validity of the concern being shown. The reasons the public have been left questioning the situation are varied. To begin with climate change was initially heralded as global warming. In northern climates the thought of warmer winters isn’t exactly one which

sounds particularly threatening, and some very cold weather soon leaves people laughing at the idea of global warming. The terminology had evolved to that of climate change, but by that time public interest had waned. There is also the problem that climate change is not something anyone sees as an immediate threat. Generally the experts are talking about the real impact beginning to manifest itself more toward the middle of the century. Yes there are things happening now, a reced-

Western Canadian farmers are sowing most Prairie acres with established varieties, according to results of the CWB’s 2011-12 variety survey. Harvest and Lillian remain the preferred choice for Canada Western Red Spring wheat (CWRS) varieties among Prairie farmers. Harvest, known for improved sprouting resistance, now accounts for 17.6 per cent of total CWRS acreage. Lillian, favoured for wheat stem sawfly management, fell behind slightly to 17.4 per cent. \The survey also reveals a trend towards the rapid adoption of newer varieties with wheatmidge tolerance. Unity

VB jumped from 1.6 to 6.6 per cent of total seeded CWRS acres and Goodeve VB broke the top 10 with 3.1 per cent, up from 0.7 last year. More than 5,000 farmers participated in the CWB’s annual variety survey by indicating the wheat, durum and barley varieties they seeded in the spring. This information is used to determine how variety trends align with customer requirements for milling, baking and brewing, and to assist farmers with variety selection. Full results and online analysis tools are available at www. cwb.ca/variety. For Canada Western Amber Durum (CWAD), Strongfield remains the

strong favourite among farmers, increasing from 60.2 to 65.8 per cent of total durum acres. Shortly after its introduction in 2006, Strongfield quickly became the popular choice for its strong agronomic yield performance. For two-row malting barley, AC Metcalfe acreage declined, but maintains it status as the preferred choice, with 54 per cent of total two-row seeded acres. CDC Copeland remains the second-highest preference, with 26 per cent of acres. For six-row barley, farmers are increasingly turning to Legacy, while Tradition dropped 6.8 percentage points to capture 14.9 per cent of six-row acres.

The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) is pleased to receive Government of Canada funding of up to $318,930 for a research project aimed at identifying bovine tuberculosis (TB) tests that are more reliable and costeffective than those presently in use. The funding from the Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Council will assist the Beef Cattle Research Council-led project to evaluate commercial tests for bovine TB developed by diagnostic companies, and identify those tests that provide a rapid, reliable

and accurate diagnosis. Rapid, simple, inexpensive blood tests for bovine TB in cattle, for use as single tests or as a panel of tests in combination, would improve our ability to detect and eradicate bovine TB, said CCA President Travis Toews. “These tests may assist in achieving the final eradication of bovine TB from livestock sooner than is currently possible with existing tools,” he said. Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz made the announcement during the CCA’s annual Fall Picnic on Parliament Hill. The

event, a perennial favourite amongst Members of Parliament (MPs) and political staffers, enables the CCA to deliver its priority policy issues directly key influencers in Ottawa. Cattle producers from across the country were at the event to discuss issues including: government funding for research and market development, activities to open foreign markets, reduction of input costs and regulatory compliance, as well as the evolution of business risk management programs.

Calvin Daniels On Agriculture

ing ice cap which could destroy polar bear populations, insect pressure in Canadian forests, and more severe weather, such as one-in-a-century storms hitting the Canadian Prairies, but the real threat seems something much more distant. In my own case, something that may hit in 2050, is a little bit more difficult to focus on since I will need to hit 90 to be there to see it. Yes there is concern for future generations, but the sharpness of the threat is still dulled. \In terms of climate change there is

Tried and true grain varieties

Funding for Bovine TB test

also something of a feeling of helplessness for the individual. When you read about governments being reluctant to take the big steps necessary to affect the factors leading to climate change, the impact of an individual seems to be of little use. \Until the world leaders in countries such as the United States, China, India and other major nations go after major greenhouse gas emitting industries, change will not happen at a rate to change the trend. What we do on an individual basis, while important as a statement of concern through selfaction, it will not make up for coal generated electric plants spewing dangerous chemicals into the atmosphere. Businesses won’t do it

without a government push. The costs of reversing emissions is simply too high and will impact bottom lines too much to be carried out voluntarily by most. The same can be said for most individuals too. We often do not make the wisest choices in terms of our environment unless pushed in that direction through tax rebates and

forced environmental fees initiated by government. Climate change is real, and until we all become more proactive, and that includes government, there is a feeling it is also inevitable, and that has the public often left trying to ignore the situation on some fanciful hope it will just go away, which of course it will not.

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DEBDEN: 144.83 ac. - 30 cult. + 80 tame grass, bal. yard/slough/native grass/bush, some fencing, wells, watering trough, watering bowl, quonset, barn, shed, well gravelled yard, 3,640 sq. ft. 2 storey home. Located next to highway! DEBDEN: 159.33 ac. - 40 tame grass, bal bush/pasture/slough, perimeter fencing, dug out, new/old scale assess 9,800/680. 1 1/2 mile from Sturgeon River & Prince Albert National Park! DEBDEN: 319 ac. NE-12 (new scale assess. 25,700, 120 ac. tame grass, yard site with misc older buildings and older 2 storey house, well, 2nd very old house), SW-7 (new scale assess. 20,500, 60 ac. tame grass, overlooks Keg Lake). MONT NEBO: 608 ac. - 70 cultO+Lsome S D tame grass, bal. native pasture, wells, small lake, creek, old yard site (power & phone sites), buildings, house. PARKSIDE: 225 ac. - 152 seeded to alfalfa, borders Kinnaird Lake (1 mile of frontage), old scale assess. 10,925/160 ac. SHELLBROOK: 157 ac. - 115 grass, 42 bush/coulee/yard, fenced, wells, watering bowls, 22,600 bu. steel grain storage, quonset, calving barn, shed, corrals, other misc. smaller outbuildings, bungalow home. SHELLBROOK: 281 ac. - 161 pasture, bal. bush, fenced, dugouts, small gravel pit, old yard site, power runs through property, avg. new/old scale assess. 17,081/1,490 per 160 ac. SHELLBROOK: 762 ac. - 150 hay/alfalfa, 240 sprayed in 2010 for 2011 cultivation, 260 ac. scheduled to be sprayed SOLD in 2011, small lake, fenced with some cross fencing, avg. new/old scale assess. 46,820/4,045 per 160 ac. SPIRITWOOD: 7,960 ac. - 5,971 deeded + 1989 leased, 2,288 tame grass, bal. pasture, all fenced & cross fenced, large alleys linking several pastures, well, dugouts, many smaller lakes, hydrants, watering bowls, 7,500 bu. steel grain storage, shop, barn, corrals, 1,008 sq. ft. home. STUMP LAKE: 160 ac. - 80 tame grass, bal. creek/trees/bush/native grass, perimeter fenced, new scale assess. 39,800 per 1/4, power & phone only 1/2 mile away. Close to Prince Albert National Park & 1 Mile from Sturgeon River! STUMP LAKE: 185 ac. - 162 deeded + 23.5 leased, 145 cult, 23.5 bush, bal. yard site (power/telephone/several older buildings), dugout, well, bungalow. ½ mile of Filion Lake frontage! STUMP LAKE: 390 ac. - wells, dugouts, watering bowls, watering tires, 16,600 bu. steel grain storage, shop, barn, cattle shed, Hy Qual cattle processing facility, 1,200 sq. ft. bungalow. STUMP LAKE: 787 ac. - 159.87 deeded + 627.59 leased, 150 tame grass, bal. pasture & bush, all fenced, approx. 2 miles of Sturgeon River frontage, dugouts, seasonal creek, avg. old/new scale assess 1,155/22,220 per 160 ac. STUMP LAKE: 1,786 ac. - 1,695 deeded + 91 leased, 835 tame grass with additional 110 ac. of cultivated land, bal. native grass/bush, seven ¼s buffalo fence, bal. 4 wire barb, well, dugouts, creek, Sturgeon River spring, 10,000 bu. steel grain storage, yard site-shop, machine shed, sea can. Gravel Deposit!

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Page 8

Shellbrook Chronicle October 7, 2011

Canwood School holds Terry Fox Run Continued from page 1

This year was the 31st Anniversary of the Terry Fox Run. At 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, September 28 Canwood Community School students in Grade 6 – 12, staff, and community members started their walk from the school

to the Regional Park. Elementary students, staff, and parents walked to Whispering Pine Place Nursing Home where they met up with several of the residents and returned to the school for lunch. Thirty one year’s ago Terry’s words were, “Even if I don’t finish, we need

TENDER OPPORTUNITY - Electrician Interpretive Centre Project number: CDTF - 010 The Town of Big River invites tenders for an electrician to do the electrical work needed for the Interpretive Centre project at the Ski Timber Ridge site. Tender documents and blueprints can be obtained from: Town Office, Box 220, Big River, SK S0J 0E0 606 1St Street North Phone (306)469-2112 Fax (306)469-4856 email - bigriver@sasktel.net Lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted. Only the successful tender will be contacted. Tenders close at 4:00 Thursday, October 14, 2011

TENDER OPPORTUNITY - Mechanical (Plumbing) Interpretive Centre Project number: CDTF - 010 The Town of Big River invites tenders for mechanical (plumbing) work needed for the Interpretive Centre project at the Ski Timber Ridge site. Tender documents and blueprints can be obtained from: Town Office, Box 220, Big River, SK S0J 0E0 606 1St Street North Phone (306)469-2112 Fax (306)469-4856 email - bigriver@sasktel.net Lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted. Only the successful tender will be contacted. Tenders close at 4:00 Thursday, October 14, 2011.

Tender Opportunity CDTF – 0013 The Town of Big River is seeking a tender/contractor to provide for, supply and the construction of the Ness Creek Road located in the R. M. of Big River, Saskatchewan in accordance with the terms of the tender documents. The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted. The successful bidder will only be contacted. The closing date of this tender will be Tuesday, October 11, 2011 at 2:30 p.m. Interested bidders may obtain tender documents from: The Town of Big River Box 220, 606 1st St. North, Big River, Sask. S0J 0E0 Tel:(306)469-2112 Fax:(306)469-4856 Email:bigriver@sasktel.net

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others to continue. It’s got to keep going on without me!” How proud Terry would be to know that so many years after his memorable and heroic journey, his dream and his belief in miracles is still going strong as our whole school and community worked together to outrun cancer. When the participants returned to the school they purchased a hearty fundraising lunch of beef or bison stew. A number of draws and prizes were given out to the Terry Fox participants and the winner of the most money raised was Chalayn Johnson. A total of $4,037.63 was raised for Cancer Research but more proceeds are still coming in. We appreciate to all who donated prizes, money and volunteered their time to make this day such a success. Also, those in our community who came and purchased lunch. The Grade 10 Wellness class and Mr. Person assisted with the organizing and set-up, to Constable Hallett for starting off our run and patrolling the highway, Joyce Bartley and WPP for the homemade buns and fundraising support, as well to Karen Kvinlaug, Marie Anne Grimard, and Tani Hamborg, from our School Community Council, for their help with lunch and clean up. Our generous sponsors were: Canadian Prairie Bison, Village of Canwood, Hawryluk Funeral Home, Pineland Sales & Service, L & P Bargain Shoppe, Tait Insurance, CIBC, Affinity Credit Union, Whispering Pine Place, Woodland Pharmacy, D’s Hair Design, Louise Benson Classic Cuts, Canwood Co-op, Judy’s Billiards and Laundry, Bev & Lester Wyatt, Cargill and Canwood Hotel

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Students running to the park - Ryan Aiken, Carrissa Archer, Cody Bischler, Brett Bischler, Raymond Stieb, Sammi Jo Duvall, and Paige Benson

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Students walk with Whispering Pine Place residents to the school for lunch. Left to Right - Tara Johnson, Joy Maess, Resident - Anne Story, Sierra Benjamin

Resident Anne Story, Kelsey Grimard, Rachel Isnana, Resident - Dorothy Johnson elementary students in the background.

other

October 7, 2011

Shellbrook Chronicle

Coreen’s ‘Ride to Conquer Cancer’ by Steve Dills Sylvan Lake News Edited and adapted by Coreen Spencer Encouragement and emotions are among the memories Coreen Spencer will carry with her after participating in the Ride to Conquer Cancer in June. “This was my first time participating in The Ride. I didn’t know what to expect so spent a lot of time searching for what everyone else was doing, searching for what I should be doing. The start line was narrower than a town street and there were 2,280 riders all ready to begin in a mass start. For a solo rider this was pretty intimidating, so I placed myself in what I thought was the middle of the pack along the outer edge in case I needed to get out. The first five kilometres I rode very cautiously and was very aware of everything and everyone around me. I heard a couple of crashes around me and it was a real reminder of how easily the ride could end if I didn’t pay very close attention.” Lots of the experienced participants were encouraging, “you’re going to love this It will be one of the best experiences of your life”. I can truly say it was. Definitely one of the most meaningful memories was the number of

places where people were cheering us on, holding up huge signs. One that struck me was, “If Michelle were here she’d thank you for what you are doing”. It instantly brings tears to your eyes. The 200+ km ride which benefits the Alberta Cancer Foundation began at the Spruce Meadows equestrian centre, south of Calgary, and travelled to Chain Lakes Provincial Park near Nanton, June 25. This route is a continual work out. You are riding in the foothills, so while you have some nice coasting, you have many long hard climbs. Every 25km or so there is a pit stop to have a bite to eat, have your bike serviced, rehydrate, apply sunscreen. Or, as the case was on Sunday, remove your soaking wet socks and replace them with thermal blanket wraps to help thaw your frozen feet. These pit stops were also an opportunity to visit with other riders. Saturday the weather was fantastic with blue sky and just a light breeze.Sunday we awoke to rain and +8, shivering and soaked very early in the day. For the added challenge we faced a strong head wind for the entire return trip. That’s when the ride became “very much a mental game over a physical one”. I paired up with an-

Coreen Spencer

other rider on the first hill climb out of camp and we stuck together for the entire ride, encouraging each other and visiting along the way to keep our minds off the weather conditions as much as possible. It’s definitely a tough ride. You learn to appreciate every flat stretch and every hill you get to go down. I have also come to understand that Alberta’s ride is the toughest of the four provinces hosting this event. I finished each day in under six hours while there were other riders on the route from 7 am to 7 pm. Anybody can do it with even a little training. I started training at the beginning of February

Flu clinics taking place across PA Parkland Health Region Continued from page 1

Chitek Lake, at the Chitek Lake Senior’s Centre October 14, 2011 from 9:30 am – 12:00 pm --

Drop In. Debden at the Debden Community Centre October 17 and 27 from 9:00 am – 12:00 pm and

Haunt our Halloween Aisle! Stop in for all your Halloween Supplies We carry  Decorations  Treats  Children’s Costumes  Adult Costumes

Everything You Need For October 31.

Woodland Pharmacy 9 Main Street ~ Open Sundays 12 Noon to 5 p.m. Ph: 747-2545 Fax: 747-3922

1:00 – 4:00 pm Hafford at the Hafford Clinic October 13 and 20 10 am – 12:00 pm and 1:00 – 4:00 pm by appointments Contact-549-2323. Leask at the Leask Seniors Centre October 12 and 27 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm Leoville at the Leoville Golden Ring Senior Centre October 12 from 10:00 am – 4:00 pm. Marcelin at the Marcelin Senior Centre October 24 from 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm Shellbrook at the Shellbrook Seniors Centre October 11 and 25,from 9:00 am-12:00 pm and 1:00 - 4:00 pm Shell Lake at the Schwartz Villa October 14 and 27 from 10:00 am 4:00 pm. Spiritwood and District Health Complex (Resource Room) October 11, 21 and 25, 2011; November 3 and 15 from 9:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm.

on an exercise bike in the basement. Then began riding outside by the end of March. I rode in every kind of weather, from snow, to sleet and high winds, and rain, to a surprise hail storm where I took shelter in a small grove of trees. As it was, the hail put several holes in my first helmet. I did get to know another rider, Twila Bamford, from Sylvan Lake before the event. She didn’t have as much training time as I had and her bike wasn’t as highly geared. After I had finished the event, I got a text from Twila that she was struggling on her way back. David, my husband, who was

also was a crew member at the event, backtracked, and I re-rode the last 20 or so kilometres with Twila to help keep her going. She crossed the line feeling such a great sense of accomplishment. As far as fundraising goes, I did really well. Each rider has to raise a minimum of $2500.00 to participate in the ride. I found the more people I talked to, everybody is affected in some way by cancer. David volunteered for the crew loading backpacks and sleeping bags, and hauling them from the start to the camp, unloading, then doing the same thing the next day. While waiting for Coreen to arrive at the finish line, David said he watched a range of emotions from riders. “As people crossed the finish line it’s hard to describe, some were absolutely ex-

Page 9

hausted, others were totally pumped. Some came across with arms in the air, while somebody else was bawling their eyes out, depending on what their motivation was.” For some who didn’t make it there was a “sense of defeat”, he said. I think many will go back and ride again this next year. As of today I am registered to take part again. I did it, felt great, know I can do it again and I feel like I have unfinished business in helping to fight cancer. I would like to pass on a huge thank you to the people in Shellbrook and area who supported my ride this year, whether financially or with words of encouragement. It has definitely meant a lot to me to have that support. Stay tuned for my adventure this coming spring as I start the journey again.

Shellbrook Curling Club Registration

October 20

7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at Curling Rink Register for Leagues (Monday & Wednesday regular draw, Thursday super league) Register as singles or as a team

All ages welcome Contact: Meg Ritchie 747-1010 or Deb Cripps 747-3326

Page 10

Shellbrook Chronicle October 7, 2011

Local Pink Glove Dance video made for Breast Cancer Awareness More than 190 staff members, physicians, volunteers and friends danced the day away at Victoria Hospital in September and are now seeking votes to support their video in the Pink Glove Dance video competition. The video was submitted to a competition to determine the best Pink Glove Dance video, sponsored by Medline Industries, Inc., manufacturer of the gloves and producer of the original Pink Glove Dance video. “We did it because we recognized we needed to do something fun, that wasn’t mandatory, to bring us all together as a team to appreciate all of our roles in delivering patient care,” said Sharon Griffin, Director of Acute Care Services. “It was a plus that it was for a good cause. If we were to win it would be icing on the cake but we already feel like we won just from the great participation that we had.” The Health Region’s video was filmed at Victoria Hospital on Sept. 17th. Barry Mihelwicz led the production crew from Big Drum Media, while the dancing was choreographed by Jennifer

Maczek. The video follows a breast cancer patient on part of their journey through the health care system. Our theme was inspired by the journey that patients diagnosed with breast cancer experience and how we as a health care team from all departments work together to support our patients physically and psychologically,” Ms. Griffin said. As part of the contest, Prince Albert Parkland Health Region’s video will be posted on www. pinkglovedance.com on October 3, along with the videos of the other participants to be viewed by the public. A link to the voting site will also be posted on the Region’s website (www.princealbertparklandhealth.com). Viewers can then vote on their favorite video (voting requires a Facebook® account). Voting takes place through “Liking” the video on Facebook which limits each account to just one vote per video. The top three winners receive a donation in their name to the breast cancer charity of their choice, with this Region choosing the Saskatchewan Cancer

A photo taken during the shooting of the “Firework” Pink Glove Dance video at the Victoria Hospital.

Agency. The winners will be announced October 28 on pinkglovedance.com. The song used in the Region’s video was “Firework” by Katy Perry. The artist gave permission to use this song specifically for the Pink Glove Dance competition. The original Pink Glove Dance video premiered in November 2009 and featured 200 Portland, Ore. hospital workers wearing pink gloves and dancing in support of breast cancer awareness and prevention. Today the video has more than 13 million views on YouTube® and has spawned hundreds of pink glove dance videos and breast cancer aware-

ness events across the country. A sequel was produced last October featuring 4,000 healthcare workers and breast cancer survivors throughout North America. Medline filmed the original Pink Glove Dance video at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center in Portland, Ore., which quickly generated thousands of responses, letters and e-mails from survivors, family and friends.

It has entertained and inspired laughter and, for many, it has evoked memories of their own battle with breast cancer or experiences faced by loved ones. “As a way to extend our breast cancer awareness campaign, we developed a pink glove called Generation Pink™,” said Andy Mills, president of Medline. “Gloves are also the first point of contact

between the healthcare worker and the patient. And, because the glove is pink, we hoped it would get people talking about breast cancer.” Medline is donating a portion of each sale of the pink gloves to the National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF). To date, Medline has donated more than $800,000 to the NBCF to fund mammograms for individuals who cannot afford them.

The Trudel Family and Erik Paquette will take to the stage at the Shellbrook Theatre on October 28th at 7:30 pm. Colin and Janice Trudel and their children Janaya, Jolissa, Graeme and Declan have been playing music most of their lives. The children have grown up doing this and loving every minute. They live in the Honeymoon district and they spend a lot of time on the road playing at Jamborees and community functions. They released their first CD “Believe” in 2010 and it had 6 SCMA nominations that year,

winning Gospel Album of the Year. Erik Paquette is from Debden and has been playing music since the age of five. His first instrument was the piano, but he has since added the violin, mandolin, guitar and banjo. He also released his first CD “Sidetracked” in 2009. He was a member of the P.A Strings Orchestra for seven years and has entertained at many community functions. Erik joined forces with the Trudel Family a couple of years ago and together they bring a great energy to the stage. They

have travelled to several Gospel Jamborees the last two summers and they are always a crowd favourite. Their show will be a mix of Gospel, Bluegrass and Old-Tyme fiddle music. They will surely leave you wanting more. Advance Tickets: $12. At the door: $15. Children 10&under: free Tickets available at Woodland Pharmacy, Shellbook; Trudel Autobody, Prince Albert; Mosaic Music, Prince Albert; Wheels 4 U, Debden; Mag’s Soup ‘n Such, Spiritwood.

Paquette, Trudels set for Shellbrook concert

Erik Paquette and the Trudels front to back: Erik Paquette, Jolissa Trudel, Janaya Trudel, Graeme Trudel, Declan Trudel (in front of the railing). Janice Trudel and Colin Trudel.

October 7, 2011

11102MC00

Shellbrook Chronicle

Page 11

Page 12

Shellbrook Chronicle October 7, 2011

Why you want a financial plan - and how to get one

Managing Your Money Paull Bourgeault, P B lt CFP

Paull Beaulieu, B li CFP

Senior Financial Consultant

Associate Consultant

306-747-2934, Shellbrook

306-747-3917, Shellbrook

High Profile Investment Fund Manager coming to Shellbrook. Join us Wed. Oct 12th, 7 pm, Elks Theatre PRESENTING: MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS FUND MANAGER: JOHN CAMPBELL, CFA, MBA, CA CAMLIN ASSET MANAGEMENT

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Shellbrook Chronicle Phone 306-747-2442 or email: chads@shellbrookchronicle.com

by Erl Svendsen Garlic (Allium sativum) is a member of the onion family and is related to regular cooking onions, chives, shallots and scallions. Native to central Asia, it has been cultivated and been a part of Asian, African and European cuisine for thousands of years. In addition, garlic has been used medicinally with several health claims including lowering cholesterol levels and high blood pressure; treating the common

Why you want a financial plan – and how to get one Canadians agree that financial planning pays off by delivering real value. In two recent studies – The Value of Financial Planning and The Value of Advice: Report -- a majority of Canadians agreed that by choosing financial advice, they accumulated more assets and were better prepared, financially, for retirement. Over 50% reported that they were on track to reach their desired lifestyle in retirement, compared to just 18% of those who don’t receive any financial advice. Most also felt that integrated financial planning improved their ability to save, made them less concerned about their financial situation and feel better about having the discretionary income to lead the life they want – and very importantly, it gave them greater peace of mind.

Do you need a financial plan? Yes – if you have an income, a family or hopes of one in the future, retirement lifestyle dreams, and for many other financially-rooted reasons that are unique to you. In general your financial plan should include investment planning, cash flow planning, education planning, estate planning, insurance planning, retirement planning, and income tax planning. But the key to a successful financial plan is tailoring each of those elements to you and your needs. To achieve that, a competent professional advisor will take you through this six step planning process: 1. Goal setting – to define and prioritize your goals and concerns. 2. Data gathering – bringing together pertinent financial information to understand your current financial situation. 3. Financial analysis – using your current and

projected financial situation to establish how much tax you will pay and how to reduce your taxes; whether you’ll have enough income to cover your retirement expenses and ways to ensure you will; what you can do to better meet your income needs; and strategies for protecting your family and income should you become disabled or die unexpectedly. 4. Plan formulation and recommendations – reviewing and agreeing on solutions for achieving your financial goals and improving your overall financial life. 5. Plan implementation – a written report that summarizes the steps you need to take to make your plan work. 6. Monitoring and plan review – staying on track by reviewing your plan at least annually and when major life events occur. Comprehensive finan-

cial planning is necessary. It’s also complex. It should be precisely tailored to your life as it is today and easily adaptable to the constant changes life brings your way. When you add a professional advisor to your financial team with the qualifications, tools and track record you can count on, you can rest assured that your personalized plan will do the job for your life. This column, written and published by Investors Group Financial Services Inc. (in Québec – a Financial Services Firm), presents general information only and is not a solicitation to buy or sell any investments. Contact your own advisor for specific advice about your circumstances. For more information on this topic please contact your Investors Group Consultant.

It’s time to plant... garlic cold; and reducing the risk of some forms of cancer. That aside, it is an essential ingredient in stews, savoury sauces, chili, dips, pickles and many other familiar dishes. There are two types of garlic: soft-neck and hard-neck. The difference between them is whether they send up a scape (stalk = hard-neck) or not (soft-neck). A number of sources suggest that the hard-neck type is hardier and therefore recommend-

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ed for growing northern climates like ours. On the other hand, the University of Saskatchewan vegetable researchers regularly test many vegetable cultivars including garlic. They have found that there are hardy cultivars of both types. Some of the hard-neck cultivars that performed well in the U of SK trials include ‘Atkin Russian’, ‘Czech’ and ‘Music’. ‘FL F4’ and ‘Vesey’ are soft-neck types that have also performed well. (More details on the U of SK vegetable cultivar trial results and seed company addresses can be found at http:// www.usask.ca/agriculture/ plantsci/vegetable/publication/index.htm.) You can also try growing garlic purchased from your grocery store but the majority of that has been grown in California and may not be adapted to our climate. A

Sask Perennial Society coming events Visit the Robin Smith Memorial Garden and the adjoining Heritage Rose Garden, now in full bloom, at the Saskatoon Forestry Farm Park and Zoo. Both are maintained by the Saskatchewan Perennial Society. Parking is only $2, but visiting the gardens are free. GARDENLINE is back for the season. 966-5865. Have a question about your lawn? about transplanting? about anything green that grows? or is dying on you? Give the friendly folks at Gardenline a call.

better local source is going to your farmer’s market. Buy some for eating now and some for planting. Growing it yourself couldn’t be easier. Like lilies, tulips and daffodils, garlic is best planted in the fall, ideally 4 – 6 weeks before the ground freezes. However, garlic can also be planted in the spring as soon as you can work the soil; it just may not produce as well. Well-drained soils amended with organic matter is best, but garlic will grow in a variety of soil types and pH. Try to avoid heavy clay and lowlying areas. Prepare your planting bed by amending the soil with compost or well-rotted manure and rototill in well. To prepare your garlic for planting, separate bulbs into individual cloves and select the largest for planting. Take care not to bruise the cloves as you break the bulb apart and keep the skin covering each clove intact. Into your prepared soil, plant the cloves pointy-side up

about 5 cm (2 in.) deep and 10 – 12 cm (4 - 5 in.) apart. Cover with soil; an additional 2 – 5 cm (1 – 2 in.) layer of organic mulch will help insulate the cloves over winter and supply them with additional nutrients in the spring. During the growing season, maintain even moisture, never allowing the soil to dry out completely. Your garlic will put down roots this fall ready from spring growth. Leaves appear in early spring followed by bulbdevelopment. Hard-neck garlic will send up stalks or scapes. These should be cut off just above the leaves to ensure all energy is sent into the bulb. The time do this is when they are just beginning to form and are still curled. The scapes are edible and can be sautéd in place of garlic cloves in your cooking, used in salads or elsewhere you want a mild garlic flavour. Garlic is ready to harvest in late summer when about 1/2 to 3/4 of the

leaves have yellowed. If left in the ground too long, the cloves will burst through the bulb wrapper (papery skin), reducing storage life when they are eventually harvested. Carefully dig up the bulbs and allow them to cure by lying them flat on a rack or hanging in bunches in a well-ventilated area out of direct sun. Do not remove any leaves until they have completely withered. Trim the stems and leaves leaving about about a 2 cm (1 in.) stub; trim off the roots at this time as well. Cleaning soil off the bulbs is easy after drying is complete and should only require gently rubbing. If grown in heavier soils, washing may be required. Store your garlic in a cool dark area. Remember to keep aside enough for planting to start the process over again. This column is provided by the Saskatchewan Perennial Society (www14.brinkster.c

October 7, 2011

Local students compete at sand golf provincials On Sept 22, 23 and 24th, Jordan Bouchard and Melinda Ardagh traveled to Bengough to take part in the Provincial High School Golf competition. Jordan finished 10th overall in the Boys competi-

tion; a great result for his first time at this level. Melinda had a great tournament. She was in third place after the first day. Then on Saturday she golfed the lowest girls’ score of the day to

maintain her hold on third place. Congratulations Melinda on your bronze medal in High School Girls Golf.

Melinda Ardagh, Jordan Bouchard and Mr. Bob Thompson

Shellbrook Chronicle

Page 13

Don’t go viral this influenza season! Influenza, commonly called the flu, is a highly contagious infection of the airways caused by the influenza virus. The Canadian Coalition for Immunization Awareness & Promotion (CCIAP) urges all Canadians – young and old – to protect themselves and those around them against influenza by getting this season’s influenza vaccine. Each year, influenza causes illness among millions of Canadians. “Some people think milder illnesses such as colds or even ‘stomach flu’ are influenza, but they are not,” says Dr. Bonnie Henry, Chair of CCIAP. “Influenza is a serious viral infection with symptoms of cough, fever, fatigue and weakness, headache, general aches and pains, and respiratory congestion. It can take several weeks to recover.” In vulnerable people such as those with chronic health conditions, pregnant women, children between 6 and 23 months of age, people who are morbidly

obese, Aboriginal peoples, residents of nursing homes and other chronic care facilities, and people 65 years of age and older, influenza can lead to serious complications and even death. Between 2,000 and 8,000 Canadians can die of influenza and its complications annually, depending on the severity of the season. “The most effective way to protect yourself from getting influenza is

to get vaccinated,” states Dr. Henry. “Immunization is a safe and effective way to prevent getting sick and spreading the virus to those around you – where you live, work and play.” The best time to get immunized against influenza is October through to December. Talk to your local public health department or your health care provider about this year’s influenza vaccine.

On September 28, 2011 Debden School held the “World Milk Day Biggest Mustache” contest. The biggest mustache was awarded to Kaiden, a kindergarten student at Debden School. Kaiden will receive free milk every day for one week. Nice mustache Kaiden!

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Shellbrook Family Bungalow

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Page 14

Shellbrook Chronicle

Pastor David Baldock, Parkside Pentecostal Church Is it just me, or is it hard to believe that it’s almost Thanksgiving again? School has been back in for over a month now and that all 3 of our boys are in school this year. I find that is something I am thankful for. They are enjoying it and we are enjoying a few more peaceful moments in our week. Actually, I’m the only one in our house who isn’t in school at the moment. I enjoy learning, but it does take some work and some time, so I am thankful not to have that

October 7, 2011

on my plate at the moment. For most of us it shouldn’t be hard to find at least a few things we are thankful for. We’ve had pretty good weather this year at harvest time, for one. Whether you’ve been in the field yourself or not, who can complain about 20 degree weather late in September? While finding things to be thankful for is not that difficult, it’s not something we often take time to do. Thanksgiving is a great holiday for this very reason. It is a reminder to be thankful for what we have, even in the midst of “troubling

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economic times.” We are still blessed, and so we should be thankful. In some homes, this coming weekend might be one of the few times that “saying grace” is remembered when sitting down to eat, but our daily bread should be a cause for regular thankfulness. It’s great to have a holiday that reminds us to be thankful, and to celebrate the good things God has blessed us with. But in my mind it should also be a time to remember those who are not as fortunate as we are. True thankfulness should begin with realizing how much we have and how much we are blessed, but it should not end there. It should also guide us to see the needs of others more clearly and encourage us to meet those needs according to our capacity. Thankfulness does not mean believing that I deserve the many blessings I have; true thankfulness means understanding that I don’t deserve it and that out of the blessing I have received, I have been given the capacity to bless others. The very idea of the thanksgiving holiday arose out of thanksgiving for

Friday, October 21 10:00 am

LARRY & EDNA ANDROSOFF Blaine Lake, SK

SELLER CONTACT(s): Larry & Edna Androsoff 306-497-2758 AUCTION COORDINATOR(s): Kim Kramer 306-445-5000

AUCTION DAY SCHEDULE: 10:00 am Shop Tools & Misc; 1:00 pm Live Internet Bidding on Major Equipment followed by grain bins. DIRECTIONS: From Blaine Lake at the junction of Hwy#12&40 (on south side of Gas Plus service station) take Twp Rd#445 5 miles east. Yard on south side of road.

HI-LITES INCLUDE: TRACTORS:1986 Case IH 4694 4wd tractor, 12 spd powershift trans, 20.8-34 duals, Re-Built engine in 1998, 7510 hrs showing; 1990 Case IH 7140 MFWD tractor,18 spd powershift trans, 20.8-42 duals, 4900 hrs showing; 1994 Degelman 12HD 12' dozer blade,; Cockshutt 1755 2wd tractor; Cockshutt 1650 2wd tractor; International W4 Antique tractor; COMBINE: 1997 John Deere 9600 sp combine, JD 914 p/u header, Kirby spreader, 1611 thr/2381 eng hrs showing, 25% down on sale day; SWATHERS: 1996 Massey Ferguson 220 26' sp swather, diesel, UII p/u reel, 1530 hrs showing, 25% down sale day; 1982 Versatile 400 20' sp swather; SEEDING & TILLAGE: Bourgault 528-32 34' air seeder cultivator; Bourgault 138 Tow behind air cart; Bourgault 536-42 41' cultivator; Case IH 5600 34' deep tillage cultivator; International 490 28' tandem disc; Degelman 7000 Strawmaster 50' heavy harrow bar; Laurier 70' harrow packer bar; Morris 70' harrow draw bar; Wilmar 500 fertilizer spreader; International 620 24' (2 - 12') double disc press drill; GRAIN HANDLING: Sakundiak HD6-41 6"x41' grain auger; Sakundiak HD6-37 6"x37' grain auger; Sakundiak HD6-29 6"x29' grain auger; Wheatheart 4" transfer auger; 2 - 125 bu hopper wagons; GRAIN BINS: 5 - Westeel Rosco 2000 bu hopper bins; Metal Ind 1650 bu steel bin; 2 - Inland 1350 bu steel bins; SPRAYING: Versatile 3800 60' field sprayer; HAYING & LIVESTOCK: 1990 New Holland 355 mix mill; New Holland 1033 Stackliner Bale wagon; Shaver hyd post pounder; HEAVY TRUCKS: 1975 International 1800 tandem axle grain truck, 478 V8 gas, 5+4 trans, Westeel Rosco steel box, 157,087 mi showing; 1964 International 1600 single axle grain truck, 304 V8 eng, 4+2 trans, 12' size wood box, 60,833 mi showing; 1974 Dodge 600 single axle gravel truck, 360 V8, 5+2 trans, 6 yard steel box, 48,095 mi showing; 1968 International 1500 single axle grain truck, 304 V8 eng, 4+2 trans, 12' wood box, 34,795 mi showing; LIGHT TRUCK: 1981 Ford F350 2wd dually service truck, 5.8L V8 gas eng, auto trans, 109,500 km showing; TRAILERS: 1992 Double M 16' car hauler trailer; 1991 Bergen 16' stock trailer; LAWN & GARDEN: Case 446 Garden tractor; ATVs: 1984 Honda 200 Big Red Three wheeler ATV; Sno-Jet Whisper Jet Snowmobile; OTHER MISC EQUIP: selection of shop tools & misc. farm supply. Partial listing only - See full list and pictures on the internet at www.kramerauction.com or call 306-445-5000 for more information IMPORTANT NOTICE: This listing is only a guide and in no way a guarantee of size, description or year. Please inspect all equipment to your own satisfaction. Complete terms and conditions are available at bidder registration.

SK Provincial Licence #914618

1-800-529-9958 See more photos and information at

mere survival. Pioneer communities both rejoiced and suffered together, sharing what they had with one another. It is also a celebration for a successful harvest, something our province continues to take very seriously. So remember this Thanksgiving weekend that the root of the holiday is thankfulness and sharing.

Obituary OLSVIK - Andrew David passed away suddenly in his home in Shellbrook on August 29, 2011. He was born November 28, 1952 in Victoria, B.C. to Jim and Mary Olsvik. David spent most of his life in Victoria were he worked at different jobs, his favorite being with the SPCA where he could work with animals. In his words, he loved all creatures ‘great and small’. He later moved to Prince Albert, then Shell Lake before moving to Shellbrook. David was predeceased by his Dad Jim (Dawna) and mother Mary (Ron) Barber and younger brother Jimmy Jr. He is survived by his sister Valerie Bell, a daughter Angela and son Christopher. His aunts Beulah (Peter) Nolan, Irene (John) Martin and uncle Gordon (Jan) Olsvik and numerous cousins. The family thanks Gordon Helgeton, Shirley Galloway and Dorothy Gray for their many acts of kindness to David, he appreciated it all very much, A memorial service was held in Shell Lake Cemetery on September 24th where he was laid to rest beside his brother. His cousin Rev. Ross Helgeton conducted the service and Uncle Peter Nolan read the 23rd Psalm and prayed. David will be missed more than he ever realized by his family and friends and his dog Charlie, a constant companion.

Regular Church Services, Sunday School and Special Church Events will be listed with the Directory FREE OF CHARGE

LUTHERAN CHURCH Zion - Canwood Sunday School, Worship Sunday, 9 a.m. St. John’s - Shellbrook Sunday School, Worship Sunday, 11 a.m. Pastor Doug Schmirler Parkside, Immanuel 10 a.m. - Worship & Sunday School Pastor Chris Dean -----------------------PENTECOSTAL CHURCH Parkside 10:00 a.m. Time of prayer 10:30 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sunday School Pastor David Baldock Shellbrook Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Sun., 11:00 a.m. - Worship Pastor David Bodvarson 747-7235 Canwood 11 a.m. - Worship Pastor Glenn Blazosek Leask Gospel Tabernacle Sunday 6:30 p.m. Pastor L. Trafford 306-466-2296 -----------------------EVANGELICAL FREE Big River 11:00 a.m. - Worship Bible Classes 9:45 A.M. Summer: 10:30 a.m. - 12 469-2258 Youth Nite: Fridays Mont Nebo Wed., 7:30 p.m. - Bible Study and Prayer. Sun., 10:30 a.m. - Worship Pastor Bill Klumpenhower -----------------------CATHOLIC CHURCH Debden Sun., 9:30 a.m. - Mass. Fr. Sebastian Kunnath Big River - Sacred Heart Sun., 11:30 a.m. - Mass Whitefish Sun., 2:30 p.m. - Mass. Victoire Sat., 7:30 p.m. - Mass. Fr. Bernabe Millan Sajonas Eucharist Celebrations Muskeg Sat., 7:30 p.m. - Mass Mistawasis Sunday, 3 p.m. St. Agatha’s Shellbrook Sunday, 9 a.m. Fr. Tru Le

St. Henry’s - Leask Sunday 11 a.m. St. Joseph’s - Marcelin Saturday, 7 p.m. Fr. Tru Le -----------------------PRESBYTERIAN Mistawasis 2nd & 4th Sunday Worship 3 p.m. Rev. Bev Shepansky -----------------------SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST 407-2nd Ave E, Shellbrook Sat., 9:45 a.m. - Sabbath School. Sat., 11:00 am Worship Broadcast on VOAR 92.1 FM Pastor Stanislav Kondrat 306-764-6853 -----------------------SOVEREIGN GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH Currently meeting in homes on Sunday morn. and Wednesday evenings. Parkside 747-2309, Leask 466-4498 Marcelin 226-4615 -----------------------ANGLICAN CHURCH Leask - All Saint’s 8 a.m. - Morning prayer Service. 9 a.m. Holy Communion Canwood - Christ Church 2 p.m. 1st & 3rd Sundays Evening Prayer 2nd & 4th Sundays Holy Communion Mont Nebo - St. Luke’s 2 p.m. - 1st and 3rd Sundays Holy Communion 2nd and 4th Sundays Evening Prayer St. Andrew’s Shellbrook Sunday, 11 a.m. Holy Communion Father Harnish 468-2264 -----------------------UNITED CHURCH Big River 1st & 2nd Sundays 1 p.m. - Worship at Anglican Church All Other Sundays -10 a.m. Shellbrook - Knox Sun., 10 am - Worship Pastor Dave Whalley

-----------------------ABUNDANT LIFE CHURCH Big River Sun., 10:30 a.m. - Worship

October 7, 2011

Shellbrook Chronicle

Page 15

Riviera’s ‘Cutter’ a saviour for Yankees Forty-year-olds playing major professional sports have almost always been hangers-on, oncegreat players merely playing out the string. Let’s cut to the chase and meet the exception — Mariano Rivera of the New York Yankees. Rivera, a Panamanian, will be 42 years old this November and he is still Major League Baseball’s best, most reliable, and certainly most amazing — considering his age — relief pitcher. This year, the ace closer saved 44 games for the Yanks, the fourth-best total of his career. Let’s also cut to the chase and zero in on why Rivera has defied every age-related athletic assumption and continued to mow down hitters and save victories for the Yankees, who are chasing yet another World Series title: The baffling ‘cutter.’ Rivera’s ‘cutter’ — a cut fastball — is the only pitch he throws. Normally, a one-pitch pitcher has about as much job security as a hockey player

Bruce Penton who goes over on his ankles, but that cutter is so dominating, so infuriatingly hard to hit that Rivera has racked up 603 saves since 1996 — the most in baseball history. Hardballmechanics.com says that the break on Rivera’s pitch is “so late, the batter must commit to swing before he knows where it’s going. That late break is a product of maximum rotation and just the right finger pressure on the ball.” Rivera throws with such ease of motion that his right arm seems like it could throw 95 MPH cutters for another 10 years. When he finally decides to retire, he will have established a saves’ record that will stand forever.

Rob Clark

Desnethé-MissinippiChurchill River

Under the guidance of our Conservative i government, Canada’s economy has remained strong in a time of global financial crisis. Prime Minister Harper’s stewardship of the economy has earned praise from financial experts and world leaders. By keeping taxes low, our government has kept our nation on track, creating jobs and economic growth. Members of the official opposition party in the House of Commons, the NDP, have made no secret of their desire to implement job-killing taxes should they gain power. In fact, the NDP have publicly criticized tax cuts made by our government. The strong mandate given to our government by the voters shows the faith the Canadian people have in our government and our economic policies. If any further proof of the effectiveness of our fiscal policies is needed, one only need check the statistics. Nearly 600,000 jobs have been created in our country since 2009. The manufacturing sector in our country continues to grow – particularly here in Saskatchewan. While the NDP claims to have the interests of the family in mind, it is our government that has put money in the pockets of Canadian families through our low-tax policies and economic development. Protecting families is a core value of our party, and we will continue to work to create safer communities, with more legislation in the works to bolster our strong stance against crime. These new laws are designed to protect children and the elderly. The global economy remains fragile, yet the stability created by our government’s fiscal policies speaks for itself. The last thing our economy needs is a job-killing tax hike, such as the one the NDP proposes, that would endanger our economic future. As always, I look forward to your letters, e-mails and calls. Write me at: Rob Clarke MP, House of Commons, 502 Justice Building, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0A6. I hope you will find time to visit my website http://www.robclarkemp.ca To contact me via e-mail use clarkr@parl. gc.ca or call my constituency office toll-free at 1-866400-2334.

Perhaps his longevity is due to his late start in baseball. Rivera was almost out of his teens before a scout noticed him — and even then, he was a shortstop who pitched in an emergency one day when the regular starter didn’t show up. He underwent elbow surgery at the age of 23 and the Yankees thought so little of him, they didn’t even protect him when Florida Marlins and Colorado Rockies held drafts to stock their expansion teams. But something clicked for Rivera in 1995. He discovered his cutter. He’s been dominating hitters ever since. And will he be a first-year inductee in the Hall of Fame? Automatic, just like that reliable cutter. • Dwight Perry of the Seattle Times: “Of all the soccer teams to be fined because fans threw cups of excrement, why did it have to be Cologne? • Mike Bianchi of the Orlando Sentinel recalls a couple of his favou-

rite quotes from legendary Clemson coach Frank Howard: — “I retired for health reasons. The alumni got sick of me.” — When the school president asked him to keep his salary quiet: “Don’t worry, I’m as ashamed as you are.” • Comedy write Jerry Perisho: “Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick was removed from a recent game with a hand injury. Every time Michael Vick suffers an injury, a party breaks out at the city dog pound.” • Tweet of the week from Steve Elling of CBS sports: “With playoff loss by Hunter Mahan, the four Golf Boys still winless since video came out. Finished Oh, Oh, Oh-forthe-entire-summer.” • Comedy writer Jim Barach: “Dustin Johnson says he isn’t mad that Tiger Woods stole his caddie. He is just glad he doesn’t have a wife.” • RJ Currie of sportsdeke.com: “An Edmonton woman is reportedly suing Kraft for $100,000 alleging one of their products caused her to suffer 10 minutes of depression. In a related story, a Toronto man has launched a $600,000 suit against Brian Burke for one hour of watching the Leafs play.” • Currie again: “Canada

stormed back late to tie Japan in their final game at the World Cup of Rugby. Surprised Canadians responded with, ‘What’s rugby?’” • Jeff Schultz, AtlantaJournal Constitution: “(Derek) Lowe didn’t quite provide $15 million worth of clutch. But given that he is now 9-17 with a 5.05 ERA, maybe there’s a chance the Braves at least qualify for federal disaster relief.” • Headline in the San Diego Union-Tribune, on the site of the next NHL Winter Classic outdoor game: “Philly fans . . . snowballs . . . did anyone really think this through?” • Packers tight end Tom Crabtree, via Twitter, watching Bears fans as the team bus exited Soldier Field after Sunday’s win: “Sad to see all these folks in Chicago missing every finger except the middle. I think they’re trying to wave to us.”

• Fox’s Terry Bradshaw, on the backlash after his criticism of Panthers rookie QB Cam Newton: “I’ve been ridiculed, insulted, I’ve been made fun of to the point I actually feel I’m still married.” • Twins third baseman Danny Valencia, to the Minneapolis Star Tribune, on how he and teammate Denard Span — in separate vehicles — collided en route to the MinneapolisSt. Paul Airport: “It was stop-and-go. I stopped, he goed.” • And a good nonsports line to finish off, courtesy of Mike Bianchi in the Orlando Sentinel: “Andy Rooney is retiring from “60 Minutes” at age 92. And, so, let’s remember what Rooney once said: “Vegetarian: That’s an old Indian word meaning lousy hunter.” Care to comment? Email brucepenton2003@ yahoo.ca

WILD ROSE/HOLBEIN LANDFILL The Wild Rose/Holbein landfill will be open

Saturday, October 15, 2011 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. To receive COMPOSTABLE MATERIALS ONLY, such as: branches, tree trimmings, leaves, grass, and garden refuse. There will be no charge for this service.

11102HS00

Page 16

Shellbrook Chronicle

October 7, 2011

BUSINESS

AUTOBODY REPAIR

WHITROW STOBBS & ASSOCIATES 764-2773 1-800-561-4357 Consultants for Simply Accounting AGRICULTURE

306.747.8124

Carlton Trail Hearing Clinic

Drs. Degelman, Miller, MacDonald & Fink

STUCCO/STONE/DRYWALL

2995 2nd Ave. West South Hill Mall, Prince Albert, SK

306-922-0003 TF 1-877-477-6863

www.carltontrailhearing.com

FARM EQUIPMENT

• Complete Autobody Repair • Lifetime Warranty • Auto Glass Repair • Paintless Dent Repair 492 South Industrial Dr. Prince Albert

PARTS Larry Adamko, Joe Clyke After Hours 960-1921 SERVICE Chris Lucyshyn After Hours 960-4916 SALES Brent Karr 232-7810

BRONZE CASTER

FINANCES

922-2040

INSURANCE

email: office@taitinsurance.ca www.taitinsurance.ca

SHELLBROOK 747-2896 CANWOOD 468-2227 LEASK 466-4811

1-877-898-8248 (TAIT)

Bronze cemetery plaques made at Mont Nebo, Sask.

Phone: 468-2853 Fax: 468-2252 email nisse@sasktel.net web: www.nissefoundry.com

Building Futures Together Serving our Communities in Debden and Big River Debden Big River

Phone 764-2288 Prince Albert

website: www.pavision.optometry.net

OPTOMETRIST Dr. Wayne Diakow Dr. Stephen Malec Dr. Carolyn Haugen Dr. Nicole Lacey

3 - 210 - 15th Street East, Prince Albert S6V 1G2

P.A. VACUUM

Saalmic Mechanical Services Ltd. Courteous, professional, reliable, plumbing, heating, gas fitting services

Phone 747-4332 Shellbrook, Sask.

PLUMBING

RED WING

AUTET

BEAU “LAC” FUNERAL HOME LTD.

BMW Plumbing & Heating

747-2828 (24 hours) www.beaulacfuneralhome.com

CURBING

1-131 Service Rd. East, Box 457 Shellbrook, SK S0J 2E0

For All Your Used Car and Truck Needs

RCM Curbing Prince Albert 960-8659

Ph 747-4321 anytime

Kwik Kerb Continuous Edging Suits: • Garden Soil & Bark Retention • Mower Strips • Driveway Borders & Edges • Landscaping Contouring • Paving Borders • Carparks

AUTOMOBILE

EAVESTROUGHING

Email: aatrading@sasktel.net Cell: 306-747-7168 Fax: 306-747-3481

TMK EAVESTROUGHING Eavestroughing • Fascia Soffits • Siding

Tyson Kasner t.m.k.@sasktel.net • Pump & Fuel Injector Overhauls • Drive-In Bay Service • Power Performance Products email: padiesel@sasktel.net

Fax: 763-0410

REMCO MEMORIAL REPRESENTATIVE

Residential & Farm Building

AUTOMOBILE

A & A Trading Ltd.

Pre-Arrangements Available

• Framing, Concrete, • Exterior/Interior Finishing

466-2159 466-7771

Cell Phone Number

306•747•8169

Donna Lovberg

John Couture

Tammy Smart Greg Spencer

Marjorie Brossart

Owned & Operated by Ed and Brenda Beaulac

FUNERAL SERVICES

LAWYER

Northern Funeral Service

DELBERT M. DYNNA Law Office

Prince Albert Shellbrook Birch Hills

Shellbrook Funeral Home We will be there, when you need us.

For all your Grain Hauling needs.

Shelltown Plumbing & Heating

Shellbrook

Dave Hjertaas

Debden, SK

WilcoxZuk-Chovin Law Office

FUNERAL SERVICES

Ph: 306-922-2210 Fax: 306-922-2689

Rocky Road Trucking Ltd.

VACUUM SALES

CONSTRUCTION

Allan Autet

TRUCKING

PLUMBING

AUTO ACCESSORIES

Mon. - Fri. 8 am to 5 pm Sat. 9 am to 3 pm (excluding long weekends) RR 5, Site 16, Comp 13 Prince Albert, SK S6V 5R3

Rodney (306) 427-4907

OPTOMETRISTS

Build our community: Buy locally manufactured

Hwy. 2 North - Pine Village

Ph:

Central Optometric Group

Fax: 306.747.3469

• CONSTRUCTION • Leask, SK

Frank (306) 427-4908

For Drywall, Boarding, Taping, Texture & Small Renos

3 - 2685 - 2nd Avenue West

www.back-to-your-roots.com

AUTO RECYCLERS

Ph:

LAWYER

747-2641

469-4944

For Stucco, Parging or Stone

PHONE 764-6311

Kimble Bradley

724-8370

P.A. Vision Centre OPTOMETRISTS

Contact Rocky Couture Cell (306)468-7872 or (306)724-2176

General Insurance Health Insurance Motor Licence Issuer

NISSE FOUNDRY Let us give you the dirt on soil health! Box 1236 Shellbrook, SK S0J 2E0

STUCCO SERVICES

Au.D., BCC - HIS Doreen Chyz, BC - HIS

...THE PULSE OF THE REGION

G. Whitrow, Prof. Acct. B. Stobbs, Tax Acct.

OPTOMETRIST

Dr. Jodi Haberstock,

DIRECTORY... ACCOUNTING

HEARING CLINIC

100A - 10th St. East Prince Albert, SK S6V 0Y7

Licensed Gas Fitter/ Journeyman Plumber New Construction & Renovations Furnace/Boiler/ Airconditioning Free Quotes 1-306-883-2350 Cell: 1-306-883-7467

Service - Parts

(all makes of vacuums welcome

FREE ESTIMATES

SALES

763-3202 #2-150-32nd St. W. Prince Albert, SK (behind Pizza Hut)

WELDING

Welding & Fabricating • Industrial Supply Agricultural & Machinery Repair Grader & Loader Service • Snow Removal

306-497-2670

Spiritwood, SK. S0J 2M0

www.blairindustrial.ca Blaine Lake, SK

REAL ESTATE

WELDING/REPAIR

Barry West, Owner/Operator

PARKSIDE WELDING & REPAIR MOBILE & SHOP

phone (306) 764-6856 fax (306) 763-9540

Your Best Move!

Brian & Bev Stobbs

Preferred areas of practice: Wills, Estates, Real Estate

www.tbmason.com

Greg Olson Ph: 747-2990 Cell: 747-8148 Parkside g-welding@hotmail.com

FUNERAL SERVICES

METAL SIDING/ROOFING

SECURITY

YARD CARE

24 Hours 82 Main Street 747-2494 Shellbrook, SK email: northfh@sasktel.net www.northernfuneralservice.ca

Claude Tucker

RIVER PARK FUNERAL HOME Prince Albert, SK

306-764-2727 1-888-858-2727 Pre-Arrangements Available Phil Fredette

Don Moriarty Colette Kadziolka Louise Robert

Lesley Sully Wayne Timoffee Andrea Langlois

922-1420

VersaFrameInc. Leask Roll Forming

A Division of VersaFrame Inc.

Metal Siding • Metal Roofing Color 80¢; WH - WH 77¢; Galvalume 66¢ FACTORY DIRECT Leonard Wollman

Office: 306-466-7921 Fax: 866-798-3696 Email: lvf@yourlink.ca www.versaframe.ca

• Municipal Bylaw Enforcement • Special Occasions Owner/Manager

Glen Andrusyk

306-747-8146

andrusykgcmj@sasktel.net

Total Lot Care

• Snow Removal • Roto Tilling • Levelling • Material Hauling • Finish & Rough Cut Mowing

Trac Skid Steer Dump Trailer ~ Tractor Call Cal at

1-306-714-7222

October 7, 2011

Shellbrook Chronicle Page 17

The Classifi fieds Shellbrook Chronicle Reaching over 10,000 people weekly. Personal Classifieds: $12.75 for 20 words + 20¢ additional words for the 1st week. Additional weeks: $7.75/week + GST. Classified Display: $17.50/column inch. Minimum 2 column inches - $35.00 + GST. For All Other Advertising Please Contact Our Office at: Ph: 747-2442 or Fax: 747-3000 Email: news: chnews@shellbrookchronicle.com advertising: chads@shellbrookchronicle.com P.O. Box 10, Shellbrook, SK S0J 2E0 Advertising Deadline - Monday: 5:00 p.m.

Subscriptions $57.00 + $2.85 (GST) = $59.85/year

SWNA Blanket Classifieds Reaching over 6 million people weekly. Cost for 25 words: Saskatchewan market .........$209.00 One Zone ............................$86.00 Two Zone ..........................$123.00 Alberta market .......................$259.00 Manitoba market ...................$179.00 BC market .............................$395.00 Ontario market ......................$429.00 Central Ontario ..................$139.00 Eastern Ontario ..................$143.00 Northern Ontario ..................$82.00 Quebec market English ...............................$160.00 French ................................$709.00 Atlantic market ......................$159.00 Across Canada ..................$1,770.00 (excluding French) Career Ads “Reaching Over 600,000 People Weekly” Rates: $7.79 per agate line Size: 2 col. x 2” ............... .....$424.00 Deadline for Booking/Material Tuesdays @ 12 Noon Contact the Shellbrook Chronicle @ 306-747-2442 or Email: chads@shellbrookchronicle.com All prices plus applicable taxes. NOTICE

This newspaper accepts advertisements in good faith. We advise that it is in your interest to investigate offers personally. Publications by this paper should not be taken as an endorsement of the product or services offered.

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

AUTOS FOR SALE

FOR SALE - 4’ x 8’ slate pool table. Can be seen at Big River. Phone 306747-2297 after 5 p.m. TFCH

FOR SALE - Portable dog pen $40.00; Wall fountain on pedestal $50.00; Ladies bike $50.00; Treadmill $500.00; Weight bench and weights, $75.00; Folding stair gates $5.00 Ph: 7473494 2-41CH

FOR SALE - Taking orders for Cornish giant roasting chickens for delivery in October. Ph: 466-4428, Cell 466-7817 4-40CH FOR SALE - Band sawn lumber, spruce 2x4 to 2x10 from 8 ft. to 20 ft.; 1x6, 1x8, 2nd cuts, and bull rails also timbers from 4x4 to 12x12. Phone 306-469-2490, Big River. TFCH

FOR SALE - 2003 Dodge 3500 SLT Laramie, crewcab, 4X4. 5.9 Cummins diesel, Auto. Loaded, incl heated leather seats. 285,000 km, $14,000. 468-2807, Canwood. 2-40CH

Classifieds Work!

747-2442

FOR SALE - 2007 Pontiac G5, 2 door, 1 owner, lady driven, excellent shape, 85,946 kms, 2 sets of tires. Ph: 7472669 2-40CH FOR SALE - 2002 Dodge Grand Caravan Olympic Edition 3.3L, V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, 68,200 Kms, very good condition. Asking $5,900.00 764-1363 or 9616316 TFCH

MACHINERY FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE- Beautiful family home 725 Cardinal Crescent Shellbrook 3 bedrooms upstairs, 2 downstairs, jacuzzi tub, 3 way gas fireplace, laundry on main floor, maple cupboards and cabinets, central vacuum, large backyard. $319,000 Contact Dean at 883-2992 2-40CH

WANTED

HOUSE FOR SALE in Debden Beautiful bi-level home, 1200 sq feet, 2.5 bathrooms, 4 bedrooms. Large yard and covered deck. Built in 1978 and well maintained. Asking $125,000.00 Call Alfred 724-4525 or Celine 724-2271 TFCH

WANTED

ACREAGES FOR SALE

Marcel Seeds

ACREAGE FOR SALE - Minutes from the thriving community of Shellbrook: Beautiful 1,800 sq. ft. home on 10 acres. 1 mile from pavement. 3+1 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, finished basement. Lots of good water plus much more. 7472376, Parkside. TFCH

M A C H I N E RY ESTATE SALE Tractors, JD 4020, FEL, 6725 hrs. V.G; JD620, gas, JD 4440, 6108 hrs. Hatford area. Ph: 306-480-7428, leave message. 4-41CH

All kinds of feed grain, including heated canola. Now distributors of feed pellets with up to 36% protein. Bulk Fertilizer For Sale

Debden Ph: 306-724-4461

WANTED - Round hay bales. Call Mike 469-7741 8-42CH WANTED - Feed barley, call Mike 469-7741 8-42CH WANTED - Grain land to buy or rent, preferably north of Shellbrook for 2012 crop year. Please call 780799-5210 4-43CH

Try the Classifieds!

747-2442

FOR SALE - 40 acres with 30 x 40 house, 42 x 72 shop, all steel in and out, 12” insulation, 22 x 32 fuel shed for storage with 16’ walls, 2 wells, 2 water bowls, good corrals, also ¼ pasture and hay, cross fenced, big dug out. Will sell 40

Great Family Home For Sale

3+1 bedroom 1,175 sq. ft. bungalow in Shellbrook. Open concept with vaulted ceiling in kitchen and living room. Close to schools in a great neighbourhood. Quick possession available. $254,000

Call 747-7545 for viewing

acres separate. Ph: 824-4908, 8417337 (Cell) Spiritwood 4-40CH

LAND FOR SALE FOR SALE - West 1/2 of 19-46-3w3, near Wingard Ferry which is 18 miles south of Shellbrook. 200 acres of seeded pasture, balance is native grass and bush in the river hills. Natural springs on the land. Contact Murray at 306-2234276. 5-41CH BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

WELDING, general repair, fabricating shop servicing a large area. Wholesale distributor, all equipment included. 6.944 sq. ft. building, excellent volume. $159,000. Also a 1,180 sq. ft. home in very good shape. $137,000, Marcelin, SK Call Del Rue 306-242-8221, Royal Lepage, Saskatoon 4-40CH BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY - Earn Income selling beautiful affordable Tablecloths, Doilies, Christmas Linens Home-shows, Craft fairs, Malls, Home-parties Laurie-Anne’s Victorian Lace & Linens Contact 1-888-2685555 www.laceandlinen.com

SERVICES Are You Tired of Sorting Through a Countless Number of Resorts? Don’t know which one to pick?

Let my experience assist in your selection.

My advice is Free! For info & a quote contact Rhonda Martin (306) 468-2633 or email

rhonda@ixtapatravel.ca

BLO VAC SERVICES

Furnace & Duct Cleaning • Chimneys • Fireplaces • Central Vacs • Residential & Commercial • Asbestos Abatement & Disposal

AUCTIONS AUCTIONS - RAY & HILDA KIMPTON AUCTION SALE: Sunday October 9, 2011 10:00 a.m. Hwy 7 from S’toon to Hwy 60, 3.2 km S. Tractors: Rec. Veh’s: Firearms: Livestock Related: Yard; Shop; Antiques; Furniture & Household . www.bodnarusauctioneering. com 306-227-9505 PL 318200SK

YARD SALE

Leslie Lepage Chitek Lake 984-4637 Cell 883-7768

If no answer we will return your call. Taking Fall Bookings Now

SERVICES - Let us inspect before you remodel, buy or build a new home. We check for heat loss, electrical problems, water damage and mold. Call today to avoid future problems. Biotherm Inspections, Stan, P.A. 306-961-6499 TFCH SERVICES - Stieb Custom Combining for the 2011 harvest Contact Angus 747-7070 2-40CH

Advertising Deadline is Monday 5:00 p.m.

YARD SALE: Shell Lake, at Diehl’s (Junction #3 & 12). Sat. & Sun., October 8 & 9, 9 am to 4 pm. A moving out sale. Everything must go. Household furniture: 2 table and chair sets, rocking chairs, lamps, Queen size bed. Chain saw, 12’ ladder, large filing cabinet and many miscellaneous items. Some

items sold prior to or after sale so ph: 427-2118 for info. 1-40CH COMING EVENTS

C O M I N G EVENTS: Donor’s Choice October 24 to 28 at Affinity Credit Union,Shellbrook. Watch for flyer in the Chronicle October 21 2-41C C O M I N G EVENTS - St. Joseph’s Parish Fall Supper, Sun., October 16, Marcelin Community Hall. 5 pm and 6 pm sittings. Adults $10, 12 and under $5, Preschool Free; Bingo, Fish Pond, Crown & Anchor to follow supper. 2-41CH C O M I N G EVENTS - Friends and relatives of Emil Jonasson are invited to celebrate his 99th birthday at Parkside Heritage Centre on Sat., October 8, 7:30 p.m.

In Memoriams may be put in the Chronicle for $18.50 (30 words) plus 20¢ per additional word

Shellbrook Chronicle Phone 306-747-2442 Fax 306-747-3000

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED - Shellbrook Motel is looking for 1 position, full time laundry, 5 mornings/week, part time fill in front desk, evenings/ weekends. Call or drop in 747-2631. TFCH WORK FROM YOUR CASTLE! Do you have 10 hrs a week? Teach over the internet. Free online training. Flexible hours. Great retirement income. www.key2wellness4all.com

. Shop Smart.. sifieds! s la C e h T p o Sh OLDS OUSEH

R 7,000 H REACH OVE

WEEKLY

k) ST (One wee G s lu p 5 .7 2 only $1 20 words for in the ional weeks it d d a r fo 5 .7 $7

icle

hron C k o o r b l l e h S

747-2442

October 7, 2011

Shellbrook Chronicle Page 17

The Classifi fieds Shellbrook Chronicle Reaching over 10,000 people weekly. Personal Classifieds: $12.75 for 20 words + 20¢ additional words for the 1st week. Additional weeks: $7.75/week + GST. Classified Display: $17.50/column inch. Minimum 2 column inches - $35.00 + GST. For All Other Advertising Please Contact Our Office at: Ph: 747-2442 or Fax: 747-3000 Email: news: chnews@shellbrookchronicle.com advertising: chads@shellbrookchronicle.com P.O. Box 10, Shellbrook, SK S0J 2E0 Advertising Deadline - Monday: 5:00 p.m.

Subscriptions $57.00 + $2.85 (GST) = $59.85/year

SWNA Blanket Classifieds Reaching over 6 million people weekly. Cost for 25 words: Saskatchewan market .........$209.00 One Zone ............................$86.00 Two Zone ..........................$123.00 Alberta market .......................$259.00 Manitoba market ...................$179.00 BC market .............................$395.00 Ontario market ......................$429.00 Central Ontario ..................$139.00 Eastern Ontario ..................$143.00 Northern Ontario ..................$82.00 Quebec market English ...............................$160.00 French ................................$709.00 Atlantic market ......................$159.00 Across Canada ..................$1,770.00 (excluding French) Career Ads “Reaching Over 600,000 People Weekly” Rates: $7.79 per agate line Size: 2 col. x 2” ............... .....$424.00 Deadline for Booking/Material Tuesdays @ 12 Noon Contact the Shellbrook Chronicle @ 306-747-2442 or Email: chads@shellbrookchronicle.com All prices plus applicable taxes. NOTICE

This newspaper accepts advertisements in good faith. We advise that it is in your interest to investigate offers personally. Publications by this paper should not be taken as an endorsement of the product or services offered.

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

AUTOS FOR SALE

FOR SALE - 4’ x 8’ slate pool table. Can be seen at Big River. Phone 306747-2297 after 5 p.m. TFCH

FOR SALE - Portable dog pen $40.00; Wall fountain on pedestal $50.00; Ladies bike $50.00; Treadmill $500.00; Weight bench and weights, $75.00; Folding stair gates $5.00 Ph: 7473494 2-41CH

FOR SALE - Taking orders for Cornish giant roasting chickens for delivery in October. Ph: 466-4428, Cell 466-7817 4-40CH FOR SALE - Band sawn lumber, spruce 2x4 to 2x10 from 8 ft. to 20 ft.; 1x6, 1x8, 2nd cuts, and bull rails also timbers from 4x4 to 12x12. Phone 306-469-2490, Big River. TFCH

FOR SALE - 2003 Dodge 3500 SLT Laramie, crewcab, 4X4. 5.9 Cummins diesel, Auto. Loaded, incl heated leather seats. 285,000 km, $14,000. 468-2807, Canwood. 2-40CH

Classifieds Work!

747-2442

FOR SALE - 2007 Pontiac G5, 2 door, 1 owner, lady driven, excellent shape, 85,946 kms, 2 sets of tires. Ph: 7472669 2-40CH FOR SALE - 2002 Dodge Grand Caravan Olympic Edition 3.3L, V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, 68,200 Kms, very good condition. Asking $5,900.00 764-1363 or 9616316 TFCH

MACHINERY FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE- Beautiful family home 725 Cardinal Crescent Shellbrook 3 bedrooms upstairs, 2 downstairs, jacuzzi tub, 3 way gas fireplace, laundry on main floor, maple cupboards and cabinets, central vacuum, large backyard. $319,000 Contact Dean at 883-2992 2-40CH

WANTED

HOUSE FOR SALE in Debden Beautiful bi-level home, 1200 sq feet, 2.5 bathrooms, 4 bedrooms. Large yard and covered deck. Built in 1978 and well maintained. Asking $125,000.00 Call Alfred 724-4525 or Celine 724-2271 TFCH

WANTED

ACREAGES FOR SALE

Marcel Seeds

ACREAGE FOR SALE - Minutes from the thriving community of Shellbrook: Beautiful 1,800 sq. ft. home on 10 acres. 1 mile from pavement. 3+1 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, finished basement. Lots of good water plus much more. 7472376, Parkside. TFCH

M A C H I N E RY ESTATE SALE Tractors, JD 4020, FEL, 6725 hrs. V.G; JD620, gas, JD 4440, 6108 hrs. Hatford area. Ph: 306-480-7428, leave message. 4-41CH

All kinds of feed grain, including heated canola. Now distributors of feed pellets with up to 36% protein. Bulk Fertilizer For Sale

Debden Ph: 306-724-4461

WANTED - Round hay bales. Call Mike 469-7741 8-42CH WANTED - Feed barley, call Mike 469-7741 8-42CH WANTED - Grain land to buy or rent, preferably north of Shellbrook for 2012 crop year. Please call 780799-5210 4-43CH

Try the Classifieds!

747-2442

FOR SALE - 40 acres with 30 x 40 house, 42 x 72 shop, all steel in and out, 12” insulation, 22 x 32 fuel shed for storage with 16’ walls, 2 wells, 2 water bowls, good corrals, also ¼ pasture and hay, cross fenced, big dug out. Will sell 40

Great Family Home For Sale

3+1 bedroom 1,175 sq. ft. bungalow in Shellbrook. Open concept with vaulted ceiling in kitchen and living room. Close to schools in a great neighbourhood. Quick possession available. $254,000

Call 747-7545 for viewing

acres separate. Ph: 824-4908, 8417337 (Cell) Spiritwood 4-40CH

LAND FOR SALE FOR SALE - West 1/2 of 19-46-3w3, near Wingard Ferry which is 18 miles south of Shellbrook. 200 acres of seeded pasture, balance is native grass and bush in the river hills. Natural springs on the land. Contact Murray at 306-2234276. 5-41CH BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

WELDING, general repair, fabricating shop servicing a large area. Wholesale distributor, all equipment included. 6.944 sq. ft. building, excellent volume. $159,000. Also a 1,180 sq. ft. home in very good shape. $137,000, Marcelin, SK Call Del Rue 306-242-8221, Royal Lepage, Saskatoon 4-40CH BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY - Earn Income selling beautiful affordable Tablecloths, Doilies, Christmas Linens Home-shows, Craft fairs, Malls, Home-parties Laurie-Anne’s Victorian Lace & Linens Contact 1-888-2685555 www.laceandlinen.com

SERVICES Are You Tired of Sorting Through a Countless Number of Resorts? Don’t know which one to pick?

Let my experience assist in your selection.

My advice is Free! For info & a quote contact Rhonda Martin (306) 468-2633 or email

rhonda@ixtapatravel.ca

BLO VAC SERVICES

Furnace & Duct Cleaning • Chimneys • Fireplaces • Central Vacs • Residential & Commercial • Asbestos Abatement & Disposal

AUCTIONS AUCTIONS - RAY & HILDA KIMPTON AUCTION SALE: Sunday October 9, 2011 10:00 a.m. Hwy 7 from S’toon to Hwy 60, 3.2 km S. Tractors: Rec. Veh’s: Firearms: Livestock Related: Yard; Shop; Antiques; Furniture & Household . www.bodnarusauctioneering. com 306-227-9505 PL 318200SK

YARD SALE

Leslie Lepage Chitek Lake 984-4637 Cell 883-7768

If no answer we will return your call. Taking Fall Bookings Now

SERVICES - Let us inspect before you remodel, buy or build a new home. We check for heat loss, electrical problems, water damage and mold. Call today to avoid future problems. Biotherm Inspections, Stan, P.A. 306-961-6499 TFCH SERVICES - Stieb Custom Combining for the 2011 harvest Contact Angus 747-7070 2-40CH

Advertising Deadline is Monday 5:00 p.m.

YARD SALE: Shell Lake, at Diehl’s (Junction #3 & 12). Sat. & Sun., October 8 & 9, 9 am to 4 pm. A moving out sale. Everything must go. Household furniture: 2 table and chair sets, rocking chairs, lamps, Queen size bed. Chain saw, 12’ ladder, large filing cabinet and many miscellaneous items. Some

items sold prior to or after sale so ph: 427-2118 for info. 1-40CH COMING EVENTS

C O M I N G EVENTS: Donor’s Choice October 24 to 28 at Affinity Credit Union,Shellbrook. Watch for flyer in the Chronicle October 21 2-41C C O M I N G EVENTS - St. Joseph’s Parish Fall Supper, Sun., October 16, Marcelin Community Hall. 5 pm and 6 pm sittings. Adults $10, 12 and under $5, Preschool Free; Bingo, Fish Pond, Crown & Anchor to follow supper. 2-41CH C O M I N G EVENTS - Friends and relatives of Emil Jonasson are invited to celebrate his 99th birthday at Parkside Heritage Centre on Sat., October 8, 7:30 p.m.

In Memoriams may be put in the Chronicle for $18.50 (30 words) plus 20¢ per additional word

Shellbrook Chronicle Phone 306-747-2442 Fax 306-747-3000

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED - Shellbrook Motel is looking for 1 position, full time laundry, 5 mornings/week, part time fill in front desk, evenings/ weekends. Call or drop in 747-2631. TFCH WORK FROM YOUR CASTLE! Do you have 10 hrs a week? Teach over the internet. Free online training. Flexible hours. Great retirement income. www.key2wellness4all.com

. Shop Smart.. sifieds! s la C e h T p o Sh OLDS OUSEH

R 7,000 H REACH OVE

WEEKLY

k) ST (One wee G s lu p 5 .7 2 only $1 20 words for in the ional weeks it d d a r fo 5 .7 $7

icle

hron C k o o r b l l e h S

747-2442

October 7, 2011

Shellbrook Chronicle

Page 19

Page 20

Shellbrook Chronicle October 7, 2011

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Shellbrook Chronicle