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DISCOVERING BUTTERFLIES B1

St. Teresa of Avila student Hayden Angevine seems excited to be holding a butterfly.

Volume 83 Number 27 © 2011 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood Email: westernhills@communitypress.com Website: communitypress.com We d n e s d a y, M a y 1 8 , 2 0 1 1

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Renewal levies considered Green Township issues would not raise taxes

By Kurt Backscheider

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

‘Hair for Hope’ to help others

Gale Oehler has been encouraging every woman and girl she knows to grow long hair. The White Oak resident wants to take her scissors to as many ponytails as possible. FULL STORY, A2

Green Township officials are considering placing two renewal levies on the November ballot. The trustees approved resolutions at the board meeting Monday, May 9, requesting the Hamilton County Auditor certify information to the township for consideration of a safety services levy and a street levy. Trustee David Linnenberg said voters approved a safety services

levy and a street levy five years ago, which will expire at the end of this year. He said the board is considering whether to place issues on Linnenberg the November ballot asking residents to renew the existing levies. The renewal levies would not raise taxes. “We’re not looking to raise taxes in this economy,” Linnen-

berg said. Green Township Administrator Kevin Celarek said both the safety services levy and the street levy are 0.5-mill levies. Township voters first approved the safety services levy, which supports the township’s police and fire services, in 1986. Celarek said the street levy, which helps pay for repair of township streets and bridges, was originally a 1-mill levy that township officials reduced to a 0.5-mill levy 10 years ago.

He said the safety services levy generates an estimated $276,000 for the township each year, and the street levy brings in an estimated $390,000 annually. The street levy costs the owner of a home with a market value of $100,000 about $9 per year in taxes. The safety services levy costs the owner of a $100,000 home about $6.50 per year in taxes. Township officials have until Aug. 10 to decide whether to place levy issues on this November’s ballot.

Miami Township celebrates facility opening By Jennie Key jkey@communitypress.com

Fisherman lobby to reopen lake

At least two avid fishermen want to cast off at Clearview Lake at the Delhi Township Park. Jim Snyder, Delhi Township, and Tom White, Covedale, have been lobbying township officials to restock the lake and re-open it for public fishing. FULL STORY, A2

To the stage

In a matter of weeks, the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts stage will belong to the youth. The Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre (CYPT) prep program will take place 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, June 13, through Friday, June 17, at the center, 4990 Glenway Ave. The program is designed for ages 10-13 interested in acting and theater arts. FULL STORY, A3

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Rain didn’t dampen the enthusiasm of Miami Township residents for their new fire station and community center as hundreds turned out for the dedication and open house at the new facility Saturday, May 14. The township ceremony included speeches by township officials and remarks from U.S. Rep. Steve Chabot. “We had a lot of great sponsors,” said Trustee Joe Sykes. “We asked for their help to make this a great event, and they really came through.” The $6.9-million complex, includes administrative offices, a community center and Miami Township Fire Station 70. The project was started in February 2010. The community center has an event area designed to accommodate up to about 250 people and a caterer’s kitchen. There is an elevator to a roughly finished basement area, which will be used by the community’s Scout troops. There are also township offices and a meeting area for the trustees. The project, on about 7.5 acres at 3780 Shady Lane, also includes a new ball field and a walking trail around the perimeter. Trustee Paul Beck thanked the Miami Township officials who had the foresight to buy the land at Bridgetown and Shady Lane. “Without them, who knows if we would be here today,” he said. Trustee Jack Rininger Jr. said residents love the fact that the building is paid for. “We made sure all the bills were paid before the dedication,” he said. “It’s free and clear.” The project was paid for with tax increment finance money, a process that allows tax money to be set aside from normal recipients, such as county levies, and dedicated for township capital improvement projects. Miami Township adopted a

JENNIE KEY/STAFF

The new Miami Township Fire Station and Community Center at 3780 Shady Lane was dedicated May 14 with speeches, thanks and a ribbon cutting. From left, Assistant Chief Michael Wells, Fire Chief Steve Ober, Deputy Chief Jim Hughes, Miami Township trustees Joe Sykes, Jack Rininger Jr. and Paul Beck, fiscal officer Cindy Oser and Congressman Steve Chabot all sliced a little of the red ribbon.

Dedication committee

The Dedication Ceremony Committee organized Saturday’s event. Co-chairs were Bob Polewski and Mark Hoffman. Members were Joe and Jean Sykes, Jack and June Rininger Jr., Paul and Pat Beck, Cindy and Chris Oser, Steve and Margie Ober, Angie Bayer, Mike Wells, Kari Kuh, Sue McCabe, Terry Simpson, Chuck and Joy Windholz and Roger and Maureen Collins.

JENNIE KEY/STAFF

The new Miami Township Fire Station and Community Center at 3780 Shady Lane was dedicated May 14 with speeches, thanks and a ribbon cutting. Chief Deputy Jim Hughes and Assistant Chief Michael Wells unveiled this memorial to fallen firefighters during the dedication ceremonies. The flag is at half staff to honor Warren County Sheriff’s Sgt. Brian Dulle, killed in the line of duty May 10. blanket tax increment finance resolution in 1996. The township also unveiled a memorial to its fallen firefighters during the ceremony, two black stone slabs behind the new flagpole at the complex. Honored on the memorial were Walter Wade, who died March 6, 1994, and William Ellison, who

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trustees and the dedication date, May 14. The Pipe and Drum Corps of the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office helped with the dedication of the memorial, playing “Amazing Grace.” At the close of the ceremonies, firefighters observed a fire service tradition, wetting down a fire truck before escorting it into a bay in the new fire house. Following a ribbon cutting ceremony at the community center entrance, there was entertainment in the main room, and residents toured the buildings. The festivities went on into the night, with a spaghetti dinner, music by Howl-n Max and fireworks.

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Western Hills Press

Index Classifieds.....................................C Father Lou ...................................B3 Food.............................................B4 Obituaries....................................B7

News

May 18, 2011

Police...........................................B8 Schools........................................A5 Sports ..........................................A7 Viewpoints ................................A10

St. Ignatius parishioner collects ‘Hair for Hope’ By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood Email: westernhills@communitypress.com Website: communitypress.com

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Find news and information from your community on the Web Addyston– cincinnati.com/addyston Bridgetown – cincinnati.com/bridgetown Cheviot – cincinnati.com/cheviot Cleves – cincinnati.com/cleves Dent – cincinnati.com/dent Green Township – cincinnati.com/greentownship Hamilton County – cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty Mack – cincinnati.com/mack North Bend – cincinnati.com/northbend Westwood – cincinnati.com/westwood News Marc Emral | Senior Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . 853-6264 | memral@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider | Reporter . . . . . . . . . 853-6260 | kbackscheider@communitypress.com Heidi Fallon | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 853-6265 | hfallon@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . 248-7573 | mlaughman@communitypress.com Tony Meale | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . 853-6271 | tmeale@communitypress.com Nick Dudukovich | Sports Reporter . . . . . . 248-7570 | ndudukovich@communitypress.com Advertising Doug Hubbuch | Territory Sales Manager. 687-4614 | dhubbuch@communitypress.com Sue Gripshover Account Relationship Specialist. . . . . . . . . 768-8327 | sgripshover@communitypress.com Dawn Zapkowski Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . 768-8215 | dzapkowski@communitypress.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 853-6263 | 853-6277 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager .853-6279 | schachleiter@communitypress.com Maribeth Wespesser | District Manager . . .853-6286 | mwespesser@communitypress.com Mary Jo Schablein | District Manager . . . .853-6278 | mschable@communitypress.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242-4000 | www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

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Gale Oehler has been encouraging every woman and girl she knows to grow long hair. The White Oak resident wants to take her scissors to as many ponytails as possible. Oehler, a St. Ignatius parishioner, is organizing a hair donation event at the church to coincide with the parish’s upcoming health fair. Oehler’s “Hair for Hope” event will benefit the Pantene Beautiful Lengths campaign, which provides cancer patients with wigs made from real hair. “My mom had brain cancer 20 years ago,” said Oehler, who’s been a hairstylist for 35 years. “I’ve wanted to do an event like this for a while.” Women and girls who have 8 to 10 inches of hair they would like to donate to Pantene Beautiful Lengths are more than welcome to participate in Hair for Hope. Oehler and her fellow stylists from Hair Management Salon in Bridgetown will cut and style hair at the event, set for 10 a.m. to 2

By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Members of the Oak Hills community will gather to remember one of their own, and also raise money for a good cause. The Oak Hills Athletic Boosters and the Lauren K. Breaux Memorial Foundation are collaborating to present the fifth annual Laps for Lauren 5K benefit run/walk May 21.

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Faith Redwine, 8, of Reading, sits patiently as she waits for hairstylist Joan Junker, right, a Monfort Heights resident and owner of Hair Management Salon, to put her hair in ponytails and cut it off. Redwine is donating her long locks to the Hair for Hope campaign at St. Ignatius Church. p.m. Tuesday, May 31, at St. Ignatius, 5222 North Bend Road. Those who would like to donate, but are unable attend the event, can stop by Hair Management anytime between now and May 31 to donate and then have their hair styled for free. “We’re standing ready,” Oehler said. Green Township resident Sharon McBreen was among a group of women who donated their hair at

the salon Friday, May 13. “Gale is the ring leader,” said McBreen. “She told me about donating hair to Beautiful Lengths, and I thought, ‘Why not?’ This is a good cause.” She said she was nervous about seeing 8 inches of her hair chopped off, but knowing it would go toward helping someone get through a difficult time eased her fears. “I talked my sister and sister-in-law into growing

their hair long, too,” she said. Oehler said every generous hair donation has a story behind it. For inspiration, she said she looks to a plastic bag filled with hair donated by Michelle Nymberg, who lost her battle with cancer three weeks ago. Oehler said Nymberg donated her hair last July so that a wig could be made for another woman fighting cancer. “Everyone has a story,” Oehler said. “This will be our first ever Hair for Hope. A lot of nervous students will be donating their hair for the first time, and we are very proud of them.” For more information about the event, visit www. sainti.org, email Oehler at galeoehler@fuse.net or call her at 574-3337, ext. 24.

Race honors former Oak Hills volleyball player

SUNDAY

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KURT BACKSCHEIDER/STAFF

Hairstylist Gale Oehler, right, of Green Township, cuts an 8-inch ponytail off Gwynne Krekeler at Hair Management Salon in Bridgetown.

Oak Hills Athletic Director Jan Wilking said Lauren Breaux was a volleyball player at Oak Hills High School who suffered a fatal cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 16. Breaux’s family established the Lauren K. Breaux Memorial Foundation to help female athletes, while keeping her memory alive. Wilking said money raised for the foundation has been awarded to Oak Hills High School female athletes as well as the Our Lady of Victory Athletic Association. The foundation has awarded more than $55,000 in scholarships to Oak Hills students, and donated more than $8,000 to various area charities. All proceeds from the 5K event go directly to the foundation. Laps for Lauren begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 21, at Storywoods Park, 694 Pontius Road, behind Rapid Run Middle School, in Delhi Township. Registration forms and information about the benefit can be found at www.LapsforLauren.com. Wilking said she hopes to see tremendous support from the community. “This is a great family event for a great cause,” she said.

HEIDI FALLON/STAFF

Jim Snyder, left, and Tom White meet up at what used to be their favorite fishing spot at Delhi Township Park. Snyder, Delhi Township, and White, Covedale, continue lobbying township trustees to stock the Clearview Lake and permit public fishing.

Fishermen lobby to re-open Clearview Lake in Delhi park By Heidi Fallon hfallon@communitypress.com

At least two avid fishermen want to cast off at Clearview Lake at the Delhi Township Park. Jim Snyder, Delhi Township, and Tom White, Covedale, have been lobbying township officials to restock the lake and re-open it for public fishing. “I’ve been fishing here forever and it’s the only lake around,” Snyder said. “It’s an asset to the community and I think we’ve answered all of the concerns the trustees have.” The township acquired the lake when it bought the Clearview Tavern property several years ago. The lake has been cleaned, a fountain and walking trail added since then, but has been closed to fishing. Trustee Jerry Luebbers said the cost is his main concern. “We’re still undecided about it, but my primary concern is our budget,” Luebbers said. “We’re looking for ways to cut costs, not spend money.” Safety is also a concern to all three trustees. They’ve said the close proximity of the trail would pose a risk to walkers. White said the cost to stock the lake would be minimal, estimating it would cost about $240 to

put 150 pounds of fish in the lake. ���We have people who would be willing to donate money for the stocking,” White said. The lake already has thousands of blue gill and lots of crappie, the men said. They have suggested making it a pay lake with an honor box to eliminate the need of park staff being at the lake. They’ve also said they, and others, would volunteer to clean and maintain the lake site. “There used to be a lot of lakes around here, but this is the only left,” Snyder said. “They’ve all closed due to development. “If fishing was limited to the east side,” he said pointing toward the park entrance driveway, “there shouldn’t be a safety concern.” Sandy Monahan, parks and recreation director for the township, said she had recommended the lake be open to fishing for a trial period. “That was before the budget crunch,” she said. “Now, I’m in the process of reviewing the fishing feasibility and getting information from state wildlife officials.” Trustee Al Duebber said he supports the lake fishing, but wants the information Monahan is gathering before he and his fellow trustees resume discussions on the issue.

News

May 18, 2011

Western Hills Press

A3

Teenagers chance to learn theater arts Seton AD is a hall inductee

By Monica Boylson mboylson@communitypress.com

Panels of glittery red fabric frame center stage. Reflections of light bounce off the curtains creating an illusion of movement. Vegas-themed props are in place for “Nunsensations – The Nunsense Vegas Revue” appearing at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts. But in a matter of weeks, the stage will belong to the youth. Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre (CYPT) prep program will take place 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, June 13, through Friday, June 17, at the center, 4990 Glenway Avenue. The program is designed for ages 10-13 interested in acting and theater arts. “Our mission is to provide a continuum of theatrical opportunities, from a young person just getting their feet wet to the seasoned professional, we have a place for you in our the-

PROVIDED.

Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre Prep program participants from 2010, from left, Carolyn Seitz, Reece Spille, Katie Reith, Colleen Hart, Mary Kate Beck, Ryan Smith, James Schmidt, Deshonna Croft, Loren Pfeiffer and Melanie McGregor Performing Arts has seen many former CYPT participants audition for regular season shows. Most recently several from the prep program were cast in “A Christmas Story.” In place since 2009, the CYPT prep program has offered individuals insight into the theatrical world. Allison Hinkel, 22, CYPT prep instructor said, “We

atrical world,” said Tim Perrino, 54, the Covedale center’s executive artistic director. The one-week intensive arts program is designed as an opportunity for learning and fun. It can be a stepping stone to the Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre program designed for 13 to 19 year olds. Covedale Center for the

want to provide the basic theatrical experience, including stage presence, memorization, and to have fun.” At 6 p.m. on Friday, June 17, the students will host a free performance at the Covedale Center for Performing Arts highlighting the skills they learned during the week. The performance will consist of mono-

logues, group scenes and a song and dance number. Anyone interested in participating can register by calling 513-241-6550 or by visiting www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. Tuition is $100 for the week. Financial assistance is available but limited. The target class size is 25. Registration closes June 9.

Delhi woman watching community garden grow grown.” Stross and her small band of volunteers have secured free seeds and area farmers are donating compost materials. “We probably won’t be able to have the soil ready for planting this spring, but we want to make sure we’re preparing the ground the right way the first time,” Stross said. Bill Lonneman, Mount professor and chair of the college’s Environmental Action Committee, has been supportive of Stross’ gardening efforts.

“Our mission is to build a community by growing healthy food, providing education about organic edible gardening and provide a safe gathering place,” Stross said. An avid and experienced gardener herself, Stross is seeking likeminded folks from the township and beyond to join her in planting the hillside adjacent the Seton Center. “The garden is free and open to the college community and township residents,” she said. “There’s no fee, but it is a co-op garden with people sharing what’s

By Heidi Fallon hfallon@communitypress.com

Amy Stross has high hopes and a decidedly green thumb. The Delhi Township woman is putting both to work to transform a plot of land at the College of Mount St. Joseph into a community garden. The Hillside Community Garden, for which Stross is the coordinator, is in the early stages with volunteers working weekends and when they can to clear the 60- foot-by90-foot plot.

“When she approached me with the idea, I thought it was a great way for the college, community and our staff to get involved,” he said. Along with the plot of land, the college is providing the water supply, Lonneman said. Stross and her gardeners meet every Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon to tackle clearing and preparing the garden area. They also will gather at the garden from 5-8 p.m. on Wednesday starting May 4. For more information go to HillsideGardenDelhi.com.

Seton High School Athletic Director Janie Shaffer has been inducted into the Northern Kentucky High School Athletic Directors’ Hall of Fame. When Shaffer attended Beechwood High School, she lettered 14 times in two sports – five times for volleyball and nine times for tennis. In volley- Shaffer ball, she was established as one of the top performers in the state and country. In tennis, Shaffer was recognized as the regional doubles champion, a Kentucky High School Athletic Association state semifinalist and team most valuable player all four years in high school. Shaffer is not only Seton’s athletic director, she is a Title IX attorney. “My back background is in Title IX,” she said. “Working as an athletic director in an all-girls schools is an ideal job for me and something I thoroughly enjoy,” said Shaffer. “I try to share my experience with the girls at Seton and help them in any way to realize their athletic potential,” she said. Shaffer is completing her second school year with Seton High School.

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Western Hills Press

News

May 18, 2011

BRIEFLY˙ The team at the Chick-fil-A restaurant on Glenway Avenue in Green Township invites the community to join in supporting military personnel serving overseas throughout the month of May, National Military Appreciation Month. The restaurant will organize a letter-writing campaign to troops and raise funds for Operation Homefront. Customers may purchase military appreciation T-shirts at the restaurant, and a portion of sales will be donated to Operation Homefront, which provides emergency financial and other assistance to families of service members and wounded soldiers. Customers who then wear the T-shirt to the Green Township Chick-fil-A in May will receive a free chicken biscuit, an order of nuggets or a chicken sandwich. Guests can support troops by writing letters during the weekly Family Night events at the restaurant from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. every Tuesday in May. “One of our team members, Erica Rehage, has a good friend serving overseas and came to us with this great idea to support our troops,” said restaurant operator Michael Calloway. “Sometimes it feels like there is little we can do for our troops, but through supportive letters and partnering with organizations like Operation Homefront, there are ways we can support the brave men and women who do so much for us.” The restaurant also will donate a percentage of sales made between 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 25, to Operation Homefront.

Spring musical

All concerts are in the Seton Performance Hall. Performances are free, but donations are welcome. Visit www.gocmo.org for more information, visit the group’s Facebook page or call the orchestra hotline at 941-8956.

Travel down the rabbit hole and through the looking glass for an evening of entertainment at St. Martin of Tours School. St. Martin eighth-graders will present their production of Disney’s “Alice in Wonderland Jr.” at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 19, and Friday, May 20, in the school auditorium, 3729 Harding Ave. Enjoy the antics of Alice, the White Rabbit, the Mad Hatter, March Hare, Cheshire Cat and all the rest as they sing and dance to Disney favorites including, “I’m Late,” “A Very Merry Unbirthday,” and “Zippedeedodah.” Tickets are $2 for adults and $1 for children, with a $5 maximum per family. Seats are first come, first served. For more information, call St. Martin School at 661-7609 and ask for Shannon Alter.

Youth reunion

The Western Hills Church of Christ, 5064 Sidney Road, is having a youth group reunion Sunday, May 22. Youth group members and sponsors of the past and present are invited. There will be a special program at 9:30 a.m. with stories, pictures and videos. There will be a combined service at 10:45 a.m. Immediately following the morning services, there will be special luncheon. A donation of $5 is asked for the luncheon. After lunch, the group is invited to Christ’s Church at Mason for a concert by the Mount Mission School. Call the office at 251-2232 to make a reservation.

Musical cruise

The Cincinnati Metropolitan Orchestra will present its spring concert, “Cruise the Danube,” at 3 p.m. Sunday, May 22, in the Seton Performance Hall, 3901 Glenway Ave. This performance features compositions by German and Austrian composers, including Strauss and Mozart. Special guests include vocalists Michele Klug Hillgrove and William Reed. Enjoy the strains of the “Magic Flute Overture,” the “Blue Danube Waltz” and other favorites. The orchestra will continue its 15th anniversary celebration with a series of summer concerts titled “Back by Popular Demand,” which will feature audience and orchestra favorites from past performances.

Electronics recycling

The Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District will collect obsolete computer equipment and televisions from Hamilton County residents through Oct. 31 at 2trg, 11085 Kenwood Road, Blue Ash. Drop-off unwanted computer equipment or televisions from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Residents must bring proof of residency, such as a driver’s license or utility bill, to participate. This program prohibits the acceptance of computer equipment or televisions from businesses, churches, schools and nonprofit organizations. Acceptable items include:

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CPUs, hard drives, personal copiers, docking stations, monitors, scanners, printers, cell phones, televisions, hard drives, tape and disk drives, VCR and DVD players, circuit boards, cables, main frames, servers, terminals, fax machines, PDAs, back up batteries, chips, keyboards, mice, modems, computer speakers, CD Rom drives and laptops. The drop-off also will be open two Saturdays: June 18 and Oct. 15 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The program will be closed May 30, July 4 and Sept. 5. For more information, call 946-7766 or visit www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org.

Pretty yards sought

The Covedale Garden District Group is sponsoring the 2011 Yard/Garden Contest for the neighborhood’s garden district area. Monthly winners will be selected throughout the months of June, July and August by a panel of judges. Each monthly winner will be recognized with a sign in their yard and a traveling urn with flowers for the month. Nominations are being accepted now and can be emailed to CovedaleGardenDistrict@yahoo.com. Include neighbor’s name, address and telephone number when submitting nominations.

50th reunion

The 50th reunion for the Western Hills High School Class of 1961 will be celebrated the weekend of June 10 and June 11. The Friday night reunion will be at the Nathanael Greene Lodge, 6394 Wesselman Road, from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Cost is $20 per person. Saturday evening there will be a dinner at Twin Lanterns, 6191 Harrison Ave., from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Cost is $50 per person. Musical entertainment

from the 1960s will be provided by The Van-Dells. To make a reservation or for more information, contact Marilyn Rupprecht Hoehne at 513-368-2980.

Seton science camp

Seton High School takes science seriously. Students from across Greater Cincinnati are invited to spend a few days at Seton learning about different aspects of science through two science camps this summer. The first camp – Camp Dragonfly – allows students in third-, fourth- and fifth-grade to experience the basics of science through music, drama, creative writing, movement and dance. The camp is 9 a.m. to noon, June 20-24. Investigation Seton allows students in fifth-, sixth- and seventh-grade see what it is like to be a forensic expert. The camp runs 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. July 11 through July 15. Each camp costs $60 per student. More information and registration forms are available at www.setoncincinnati.org.

Park appreciation days

The Hamilton County Park District would like to say thank you to Hamilton County residents for their continued visitation and support of the parks. June 1, July 1 and Aug. 1 have been designated as “Free Firsts.” During Free Firsts appreciation days, county residents can enjoy free entry into a Hamilton County Park without a motor vehicle permit. Each day also will include many free and discounted activities. For more information, call 521-7275 or visit www.greatparks.org.

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Block party

EXIT Realty West is hosting a Ruwe’s Oak Block Party from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, May 20, in the parking lot at 6701 Ruwe’s Oak Drive. The block party is open to the public with free hot dogs and popcorn while supplies last and free Kona ice cones to the first 75 children. Other businesses participating include the American Cancer Society, Colerain Urgent Care, Middle Village Farm, Bank of America, Barry L. Brown Paving LLC, Pillar to Post and Central States Title. There will be a split-the-pot cornhole tournament to benefit Habitat for Humanity. For more information, call 429-3948.

Summer program

The Economics Center is now accepting applications from high school juniors interested in a three-week summer program, Today’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Leaders, from June 13 through July 1. Participants will earn college credit from the University of Cincinnati and learn about the Cincinnati community and the economy. Students should apply at www.economicscenter.org/tl2. The course covers concepts such as opportunity cost, comparative advantage, supply and demand, elasticity, competition and monopoly. The deadline to apply is Friday, May 20.

Yard of the month

The Westwood Civic Association is again encouraging residents and business to beautify their landscaping by sponsoring a Yard of the Month contest. From June through September, about 10 landscapes per month will be designated with WCA Yard of the Month signs. The group asks residents to nominate yards and gardens they feel are works of “outstanding beauty” within the boundaries of Westwood. To nominate a yard or business landscape, call Joan and Gil McLean at 661-6017.

Help repeal SB 5

The Green Township Democratic Club will have petitions for a referendum to repeal Ohio Senate Bill 5 and put collective bargaining for public workers on the November ballot available to sign prior to their meeting at 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 18, at Nathanael Greene Lodge, 6394 Wesselman Road in Dent. The public is invited. Refreshments will be served.

Our Lady of Victory Parish Festival Mayy 20,, 21 and 22, 2011

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Supporting the troops

SCHOOLS

May 18, 2011

ACHIEVEMENTS

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NEWS

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ACTIVITIES

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HONORS

Western Hills Press

Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood Email: westernhills@communitypress.com

Editor Marc Emral | memral@communitypress.com | 853-6264

communitypress.com

A5

PRESS

New high school receives Schmidlapp grant

DePaul Cristo Rey High School, Greater Cincinnati's newest Catholic high school, has received a $100,000 grant from the Jacob G. Schmidlapp Trusts, Fifth Third Bank, Trustee. The grant will help fund transportation costs for the school's Corporate Work Study Program (CWSP) and provide scholarship support for students. DePaul Cristo Rey is sponsored by the Sisters of Charity of Cincin-

nati and will offer underserved students in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky the opportunity for a strong college preparatory education in a Catholic setting. The school is now enrolling students for its first freshman class for the 2011-12 school year. The CWSP is an integral part of the success of DePaul Cristo Rey. All students will participate in the CWSP, enabling them to contribute to the cost of their education, gain

real world job experience, grow in self-confidence, and realize the relevance of their education. Students will work in clerical support positions five days a month at one of 26 Cincinnati CWSP partner companies. The support of the Jacob G. Schmidlapp Trusts will assist the school with the costs of transporting students between the DPCR Clifton campus and their CWSP sites. A student's education at the

school is financed through a combination of CWSP revenue and family tuition. The support of the Jacob G. Schmidlapp Trusts provides financial assistance to those students with significant economic need. DePaul Cristo Rey High School is the 25th school in the nationwide Cristo Rey Network which serves almost 6,000 urban young people who live in communities with limited education options.

Most of the students qualify for the Federal Free or Reduced Lunch Program. Family income for eligible Greater Cincinnati students must fall within 75 percent of the median family income for Hamilton County. For more information about enrolling a student, becoming a Corporate Partner, or other ways to support DPCR, please contact the school at 513-861-0600 or visit www.depaulcristorey.org.

PROVIDED

Student of the Year

Mother of Mercy High School senior Emma Jones was named Student of the Year by the Western Hills Exchange Club. The program is sponsored by Kroger. Jones is pictured receiving a plaque and $1,000 check from club member Dan Driehaus.

PROVIDED.

Teams from C.T. Young Elementary and Three Rivers Middle School took part in Destination ImagiNation competition at Live Oaks March 12. Pictured is the C.T. Young fourth-grade Delirium team – Eric Dart, Andrew Murphy, Michael Maddin, Koryn Thomas, Lanie Calcara. Sam Konerman is hiding behind their machine, “The Dicycler.”

3 Rivers students are in Destination ImagiNation

PROVIDED

National finalist

Mother of Mercy High School junior Holly Reckers tied for fourth at the EnglishSpeaking Union National Shakespeare Competition held in New York City. Reckers won the ESU Cincinnati Branch regional competition, marking the fourth year in a row and fifth out of the last seven years that a Mercy student has won the regional contest. Her fourth place finish at the National Competition was the highest finish by any Mercy student. While in New York, Reckers also visited the Morgan Library & Museum’s exhibition “The Changing Face of William Shakespeare,” participated in an acting workshop at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts and toured New York City.

Teams from C.T. Young Elementary and Three Rivers Middle School took part in Destination ImagiNation competition at Live Oaks March 12. The fourth-grade Delirium team – Koryn Thomas, Eric Dart, Michael Maddin, Andrew Murphy, Lanie Calcara and Sam Konerman – placed first and the competition and is the district’s first team ever to qualify for the state tournament. Eighteen regions from through-

out the state competed in five categories at state competition. The fifth-grade team of Lucy Osborne, Isabelle Osborne, Robby Martini, Jacob Pierson, Audrey Simonson, Grace Kelley and Logan Bray, also known as the Rockin Road Show, placed second in their category and missed a trip to the state by a four points. Two other teams – the thirdgrade “I” Steins and fifth-grade Mythical Creatures, scored high in

both categories and just missed the third-place trophy, finishing fourth. In Destination ImagiNation, student teams solve open-ended challenges and present their solutions at tournaments, where they must think on their feet, work together and devise original solutions that satisfy the requirements of the challenges. More information is available at www.idodi.org.

St. Al students have service day As part of their preparation for the sacrament of Confirmation, seventh- and eighth-grade students at St. Aloysius School in Bridgetown developed and executed service projects to support nonprofit organizations both in Cincinnati and on a global scale. One group chose a global organization, the LiveStrong Foundation, which inspires and empowers people affected by cancer. To raise money for this organization, the students sold LiveStrong wrist bands and made and sold popcorn during one school

lunch period. Another group chose to support the SPCA Cincinnati by making and purchasing items on the SPCA’s wish list. These students held a contest to decide if cats or dogs are more popular pets, and all students could vote by making a donation – each cent bought one vote. Dogs won the election and $136 was raised which the students used to purchase fleece to make blankets for SPCA animals as well as pet supplies including kitty litter, dog bones, toys, and pet food.

PROVIDED

Physics field trip

McAuley High School physics students, their families and faculty, recently took a field trip to the Shrine Circus. According to teacher Lisa Nissen, “The circus is a great place to see physics in action. The students had to choose a circus act, like the trapeze, tightrope, elephants or even the ‘human cannonball’ and then explain the physics involved.” From left are seniors Samantha McQueen, Chelsey Maag, Maria Lupp, Amanda Rapien, Christina Gruenwald and Sarah Herman.

THANKS TO MARGEE GARBSCH.

THANKS TO MARGEE GARBSCH.

Students Marissa Long and Mitch Ward work on a blanket for the SPCA.

Seventh-grade student Joey Froehle fills orders for LiveStrong bands

A6

Western Hills Press

Schools

May 18, 2011

COLLEGE CORNER Awards

Two Cleves residents have received Student Achievement Awards from Marian University. Megan Molleran, a senior religious education major, was recognized for being named to “Who’s Who in American Colleges and Universities.” Lauren Nickoson, a senior graphic design major, received the Art Department Award of Excellence. • Jana Eilermann recently received an award at the Brevard College Honors and Awards Ceremony. Eilermann received the Environmental Stewardship Award for her work to inform others about on and off campus environmental issues.

Dean’s list

The following students were named to the winter quarter dean’s list at Ohio University: Laura Bengel, Krystyna Chisholm, Robert Doll, Alexandra Droba, Erin English, Joseph Gattermeyer, Hayley Geiler, Kaitlyn Grote, Mary Hautman, Arianna Iliff, Rebecca Jackson, Emily Kelly, Katie Kemen, Adrienne Krueger, Alexander Kummer, Bradley Kummer, Colin Lambert, Marika Lee, Sara Lorenz, Emily Luken, John Marcheschi, Rebekah Meiser, Racheal Meyer, Shannon Miranda, Emma Morehart, Benjamin Nutter, Jonathan Nutter, Megan Oehler, Rebecca Otten, David Peters, Samantha Proctor, Rebecca Reif, Morgan Sanders, Blair Scanlon, Melissa Schirmann, Kathryn Seitz, Kristen Spicker, Samantha Theders, Joseph Tiemeier, Frank Trotta, Megan Vogel, Ann Wiebell, Justin Williams and Patrick Wright. • Melissa Buschmann, Emily Caldwell and Anne Hartkemeyer

were named to the winter quarter dean’s list at Otterbein University.

Graduates

The following students graduated from Ohio University after the winter quarter: George Batsakes, bachelor of science in health services administration; Christopher Kortekamp, bachelor of science in media management; Hannah Meiser, bachelor of science in journalism, cum laude; Alexander Richmond, bachelor of science in exercise physiology; Brandon Roell, bachelor of science in health services administration; Douglas Schroeder, bachelor of specialized studies; Joseph Super, bachelor of science in education; and Robert Thomas, master of science in journalism. • Brian Denny and Christina Zoellner have graduated from the University of Evansville Denny received a bachelor of science in business administration. Zoellner earned a bachelor of science in nursing.

Scholarships

The following students have received scholarships from Xavier University: • Mother of Mercy High School senior Traci Ann Garcia has received a Trustee Scholarship and a Pro Scholarship. At Mercy, Garcia is active as a board member of the National Honor Society and Spanish Club, on the Academic Team in drama. Garcia plans to major in public relations. She is the daughter of Tana and Ronald Garcia of Green Township.

• Oak Hills High School senior Emily McMahan has received a Dean’s Award from Xavier University. At Oak Hills, McMahan is active in National Honor Society, Key Club and indoor soccer. McMahan plans to major in radiologic technology. She is the daughter of Kim and Kelly McMahan of Green Township. • Taylor High School senior Bradley Rapking has accepted a Presidential Scholarship. At Taylor, Rapking is active in the National Honor Society, golf, basketball and service. The son of Carolyn and Mark Rapking of Cleves, he plans to major in business. • Mother of Mercy High School senior Allison Hart has accepted a Dean’s Award. At Mercy, Hart is active in athletics and student council. The daughter of Nancy and Patrick Hart of Green Township, she plans to major in early childhood education. • La Salle High School senior Kyle Comer has received a Dean’s Award. At La Salle, Comer is active in student government, drama and vocal ensemble. The son of Nancy and Patrick Comer of Westwood, he plans to major in political science. • Elder High School senior Nicholas Stock has received a Leadership Award. The Leadership Award recognizes a student’s academic achievement, leadership and overall involvement. Stock is active in athletics. The son of Becky and Michael Stock of Miami Township, he plans to major in business. • Elder High School senior Christopher Branigan has received a Dean’s Award. At Elder, Branigan is active in art club, spirit committee, lacrosse and

Key Club. He is the son of Susan and Tom Branigan of West Price Hill. • Seton High School Akayla Floyd has received a Dean’s Award. At Seton, Floyd is active in the French and photography clubs, and service. She is the daughter of Karen and Eric Floyd of West Price Hill. • Oak Hills High School senior Karly Gade has received a Buschmann Award. The Buschmann Award is based on a student’s record in high school. Amounts vary. At Oak Hills, Gade is active in student council, volleyball and Key Club. The daughter of Kim and Daryl Gade of Green Township, she plans to major in nursing. • Oak Hills High School senior Rebecca Henry has received a Dean’s Award. At Oak Hills, Henry is active in National Honor Society, earth and science club and is a class officer. The daughter of Patricia and Kenneth Henry of Green Township, she plans to major in marketing. • Mother of Mercy High School senior Jacklyn Meyer has received a Dean’s Award. At Mercy, Meyer is active in athletics and student council. The daughter of Kimberly and Daniel Meyer of Green Township, she plans to major in communications. • Oak Hills High School senior Lucas Neville has received a Presidential Scholarship. At Oak Hills, Neville is active in athletics and student council. The son of Beverly and Russell Neville of Green Township, he plans to major in economics. All incoming freshmen are evaluated for Xavier’s Trustee and Presidential Scholarships, and the Dean’s and Schawe Awards. Award levels vary.

• Forty students from the Western Hills University High School class of 2011 will receive Project GRAD Scholarships. The Project GRAD Scholarship recognizes students who display perseverance and focus on their academics. Students who receive the Project GRAD Scholarship must have a 2.5 cumulative grade-point average at the time of graduation, complete the college recommended academic requirements and participate in two Project GRAD Summer Institutes. The 40 students signed their Project GRAD Scholarship as freshmen in 2007. The students’ academic achievements will be recognized at the Rising Star Scholarship Reception at Cincinnati State Conference Center. Students and their families will join Project GRAD Cincinnati’s staff and board of directors, and Cincinnati Public School employees. • Ursuline Academy senior Carolyn Johnson has received a National Merit corporate-sponsored scholarship from the American Financial Group. Johnson plans to study information systems.

Miscellaneous

Miami University senior Erin Fischesser, a journalism and economics major, was selected to participate in the Poynter Institute’s 2011 College Fellowship in St. Petersburg, Fla. Fischesser was selected as one of 30 participants who display ingenuity in their essays and the strongest range of skills in their work with high recommendations and interest in multimedia. The program is designed to take participants’ journalistic skills to a higher level. Poynter is a non-profit school ded-

icated to teaching and inspiring journalists and media leaders from around the world. Fischesser will spend her time at the institute studying ethical decision-making, developing sources for stories and telling untold stories. • University of Cincinnati student Ryan Deffinger is a member of Phi Sigma Theta National Honor Society, which recognizes and rewards the academic achievement of undergraduates at institutions of higher learning. Deffinger is Deffinger the son of Kim Deffinger and grandson of Ray and Margie Deffinger, all of North Bend. • University of Toledo senior Amy James, a senior majoring in pharmacy, will serve as president of the National Leadership Council for The National Society of Collegiate Scholars for the 2011-2012 academic year. James also held the position for 2010-2011. The 10 members of the council serve as the sounding board for the NSCS staff, conduct research on their campuses about member needs and serve as the faces of the honor society at national functions. The president of the council is a voting member of the NSCS Board of Directors. James joined the honor society her sophomore year and was an officer in the UT chapter. At UT, she also is a member of the Greek national honor society Gamma Sigma Alpha, Alpha Omicron Pi and the UT Peppers Chapter of the Mortar Board National Honor Society.

HONOR ROLLS Gilbert A. Dater High School

A average

The following students earned honors for the third quarter of the 20102011 school year.

A honors

Taylor Brackett, Megan Doebrich, Francis Gyau, Jonathan Judge, Zoe Lee, Tyler Nicholas, Mitchell Peter, Andrew Rose, Molly Rose, Britney Simpson and Armani Yett.

Robert Asher, Nicholas Becker, Sabrina Belcher, Leonard Belew, Vincent Bell, Amanda Bennett, Karin Brooks, Tyree Bryant-Harmon, Jessica Cain, Summer Colwell, Sara Colyer, Imari Dubose, Amber Etzel, Destiny Feltha, Emily Ferguson, Donissa Flowers, Benjamin Friskney, Kaylin Gaines, Lance Gibson, Robin Griffin, Aissatou Guisse, Joshua Gyau, Stacy Hail, Alexa Hamilton, Krystal Kelley,

Lauren Kincer, Angela Marino, Gabriel Marko, Stephanie McFadden, Kayla McGill, Are Montay Nared, Maria Nkata, Meghan Patterson, Brittney Perry, Mary Pickett, Kelly Rose, Amy Saylor, Jacob Schoenung, Tazia Segar, Korea Smith, Alyssa Theuerling, Lavella Thompson, Armond Thompson, Lashawnette Townsend, Alexus White, Ivona White and Tyanna Williams.

B average

Makennzie Adams, Abdallah Amidou, Dina Ballard, Samantha Ballou, Elizabeth Barnes, Aislynn Bell, Jessica Bennett, Anna Bens, Courtney Bentley, Kayla Billing, Ahmahd Blair, Fileeta Christian, Jarius Cobb, Edwin Cook, Jacob Cox, Seanta Crump, Shanteya Cunningham, Jazmyne Dear, Kyle Devoto, Mackenzie Elliott, Aaron Ernst, Brian Finley, Miranda Flemming, Casey Frank, Purcell Gaines,

Round 1 Voting Ballot Round 1 Voting Ballot • May 8 - May 23 Mail to: The Enquirer Baby Idol 2011, 312 Elm St., Cincinnati, OH 45202 or drop off ballot between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays to the Customer Service Center in the lobby at 312 Elm St., Cincinnati, OH 45202. Name: ____________________________________________________________ Contact Phone: ____________________________________________________ Note: ONLY ORIGINAL BALLOTS accepted, no photocopies. One free vote per ballot. All voting ballots must be received by 11:59 p.m. May 23, 2011.

FREE VOTE: Baby’s No: _________ Baby’s Name: ____________________________________________________ VOTE: Baby’s No: _________ Baby’s Name: ___________________________ # of votes: _______ X $.25 = $________ Donation Method: Check (Make checks payable to Newspapers In Education.)

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You can vote online now at Cincinnati.com/babyidol NO PURCHASE OR DONATION REQUIRED TO ENTER. ALL FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL AND MUNICIPAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS APPLY. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand Baby Idol 2011 Contest is open to Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky residents who are 18 years or older and a parent or legal guardian of a child at the time of entry. Employees of Enquirer Lend-A-Hand, The Cincinnati Enquirer, Gannett Co., Inc., and each of their respective affiliated companies, and advertising and promotional agencies, and the immediate family members of, and any persons domiciled with, any such employees, are not eligible to enter or to win. Contest begins at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 3/20/11 and ends at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 6/22/11. Beginning at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 3/20/11 and ending at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 6/22/11, Enter by submitting a photo of your baby and a completed entry form. Entries must be submitted by a parent or legal guardian, 18 years or older. Children must have been born on or after 5/8/07 and Sponsor reserves the right to verify proof of age. Entries with incomplete or incorrect information will not be accepted. Only one (1) entry per child. Multiple births can be submitted as 1 entry with 1 photo. Enter online at www.Cincinnati.com/babyidol. Enter by mail or in-person: complete an Official Entry Form available in The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Kentucky Enquirer, The Community Presses in Ohio & KY and at The Enquirer Customer Service Center, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202. All entries must be received by 5:00 p.m. (EST) 4/18/11. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries and votes received. (1) First Place Winner will receive a $2000 American Express gift card. (1) Runner Up Winner will receive a $500 American Express gift card. (1) Randomly Selected Winner will receive a $500.00 American Express gift card. Winners will be notified by telephone or email on or about 6/27/11. Participants agree to be bound by the complete Official Rules and Sponsor’s decisions. For a copy of the prize winners list (available after 7/3/11) and/or the complete Official Rules send a SASE to Baby Idol 2011 c/o The Enquirer, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 or contact Pam Clarkson at 513-768-8577 or at pclarkson@enquirer.com. CE-0000459556

CE-0000460461

Deshawnta Goodson, Jessica Hankins, Matthew Hoffman, Linzie Hollandsworth, Jasmine Huffaker, Damiko Hunter, Amber Jacobs, Alexis Janes-Maye, Nicholas Janes-Maye, Daisha Johnson, Shanique Kirby, Hakeem Lanier , Andrea Lowery, Taylor Lude, Albarina Maddox, Leon McCollum, Matthew McMullin, Brittany Mechley, Jazmine Mincy, Alexis Mitchell, Tiana Mutts, Tabitha Oswald, Abby Parker, Demondre Peak, Ebonni Pegues, Summer Pennekamp,

Stephanie Pickett, John Pickett, Shasta Ralph, Shakendra Reynolds, Kaitlin Roberts, Jordan Rucker, Olliea Sanders, Jordan Saunders, Tiffany Scalf, Evan Sgouris, Aaron Singleton, Dailyn Stevenson, Laura Thiergartner, Alyssa Thomas, Daryl Thompson, Willie Thompson, Jr, Katherine Tucker, Countney Tucker, Iesha Walker, Caitlyn Ware, Cameron Washington, Jacob West, Sasha Wilkins, Juan Williams, Cody Winkle and Alison Woulms.

SPORTS BRIEFLY

The week at Taylor

• The Taylor baseball team beat Deer Park 18-1 in five innings, May 7. Taylor’s Zach Brisker was 3-4 with three RBI. On May 10, New Richmond beat Taylor 9-0 in sectionals. Taylor’s Alex Haussler was 2-3. • In softball, Taylor beat Indian Hill 8-7 in Division II Sectionals, May 10. Taylor’s Liz Mooney and Katie Jackson were both 3-4. Taylor advances to play Goshen on May 12.

The week at Elder

• The Elder baseball team lost 4-1 to Moeller, May 7. Michael Schwartz collected an RBI. Elder also fell to Dublin Jerome 5-2. Jacob Lindsey was 2-3 for Elder. On May 9, Elder beat Ross 15-10. Elder’s Jacob Lindsey was 3-5 with a homerun and three RBI. Colerain beat Elder 6-1, May 10. Elder’s Frank Rosenacker was 2-2. Elder beat Hamilton 5-0, May 12 in sectionals, advancing them to play Glen Este on May 19. Lindsey was 3-3 with two triples, three RBI and two runs.

The week at Oak Hills

• The Oak Hills baseball team beat Milford 10-3, May 7. Oak Hills’ Jay Schunk was 2-4 with a homerun, a double and four RBI. Oak Hills also beat Princeton 4-1 the same day. Schunk was 2-4, scored a homerun and had two RBI against Princeton. On May 9, Oak Hills beat Wyoming 10-8. Schunk scored a homerun and had three RBI. On May 10, Oak Hills beat Winton Woods 13-0 in five innings. Schunk was 2-2 with four RBI. Oak Hills beat Princeton 10-4, May 11. Tyler Walters had three RBI. Oak Hills lost 3-2 to Kings, May 12.

Athletes of the week

Oak Hills High School athletes of the week Ed Smith and Anthony Wunder have spent much of the year as the boy’s tennis team’s second doubles. Smith and Wunder are second-year Smith v a r s i t y starter, and are 2-4 in the tough GMC b e a t i n g Hamilton and Colerain, and have nonconference Wunder wins against Roger Bacon and Taylor. They took home first place at second doubles at the Oak Hills Invitational beating a tough Northwest team. The duo placed second at the Coaches Classic last weekend, losing to Mason in the finals. Smith leads the team in Aces, with a career high 15 in the Oak Hills Invitational. A key win for Wunder this season was a two-set win over Princeton. Smith and Wunder are both excellent student-athletes excelling in the classroom as well.

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Western Hills Press

May 18, 2011

HIGH

SCHOOL

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YOUTH

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Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood

RECREATIONAL

Email: westernhills@communitypress.com

Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 248-7573

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A7

PRESS

Elder advances to sectional final By Tony Meale

innings). The experience Elder gained in advancing to the state final last year could come in handy this postseason. Some managers downplay the importance of having been there before, but Thompson isn’t one of them. “I don’t think it’s overrated at all; I think it’s very important,” he said. “It gets you to relax in certain situations playing in pressure-type games. Our guys are kind of used to that year in and year out. It’s definitely a plus.”

tmeale@communitypress.com

Tim Baldrick did it again. The Elder High School senior, who threw a no-hitter earlier this season, tossed a complete game shutout in the Panthers’ playoffopener, a 5-0 win over Hamilton May 12. “He threw first-pitch strikes and got ahead in the count,” Elder head coach Mark Thompson said. “That’s the key to his success.” Baldrick, who improved to 5-1 with the win, has filled the ace void left by 2010 Elder graduates Brian Korte and Matt Pate. “Tim had one bad outing his first outing of the year, and since then he’s really stepped up and led our pitching staff,” Thompson said. Senior Jacob Lindsey, who went 3-3 with two triples and three RBI, led the way offensively against Hamilton; he leads the team in average (.394), OBP (.463) and RBIs (23). “He’s kind of the heart and soul of the team,” Thompson said. “He’s a tremendous leader and put us on his back the other day against Hamilton.” Other top run-producers include Nick Connor (.329, 15 RBI), Dewey Freidel (.294, 14 RBI), Michael Schwarz (.281, 13 RBI), Ben Gramke (.282, 10 RBI), David Haley (.274, 14 RBI) and Anthony Asalon (.229, 12 RBI). The Panthers (14-10) have gone 9-5 since starting 5-5. They advance to face No. 5 Glen Este in the sectional finals May 19 at Lakota West. Thompson intended to scout Glen Este in its game against Kings May 13, but it was rained out.

Oak Hills

SCOTT SPRINGER/STAFF

Oak Hills High School senior Jay Schunk awaits the glad hand at third base after jacking a home run to center against Wyoming May 9. Schunk drove in three runs as Oak Hills beat the Cowboys 10-8. The Highlanders fell to Kings 3-2 in the sectional semifinals May 12. “If we do what we do well, things will take care of themselves,” Thompson said. While Baldrick is Elder’s ace, the Panthers have a deep pitching staff. Among those who could see time on the mound this postseason are Joe Ramstetter (1.04 ERA, 41 strikeouts, 33.2 innings), Andrew Crofton (1-0, 1.75 ERA), Greg Niehaus (1-0, one save, 3.28 ERA) and Alex Bolia (2-1, 14 Ks in 14.2

No. 15 Oak Hills fell 3-2 to No. 11 Kings in the sectional semifinals May 12. The Highlanders advanced after defeating No. 32 Winton Woods 13-0 May 10. They finish the season 18-9 (12-6). Oak Hills, which started the year 6-7 (5-6) and was among the bottom three teams in the Greater Miami Conference at midseason, went 12-2 the rest of the way and finished second to Lakota East by a game in the GMC. The Highlanders went 1-1 against East, losing one game by a run and winning the other by a run. Senior Jay Schunk finished among the top three in the league in average (.431), home runs (five) and RBI (25). He also led the team in OBP (.559) and doubles (11). Five other Highlanders knocked in at least 10 runs, including sophomore Jake Richmond (.343, 12 RBI) and junior Brandon Hemberger (.325, 17 RBI). Sophomore Tyler Walter (.286, 11 RBI), senior Dylan Simkin (.273, 10 RBI) and junior Tyler Cox

(.258, 10 RBI) also played pivotal roles. On the mound, Schunk went 1-1 with a 2.96 ERA and had 23 strikeouts in 23.2 innings, junior Thomas Connolly went 3-1 with a 3.54 ERA and junior Austin Kron went 4-0 with a 3.71 ERA.

Taylor

The Yellow Jackets, seeded eighth, fell 9-0 to No. 7 New Richmond during sectional play May 10. Alex Haussler and Patrick Pennington hit right around .400 this season, while Zach Brisker, Brandon Siebel, Jordan Blanton and Dylan Lee all hit over .300. Brisker and Sean Weisgerber led the team in wins and strikeouts.

Western Hills

Seeking their first playoff win in more than five years, the Mustangs, seeded 26th, fell 8-4 to Mt. Healthy during sectional play May 10. They finish 11-10 (9-2). Sophomore Cameron Washington led the team in average (.455), OBP (.513) and RBI (25), while senior Antwuane Blackwell hit .448 with a .579 OBP. Blackwell had 29 steals, which led the Cincinnati Metro Athletic Conference. Washington was second with 22. Senior Aaron Ernst hit .354, sophomore Levi Wolf hit .314 and sophomore Dailyn Stevenson hit .306. On the mound, Ernst went 4-2 with a 1.70 ERA and 44 strikeouts in 33.0 innings, senior Juan Warren went 4-3 with a 1.96 ERA and 67 strikeouts in 39.1 innings and freshman Edurado Rodriguez had 47 Ks in 39.2 innings.

Bobcats use balance to win playoff-opener Sophomore Anna Hetzer, junior Kari Lockwood and senior Laney Sportsman were among the top hitters for Seton, while junior Danielle Hoffman received the vast majority of innings on the mound. The Saints have gone a combined 0-20 in the GGCL over the last two years.

By Tony Meale tmeale@communitypress.com

The Mother of Mercy High School softball team showed it’s not just a oneperson show. Senior catcher Erika Leonard, who leads the Girls’ Greater Cincinnati League Scarlet division in average (.547), home runs (six) and RBI (19), was walked every at-bat in the Bobcats’ playoff-opener against No. 5 New Richmond May 12. “In order to produce runs, we had to have everyone contribute,” Mercy head coach Stefanie Kathman said. “And they did.” Juniors Anna Eggleston, Amy Feie and Morgan Fuller sparked the Bobcats to an 8-0 win, as Mercy, seeded No. 1, advanced to face No. 8 Goshen in the Division II sectional finals May 17 after deadline. Eggleston and Feie are hitting .411 and .354, respectively, but their biggest contributions have come on the mound. They have a combined 0.87 ERA, eight shutouts and 211 strikeouts in 145.0 innings, as the Bobcats have allowed two runs or fewer in 18 of 21 games this year. “We’re kind of in this weird dilemma that most coaches don’t have where you have two very good pitchers,” Kathman said. “We don’t really have a No.1 or No. 2, but I think they’re two of the strongest pitchers in the city.” Mercy (19-2, 9-1) finished the regular season on a 10-game winning streak. The Bobcats’ only losses

Taylor

TONY MEALE/STAFF

Seton High School senior Sam Dressman, left, applies a tag to Oak Hills senior Ally Janson as Seton junior Rachel Poston looks on during Division I sectional play May 9. Janson was safe on the play, as the Lady Scots won 11-3. The game was played at Rapid Run Middle School. this year were to Ursuline and McAuley, and they won rematches with each – 8-7 over Ursuline May 9 and 10 over McAuley May 10. Mercy has now won the GGCL three years in a row. “We’ve definitely had a strong pitching-catching combo,” Kathman said. “But you can’t win and be successful with one or two all-stars. So it really has been other players stepping up, playing defense and hitting through the line-up. People look for Erika and Anna and Amy, but they don’t always recognize that we have nine other players on the team who play well.” Kathman, a first-year head coach, was on staff under former Mercy coach Karen Kron for several years before taking over this season. The Bobcats graduated six seniors from last year’s squad, and Kathman said one of the biggest challenges she faced was getting the varsity newcomers to believe they belonged at this level.

Given that Mercy won at least 19 games for the third straight season, it’s safe to say Kathman succeeded in that endeavor. The focus now turns to a deep tourney run. Despite going 39-11 (.780) in 2009 and 2010, Mercy was unable to advance past sectionals in either season. Kathman said this year could be different. “Last year we had hoped to go further, and the girls on the team this year remember that and how tough that loss was,” Kathman said. “This year, the girls just want to keep playing. After losing six seniors, no one really expected this team to do that well, and they’ve already exceeded everyone’s expectations. So I think their goal is to keep going with that.”

Oak Hills

The Lady Scots opened the postseason with an 113 win over No. 17 Seton May 9 but fell i7-3 n the sectional semifinals to No. 7 Ursuline May 11.

TONY MEALE/STAFF

Oak Hills senior Ally Janson gets ready to run to third base in the May 9 game against Seton. Oak Hills, which started the season 3-5, dropped 10 straight before winning three in a row heading into its game with Ursuline. Senior Ally Janson hit just below .400 this season, while freshman Sammy Sagers, senior Rachel Salzl, junior Katherine Herbort and sophomore Emily Laymance were all above .300. Junior hurlers Katelyn Doran and Lauren Sommer split the majority of time on the mound. Oak Hills finishes 6-17 (4-12).

Seton

The Saints, seeded No. 17, fell 11-3 to No. 14 Oak Hills in their playoff-opener May 9. They finished the regular season with three losses in three days May 10-12, losing 7-2 to Mount Notre Dame, 4-3 to St. Ursula and 9-8 to McAuley. Seton, which started 2-3, lost 10 straight and 15 of 17 to close the season. The Saints finish 4-18 (0-10).

The Lady Yellow Jackets pulled off a bit of a shocker in an 8-7 sectional upset of Indian Hill May 10. Seeded 10th, they entered the game 2-12 overall and a winless 0-10 in the Cincinnati Hills League. No. 4 Indian Hill, meanwhile, was 11-8 (7-5). Nevertheless, Taylor held on for the win before bowing out to No. 6 Amelia, 104, in the sectional semifinals May 12. Senior Katie Jackson and junior Cheyenne Hawk both hit over .400 this season, while freshman Caitlyn Bowman and juniors Christy Baldwin, Liz Mooney and Brandy Crouse posted OBPs well above .350. Freshman Kaylyn Schmitz was Taylor’s top pitcher.

Western Hills

The No. 20 Lady Mustangs forfeited to No. 9 Colerain in the Division I sectional semifinals May 11. Western Hills finishes 83 (7-1). Among the top players for the Lady Mustangs were junior catcher Becky Owens, senior outfielder Miah Davis and senior third baseman Melvona Coleman.

A8

Western Hills Press

Sports & recreation

May 18, 2011

Gold medalist wrestler to speak at La Salle By Tony Meale tmeale@communitypress.com

Rulon Gardner, the former wrestler who won a gold medal at the 2000 Summer Olympics, will speak at a La Salle High School fundraiser May 26 at Receptions Banquet and Conference Center in Fairfield. “Rulon’s story is truly amazing,” La Salle athletic director Dan Flynn said. “He’ll be discussing his life and accomplishments, from winning a gold medal to his time on ‘The Biggest Loser.’” Gardner, 39, won gold in Sydney after defeating Russia’s Alexander Karelin, who was previously unbeaten in 13 years of international competition. Gardner then won a world championship in 2001 – making him the only American to ever win a world and Olympic title in Greco-Roman wrestling – before collecting a bronze medal in Athens in 2004. After several brushes with death (he survived severe frostbite in 2002 and a plane crash in 2007, among other calamities), Gardner appeared on NBC’s “The Biggest Loser” earlier this year. His weight had ballooned to 474 pounds, but he trimmed down to 301 before withdrawing from the show. He weighed 264 pounds

Lancer letters

La Salle High School athletes sign letter of intents Friday, April 8. Zach Dillman will play baseball for Union College, Travis Hawes will run cross country and track at Xavier University and Colton Brauning will swim for University of Findley.

Rulon Gardner won gold in Sydney after defeating Alexander Karelin, who was previously unbeaten in 13 years of international competition. at the 2004 Olympics. “It’s a pretty interesting life story,” Flynn said. Tickets to the event can be purchased in La Salle’s main office Monday through Friday between 7:30 a.m and 3:30 p.m. or go to www.lasallehs.net. VIP tickets, which are $85 per person or $150 per couple, include a meet-andgreet with Gardner beginning at 6 p.m., open bar and hors d’oeuvres, dinner at 7 p.m., and a speech expected to last upwards of 45 minutes. VIP ticket-buyers will also have an opportunity to pose with Gardner in an 8by-10 photo. General tickets, which are $50 per person or $90 per couple, cover dinner and the speech, along with beer, wine and soft drinks. Gardner is expected to field questions after his speech. Flynn, who was able to book Gardner through a contact at USA Wrestling, hopes the fundraiser attracts 300 to 400 people. Persons under 21 are permitted to attend if their parent or guardian is also in attendance.

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The Western Sports Mall is having a Princess Tea Party from 2-4 p.m., Saturday, May 21. The children can wear their favorites princess dress and enjoy some tea time with their favorite princess. Also included in the event is storytime, games and a craft. Payment of $20 can be dropped off at or mailed to Western Sports Mall 2323 Ferguson, 45238. Call 451-4900 or cmitchell@fuse.net with any questions. Reservation deadline is May 18.

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A group of players from the Ohio Elite Soccer Academy travel to Argentina for 10 days developing their soccer skills with Estudiantes de La Plata futbol club, one of the top clubs in the world, known for developing professional players. The players took part in the OESA International Training Program. The players trained daily with the high caliber Estudiantes staff and players. This fall Estudiantes won its 11th league championship and are currently in first place in the Argentine Premera Division. The group was able to attend two Estudiantes professional matches two reserve matches and multiple youth matches. Most of the players had not traveled internationally before. Trips to historical locations in Argentina and Uruguay, as well as experiencing a new culture, language and cuisine, afforded the boys a true opportunity for personal development. In front, from left, are Marty Bixler (Loveland), Kevin Barbour (Lakota West), David Noble (Fairfield) and C.J. Seig (La Salle). In back, from left, are Joey Kunkel (Summit Country Day), Ryan Hall (Summit Country Day), Nick Neuhaus (Mason), Trey Lonneman (Moeller), Brandon Hart and Matthew Lustig (Cincinnati Christian).

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Swim Lessons

Mercy HealthPlex Western Hills will offer group swim lessons for all ages on June 4, 5, and 7 and July 23 through Aug. 28. Private and semi-private lessons are also available by appointment. For registration, call Annie Macke at 389-5498 or e-mail asmacke@health-partners.org.

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The Tower Titans Junior High Football Program is looking for prospective football players for the upcoming 2011 season. Two camps for the ABCs of Football will be Sunday, May 22, and Sunday, June 12. Each camp will last from 3-4:30 p.m. Players should meet in the in the parking lot behind La Salle High School, 3091 North Bend Road in Monfort Heights, near the entrance to the stadium. Registration for participating on the team for the upcoming season will be conducted prior to the beginning of each camp for all prospective players. The Tower Titans is comprised of seventh- and eighth-grade students who are not in a position to play football because they either: Attend schools that do not offer this sport, are home schooled or are over the weight limit for their schools' respective leagues. Practices and home games are at LaSalle High School. The team will compete in the Southwest Ohio Catholic Conference (SWOCC) in which they were undefeated and league champions last year. This is the ninth year that the program has been offered for young men. Contact coach John Bosse at 741-2368.

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Sports & recreation

Western Hills Press

May 18, 2011

A9

BRIEFLY Huismann honored

Mother of Mercy High School will host an Open House June 1 to honor Mary Jo Huismann, who has retired as athletic director after 39 years of service. The event will be held in Mercy’s gym from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. A program and blessing will begin at 6 p.m. To RSVP to the event, visit www.motherofmercy.org/MJH celebration or contact Development Coordinator Nancy Jamison at 661-2740 ext. 402. Huismann will continue to coach Mercy’s basketball team.

The week at Mercy

• The Mercy softball team beat Ursuline 8-7 in 10 innings, May 9. Mercy’s Morgan Fuller was 3-6 with three RBI and a double. On May 12, Mercy beat New Richmond 8-0 in sectionals, advancing them to play the winner of Goshen vs. Taylor on May 17. Amy Feie threw nine strikeouts, and was 2-4 with a homerun and two RBI. • In girls lacrosse, Mercy beat Seven Hills 9-8, May 9. Mercy’s Harrison scored three goals, Megan Humphrey and Kaitlin Bigner scored two goals each and Emily Fredmann and Melissa Burns scored one goal each. Mercy’s Briggs made 13 saves.

More at Elder

• In boys tennis, Elder beat La Salle 5-0, then beat Moeller 4-1 in the Greater Catholic League South Championship. May 7. Against La Salle, Drew Schroeder beat Bush 6-0, 6-1; Nathan Walroth beat Hoeweler 6-1, 6-2; Andrew Cole beat Gundlach 6-2, 6-0; Ryan Patty and Jake Groene beat Heckle and Samoya 6-1, 6-2; Andy Martini and James Schottelkotte beat Pieper and Robertson 63, 6-4. Against Moeller, Schroeder beat Stencel 6-4, 6-2; Danny James beat Patterson 6-1, 6-1; Walroth beat Stubbers 6-1, 6-1; and Kevin Butler and Cole beat Sullivan

and Wies 7-5, 6-2. In the quarterfinals of the Division I Sectional tournament on May 12, Elder’s Nathan Walroth; Ryan Patty beat Oak Hills’ Patel and Rabbe 6-0, 6-0; Elder’s Drew Schroeder beat Anderson’s Ruzlboev 6-3, 6-4; and Danny James beat Anderson’s Scott 6-3, 6-4. • In boys lacrosse, Elder lost 16-9 to Mason, May 11.

The week at La Salle

• The La Salle baseball team beat Harrison 5-4, May 7. La Salle’s Brett Humphrey pitched 10 strikeouts, Dominic Capano scored two runs and Dan Carrier was 3-3 with three RBI for La Salle. On May 9, La Salle lost 1110 to Mason. La Salle’s Ryan Johns was 4-5 with a double and four RBI. On May 12, Sycamore beat La Salle 5-1 in sectionals. Johns was 2-3 at bat. • In the boys tennis quarterfinals of the Division I Sectional tournament on May 12, La Salle’s Anthony Heckle beat St. Xavier’s 6-3, 6-4. • The track team finished first with a score of 151 in the Don Mitchell Roosevelt Memorial Track Invitational, May 7. La Salle’s Ethan Bokeno won the 800 meter in 1 minute, 55.65 seconds, and Hytchye was second at 1 minute, 57.60 seconds; Travis Hawes won the 1600 meter in 4 minutes, 25.35 seconds, and Kluesener placed second at 4 minutes, 31.11 seconds; Tim Bell placed third in the high jump with a 5 foot, 10 inch leap, and placed third in the long jump at 20 feet, 9 inches, while Rodriguez Coleman placed fourth at 20 feet, 7 inches; Coleman won the 110 meter hurdles in 15.39 seconds; Coleman won the 300 meter hurdles in 39.36 seconds; the relay team was second in the 8x800 meter at 8 minutes, 55.70 seconds; La Salle took first in the 4x1600 meter in 19.42 seconds; first in the 800 medley in 1 minute, 40.34 seconds; and the 1600 medley in 3 minutes, 31.96 seconds; La Salle won the DMR in 10 minute, 57.58 sec-

onds; Jake McNamara won the 3200 meter run in 10 minutes, 25.20 seconds; Linden Ayoki won the shot put at 46 feet; Ayoki won the discus at 156 feet, 10 inches, and Jesse Back took second at 143 feet, 2 inches; Andrew Silber won the pole vault at 14 feet, and Tyler Vidourek took second at 13 feet, 6 inches.

More at Oak Hills

• In softball on May 7, Oak Hills beat Hamilton 8-7, then beat Princeton 4-3. Oak Hills’ Nikki Streder was 3-3 in game one. Jackie Raabe was 2-3 in game two. On May 9, Oak Hills beat Seton 11-3. Oak Hills’ Emily Laymance was 3-4 and collected three RBI. Seton’s Kari Lockwood and Alex Heekin were both 3-4. On May 11, Ursuline beat Oak Hills 7-3 in sectionals. Oak Hills’ Ally Janson hit a double. Oak Hills lost 5-1 to Lakota East, May 12. • In boys tennis, Oak Hills tied for seventh with Colerain with a score of 16 in the Greater Miami Conference Tournament, May 7. On May 9, Oak Hills beat Glen Este 4-1. Oak Hills’ Jay Morgan beat Tostado 6-2, 76; Christian Vandewalle beat Cutshall 6-1, 6-1; Miraj Patel and Michael Raabe beat Stroup and Moore 6-1, 6-1; and Ed Smith and Anthony Wunder beat Ford and Owens 6-1, 6-2. • The boys volleyball team beat Lakota East 25-21, 2527, 16-25, 25-19, 15-12, then

beat them 25-21, 25-27, 1525, 25-19, 15-12, May 11.

Conference accolades

Mercy High School graduate Lauren Summe was recently voted first team All GLVC at first base for Division III softball at Bellarmine University in Louisville, Ky. Summe was either first or second on her team in just about every hitting category, and finished third in the conference in home runs. She led the team and was eighth in the conference batting .379 on the season, scoring 28 runs, and collecting 26 RBI. Summe hit in every game and went 9-14 at bat with 12 RBI and nine runs in a 10game stretch this season.

• The Western Hills baseball team beat Hughes 18-0 in five innings, May 9. Western Hills’ Dailyn Stevenson was 2-3.

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• The Seton softball team beat Loveland 5-4, then 3-2 in a May 7 double-header. Seton’s Jourdan Lyons scored a homerun and had two RBI in the first game. Jenna Weber was 2-4 with a double in the second game. On May 11, St. Ursula beat Seton 4-3. Seton’s Rachel Poston hit a triple. On May 12, McAuley beat Seton 9-8. Seton’s Poston was 2-4 with a triple and three RBI. • In girls lacrosse on May

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11, Mariemont beat Seton 159. Seton’s Rogers and Jenna Martini made two saves each.

• In boys track, Western Hills placed third with a score of 83 in the CMAC Championships, May 11. Western Hills’ Denzel Peters won the 110 meter hurdles; Dedrick Hill won the 300 meter hurdles; and Fred Nayou won the 3200 meter run in 11 minutes, 20.52 seconds. • The girls track team placed fifth with a score of 29 in the CMAC Championships, May 11.

VIEWPOINTS

A10

Western Hills Press

May 18, 2011

EDITORIALS

I would like to give a big thank you to the residents that came out and voted at the May 3 election. The levy was much needed and I am grateful for the passage. Times have not been good for people the last three years and for people to vote for a tax increase is gratefully appreciated by the village government. Special thanks goes to the citizen group (PAC) that helped with the information that was distributed. Enough cannot be said for the people that folded, labeled, gave their time and money. They were PAC chairman Robert Nichols, Doug Carpenter, Joyce Harper, Nancy Grigsby and Marianne Rudisell. Special thanks also goes to the people who gave their funds to pay for the printing and mailings. The levy has passed (funds will not be available until 2012) and

council has been given the responsibility of overseeing the correct use of the funds. The (school district’s) construction of the new school will bring new additional challenges and it is time to move forward with the challenges and work together. On a personal note, as my granddaughter has traveled the world, mostly in Third World countries, there is one common fact that appears over and over again. They do not have small government, village councils, township trustees and, in some cases, not very big cities. There is no one accountable. Voting is a privilege and we are again grateful for the citizen committee and the people that came out to vote and thankful for the passage of the levy. Get involved, come to council meetings and vote when you get the chance. Bev Meyers Vice mayor, Village of Cleves

CH@TROOM Last week’s question

Next questions

What do you think of the way the administration has handled the aftermath of the killing of Osama bin Laden, including the conflicting stories about the mission, and the decision not to release photos? “I believe President Obama is doing it the right way with media control. “We have enough speculations and second guessing by the media on military missions, which of course is broadcasted for anyone to see.” O.H.R. “The issue of photos is something that occurs regularly in civil litigation in our courts. The courts ask a basic question when considering whether to admit photos into evidence. Will the photos really add anything to the process of proving something? If someone is dead, what will a photograph add? “Usually a death certificate is sufficient. Testimony under oath by witnesses is an acceptable alternative. I am one of those that believe that releasing the photos adds nothing to the information already released by the government. If someone is suspicious of the government, a photo is probably not going to change that opinion. “It is unfortunate that we have a segment of the population that wants to discredit the government at every opportunity. It has long ago been established that people believe what they desire. Since they desire to discredit the government they form an opinion that conforms to that desire. “Irrationality is too pervasive in society. Just another display of ignorance in action. It is part of the anti-intellectual attitude held by mostly uneducated folks in our society. If someone is not like them they condemn them. Uneducated and ignorant condemn the educated. “My intellect tells me that we do not need photos of a dead person to prove they were killed. If you need the photos you will probably conclude that they were altered or faked if they are released.” J.S.D. “This is one of those situations in which no matter what you do, you are not going to please everyone.

LETTERS

Editor Marc Emral | memral@communitypress.com | 853-6264

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Thank you, Cleves residents

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What do you remember of your high school graduation? Should the U.S. continue to give tax breaks to oil companies? Why or why not? Every week The Western Hills Press asks readers a questions that they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to clermont@community press.com with “chatroom” in the subject line. “The truth is that bin Laden was consummately evil, and no punishment could have been enough for what he did. “Pakistan might be understandably upset that we invaded their borders to do this, but that is the price that has to be paid. “I haven’t trusted the leadership of that country for a long time, and I don’t really think that the Islamic population has any love for the U.S. “It is hard to believe that this monster could have lived in that compound for five years without someone getting wise to it; if they did know, then they are complicit in protecting him. “As to conflicting stories, our intelligence community has a tough job of balancing the need to tell the public as much as possible, without compromising our security. “As to the photos, yes, a part of me would like to see that satanic face with holes in it, but I understand that you can’t always satisfy curiosity; it serves no purpose. “I’m not a fan of the Obama administration, but I’m glad they got this job done.” B.B. “I think it is a shame that the media concentrates on trivialities instead of the over-arching issues of what our policy towards the Middle East countries ought to be, and how we ought to go about getting it. “We need to recognize that our oil addiction is driving us to insanity. Whenever that point is raised someone points out how little of our oil comes from there, but U.S. oil consumption drives world oil demand. “China is catching up, but only because they have six times as many people as we do. They still use very little oil per person. “A strong climate solution could solve our Middle East oil dependence.” N.F.

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COLUMNS

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PRESS

Email: westernhills@communitypress.com

communitypress.com

Foreclosure remains a risk for many Hamilton County homeowners, especially in light of ongoing unemployment, increasing consumer prices, and falling home values. Because of the stress and potential embarrassment of dealing with their financial problems, some become vulnerable to mortgage rescue scams that appear to offer solutions, but are actually rip-offs. As part of our outreach services, Housing Opportunities Made Equal provides free one-on-one consultations as well as free educational sessions to community organizations in an effort to counteract this misinformation. Bill Hanks, HOME foreclosure prevention counselor, has seen far too many scam victims. As an example, he cited a recent client who thought he had hired an attorney to help him restructure his loan for a lower monthly payment. Indeed the agency title had “attorney” in its name. Its representatives sent him official looking documents and required a $3,000 fee to secure their services. He followed their instructions and paid the $3,000. Soon thereafter, the man was served with a foreclosure notice. He wondered what had gone wrong and began trying to contact the firm. It was nowhere to be found. “Sadly, that’s the standard pattern,” Bill said. Because of the proliferation of such scams, the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development

recently released an alert about six indications of a loan modification scammer: • Upfront fees – Advisers who seek fees in Elizabeth advance to Brown negotiate with your lender usuCommunity ally just take Press guest your money, discolumnist appear and do little or nothing to help save your home. • Bogus guarantees – Legitimate counselors will try their very best to help you, but no counselor has the power to modify your loan or stop the foreclosure. • Redirected payments – Make your mortgage payments only to your lender. Scammers say to pay them instead, taking your money and putting you further behind. • Misleading documents – If you’re pushed to sign something without reading it or understanding it, stop. You could be giving away your home. • TMI (Too Much Information) – Share financial information only with your lender or a local nonprofit counseling agency – never over the phone or online. • “Government” Tag – Be cautious with anyone claiming to act on behalf of the government. Odds are, they’re bogus. If you or someone you know is facing financial hardship and needs immediate advice about mortgage options, call Bill Hanks,

About guest columns

We welcome guest columns on all sides of an issue; however, potential columnists should reserve space in advance with Editor Marc Emral by calling 853-6264. Include with your column your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a two-to-three line biography outlining your expertise related to this topic. Either include a color headshot of yourself, or make arrangements when you call to have your photo taken here. We reserve the right to edit for length, accuracy and clarity. Columns may be no more than 500 words. Deadline: Noon Friday for next Wednesday’s issue. E-mail: memral@community press.com Letters, columns and articles submitted to the Western Hills Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

foreclosure counselor, at 7214663, ext. 3111. Churches, PTAs, civic groups, employee associations and similar organizations that would like to arrange a speaker to address fair lending, foreclosure prevention or mortgage rescue scams is invited to contact Myra Calder, consumer education specialist, at 721-4663, ext. 3105, or myra.calder@homecincy.org. Elizabeth Brown is the executive director for Housing Opportunities Made Equal, a private, non-profit agency that serves as the traditional fair housing agency for Greater Cincinnati. Its mission is to eliminate illegal housing discrimination and promote stable integrated communities.

Electronic payments will be a must For years, Social Security has stressed the convenience, security, and safety of getting benefit payments electronically. Soon, direct deposit (or Direct Express) will not just be the best way to receive Federal benefit payments – it will be the only way. The U.S. Department of the Treasury has announced a new rule that will phase out paper checks for Federal benefit and non-tax payments by March 1, 2013. Here is how the transition will work. • Anyone applying for Social Security or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits on or after May 1 will receive their payments electronically, while those already receiving paper checks will need to switch to electronic payments by March 1, 2013. • Anyone already receiving their benefit payments electronically will continue to receive their payment as usual on their payment day.

• People receiving benefits have the option of direct deposit to a bank or credit union account (of their choice) or into a Direct ExpressÆ Sue Denny Debit Mastercard Community CardÆ Press guest account (a Treaury-recomcolumnist smended prepaid card option). Visit www.GoDirect.org to learn more about this option. • Social Security, SSI, Veterans Affairs, Railroad Retirement Board, Office of Personnel Management benefits, and other nontax payments are included. For most people getting monthly benefits, this won’t really be a change; already 8 out of 10 beneficiaries receive payments electronically. Why the push for electronic payments instead of paper checks received in the mail?

• It’s safer: no risk of checks being lost or stolen. • It’s easy and reliable: no need to wait for the mail or go to the bank to cash a check. • It saves taxpayers money: no cost for postage and paper and printing. • It saves you money: no check-cashing fees or bank fees. • It’s good for the environment: it saves paper and eliminates transportation costs. If you still get your check in the mail, don’t wait for the new rule to go into effect to enjoy the benefits of electronic payments. Please visit www.godirect.org today and begin getting your Social Security and SSI payments the safe, easy, inexpensive, and green way – electronically. Sue Denny is the public affairs specialist for the Social Security Administration in Cincinnati. Do you have a question about Social Security? Would you like to schedule a free Social Security-related presentation for your group or organization? Contact her at susan.denny@ssa.gov.

MEETINGS • Village of Addyston Council members meet at 7 p.m. on the first and third Monday of the month at the Addyston Municipal Building, 235 Main St. Phone: 941-1313. Mayor: Dan Pillow. Vice mayor: Pam Jackson. • Cheviot City Council members meet at 7:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesday of the month at city hall, 3814 Harrison Ave. Phone: 661-2700. Mayor: Samuel Keller. President of Council: Debbie McKinney. • Cincinnati City Council meets at 2 p.m. every Wednesday in room 300 at Cincinnati City Hall, 801 Plum St. When there is a Monday holiday, all meetings including committee meetings are pushed back a day. City Manager: Milton Dohoney Jr. Mayor: Mark Mallory. • Cincinnati Public Schools Board of Edu-

cation usually meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 2651 Burnet Ave. Board of Education phone: 4757000. Superintendent: Mary Ronan. Board President: Eileen Cooper Reed. • Village of Cleves Council meets at 7 p.m. on the second and fourth Wednesday of each month at the Cleves Municipal Building, 101 North Miami Ave. Phone: 941-5127. Mayor: Shawn Sutton. • Green Township Trustees meet at 5:30 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of the month at the administration building, 6303 Harrison Ave. Phone: 574-4848. Administrator: Kevin Celarek. Trustee Chairman: David Linnenberg. • Miami Township Board of Trustees at 7:30 p.m. on the fourth Wednesday of the month at the Miami Township Hall, 122 South

Western Hills Press Editor . . . . .Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com . . . . . . .853-6264

Miami Ave. in Cleves. Phone: 941-2466. Board president: Paul Beck. • Village of North Bend Council meets at 7 p.m. on the last Monday of each month at the North Bend Municipal Building, 21 Taylor Ave. Phone: 941-0610. Mayor: Terry Simpson. Vice mayor: Ron Nunnery. • Oak Hills Local School District Board of Education members meet the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at various locations within the district. District office: 6325 Rapid Run Road. Phone: 574-3200. Superintendent: Todd Yohey. Board President: Rick Ahlers. • Westwood Civic Association members meet the third Tuesdays of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Westwood Town Hall, 3017 Harrison Ave. Phone: 662-9109. Civic Association president: John Sess.

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A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | For additional contact information, see page A2 923-3111 | Fax 853-6220 | 5556 Cheviot Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 | e-mail westernhills@communitypress.com | Web site: www.communitypress.com

Email: westernhills@communitypress.com Website: communitypress.com

PRESS

Home foreclosure increase brings out scam artists

A publication of Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood

Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston,

Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, C H @ T R O O MBridgetown, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood

Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood Email: westernhills@communitypress.com

PRESS

We d n e s d a y, M a y 1 8 , 2 0 1 1

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

THANKS TO KAREN MILLER.

THANKS TO KAREN MILLER.

Kayden Hazelbaker, left, and Sam Whitmer of St. Teresa of Avila study a butterfly.

St. Teresa students from left Jacob Roth, Noah, Carter Cowans examine a butterfly they first received as a caterpillar.

THANKS TO KAREN MILLER.

Marie Dattilo, left, Anna Marchioni are enthralled by a butterfly.

Life cycle

THANKS TO KAREN MILLER.

The kindergarten class at St. Teresa of Avila enjoyed watching and learning about the life cycle of a butterfly. The class received caterpillars when they were very small. Then they ate and grew big and soon after, the students saw them make their cocoons, and were excited when they came out as beautiful butterflies. The student then held them and released them near the school butterfly garden. From left, Austin Bass, Logan Green, Jacob Roth examine a butterfly.

THANKS TO KAREN MILLER.

St. Teresa of Avila student Hayden Angevine seems excited to be holding a butterfly.

THANKS TO KAREN MILLER.

St. Teresa of Avila student Sadie Briggs with a butterfly.

THANKS TO KAREN MILLER.

St. Teresa of Avila students, from left, Noah Angevine, Carter Cowans and Kayden Hazelbaker with a butterfly they saw grow from a caterpillar.

6500 GLENWAY AVENUE CINCINNATI, OH 45211

513.574.5584 www.garyrainsbodyshop.com

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Western Hills Press

May 18, 2011

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD T H U R S D A Y, M A Y 1 9

EXERCISE CLASSES Beginners’ Gentle Ashtanga Yoga, 7-8 p.m., Miami Heights Elementary, 7670 Bridgetown Road, Create strength, flexibility and release of stress. Gentle moving meditation connecting mind, body and spirit. Family friendly. $70 for 10-class pass, $40 for fiveclass pass, $9 drop-in. Presented by Three Rivers Community Education. 675-2725. Miami Township. Yoga for Strength and Healing, 10:3011:30 a.m., Westwood Town Hall Recreation Center, 3017 Harrison Ave., Beginners to intermediate levels. Learn ways to relax the mind and purify the body through various postures and breathing exercises. $8. Registration required. 662-9109. Westwood. Yoga for the Back, 6-6:45 p.m., Miami Heights Elementary, 7670 Bridgetown Road, Create flow of postures that soothes and nurtures neck, shoulders and upper and lower back issues. Family friendly. $70 for 10-class pass, $40 for five-class pass, $9 drop-in. Presented by Three Rivers Community Education. 675-2725. Miami Township.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Danny Frazier Band, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Drew’s on the River, 4333 River Road, $3. 451-1157; www.drewsontheriver.com. Riverside.

MUSIC - JAZZ

West Chester Jazz Dogs Quintet, 8 p.m.-10 p.m., Refuge Coffee Bar, 5010 Glenway Ave., 429-4215; www.refugecoffeebar.org. Price Hill.

MUSIC - OLDIES

Cincy Rockers, 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, 2517977; www.jimandjacks.net. Riverside.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke with Mean Jean, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Club Trio Lounge, 5744 Springdale Road, Karaoke and dance music. Free. 385-1005. Colerain Township.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

COLD Tuna, 8 p.m.-midnight, Poppy’s Sports Bar and Grill, 6611 Glenway Ave., Free. 5744939. Bridgetown. Bob Cushing, 8 p.m., Black Sheep Bar & Grill, 3807 North Bend Road, 481-6300. Cheviot.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Alice in Wonderland Jr., 7 p.m., St. Martin of Tours School, 3729 Harding Ave., Production by eighth-grade students. Family friendly. $2, $1 children; $5 maximum per family. Presented by St. Martin of Tours. 661-7609. Cheviot.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Nunsensations, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., The Nunsense Vegas Revue takes the sisters on a brand new adventure. Family friendly. $17, $16 seniors and students. Presented by Showboat Majestic. Through May 22. 2416550. West Price Hill. F R I D A Y, M A Y 2 0

FARMERS MARKET

Lettuce Eat Well Farmers Market, 3-7:30 p.m., Harvest Home Park, 3961 North Bend Road, Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. Through Nov. 25. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

FESTIVALS

Our Lady of Victory Parish Festival, 6-11 p.m., Our Lady of Victory, 810 Neeb Road, Booths, games of chance, rides, raffles, burgers, brats, hot dogs and more. 9224460; www.olv.org. Delhi Township.

MUSIC - OLDIES

The Avenues, 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, 251-7977; www.jimandjacks.net. Riverside.

MUSIC - ROCK

Twistlock, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Drew’s on the River, 4333 River Road, $3. 451-1157; www.drewsontheriver.com. Riverside.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Nunsensations, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $17, $16 seniors and students. 241-6550. West Price Hill. tick … tick … BOOM!, 8 p.m., Dunham Recreation Center Arts Building, $9, 8 students and seniors. 588-4988; www.sunsetplayers.org. West Price Hill.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Arthritis-Alternative Approaches to Preventing and Relieving Joint Disease, 1-2 p.m., Bayley Community Wellness Center, 401 Farrell Court, Library Room. Presentation educates about what arthritis is, who is susceptible to it, what causes it, how to relieve it and steps to help prevent joint disease. Ages 21 and up. Free. Presented by Bernen’s Medical. 347-1450. Delhi Township. The Hoopla about Pelvic Health, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Nathanael Greene Lodge, 6394 Wesselman Road, Interactive program designed to give women opportunity to ask questions about pelvic health. Learn how variety of pelvic health topics affect confidence and quality of life. $5. Reservations required. Presented by TriHealth Spirit of Women. 5695900; www.trihealth.com/spiritofwomen. Green Township.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

NATURE

Birds Along the Ohio, 5 p.m.-7 p.m., Fernbank Park, 60 Thornton Ave., Meet by playground. Explore the birds along Ohio River, one of North America’s most important flyways. See which birds might be flying through, or arriving for a summer stay. Binoculars provided. Free. Presented by Cincinnati Parks. 53-231-8678; www.cincyparks.com. Sayler Park.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Nunsensations, 8 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $17, $16 seniors and students. 241-6550. West Price Hill. tick … tick … BOOM!, 8 p.m., Dunham Recreation Center Arts Building, 1945 Dunham Way, Book, music and lyrics by Jonathan Larson. Unique blend of pop and musical theater styles. Set in 1990, story of young composer on brink of turning 30 and agonizing over big life choices. $9, 8 students and seniors. Presented by Sunset Players Inc. Through May 21. 588-4988; www.sunsetplayers.org. West Price Hill.

RECREATION

Walk Club, 8:30 a.m., Fernbank Park, 60 Thornton Ave., Walks led by Park District volunteers. Walkers may choose what days to walk. Ages 50 and up. Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. Through Nov. 30. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sayler Park. S A T U R D A Y, M A Y 2 1

BENEFITS

Dancing Under the Stars, 7-11:30 p.m., Wesley Services Organization, 2091 Radcliff Drive, Evening of dancing and entertainment with panoramic view of Cincinnati skyline. Includes hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and silent auction. Music by Swampthang: Phil Castellini, percussion; Bill Debuys, bass; Andrew Dewitt, guitar; April Hilen, vocal; Shonda Moore, vocal; Ricky Nye, vocal and keys; Allen Zaring, vocal and guitar; Mark Zaring, drums. Benefits Wesley Services Organization. $65. 661-2777; www.wsocincinnati.org. Price Hill.

CIVIC

Yardwaste Recycling Drop-off Program, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road, Includes leaves, grass clippings, brush, garden waste, tree trunks and tree and shrub prunings. Hamilton County residents only. Commercial businesses and landscapers not eligible to participate in this program. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 9467755; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

FESTIVALS

Our Lady of Victory Parish Festival, 5-11 p.m., Our Lady of Victory, 922-4460; www.olv.org. Delhi Township.

RECREATION

FILE PHOTO

St. Antoninus Cub Scout Car Show, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., St. Antoninus Parish, 1500 Linneman Road, Awards for car owners, Tshirts, door prizes, split-the-pot, music by disc jockey and concessions. Benefits Cub Scout Pack 614. $10 to enter car, free for spectators. 451-3428; www.saintantoninus.org. Green Township. Flying Trapeze Lessons and Aerial Fitness, 7-11:30 p.m., Western Hills Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson Road, Introductory and advanced classes for flying trapeze, no experience necessary. Ages 3 and up. $45. Registration required. Presented by Cincinnati Circus Company. 921-5454; www.cincinnaticircus.com. Westwood.

SHOPPING

Community Yard Sale, 9 a.m.-noon, Westwood, Participating addresses available online or stop by any one of the yard sale homes on day of event to pick up map of where others are located. Rain or shine. Free. Presented by Coldwell Banker West Shell. 560-6513; www.westwoodyardsale.com. Westwood. Riverside Community Yard Sale, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., Gilday Recreation Complex, 3540 Southside Ave., Community-wide yard sale in conjunction with U.S. 50 Yard Sale. Free. Presented by Riverside Civic and Welfare Club. 471-4646. Riverside. Used Book Sale, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Grace Lutheran Church, 3628 Boudinot Ave., Lower Level Sanctuary. Books for everyone in the family. Benefits High School Youth Group. Free. 661-5166; www.gracemin.org. Westwood. S U N D A Y, M A Y 2 2

AUDITIONS

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, 6:30-9 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., Must be 18+ years of age. Must have a resume listing theatrical experience in order to audition. A head shot is appreciated but not required. Prepare an excerpt of a song (1632 bars) that best represents voice and bring sheet music for the accompanist in the proper key. A comedic song is preferred but not required. No a cappella or recorded music auditions please. Also prepare a contemporary, one minute, comedic monologue. Auditionees will also take part in a brief improvisation. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Showboat Majestic. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

CIVIC

Yardwaste Recycling Drop-off Program, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free. 9467755; www.hamiltoncountyrecycles.org. Green Township.

The Cincy Rockers will hit the stage at 9 p.m. Friday, May 20, at Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road. For more information, call 251-7977 or visit www.jimandjacks.net.

FESTIVALS

Our Lady of Victory Parish Festival, 3-10 p.m., Our Lady of Victory, Chicken dinner starts at 3 p.m. Discount ride specials 3-5 p.m. Music by Bob Cushing 4-8 p.m. 9224460; www.olv.org. Delhi Township.

HISTORIC SITES

German Heritage Museum, 1-5 p.m., German Heritage Museum, 4790 West Fork Road, Two-story 1830 log house furnished with German immigrant memorabilia. Available by appointment. Free, donations accepted. Presented by German-American Citizens League of Greater Cincinnati. Through Oct. 30. 598-5732; www.gacl.org/museum.html. Green Township.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Cincinnati Metropolitan Orchestra, 3 p.m., Seton High School, 3901 Glenway Ave., “Cruise the Danube.” Features compositions by German and Austrian composers, including Strauss and Mozart. Special guests include vocalists Michele Klug Hillgrove and William Reed. Free, donations accepted. Presented by Cincinnati Metropolitan Orchestra. 941-8956; www.gocmo.org. West Price Hill.

MUSIC - OLDIES

Blair Carmin and the Bellview Boys, 7-10 p.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, “The rockinest piano in the Midwest.” $10. Reservations recommended. 2517977; www.jimandjacks.net. Riverside.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. T U E S D A Y, M A Y 2 4

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Oak Hills Kiwanis Meeting, 6:30-8 p.m., Nathanael Greene Lodge, 6394 Wesselman Road, Bi-monthly meeting. Serving Green Township and Oak Hills communities. Ages 21 and up. Presented by Oak Hills Kiwanis Club. 325-8038. Green Township.

DANCE CLASSES

Line Dance Class, 10-11 a.m., Dunham Recreation Complex, 4356 Dunham Lane, Line dancing with Jerry and Kathy Helt, instructors. Wear smooth-soled shoes. No partner dances and no prior dance experience required. $4. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 321-6776. West Price Hill.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Ashtanga Yoga Level I, 5:45-7 p.m., Miami Heights Elementary, 7670 Bridgetown Road, Deepen moving meditation practice with strong flow of familiar asanas and introduction of new asanas. Family friendly. $70 for 10-class pass, $40 for five-class pass, $9 drop-in. Presented by Three Rivers Community Education. 675-2725. Miami Township. Yoga for Strength and Healing, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Westwood Town Hall Recreation Center, $8. Registration required. 662-9109. Westwood.

FARMERS MARKET

NATURE

Lords of the Wind, 2 p.m., Fernbank Park, 60 Thornton Ave., Playground. Naturalist speaks on vultures. Includes live vulture. Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sayler Park.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Sayler Park Farmers Market, 4-7 p.m., Sayler Park, Parkland Avenue and Monitor Street, Local produce, spices, dips, salad dressings, barbecue sauce, baked goods, ice cream, plants and flowers. 675-0496. Sayler Park.

MUSIC - OLDIES

Bop Club Dance, 7-11 p.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, Dance lessons 7-8 p.m., except last Tuesday of month. $3, free members. 251-7977; www.cincibop.com. Riverside.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Community Mental Health Assistance, 1-3 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Mental health support with Recovery International. Free, donations accepted. Presented by Recovery International. 379-6233. Cheviot. W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 2 5

COMMUNITY DANCE Line Dancing, 7-11 p.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, 251-7977. Riverside. DANCE CLASSES

Square Dance, 10-11:30 a.m., Dunham Recreation Complex, 4356 Dunham Lane, With Jerry and Kathy Helt, instructors. Wear smooth-soled shoes. No partner dances and no prior dance experience required. $4. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 3216776. West Price Hill.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 7-9 p.m., Aston Oaks Golf Club, 1 Aston Oaks Drive, Five wines and three appetizer courses. Family friendly. $20 plus tax and gratuity. Reservations required. 4670070, ext. 3. North Bend.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

American Heart Association: Heartsaver CPR/AED/First Aid Course, 6-8:30 p.m., Bayley Community Wellness Center, 401 Farrell Court, Two-year certification for health care providers and general public. Registration and payment due one week before class. $63.90. Registration required. 3471400. Delhi Township.

Nunsensations, 2 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, $17, $16 seniors and students. 241-6550. West Price Hill.

RECREATION

Help Haiti 5K, 3-6 p.m., Oak Hills High School, 3200 Ebenezer Road, Includes T-shirt and afterparty cookout with music by the Menus. Benefits Kids Against Hunger. $25. Registration required. Presented by Oak Hills French Club. 319-4569; helphaiti5k.yolasite.com. Green Township. M O N D A Y, M A Y 2 3

AUDITIONS

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, 6:30-9 p.m., Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, Free. 241-6550; www.cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. West Price Hill.

RECREATION

PROVIDED

Jazz and bluegrass come together on stage as the Preservation Hall Jazz Band and the Del McCoury Band blend the sounds of Appalachia and New Orleans in concert at 8 p.m. Friday, May 20, at the Aronoff Center. Tickets are $22.50, $32.50, $42.50 and $52.50. Call 513-621-2787 or visit www.cincinnatiarts.org.

George Knittle Memorial Bayley Place Golf Classic, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Western Hills Country Club, 5780 Cleves Warsaw Pike, Shotgun start, dinner and awards follow golf outing. Fox News Anchor Bill Hemmer, host. Benefits Bayley Place. $200 golfer, $50 cocktail reception. Registration required. Presented by Bayley Place. 347-4040; www.bayleyplace.org. Green Township. Walk Club, 8:30 a.m., Fernbank Park, Free, vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sayler Park.

THANKS TO PHILIP GROSHONG/CINCINNATI OPERA

The Cincinnati Opera and Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden present “Back to the Zoo,” a free, family-friendly concert at the zoo’s Wings of Wonder Theater, at 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 1. Opera, memories from zoo days, and encounters with animals, will follow a reception with hors d’oeuvres and cash bar at 6 p.m. Tickets are free, but reservations are required. Call 513-241-2742. Pictured are singers John Christopher Adams, Megan Dewald, Nathan Stark, and accompanist Carol Walker, joined onstage by a llama and its handler.

Life

May 18, 2011

Western Hills Press

B3

Can good people occasionally become angry at God? ment psalms are known as Lament Psalms, prayers of complaint registered against God. They show that people, in touch with their humanness, and to whom God was real, felt free to express their frustration to God. Praying such psalms can give us words we hesitate using on our own. Where else can we be totally human if not before the One who made us humans? We certainly can feel free to pray our anger, conflicts, and frustrations that question divine fairness until we’ve emptied them out and sent them echoing through the universe. Then, as Job did or as we often do in our human relationships, we begin to see things differently. We forgive original impressions, recant, see things anew and accept – until the next time. Being open with God is conducive to letting God be open with us. It permits us to shake our fist at God on

Anger is a h u m a n emotion. It’s as normal as contentm e n t , loneliness, Father Lou s e x u a l i t y Guntzelman or satisfacPerspectives tion for a job well d o n e . Anger arises from the perception (right or wrong) that someone has disrespected us. Are we allowed to shake our fist at God without fearing repercussions? Certainly. Some prophets became angry at God and said so. A prophet, the stature of Jeremiah, once rebuked God for mistreating him, “You duped me, O God, and I let myself be duped … I have become a laughingstock all day long. (Jeremiah 20:7) Many of the Old Testa-

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one occasion and break into feelings of thankfulness on another. We appreciate anyone who accepts our true feelings and understands why we feel and think the way we do. We learn to trust such a person. One is only able to express anger at a Beloved

because we feel safe. We realize the one who loves us will neither react with violence, reject us, or erect a wall of distance between us – but still love us. May good people ever become angry with God? Of course. Paradoxically our human struggles with God

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may eventually bring us to a deeper trust in what G.K. Chesterton called “The furious love of God for us.” Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@community press.com.

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Some pious people say that their faith is so strong they never feel angry at God. If we’re honest with ourselves, however, I think most of us would admit there are times we become angry with God. We become angry at God for many reasons: he seems so silent, so unresponsive when we pour out our hearts, so unrelenting in the misery we perceive he lets go on in our lives and in the world. Anger is one of our greatest blocks to prayer and a maturing spiritual life. When we were children we hid much of our anger toward authorities such as parents, teachers, coaches, etc. Our restraint was possibly for one of two reasons. 1. We were becoming acquainted with the power of our anger and what harsh things we could say or do under its influence. 2. We were also afraid of what these authority figures might do to us if we challenged them with our anger. Parents could discipline or reject us, teachers could administer punishment or poor grades, and coaches could put us off the team or never permit us to play. Thirty, 50 or 70 years later good people may hide their anger at God for variations of the same reasons: fear of receiving divine punishments such as illness, financial loss, loss of love, or “thunderbolts” of displeasure administered to us in some painful way. There are those who stop praying or worshipping because they imagine God deliberately caused some painful incident in their lives.

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Western Hills Press

Life

May 18, 2011

Time to ‘stalk’ up on tasty rhubarb recipes inserted in center comes out clean. Icing (optional) Stir in a couple tablespoons water into 1 cup confectioner’s sugar. If too thick, add a bit more water. Or put 1⁄2 cup cream cheese frosting (purchased) in the microwave for 15 seconds. Drizzle over cake. Serves 12 to 15.

Our rhubarb has shot up overnight. In fact, some of it is starting to flower, so I went out to the garden this morning and cut as m a n y Rita stalks as I Heikenfeld could. When Rita s kitchen we were kids, I didn’t like rhubarb at all. I guess it was the tanginess of it that made my mouth pucker. Interestingly enough, now I absolutely adore rhubarb. And it’s something that is at its best in season. Rhubarb is called “pie plant” because most folks make a rhubarb and strawberry pie with it. Rhubarb contains calcium and is good for our skeletal system. It contains anti-bacterial and anti-cancer properties, as well

COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

Freshly cut stalks of rhubarb from Rita’s garden. sugar 2 tablespoons butter 3 ⁄4 cup chopped walnuts 2 large eggs 8 oz. sour cream 11⁄2 cups finely chopped fresh rhubarb (substitute frozen if you want, thaw slightly and drain if necessary) 11⁄2 cups sliced strawberries Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine 2⁄3 cup cake mix and sugar; cut in butter until crumbly. Add nuts and set aside. Put rest of cake mix in bowl, add eggs and sour cream and mix. Fold in rhubarb and berries. Spread into sprayed 9by-13 pan. Sprinkle with crumb mixture. Bake 40 to 50 minutes until toothpick

Easy rhubarb berry coffeecake

I love this over ice cream. 4 cups chopped rhubarb 2 cups strawberries, halved 1 ⁄2 cup each: sugar and orange juice Grated zest of 1 orange and 1 lemon (opt.) 1 tablespoon finely grated fresh ginger 1 teaspoon vanilla Put in pan and bring to boil over medium heat. Reduce to simmer, skim off any foam and cook until rhubarb is tender, about 10 minutes. Store in fridge. Makes about 4 cups. Tip from Rita’s kitchen: Only the stalks of rhubarb are edible, not the leaves.

COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

The cauliflower and carrots roast alongside the spiced chicken.

Israeli spiced chicken with carrots, cauliflower

This has now become a family favorite. Once you try it, you’ll see why. The cauliflower and carrots roast beautifully alongside the chicken. Now if you want, you can use any kind of chicken pieces with skin and bone on. 1 pound carrots, peeled and cut into large chunks 1 nice head cauliflower, broken into florets 2 teaspoons each: ground coriander and cumin mixed together Olive oil 4-5 chicken thighs with skin left on and bones left in Sea salt and freshly ground pepper Lemon wedges Preheat oven to 475 degrees. Combine veggies and chicken pieces. Coat very lightly with olive oil.

Then sprinkle on coriander and cumin, making sure all pieces are coated with the mixture. Spray a large, shallow roasting pan, big enough for everything to fit in single layer. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper and roast until chicken is done and veggies are cooked, about 40 to 45 minutes. Chicken will be golden brown. Serve with lemon wedge.

Tips from readers’

Crockpot potato sausage soup mystery solved. Thanks to Liz Brown who tried the crockpot potato soup recipe again, this time with the 1-pound bags of frozen hash browns. “A hit with my family,” she said.

Tips from Rita’s kitchen

Peeling very fresh hard-boiled eggs: I dump the eggs in a bowl of very cold water and as soon as they are cool enough to handle, I turn the faucet on

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Green Township resident Robert Luckey has been promoted to vice president at Fifth Third Bancorp. Luckey joined Fifth Third Bank in December 1994 and currently serves as senior equity/fixed income trader. He is also responsible for supervising junior and intermediate traders as well as operations analysts on the bank’s Equity Trading Desk. Luckey received his associate’s degree in business management and finance from Cincinnati State and his bachelor’s in Business Administration from the College of Mount St. Joseph. He is a member of the Ohio Securities Traders Association. • Patricia Valentino has joined the sales team operating out of the Huff Realty Western Hills office.

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Jeff Ruby’s Waterfront corn: Debbie Dolan, a Hebron, Ky., reader hopes someone can come close to this recipe. “The best corn I have ever had came from Jeff Ruby’s Waterfront Restaurant. It contained truffle oil (I think) and bits of crab meat. Now that the restaurant has floated away, can someone please help me learn to make this at home?” she asked. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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cold water and peel the eggs under running cold water. Update on Gorgonzola/bleu cheese bacon dressing recipe: After the dressing was in the fridge for a day, it got really thick – it made a great veggie dip. If this happens to you, just thin it out with a little bit of milk.

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Community

Western Hills Press

May 18, 2011

Sisters of Charity will have new leader The 2011 Chapter of the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati has a new president and four council members. The sisters met to set direction and hold elections was held April 8-16 at the Sisters of Charity Motherhouse in Delhi Township. President Sister Barbara Hagedorn will complete her eight-year term as current president of the Sisters of Charity on June 30. “Serving as president has been a gifted ministry for me,” Hagedorn said. “I have had the privilege of working with a wonderful leadership team as we served the community. My position gave me opportunities to represent the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati in church, local,

THANKS TO DONATA GLASSMEYER.

New leaders of the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati are, from left, sisters Louise Lears, Mary Bookser, president-elect Joan Elizabeth Cook, Lois Jean Goettke, Christine Marie Rody national and international settings, all done in the spirit of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, our founder.” President-elect, Sister Joan Elizabeth Cook, S.C., of Silver Spring, Md., has been a Sister of Charity of Cincinnati for 50 years. She is currently professorial lecturer

in the theology department of Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and served as the Catholic Biblical Association's Visiting Professor at the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome, Italy, during the 2009 spring semester. She will assume her role as president

form July 1 through June 30, 2015. Four councilors also were elected to the leadership team: Sisters Mary Bookser and Lois Jean Goettke, both of Cincinnati; Louise Lears, Baltimore; and Christine Marie Rody, Cleveland. Their four-year

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About the Sisters of Charity

The Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati, whose motherhouse is in Delhi Township, is an apostolic Catholic women’s religious community that exists to carry out the Gospel of Jesus Christ through service and prayer in the world. Sisters, using their professional talents as ministers of education, health care, pastoral and social services, currently live and minister in 17 states and in Guatemala, Mexico and the West Indies. They also sponsor institutions to address education, health care and social service needs, with particular concern for direct service to the poor. Fourhundred Sisters are joined in their mission by 185 Associates. The Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati website is www.srcharitycinti.org.

term begins July 1. In addition, the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati Mission Statement was revised as a result of Chapter directives. The revised statement reads: “Urged by the love of Christ and in the Spirit of our founder, Elizabeth Ann Seton, we Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati strive to live Gospel values. We choose to act justly, to build loving relationships, to share our resources with those in need, and to care for all creation.” Among several other directives, the Community also committed to “explore the choices and changes we need to make in order to strengthen the witness of consecrated life,” Hagedorn said.

Women’s club goes to the hop

THANKS TO ROSEMARY SCHLACHTER.

Former WSAI DJ Dusty Rhodes takes a break from spinning the platters with CWC member Rosemary Schlachter and husband Mark Schlachter of Western Hills.

Cincinnati Woman’s Club members and guests were stompin’ and strollin’ At The Hop April 8 at a lively and unforgettable benefit for the club’s Philanthropic Endowment Fund. Members in rock ‘n roll attire danced the night away to the groovy sounds of celebrity DJ, former WSAI broadcaster Dusty Rhodes. Even Elvis made a special appearance and wowed the ladies and their guests with his celebrated moves. Party guests dined on Kobe beef cheese burgers, onion rings, French fries and root beer floats, in 1950s sock hop tradition. The event was successful thanks to all the hard work of Planning Committee chairwoman Mrs. Stephen Carlson,

THANKS TO ROSEMARY SCHLACHTER.

The Carlson Family enjoy the fifties tunes: CWC member Cookie Carlson, of Monfort Heights, her granddaughter Megan Carlson, Cookie’s son Kevin Carlson, and Kevin’s wife, Melissa Carlson. and Mrs. Donald C. Siekmann, whose decorations transported the club back to the 1950s. Others who served on this

committee: Mrs. Joseph L. Hall V, Mrs. Thomas Sakmyster, Mrs. Donald Stites, Mrs. Marion D. Frances, Mrs. Murray

W. Janzen, Mrs. G. Gregory Miller, Mrs. Jackson L. Clagett III, and Mrs. Sarah S. Stirsman.

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Western Hills Press

Community

May 18, 2011

Literacy Network gets grant from NKU

PROVIDED

Cruising for a cause

A group from the Western Hills Exchange Club and Living Hope Transitional Homes recently traveled on a seven-day fundraising cruise through Dave Martini and Cruise Holidays. Dan and Colleen Aug and family, and Bill and Mary Ann Robbe raised money for the Western Hills Exchange Club. Cindy and Mike Smith, Doug and Ellen Witsken, Tia and Bob Ruehlman, Tom, Sharon and Cecilia McEnaney, and Rick and Lisa Lane raised funds for the Living Hope Transitional Homes, which provides a secure environment for women and children in transition from homelessness to stable, independent living. Pictured from left are club members Dan Aug, Bill Robbe, Dave Martini, owner of Cruise Holidays, and Cindy Smith, who also is director of Living Hope Transitional Homes.

Michael Feinstein in Concert with Christine Ebersole

Enjoy an evening with Michael Feinstein at the Fitton Center for Creative Arts on

Saturday, June 4, 2011, at 8 p.m.

Broadway singer and actress Christine Ebersole will be performing with Michael this year.

Tickets are $100 each or $150 for preferred seating. To reserve your seats call 513-863-8873 ext. 110. Event sponsored by the Carruthers Family.

ham approach, CBRP gives students the tools and confidence to read independently. Students enrolled in CBRP take classes four days a week for one hour for two years. Since the program’s inception in 1998, graduates have averaged a 3.5 grade level increase in their word attack skills. The Mayerson Student Philanthropy Project was established in 1999 by the Mayerson Foundation president, Neal Mayerson, and NKU President James Votruba. The program is intended to influence the way NKU students view civic responsibility, to broaden their understanding of community, and to teach them what it means to be philanthropic in order to work towards the goal of allowing the students to develop their own sense of community responsibility. “The Mayerson Student Philanthropy Project at NKU provides students with a unique opportunity to learn about organizations who are working to help others, and provides the resources for the students to get involved and make a positive difference. This outstanding program benefits all involved,” said Ciarla. For more information about Cincinnati Reads, the Children’s Basic Reading Program, volunteer opportunities, or how you can help support the Literacy

THANKS TO CATHERINE ALEXANDER.

Literacy Network of Greater Cincinnati President Kathy Ciarla thanks the NKU students in Jeffrey Fox’s class for the $1,500 grant from the Mayerson Student Philanthropy Project. LNGC student Cameron Davis participated in the presentation. From left are Eric Branham, Cameron Davis, Kathy Ciarla, Leigha Phelps, and Jeffrey Fox.

THANKS TO CATHERINE ALEXANDER.

Literacy Network of Greater Cincinnati President Kathy Ciarla thanks the NKU students in Jeffrey Fox's class for the $1,500 grant from the Mayerson Student Philanthropy Project. LNGC student Cameron Davis participated in the presentation. From left are Eric Branham, Cameron Davis, Kathy Ciarla, Leigha Phelps, and Jeffrey Fox. Network, please call 513621-7323 (621-READ) or visit www.LNGC.org.

For more about your community, visit www.cincinnati.com/pricehill.

IN THE SERVICE Barnes

Navy Seaman Recruit Jonathon E. Barnes, son of

Mike is a 29-year-old -year-old young professional. essional. He says he’s not as smart as his smartphone – yet.

Caroline A. and Robert L. Barnes recently completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. During the eight-week program, Barnes completed a variety of training which included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival, and shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis was also placed on physical fitness. Barnes is a 2010 graduate of Oak Hills High School.

Kreimer

Navy Seaman Apprentice Christopher M. Kreimer,

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A post performance reception with Michael and Christine is included in your ticket price.

The Literacy Network of Greater Cincinnati received a $1,500 grant from Northern Kentucky University’s Mayerson Student Philanthropy Project. The grant will be used for the Children’s Basic Reading Program. LNGC was chosen by Professor Jeffery Fox’s “Strategies of Persuasion” class as a beneficiary of this project. Fox’s class raised the money for the grant through a letter-writing campaign and the Scripps Howard Foundation matched those funds. LNGC President Kathy Ciarla was invited to speak to the class about the programs, services and needs of the network. The students then voted on funding CBRP. This grant will fund one student for a full year of CBRP and another student for a half-year. “I was very impressed with the NKU students and their dedication to learning more about functional illiteracy and how they can help. This gift will make a difference for children who struggle with dyslexia. I am so thankful to the students for their support,” said Ciarla. CBRP provides free reading instruction for firstthrough fifth-grade children suffering from severe reading deficiencies or symptoms of dyslexia. Utilizing a multi-sensory technique based on the Orton-Gilling-

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son of Lawrence J. Kreimer, was recently promoted to his current rank upon graduation from recruit training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. Kreimer received the early promotion for outstanding performance during all phases of the training cycle. Training which included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival, and shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis was also placed on physical fitness. Kreimer is a 2009 graduate of La Salle High School.

Wreh

Air Force Airman Brandon S. Wreh graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, Wreh eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Wreh is the son of Melinda Wreh, he graduated in 2006 from Western Hills High School.

Community Alba E. Adams, 84, Western Hills, died May 9. Survived by husband Willie Adams; daughter Constance Esswein Hergert; sibling Carmel Martin; nieces Marsha Pratt, Gayle Jones. Services were May 13 at Dalbert, Woodruff & Isenogle Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hospice of Southwest Ohio.

Raymond Amrein

Ernst

Maribeth Flading

Raymond Amrein, 89, died May 11. He was an Army veteran of World War II and a member of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9294. Survived by brother Peter Amrein; sister-inlaw Thelma Selby; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by wife Zudora “Sid” Amrein, Amrein nine siblings. Services were May 18 at St. Antoninus. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, 4420 Carver Woods Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45210.

Maribeth A. Flading, died May 4. Survived by mother Yvonne Flading; siblings Cathy (Joe) Barker, Joseph (Kathy) Flading; nieces and nephew Annie Barker, Stephanie, Joe, Flading Beth Flading. Preceded in death by father Henry Flading. Services were May 7 at St. William. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home. Memorials to: Down Syndrome Association of Greater Cincinnati, 644 Linn St., Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Joseph Beyersdorfer

Wilbur Hartoin

E. Joseph Beyersdorfer died May 7. Survived by daughters Paula Conner, Carol, Nancy, Janet, Laura Beyersdorfer; grandchildren Lisa (Keith) Berlin, James Conner; greatgrandchildren Grace, Jack, Cooper Berlin; sister Helen Lingenfelter. Preceded in death by wife Elizabeth “Betty” Beyersdorfer, brothers Jack, Jim Beyersdorfer. Services were May 12 at St. Antoninus. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to: University of Cincinnati Foundation Parkinson’s Research Fund, P.O. Box 670570, Cincinnati, OH 45267 or St. Antoninus School Endowment Fund, 1500 Linneman Road, Cincinnati, OH 45238.

James Cavanaugh

James E. Cavanaugh, 69, died May 6. He worked in the heating and air conditioning industry. He was an Army veteran of Vietnam. Survived by wife Nancy Cavanaugh; daughters Michelle, Melissa Cavanaugh; granddaughters Amanda, Leah Taylor; siblings Pat (Arnold) Woody, Pam (Ralph) Jones, Penney (Doug) Morsch, Peggy (Richard) Wilcox, Jill (Tom) Zink, Joe (Nancy), Jack (Lisa), Jerry (Toni) Cavanaugh. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Diabetes Association or Hospice of Cincinnati.

Del Ciafardini

Maudella “Del” Berry Ciafardini, 87, died April 30. Survived by siblings Alice “Sue” (Bill) Bussell, Raymond (the late Dorothy) Berry; sister-inlaw Margie Berry. Preceded in death by husband Vincent Ciafardini, brothCiafardini er Gilbert Berry. Services were May 4 at Meyer Funeral Home. Memorials to: American Cancer Society, 2808 Reading Road, Cincinnati, OH 45206 or a charity of the donor’s choice.

Imogene Coffey

Imogene Steely Coffey, 81, Cleves, died May 11. She worked in the household products manufacturing industry. She was a member of the Addyston Baptist Church. Survived by son Gary (Beverly) Coffey; grandchildren Caitlin, Selina Coffey, Nikki Brinck; siblings Coffey Alma Napier, Herman, Homer Steely. Preceded in death by husband Logan Coffey, siblings Robert, J.L. Steely, Thelma Holland. Services were May 14 at Addyston Baptist Church. Arrangements by Dennis George Funeral Home. Memorials to Addyston Baptist Church.

Katrina Ernst

Katrina L. “Katie” Ernst, 36, died April 29. She was a waitress. Survived by children Ashley, Alexis Wischer, Damien, Jaden Griffin; parents Esher Oakes, Bernie Wischer; grandmother Melva Rogers; siblings Bernie, Sean, Brittany Wischer, Jessica, Michael Oakes; aunt Janice Waddle; friend Loretta Veach. Preceded in death by grandparents

Wilbur J. Hartoin, 92, Green Township, died May 11. He owned Bill’s Battery. He was an Army veteran of World War II. Survived by Hartoin wife Helen Hartoin; children Donna (Robert) Diers, Dennis (Lois), Richard (Karen), Ronald (Patricia), Michael (Karen) Hartoin; grandchildren Tim (Brooke), Amy Diers, Becky (David) Harmon, Denise (Naveen) Reddy, Kelly (Jeff) Edmondson, Julie (Chris Wolf), Jennifer, Katie, Kevin, Brian (Danielle), Nicole, Kyle, Rob, Nathan, Marisa, Mikayla Hartoin; great-grandchildren Mackenzie, Drew, Abbey, Robby, Adam, Ashley, Sebastian, Gavin, Emmy, Isabel, Alex, Maddie; sister Vera Mae Miller; sister-in-law Dolores Hartoin. Preceded in death by parents Harry, Marie Hartoin, brothers Harold (Lois), Charlie, Raymond Hartoin. Services were May 17 at St. Antoninus. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: Elder High School, 3900 Vincent Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205.

Robert Hellmann

Robert “Dutch” Hellmann, 73, died May 8. Survived by wife Cynthia Smith Hellmann; children Diane (Mark) Hoehn, Tony (Jody), Bob (Linda) Hellmann, Patty (Chuck) Uhrig; Hellmann grandchildren Nick, Zack, Holly, Robert III, Bridget, John, Daniel, Christy, Kaitlyn; siblings Rosie Brauch, Jean Mersch, Charles, Dick Hellmann. Services were May 11 at St. Dominic. Arrangements by Meyer & Geiser Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, 4310 Cooper Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Edward Lameier

Edward T. Lameier, Cheviot, died April 23. He was a former member of Cheviot City Council. He was a Marine Corps veteran, a member of the Knights of Columbus, Catholic Kolping Society and American Legion, served as a trustee on the Cincinnati Insurance Board for 12 years, Lameier was vice president of the Cincinnati Health Underwriters for three years, served on the Mother of Mercy High School Board of Education for 10 years and was the president of the Southern Ohio Swim League for 10 years. Survived by wife Mary Jo Lameier; daughters Jennifer (Drew) Codner, Lisa (John) Rich; grandchildren Hannah, John, Caroline, Joshua, Madeline; brother Lawrence (Jane) Lameier; brothers and sistersin-law Len, Diana Kroeger, Kathy, Matt Guilfoyle, Ronnie, John Dawson, Marie, Eileen Kroeger, Mary Anne, Michael Broe, Bob, Julie, Dennis, Elaine Wanstrath, Ellen Wagner; many nieces, nephews and cousins, two aunts and one uncle. Services were April 28 at St. Catherine of Siena. Memorials to Elder High School or the Hospice of Cincinnati.

Elmer Leistler

Elmer “Bill” Leistler, 60, died May 2. He was a corporate security advisor for Tri Health. Survived by wife Margaret Leistler; children Kellie (Paul) Burgess, Greg Leistler; grandchildren Ashley, Sierra, Kathryn, Matt, Elizabeth, Miranda; siblings Betty Ventre, Jerry McMurtry. Preceded in death by sisters Mildred McMahan, Bunny Brock. Services were May 7 at Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to: Delhi Historical Fire Museum, 697 Neeb Road, Cincinnati, OH 45233 or Sheltered Paws Dog Rescue, P.O. Box 18003, Cincinnati, OH 45218.

Richard Lyle Martin, 88, Green Township, died May 5. He was an attorney with Martin and Boehm, LPA. He was an Army Air Corps veteran of World War II. Survived by wife Gertrude Martin Martin; sons William, Stephen (Linda) Martin; grandchildren Jaimie, Kyle Martin, Christina (Bryan) Oehler; great-grandchild Ryker. Services were May 9 at St. Antoninus. Arrangements by B.J. Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to: Evercare Hospice, 9050 Centre Pointe, Suite 400, West Chester, OH 45069 or American Heart Association, P.O. Box 163549, Columbus, OH 43216-3549.

B7

About obituaries

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 8536262 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 2424000 or pricing details.

Lee Morgan

Homer Leroy “Lee” Morgan, 75, died May 6. He owned and operated Lee’s Barber Shop in Covedale for more than 40 years. He was a Navy veteran. Survived by wife Maralah Morgan; sons Kevin (Lisa) Morgan, Rob (Debbie) Morgan; sister Donna (Steve) Wright; six grandchilMorgan dren. Memorials to: Highway 32 Church of Christ, P.O. Box 642, Williamsburg, OH 45176.

SOUTHERN BAPTIST

UNITED METHODIST

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NORTH BEND UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Mabel Muncy, 68, Cleves, died May 8. She was a drug store manager. She was a member of the Cleves Church of Christ, ClevesThree Rivers Kiwanis and Three Rivers Muncy Boosters. Survived by son Wade Muncy; siblings Thelma Bowling, Lou Campbell; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by husband Marvin Muncy, siblings Dosha, Sammy Owen Campbell, parents Preston, Octa Campbell. Services were May 13 at Dennis George Funeral Home.

Deaths | Continued B8

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Anderson Ferry & Foley Roads 513-451-3600 www.shilohumc.com 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship and Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Praise Celebration and Junior Church nursery provided for both services

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3001 Queen City Ave. 513-661-3745 Rev. Martin Westermeyer, Pastor Bible Study 9am Worship & Church School 10am Dial-A-Devotion 426-8957 www.stpeterandstpaulucc.org

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Ethel Hoff

Ethel R. Hoff, 88, died May 10. Survived by children Sister Carolyn, OSF, Gregory (Gail), Joseph (Linda), Alan (Janet), George (Lorri), Daniel (Laura) Hoff; siblings Colletta Rogers, Hoff Eugene Augustine; 19 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Joseph Hoff, sister Lois Helm. Services were May 14 at St. Jude Church. Arrangements by Rebold, Rosenacker & Sexton Funeral Home. Memorials to: Sisters of St. Francis, P.O. Box 100, Oldenburg, IN 47036 or Hospice of Southwest Ohio, 7625 Camargo Road, Cincinnati, OH 45243.

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David Gregory Huston, Green Township, died May 7. Survived by wife Tina Huston; daughters Amanda, Christine Huston; grandchildren Mackenzie, Kylie Huston-Swain, Bailey Huston; siblings Charlotte, Ken (Peggy) Huston, Karen (Ken) Knauff; father-in-law Paul Belcher; sisters- and brothersin-law Missy (Brian) Byrd, Paul (Lisa) Belcher, Carl (Julie) Palmer; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by parents George, Arby Huston, grandchild Snickers Huston,

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DEATHS Haskel Rogers, Emogene Rogers, Bernie Wischer. Services were May 9 at Erlanger Baptist Church. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

Western Hills Press

May 18, 2011

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Western Hills Press

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BIRTHS

|

DEATHS

Morgan Fields, 21, 4322 Harding Ave., driving under suspension, May 10. Kyle Essary, 20, 1930 Hudson Ave., driving under suspension at 3950 North Bend Road, May 6. Naeshia Crawford, 23, 2552 Harrison Ave., driving under suspension at Harrison Avenue and Washington Avenue, May 6. Lee Williams, 31, 3631 Janlin Court, driving under suspension at Harrison Avenue and Washington Avenue, May 6. Christopher Kresser, 26, 8513 Bridgetown Road, driving under suspension, May 7. Sean Grimes, 28, 3765 Frances Ave., driving under suspension, May 11. Melissa Lasita, 28, 3838 Washington Ave., driving under suspension at 3300 block Harrison Avenue, May 11. Virginia Carney, 47, 3700 Woodbine Ave. No. 1, driving under the influence at Daytona Avenue and Glenmore Avenue, May 8. Dakota L. Sellers, 19, 3947 Glenmore Ave., obstructing official business at 3947 Glenmore Ave., May 6. Aaron Chapman, 31, 3966 Roswell Ave., possession of drugs and drug abuse instruments at 3814 Harrison Ave., May 12. Terri Preston, 26, 700 Neave St., warrant, May 9. Brian Rose, 30, 3947 Lovell Ave., warrant, May 11.

Assault

Incidents/reports

Suspect struck victim in head with metal pipe at 3420 Glenmore Ave., May 6.

|

REAL

The Community Press publish the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: • Cheviot: Chief David Voss, 661-2700 (days), 661-2917 (evenings).

Breaking and entering

Copper plumbing and fittings stolen from home at 3730 Dina Ave., May 4.

Criminal damaging

Two windows broken on vehicle at 3619 Harrison Ave., May 7. Rock thrown through home’s glass front door at 3320 Augusta, May 9.

Theft

Credit card stolen from victim and used several times to make unauthorized charges at 3618 Robb Ave., May 6. Money stolen from vehicle at 3619 Harrison Ave., May 7. DVD/television system, amplifier and flip-down television stolen from vehicle at 3414 Glenmore Ave., May 8.

CINCINNATI DISTRICT 3 Arrests/citations

Andrew C. Pottinger, born 1978, possession of an open flask, May 1. Candis Richardson, born 1986, criminal damaging or endangering, May 1. Zachariah T. Meyer, born 1994, selling liquor to a minor, May 1. Carlton Lampley, born 1984, domestic violence, 2760 Queen City Ave., May 2.

Email: westernhills@communitypress.com

communitypress.com

CHEVIOT

• Cleves: Chief Bill Renner, 941-1212. • Cincinnati District 3: Capt. Russell A. Neville, 263-8300. • Green Township: Chief Bart West, 574-0007; vandalism hotline, 574-5323. • North Bend and Miami Township are patrolled by the Hamilton County: Sheriff Simon Leis, 825-1500. Christopher J. Trentman, born 1986, domestic violence, 3360 Glenmore Ave., May 2. Akiel Belfon, born 1988, domestic violence, 3531 Werk Road, May 3. Antonio Cuthbertson, born 1973, domestic violence, 3900 Glenway Ave., May 4. Curtis France, born 1990, drug abuse, falsification, 1264 Beech Ave., May 4. Ashley E. Holt, born 1983, theft under $300, 6140 Glenway Ave., May 4. Michael Terrell Howard, born 1974, trafficking, 3249 Queen City Ave., May 4. Travis Downey, born 1978, possession of drugs, May 4. John Crawford, born 1992, obstructing official business, 4401 Glenway Ave., May 5. Jwantay Dennis, born 1991, domestic violence, 1244 Dewey Ave., May 5. Carla Sumner, born 1978, theft under $300, 2310 Ferguson Road, May 5. Frank Deters, born 1958, possession of a dangerous drug, 6024 Glenway Ave., May 5. Sheila Nared, born 1966, criminal damaging or endangering, 2303 Wyoming Ave., May 6.

Police | Continued B9

3829 Davis Ave.: Knowles, Scott A. & Deana L. to Lauck, Donald F. & Joanne C.; $28,500. 4159 Harrison Ave.: Burnette, Debra M. to U.S. Bank NA Tr.; $52,000. 3934 North Bend Road: Gamm, James A. to Harris, Novita F.; $129,000. 3913 Smith Road: Baumann, Helen M. to Fuller, Debra; $85,000.

CLEVES

131 State Road: Bank of America NA to Lundberg, Charles A.; $84,500. 20 Timberline Court: Wesbanco Bank Inc. to Masminster, Forrest E.; $43,000.

GREEN TOWNSHIP

Address not available: Fischer Attached Homes II LLC to Schultz, Daniel J. & Stacey M. Firsich; $152,960. Address not available: Fischer Attached Homes II LLC to Fischer Attached Homes II LLC; $152,960. 2984 Bailey Ave.: Re Recycle LLC to Singler, Brandon A. & Stephanie N. Gaynor; $79,900. 5558 Bluepine Drive: CDE Services Inc. to Pulda, Benjamin E.; $128,000. 5423 Bluesky Drive: Brown, Jim & Tiffanie to Deutsch Bank National Trust Co. Tr.; $40,000. 4506 Bridgetown Road: Shepherd, Jack A. & Connie J. to Kollner, Wilfred; $96,000. 6265 Bridgetown Road: Leedy, Janice W. & Alan Windgassen to Leedy, Jessica M.; $97,000. 3008 Carroll Ave.: Votaw, Joshua J. to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp.; $54,000. 3096 Crestmoor Lane: Stieritz, Michael J. & Christopher J. Trs. to Burke, Daniel S. & Michelle; $93,000. 5430 Douglasfir Court: Gates, Janet

& Jerald to Rosebrook, Brian & Lauren M.; $157,000. 4030 Ebenezer Road: Steding, Christopher A. & Heather L. to Wessel, Jason; $155,000. 5724 Eula Ave.: Meyer, Michael E. & Jean M. to Bank of New York Mellon T. The; $62,000. 6014 Flyer Drive: Crabb, Julie A. to Brandt, Dale F. Tr. & Joan C. Tr.; $168,449. 3900 Gary Court: Studer, Michael E. & Donna J. to Kroener, Theresa & Rene Schmitz; $80,100. 6603 Hearne Road: Shaw, Robert & Victoria to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp.; $24,000. 6048 Jessup Road: Federal National Mortgage Association to Bosse, David A.; $73,500. 3435 Kleeman Lake Court: Celsus, J. Belletti LLC to Berger, Steven M. & Lisa M.; $177,000. 5292 Leona Drive: Hughes, Chris R. to Demmons, Brandi A.; $86,000. 3677 Moonridge Drive: Ireland, Krista Maria to Hilton Capital Group LLC; $55,000. 5733 Nickview Drive: Temke, Gretchen M. to Memory, Arien N. & Christopher P. Jr.; $153,500. 5247 North Bend Crossing: Bender, Kathy to Schneider, Kenneth Paul & Patricia Ann; $105,000. 2967 Parkwalk Drive: Mercado, Maria E. to Big Move Properties LLC; $114,100. Sally Court: Kildare West LLC to NVR Inc.; $80,000. 3773 Sunburst Ridge Lane: McCloy, Rita H. Tr. to McCloy, Mark S.; $225,000. 4053 Westwood Northern Blvd.: Oberrecht, Sharon R. & Steven M. to Teeters, Bradley M.; $71,000. 7168 Wyandotte Drive: Geiser, Greg to Geiser, Maria; $155,000.

MIAMI TOWNSHIP

3730 Indian Brave Trail: Kammerer, David M. & Kathy M. to Thomas, Vincent L. & Erin P.; $293,500.

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SATURDAY, MAY 28 1-2 p.m. Faux Frenchmen 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. The Cincy Brass 4-5 p.m. The Pinstripes 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Mark Ballas 6:30 p.m. Mixing with Molly Wellmann (demo) 7:30 – 9:00 p.m. The Seedy Seeds 9:30 – 11:00 p.m. Pomegranates

Colleen Johnson (Nash) & Charles Johnson were married June 9, 1951 at St. Bonaventure Church in Cincinnati, Ohio. They have three children: Curtis Johnson, Craig Johnson & Carol Johnson-Dreyer. They have 10 grandchildren & 12 greatgrandchildren.

SUNDAY, MAY 29 1-2 p.m. The Minor Leagues 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. Giant Wow 4-5 p.m. The Tillers 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. The Lions Rampant 7 – 8 p.m. Buffalo Killers 8:30 – 9:30 p.m. Walk the Moon 10 – 11 p.m. 500 Miles to Memphis

1:30 – 3:30 p.m. Kelly Thomas and The Fabulous Pickups 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. The Kickaways (featuring Freekbass and DJ Tobotius from Animal Crackers)

James E. Musser, 85, Green Township, died May 8. He owned Musser Barber Shop in Cheviot for 44 years. He was a Navy veteran of World War II, Musser and member of Cheviot Eagles Aerie 2197 and Harry S. Johnson Masonic Lodge 641. Survived by wife Leona Musser; children James Musser, Jannie Kidwell; stepchildren James, Charlie Smith, Holly Scheyer; sister Irene Wallace; 21 grandchildren; 12 greatgrandchildren. Services were May 13 at GumpHolt Funeral Home. Memorials to: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, P.O. Box 5202, Cincinnati, OH 452015202.

Andrew Schultz Walk the Moon

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Andrew P. Schultz, Green Township, died May 7. He was a tool and die maker for General Electric. Survived by wife Dorothy Schultz; children Ken (Linda), Rick (Mary Jo), David Schultz, Kathy Schultz (Daniel) Sexton; grandchildren Gina, Bill, Michelle, Rebecca, Craig, Jessica, Tim, Jackie, Carrie, Katlyn; great-grandchildren Lauren, Jamie. Preceded in death by daughter Darlene Miller, grandson Keith Services were May 11 at St. Ignatius of Loyola. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hospice of Cincinnati or Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

James Umberg

Charles & Colleen worked in their family-owned business, JohnsonNash Metal Products. They have resided in Florida for 18 years. A celebration party is planned for them by their children in Cincinnati, Ohio

Western Hills High School Class of 1966 is planning their 45th class reunion Sept. 3, 2011. For information please contact worrelllinda@fuse.net

Mark Ballas

*Official Metromix Stage Afterparty at Neons Unplugged!

MONDAY, MAY 30 1:00 p.m. Presentation of The Spirit of Katie Reider Award

60th Anniversary

PRESS

About real estate transfers

Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate.

NORTH BEND

3 Edinburgh Place: Means, Dwayne H. & Deena L. to Guardian Savings Bank FSB; $245,000. Hamilton Cleves Road: Bunch, John S. & Tracy R. to Citimortgage Inc.; $63,547. 120 Shawnee Ave.: Bunch, John S. & Tracy R. to Citimortgage Inc.; $63,547.

WESTWOOD

3073 Bracken Woods Lane: Federal National Mortgage Association to Harbour Portfolio VI LP; $6,237. 3159 Daytona Ave.: Federal National Mortgage Association to Carroll, Randall J.; $48,000. 2930 Feltz Ave.: Payne, Alyssa M. & David R. to Carvitti, Robert V.; $97,000. 2645 Fenton Ave.: Federal National Mortgage Association to Seldon, Jackie P.; $24,000. 2504 Forthmann Place: Williams, Gilbert & Jacqueline M. to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Association; $24,000. 3259 Hildreth Ave.: Garrett, David J. & Joanne M. to Ginter, Jared M.; $105,500. 2620 Montana Ave.: Frick, Diane to Everbank; $68,000. 3135 Pershing Court: Dipilla, David A. to Flannery, Nicholas & Adrienne; $127,000. 3335 Robinet Drive: Stanghetti, James R. & Patricia J. to Moreno, Jacqueline N. & Don Juan Moreno II; $92,500. 2780 Shaffer Ave.: Smith, Richard G. to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Association; $34,000. 2596 Westwood Northern Blvd.: Tabanna Properties LLC to STD LLC; $70,000.

DEATHS

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Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood

ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

About police reports

Arrests/citations

POLICE

Editor Marc Emral | memral@communitypress.com | 853-6264

POLICE REPORTS

CHEVIOT

|

PRESENTED BY

PRODUCED BY

CE-0000450730

Photo Credit: Mark Ballas/Provided, Walk the Moon/David DeWitt, 500 Miles to Memphis/Stephanie Keller, Kelly Thomas/Stephanie Keller

James Umberg, 73, died May 10. Survived by wife Pauline Umberg; children Trina, Matt (Jenny) Umberg; grandchildren Jacob, Tyler Umberg. Preceded in death by brother John Umberg. Services were May 16 at St. Aloysius Gonzaga. Arrangements by Rebold, Rosenacker & Sexton Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263, Elder High School Scholarship Fund, 3900 Vincent Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205 or Our Daily Bread, P.O. Box 14862, Cincinnati, OH 45250.

Howard Willoughby

Howard William Willoughby, 90, formerly of Miami Heights, died April 30. He was a member of American Legion Post 199 and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 15036. Survived by wife Irene Willoughby; daughter Lorraine (Wayne) Neff; grandchildren Kim (Dan) Ashcraft, Jason Neff; great-granddaughter Tiffany Ashcraft; sisters Dorothy, Christine, Patty Faye, Donna Lee. Services were May 6 at ArgoBolton & Lunsford Funeral Home.

Dee Woltering

Dolores “Dee” Hoffrogge Woltering, Green Township, died May 5. She was a homemaker. Survived by husband Robert Woltering; children Kimberly (Mark) Baltrusch, Lori (James) Woltering Adler, Robert (Trudy) Woltering; grandchildren Matthew Leist, Danielle, Kate Baltrusch, Stuart, Keith Adler, Spencer Woltering; siblings Donald (Helen) Hoffrogge, Judith (Jerry) Imsicke. Preceded in death by grandson Jason Leist, brother Edward (Jean) Hoffogge. Services were May 10 at St. Bernard Church. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to the American Diabetes Association or St. Vincent de Paul Society in care of St. Bernard Church.

Richard Ziegelmeier

Richard Ziegelmeier, 54, Miami Township, died May 10. He was a smokehouse operator for Queen City Sausage. Survived by wife Brenda Ziegelmeier; chil- Ziegelmeier dren Christina, Jennie, Richard Jr., Brian, David Ziegelmeier, Michelle (George) Byrnside, Shannon (Jason) Bowlin; grandchildren Devon, Brian Jr., Ashley, Phoenix, Serenity, Austin, Caden, Angel, Bradley, Alana Ziegelmeier, Seth Wilson, Leonard II, Joshua Kersey, Dylan, Haley Huff, Brieana, Jonathon, Nathan Byrnside, Elizabeth Miller, Austin Young, Logan Bowlin; sister Janet Lafferty. Preceded in death by siblings Shirley Keith, Linda Bay, Leslee Ziegelmeier. Services were May 13 at Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263.

On the record

May 18, 2011

Western Hills Press

B9

POLICE REPORTS From B8 Clara Humphries, born 1990, theft under $300, 6100 Glenway Ave., May 6. Jerry A. Farrington, born 1976, disorderly conduct, child endangering/neglect, 5450 Glenway Ave., May 6. Kenneth Heard, born 1991, theft under $300, 6000 Glenway Ave., May 6. Zack D. Harmeyer, born 1992, aggravated menacing, 2913 Boudinot Ave., May 6. Christopher Jason Fuerst, born 1977, domestic violence, 4247 W. Eighth St., May 7. Michael A. Robinson, born 1968, assault, 1049 Sunset Ave., May 7. Randy Shears, born 1991, aggravated robbery, 4220 Glenway Ave., May 7. Eboney Richardson, born 1987, assault, 2731 East Tower Drive, May 7. Danielle Zinveli, born 1976, violation of a temporary protection order, 4129 W. Eighth St., May 8. Jonathan G. Little, born 1981, domestic violence, 4724 Glenway Ave., May 8. Kyra McClelland, born 1976, assault, 1630 Gilsey Ave., May 8. Michael Hall, born 1983, domestic violence, 1226 Rutledge Ave., May 8. Ronald Burton, born 1990, assault, 1630 Gilsey Ave., May 8. Archie Brown, born 1980, domestic violence, 3357 Queen City Ave., May 8. Bridgett Blair, born 1952, theft under $300, 2435 Harrison Ave., May 8. Holly Graber, born 1992, aggravated menacing, assault, domestic violence, 3338 Gerold Drive, May 8. Jessica Gordon, born 1986, theft under $300, 6150 Glenway Ave., May 8. Kimberly Thompson, born 1969, felonious assault, 2400 Harrison Ave., May 8. Donald Cordell, born 1981, falsification, obstructing official business, 1622 Wyoming Ave., May 9.

Incidents/reports Aggravated burglary

4615 Glenway Ave., May 1.

Aggravated menacing

5560 Glenway Ave., April 30. 3897 Yearling Court, May 1.

Aggravated robbery

2447 Westwood Northern Blvd., May 3. 6180 Glenway Ave., May 4.

Assault

1876 Sunset Ave., April 29. 4323 Glenway Ave., April 29. 2776 Lafeuille Ave., April 29.

2604 Harrison Ave., April 30. 5556 Glenway Ave., April 30. 5712 Glenway Ave., April 30. 1920 Westmont Lane, May 1. 646 Roebling Road, May 1. 2642 Harrison Ave., May 1. 2670 Lehman Road, May 1. 3100 Midway Ave., May 5. 3200 McHenry Ave., May 5.

Breaking and entering

2658 Mustang Drive, April 29. 2608 Harrison Ave., May 2. 3080 McHenry Ave., May 3. 1253 First Ave., May 4. 4134 Heyward St., May 5. 3055 Glenmore Ave., May 5. 3126 Harrison Ave., May 6.

Burglary

4401 Glenway Ave., April 29. 2036 Sunset Ave., May 1. 3055 Glenmore Ave., May 1. 3061 Glenmore Ave., May 1. 3753 Westmont Drive, May 3. 4118 Flower Ave., May 5.

Criminal damaging/endangering

3341 Parkcrest Lane No. 1, April 29. 4112 Flower Ave., April 30. 4105 W. Eighth St., May 1. 4105 W. Eighth St., May 1. 5500 Glenway Ave., May 1. 2556 Hollenshade Drive, May 2. 3348 Stathem Ave., May 5.

Domestic violence

Reported on Iliff Avenue, April 29. Reported on Iliff Avenue, April 30. Reported on Wyoming Avenue, May 2. Reported on Four Towers Drive, May 4.

Felonious assault

1233 Dewey Ave., May 2. 2703 Shaffer Ave., May 2. 1235 Beech Ave., May 5.

Making false alarms

4352 W. Eighth St., April 29.

Menacing

2442 Ferguson Road, May 1.

Robbery

5092 Glencrossing Way, April 30. 5712 Glenway Ave., April 30. 4404 W. Eighth St., May 4.

Theft

1079 Lockman St., April 29. 1247 Sliker Ave., April 29. 1251 Sliker Ave., April 29. 2587 Lafeuille Ave., April 29. 2835 Westwood Northern Blvd., April 29. 2905 Lischer Ave., April 29. 3531 Werk Road, April 29. 1237 Iliff Ave., April 30. 4899 Cleves Warsaw Pike, April 30. 5156 Willnet Drive, April 30. 2311 Harrison Ave., April 30. 2991 Harrison Ave., April 30. 3144 Queen City Ave., April 30. 6150 Glenway Ave., April 30. 1600 Gilsey Ave., May 1. 4021 W. Eighth St., May 1. 4418 W. Eighth St., May 1.

2947 Westridge Ave., May 1. 5500 Glenway Ave., May 1. 4229 St. Lawrence Ave., May 2. 1811 Ashbrook Drive, May 3. 1856 Sunset Ave., May 3. 6000 Glenway Ave., May 3. 1507 Vienna Woods Drive, May 4.

GREEN TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations

Juvenile, 13, assault at 5400 Edalbert Drive, May 5. Juvenile, 12, assault at 5400 Edalbert Drive, May 6. Juvenile, 16, criminal mischief, obstructing official business and underage consumption at 6100 Cheviot Road, May 1. Randi Garrett, 19, 1234 Main St. Apt. B, criminal trespass at 3835 Race Road, May 7. Aaron L. Massey, 18, 4424 Harrison Ave. No. 2, disorderly conduct while intoxicated at 6537 Glenway Ave., May 1. Jennifer J. Adkins, 21, 220 N. Hill St., domestic violence at 6949 Harrison Ave., April 29. Juvenile, 15, domestic violence at 3175 Balsamridge Drive, April 30. Dionna R. Wallington, 25, 3402 North Bend Road No. 2, domestic violence at 3402 North Bend Road No. 2, May 6. Yvonne Carpenter, 51, 6747 Hill St., drug possession at 6714 Harrison Ave., April 30. Juvenile, 16, drug possession at 3200 Ebenezer Road, May 5. Juvenile, 17, drug possession, drug paraphernalia and driving under suspension at 6133 Berauer Road, May 3. Michael Cason Jr., 21, 7301 Sheed Road, failure to comply at 6000 block Taylor Road, May 5. Tim Schlueter, 53, 3858 North Bend Road, open container at Church Lane and Bridgetown Road, May 6. Jennifer Wingerberg, 19, 3846 Cartwheel Terrace, possession of marijuana at 3130 Jessup Road, May 4. Yeremiah I. Tafari-Hawkins, 18, 6821 Simpson Ave. No. 9, receiving stolen property at 6375 Harrison Ave., May 2. Jamie M. Costa, 21, 1288 Rutledge Ave., theft at Eastbound Interstate 74, April 29. Nathaniel Q. Goodrich, 21, 749 Clanora, theft at 6303 Harrison Ave., April 30. Summer M. Colwell, 28, 132 Derby Blvd., theft at 6300 Glenway Ave., May 1. Christopher J. Trentman, 24, 3814 Darwin Ave. No. 2, theft at 6550

Cheviot Road, May 6.

Harrison Ave., May 2. Chrystal A. Quigley, 33, 4830 Fairview Ave., theft at 6580 Harrison Ave., May 4.

Arson

Menacing

Suspect threatened to harm victim at 4373 Bridgetown Road, May 2.

Incidents/reports

Passing bad checks

Check written on account with insufficient funds passed at Benco LLC at 5410 Cherry Bend Drive, May 3.

Port-A-Potty owned by Rumpke was set on fire at Bridgetown Middle School at 3900 Race Road, April 29.

Theft

Assault

Suspect punched victim in the jaw at 2965 Blue Rock Road, April 29. Suspect punched victim and hit them with a shoe at 5488 Rybolt Road, May 5. Suspect punched victim at 3649 Whiteoak Drive, May 5.

Breaking and entering

Two satellite radios stolen from garage at Hillview Golf Course at 6954 Wesselman Road, May 1.

Burglary

Home entered, but nothing found missing at 6542 Hearne Road No. 707, May 2. Bicycle stolen from home’s garage at 5181 Shepherd Creek Road, May 3. Home entered and ransacked, but nothing found missing at 5473 Michelle’s Oak Court, May 5.

Criminal damaging

Vehicle driven through home’s front yard at 3251 Tallahassee, April 29. Black paint poured on home’s driveway at 6076 Gaines Road, April 30. Graffiti spray-painted on wall at La Salle High School at 3091 North Bend Road, May 4.

Counterfeit $100 bill passed at Toys R Us at 6251 Glenway Ave., May 4 Suspect cashed a cashier’s check without authorization at 5540

Handgun stolen from home at 6554 Hearne Road No. 809, April 29. Purse and contents, money, radar detector, checkbook and cordless drill stolen from vehicle at 6550 Harrison Ave., April 29. Wallet and contents stolen from purse sitting in shopping cart at Home Depot at 6300 Glenway Ave., April 29. GPS stolen from vehicle at 5572 Bridgetown Road, April 30. Medicine and money stolen from home at 4312 Homelawn Ave., April 30. Yard statue stolen from home’s garden at 5578 Mayberry Drive, May 1. T-shirt and a costume jewelry ring stolen from Dillard’s at 6290 Glenway Ave., May 2. MP3 player and money stolen from vehicle at 5438 Cherry Bend Drive, May 3. MP3 player cord, cell phone charger and seven CDs stolen from vehicle at 3346 Markdale Court, May 3. GPS, miscellaneous tools and 10 communication radios stolen from vehicle at 3347 Markdale Court, May 3. MP3 player, cell phone and digital camera stolen from home at 4424 Harrison Ave., May 3.

FLORIDA

SOUTH CAROLINA

Playground set spray-painted with graffiti at Blue Rock Park at 3014 Blue Rock Road, May 1. Tail light broken on vehicle at 3271 Dickinson Road, May 6. Construction cone thrown through rear window on vehicle at 3570 Coral Gables, May 7.

Domestic dispute

Argument between former spouses at Pattie Court, April 29. Argument between spouses at Townhill Drive, April 29. Argument between man and woman at Bridgetown Road, April 30. Argument between spouses at North Bend Road, May 1. Argument between live-in partners at Lee’s Crossing Drive, May 2. Argument between man and woman at Oakapple, May 2. Argument between live-in partners at Lee’s Crossing Drive, May 3.

Forgery

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, SC

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B10

Western Hills Press

May 18, 2011

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