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Pembroke Pines CITY CONNECT

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Oct/Nov 2011 Volume1,Issue1

So No One Ever Forgets

The world stopped last month during the 10th anniversary of 9/11 to remember that tragic day and the people that were lost. Memorials were dedicated, ceremonies and services were held, and here in Pembroke Pines, many also gathered at the unveiling of the 9/11 art Memorial to pay their respects. Those residents who were unable to attend last month’s unveiling of the city’s 9/11 Memorial are encouraged to take the time now and visit it at Pembroke Pines City Center

located at 10300 Pines Blvd. “Remembering should never be just one day out of the year,” said Mayor Frank C. Ortis. “The 9/11 Memorial should be visited often to ensure we never forget.” The multi-piece memorial, created by two Pembroke Pines residents, was inspired by the 2005 donation, solicited by Commissioner Angelo Castillo, by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg of a 250-pound steel girder salvaged from the ruins of the World Trade Center. Residents can view artist Benoit Menasche’s creation of a four-sided Italian marble relief with carvings of people on each side representing shock, grief, acceptance and rebuilding. And, artist Felix Gonzalez’s creation is of two eight-foot and 10-foot tall artworks fashioned from twisted, mangled steel to

represent the Twin Towers; and two human figures made of solid, handcut and welded steel – a seven-foot

firefighter and a little girl climbing from rubble. An open steel gazebo surrounds the artworks.

Pembroke Pines City Commission From left to right: Jack McCluskey (District 2), Iris A. Siple (Vice Mayor – District 3), Mayor Frank C. Ortis, Carl Shechter (District 1), Angelo Castillo (District 4) Mayor Frank C. Ortis (954) 435-6505 ……. fortis@ppines.com Commissioners: Iris A. Siple (Vice Mayor) (954) 436-3266 … isiple@ppines.com Angelo Castillo (954) 436-3266 ………. acastillo@ppines.com Jack McCluskey (954) 436-3266 .….. jmccluskey@ppines.com Carl Shechter (954) 436-3266 ……… cshechter@ppines.com City Manager: Charles F. Dodge (954) 431-4884 ……. cdodge@ppines.com

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Citywide Streetscape Project Moves Forward Meandering sidewalks, more landscaping, smaller trees and a more cohesive look to shopping areas were just a few ideas and suggestions

shared recently at an open gathering (charrette) of residents, businesses and city officials to discuss the City’s Streetscape plans.

Miller Legg and Associates, a local planning, engineering and architectural landscape firm who planned the charrette, was hired earlier this year to help the city improve the look of its streets and right of ways. Their ultimate goal is to assist the City Commission and staff in the creation of a planning document that the city will use as a planning tool to make the gateways into the city unique, so that anyone knows they have just entered Pembroke Pines. Recommendations and input from the public are helping the company prepare a draft of citywide guidelines to be presented to the Commission later this year. “The charrette was the first big baby step in moving towards creating a warm and friendly environment where people of all ages can come to shop and enjoy our city,” said Commissioner Jack McCluskey, a long-time proponent of a citywide streetscape plan. “The bond money

for the project, however, needs to be spent intelligently. From our oldest areas to our newest, we should have a unified look so people know they are in the City of Pembroke Pines.” Residents can check on general streetscape updates and information on the city’s website at www.ppines. com.

October-November 2011

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Honoring Those Who Have Served Our Country One Brick At A Time Veterans Day on November 11 can mean different things to different people. For some it’s a time to heal from past emotional wounds or to teach about freedom, while for others

Pembroke Pines City Connect Published by the City of Pembroke Pines Marianne Wohlert – News Editor 10100 Pines Blvd – 5th Floor Pembroke Pines, FL 33026 For Advertising Information CityConnect@ppines.com Contacts: City Manager’s Office (954) 431-4884 Martin Gayeski, Deputy City Manager mgayeski@ppines.com Aner Gonzalez, Assistant City Manager agonzalez@ppines.com City Clerk’s Office (954) 435-6501 Judy Neugent, City Clerk jneugent@ppines.com Finance (954) 431-4330 Rene Gonzalez, Finance Director rgonzalez@ppines.com

it’s a time to remember and honor all those in the military who dedicated their lives to protect our country. This Veterans Day, the Pembroke Pines Veterans Memorial at City

Public Services/Utilities (954) 437-1115 Shawn Denton, Director of Public Services sdenton@ppines.com Fire (954) 435-6712 John Picarello, Fire Chief jpicarello@ppines.com Police (954) 431-2466 Dan Giustino, Police Chief dgiustino@ppines.com Recreation (954) 437-1137 Dean Combs, Recreation Director dcombs@ppines.com Community Services (954) 450-6868 Jay Shechter, Community Services Director jshechter@ppines.com Human Resources (954) 437-1146 Daniel Rotstein, Human Resources Director drotstein@ppines.com

Paying Utility Bills Got Easier Pembroke Pines residents can now pay their utility bills online using a credit card, debit card or echeck. All major credit cards, except for VISA, are now being accepted. VISA debit cards will be accepted on face-to-face transactions. To make a payment, residents can log on to www.ppines.com and

click on Online Services or they can walk in to City Hall and the Utility Department. Residents will soon be able to make credit and debit card payments at various other locations throughout the City such as the Early Development Centers, Parks, Housing Rental Facilities, and the Charter Schools.

Center will be officially unveiled at a special dedication ceremony at noon. The 15-foot black obelisk with the seals of all our country’s Armed Forces is surrounded by a commemorative brick walkway which residents can help build. “This Memorial reminds all Americans that we owe a great debt to those who have served in the military,” said Pastor Peter Tokar, a member of the Pembroke Pines Veteran’s Memorial Foundation Executive Board and a Navy veteran himself. “The bricks are a fantastic opportunity to immortalize family veterans and/or friends who have served our great nation.” There is room for five-thousand bricks to surround the Memorial. The bricks come in two sizes: a 4” x 8” brick has three lines with a total

of 20 characters per line for $50 and an 8” x 8” brick has six lines with a total of 20 characters per line for $95. Those purchasing a brick will also receive a duplicate as a memento. The commemorative bricks, which can feature the name of a veteran, memorial comments or a general message thanking our veterans, can be purchased by logging on to www. ppines.com and clicking on Veterans Memorial Foundation or by calling 954-443-4829. The site of the Veterans Memorial is City Center located just west of City Hall at 10300 Pines Blvd. Refreshments will be served immediately following the November 11th memorial unveiling and Veterans Day ceremony.

City Tip: It Pays To Be Water Smart Florida may still be in the rainy season but conserving water should always remain a priority. Here are some common sense tips to use around your home: • Position your sprinklers to spray water on your lawn and landscape, not onto paved areas nearby. Install and use timers on all your irrigation systems and portable sprinklers to prevent over watering. • Use sprinklers during the early morning hours when temperatures and wind speeds are the lowest. This reduces water loss through evaporation. • Avoid over-fertilizing your lawn. Applying fertilizer increases the need for water. • Collect rainwater from rooftop gutters in a rain barrel or cistern. Use the stored water during dry periods.

• Do not leave hoses unattended. More than 600 gallons of water can flow from an open garden hose in one hour. • Repair dripping faucets by replacing washers inside. One drop per second wastes 2,700 gallons of water per year. • Check for toilet leaks by adding food coloring to the tank. If it is leaking, colored water will appear in the bowl within 30 minutes. Flush the colored water immediately to avoid staining the bowl. • Turn off the faucet after wetting a toothbrush, razor or washcloth. Turn the faucet back on when you are ready to rinse. • Do something every day to save water – every drop counts. For more tips from the South Florida Water Management District go to www.sfwmd.gov.

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Halloween Can Be Both Fun and Safe Ghosts, ghouls and monsters aren’t the only things to be afraid of on Halloween. Accidents and mishaps increase dramatically when children trick-or-treat. Many of our city merchants offer safe trick-or-treating events within malls or shopping plazas to reduce many holiday risks. However, for those who wish to enjoy Halloween in a more traditional way, the

Pembroke Pines Police Department offers these recommendations for a safe and fun trick-or-treating experience: Don’t eat anything until it’s been inspected by an adult. Only give/accept wrapped or packaged candy. Notify the police if anything harmful is discovered. Keep costumes simple to avoid falls. They should be made of light

colored materials to be easily seen at night. Reflective patches can even be added. Instead of wearing masks, consider face painting. Obey all the traffic rules and cross only at corners. Walk on the sidewalk but if there isn’t one, walk facing traffic. At least one person in each group should carry a flashlight. Pre-plan what route to take and

make sure you know the area. Only go to houses that have porch lights turned on. Be suspicious of older children who come to your home more than once because they may be ‘casing’ your home for a burglary. A final ‘tricky’ tip, give your children small Halloween bags – these will be filled quickly and the kids will return home earlier.

A Behind-the-Scenes View of Police Operations Twice a year, the Pembroke Pines Police Department gives residents an opportunity to experience and become more closely acquainted with the roles and responsibilities of the police. The Pembroke Pines Citizens’ Police Academy (CPA), held once a week for a 15 week period, is a sampling of police training. CPA students are taught about police procedures, the effect of the media on public perception, what it’s like to be a patrol officer, firearms

familiarity and information on the department’s specialized units such as Dive Team, K-9, Investigations and the Special Response Team. Any resident without a felony record who is interested in the police department can apply for the class. The 34th CPA is now underway with graduation slated for December 1st. Approximately 35 – 42 people participate in each of these classes. Since the academy began in 1995, over 1,000 residents and business

leaders throughout the community have graduated. Students leave this training with an awareness of what goes on in the city, and the ability to volunteer, help during disasters, and have a better understanding of a police officer’s perspective. Upon graduation, participants have the opportunity to join the Alumni Association (CPAAA), established in 1995, and further their training. Many graduates choose to join Citizens on Patrol (COP), the

Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) or the Parking Enforcement Specialist (PES) program. Anyone interested in becoming a part of CPA’s 35th class which begins February 2012, please call Police Service Aide Cheryl Watters at 954436-3274.

Free Jazz Concerts Bring a chair or a blanket and relax while enjoying an evening of jazz at the William B. Armstrong Dream Park, 1700 Dykes Road (NW 160 Ave). The Concerts are free and will be held 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, October 23rd, November 20th and December 18th.

October-November 2011

Pembroke Pines to Provide Fire and EMS Services to Southwest Ranches Tough economic times have led the City of Pembroke Pines and the Town of Southwest Ranches towards a cost-saving venture for fire, rescue and fire prevention services. A five year agreement between the two southwestern Broward neighbors recently went into effect, calling for the Town of Southwest Ranches to pay about $2.5 million annually to the City of Pembroke Pines in return for the services that include the use of a fire engine, rescue truck, dispatch services, fire inspectors and other fire prevention activities. This agreement will save both the City and Town money by sharing resources and providing quality Fire and Rescue Services where needed.

“We look forward to working with the Southwest Ranches Volunteer Fire Department, and enhance the service they provide,” said Pembroke Pines Fire Chief John Picarello. Since its inception as a town in 2001, Southwest Ranches had contracted with the Broward County Sheriff’s Office Fire Rescue for the services. The current shared approach is unique to both the Town and the City. The Pembroke Pines Fire Department has added the necessary personnel to its ranks to staff Southwest Ranches Station #112. And for the first time, members of the Southwest Ranches Volunteer Fire Department will be on-duty around the clock in their fire station.

Pines Night Out Raises Crime Prevention Awareness and Community Trust For generations, a person’s community served a vital role in offering friendship and a support system. With society moving at a faster and more detached pace, longer business hours, changing jobs and moving homes, it’s harder to feel a sense of community and safety. Pines Night Out is a time when residents can get together as a community. Wild animals, bounce houses, face painting, free giveaways, food and activities are all part of a fun night when Pembroke Pines Police and Fire departments

join together to host Pines Night Out on Friday, October 28th, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Walter C. Young Middle School, 901 NW 129th Ave. This event gives residents the chance to meet local police officers and firefighters, and see demonstrations by the Police K-9 unit and fire rescue and ladder trucks, as well as displays by the Police Dive/Rescue Team and the safety smoke house. Pines Night Out, an annual event, helps to build community spirit and teaches how to keep families safe. For more information, call 954-436-3274.

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Firefighter of the Year Named

Pembroke Pines Fire Department, Rescue Lieutenant Bill Dearman, Jr. was named Pembroke Pines Firefighter of the Year 2011. Dearman was honored for his prompt action in saving a life. While off-duty at Flamingo Park, he performed CPR and used an on-site defibrillator on a man having a heart attack.

It may have happened a year ago, but a firefighter’s off-duty actions are now being recognized for their true heroism. Pembroke Pines Fire Department, Rescue Lieutenant Bill Dearman, Jr. was recently named Pembroke Pines Firefighter of the Year 2011 for prompt action he took in saving a man whose heart stopped in Flamingo Park last October. While off-duty and coaching youth baseball during a night game at the park, Dearman’s attention was drawn to a commotion on another field. He immediately ran to a 52-year-old man on the ground who was in cardiac arrest. While administering CPR, Dearman instructed bystanders to call 911 and notify park personnel to retrieve an Automatic

External Defibrillator (AED) from the concession stand. Rescue crews from the Pembroke Pines Fire Department quickly arrived and transported the patient to a local hospital where he made a full recovery. In fact, the man attended the Commission meeting when Lt. Dearman was presented the award. “The early, quality CPR and AED usage by Lt. Dearman certainly made the difference in this patient’s positive outcome,” said Division Chief Mike Vincent who oversees Pembroke Pines’ EMS Division. The City is a recipient of the American Heart Association’s “Heart Ready City Award” which recognizes cities that take steps to improve cardiac arrest survival and prevention.

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Little Goblins Will Scream With Delight Looking for something different to do this Halloween season? Boo-ville may be the answer! The City of Pembroke Pines Parks and Recreation Department and Baptist Health have joined together in creating Boo-ville, where children and parents can enjoy Halloween festivities worry free. Held Saturday, October 29, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Pines Recreation Center, 7400 Pines Blvd, Boo-ville is the perfect place to see costumed characters, listen to spooky scarecrow storytelling, enjoy game booths, numerous rides and bounce houses, watch magician and character shows, and stroll through a pumpkin patch filled with hidden prizes. This spooktacular event even features a costume contest sponsored by TD Bank of Pembroke Pines, as well as trick or treat stations with candy and spooky surprises. Admission is $2 per child, 17 and under. Tickets can be purchased starting at 4 p.m. the day of the event. For more information, visit www. ppines.com or call 954-435-6525.

October-November 2011

~ Pick A Park ~ One of the best kept secrets in Pembroke Pines is the Chapel Trail Park Nature Preserve. The City oversees this 450 acre wetland, established in the 1990s, that is home to 120 species of birds, deer, marsh rabbits, alligators, snakes, turtles, and largemouth bass.

Visitors to this natural habitat walk through the wetlands on 1,650 feet of winding boardwalks that take you into the heart of the Preserve. It’s no wonder that the Preserve is visited regularly by Audubon members, bird watchers, environmentalists and is the perfect destination for a family

outing. When water levels are up, canoe rentals are even available on Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The Preserve, located at 19800 Sheridan Street, is open Monday through Sunday 7:30 a.m. to dusk. For more information, call 954-450-6771.

October-November 2011

No Time To Be Bored School is in full swing and afterschool activities abound, but there are still those days when a teenager just wants to play because they are bored. The City’s Teen Center, located at the Pines Recreation Center, 7400 Pines Blvd, is the perfect place for ages 12-17 looking for something to do. Teens can play pool, Playstation, Xbox, Wii, air hockey, video games and more. The Center is open Monday through Friday, 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. and on Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information regarding activities provided year round, please call 954-986-5022. For those who’d rather be out on the dance floor than playing games, there are teen dances held Friday, October 14 and Friday, November 18 from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at Walter

C. Young Middle School, 901 NW 129th Ave. The entrance fee is $4 and refreshments will be sold. However, please note, you must attend Walter C. Young Middle School to attend, and Student ID is required. For more information, call 954-437-1134.

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If Golfing Is Your Thing, Swing for the Green For the past eight years, golf enthusiasts have not only been able to enjoy a fun day on the links, but also support a great event: the annual “Swing for the Green” charity golf tournament which benefits the Southwest Focal Point Senior Center. This year’s event is being held on Saturday, October 22 at the Hollybrook Golf and Tennis Club, 900 S. Hollybrook Drive. “More than 100 players join the tournament each year which always features good food, good friends and good golf,” said Pembroke Pines Commissioner Carl Shechter, event host and founder. “Last year we raised over $25,000. We’re hoping this year will be even better.” Since it began in 2003, “Swing for the Green” has raised over $200,000 for the Southwest Focal Point Senior Center for programming, events and special classes, new equipment and renovations. Staff from the Center, along with Hollybrook Golf & Tennis Club residents all volunteer every year to ensure the tournament’s success.

“Without their help and dedication our tournament would not be nearly as well received as it is,” added Commissioner Shechter. A full breakfast and lunch are served, and there are snacks and drinks on the course. There are prizes for the winners and great raffle prizes. For information on participating or sponsorship, call Marilyn Gonzalez at 954-450-6960.

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954-483-5861

2218 Flamingo Road, Pembroke Pines Located in Your Natural Spa and Salon in the Fresh Market Plaza

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October-November 2011

A Closer Look: Passion Drives City’s Special Population Coordinator Mary Wilson Palacios has always enjoyed helping others. So it’s no wonder that she is responsible for overseeing year round programs for individuals with disabilities ages 5 and older, including adults, as the City’s Special Population Coordinator in the Parks & Recreation Department. “It’s so rewarding to see the smiles not only on the children’s faces, but on their parents when they realize how much their child is growing and blossoming,” said Palacios, who is

the first person in this position with the City. “And the adults in our programs really give their all.” Palacios began the program eight years ago and now runs the various activities with the help of Recreation Aide Sherry Roden and a group of volunteers. She also has additional staff during the summer camps. “I can’t really say enough about these types of programs,” said Vice Mayor Iris A. Siple, who initiated the suggestion that the City cover the

cost for the program back in 2005. “These are our kids, our residents, and why should they be treated any differently.” The real goal of the Special Population Program is to provide quality recreational and educational opportunities for individuals with special needs. Programs offered include wheelchair sports, Special Olympic Training, specialty camps, special needs tennis and a variety of special events and educational field trips. Some of the programs have participants incorporated into regular programs and may include modifications as needed. Palacios realized at an early age that she liked working with people. As a teenager, she volunteered in a nursing home. As an adult she became a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS) and a Certified Parks and Recreation Professional (CPRP). She is also certified in Life Guarding/First Aid, CPR and Automatic External Defibrillator (AED), and is a Special Olympics Certified Coach in Basketball, Soccer, Swimming and Alpine Skiing. Palacios also has over 30 years experience working with individuals with disabilities in various settings and populations, including but not

limited to developmental disabilities, at-risk youth, substance abuse, mental health and physical rehabilitation. “I like the idea of helping others work through their problems and issues in a non-threatening, caring, fun and supportive environment,” added Palacios. “My underlying focus is always on the end result. How can I improve the quality of the lives of the individuals that I work with and help them have improved coping skills, improved self image and esteem, improved frustration tolerance and social skills, improved physical abilities, and provide them these opportunities in a safe, structured environment.” For three years in a row, Palacios has been nominated Coach of the Year with Special Olympics Broward. Earlier this year, the Special Olympics Soccer Senior Team placed first in February, and the Special Olympics Basketball Senior Team placed first in May. Palacios is always eager to hear from residents about new programming ideas and encourages feedback from the community. “I can always use more youth and adult volunteers to help out with the various programs,” she said. For more information on the Special Populations Program, go to www.ppines.com to the Parks & Recreation Link and click on the special needs section. Mary Wilson Palacios V/TDD 954-450-3663 or mpalacios@ ppines.com.

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City of Pembroke Pines Special Population Programs: o Adult Monthly Socials: Second Thursday of the month at 6:30 p.m. The program is held at Pines Recreation Center, 7400 Pines Boulevard. Directions 954-986-5022. For more information about the Friendship Club, call 954-274-7321. o Miracle League Baseball for ages 5 -18. August 26 - November 4, 2011. Games and practice will begin at 7 p.m. and will be held on Friday nights at Rose G. Price Park. 901 N.W. 208th Avenue. Registration information is available at www.wppomiracleleague.com or email at miracleleague@mhs. net o Special Olympics Basketball Program for ages 8 and older. Training will be held on Tuesdays from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. beginning Tuesday, October 18, 2011 Location: Charter Central School Airnasium, 12350 Sheridan Street. Athletes must meet Special Olympics eligibility requirements. o Special Population Tennis Program: ages 12 and older, Monday nights 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. This program is geared for individuals with special needs and a family member or guardian to participate with the participant. Court fees apply. Call 954-450-3663 for more information. o Wheelchair Basketball: Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. (non-motorized wheelchairs only). Wheelchair athletes can join us for pick up games and basketball skills training. Please call 954-450-3663 for registration information. o Wheelchair Tennis: Mondays, 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. Please call 954-450-3663 for registration information. o Youth and Adult Monthly Community Family Outings: Youth ages 8- 17 and Adults 18 and older. Monthly outings are being planned for youth and adults, including events for family members, guardians, and siblings. Please call the Special Population Program office for registration information.

Classes Now Available for New Dance Fitness Craze Zumba, the Latin-inspired fitness program that blends red-hot international music with a dance fitness program is now being offered at the TownGate Recreation Center, 901 NW 155th Ave. Classes are held on Tuesdays

and Thursdays 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. There is no initiation fee. Monthly packages are also available. All fitness levels welcome! For more information, contact Marisol at 954-665-1020 or email marisoloritz710@yahoo.com

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City Art Classes Inspire Creativity Throughout the year, the City Parks and Recreation Department offers a wide variety of art classes for all ages and skill levels. Classes range from one-day workshops to comprehensive courses. Class themes, objectives, and schedules change throughout the year, so there is always something new and exciting to try. Following is a list of adult art classes being held at Studio 18 in the Pines, 1101 Poinciana Drive, Pembroke Pines. For more class information, call 954-961-6067 or visit www.ppines.com/studio18. o Watercolor Splash: Call Instructor Henriette “Kitte” Arnold at 954-920-4574, for information. o Classical Oil Painting: Call Instructor Maria Wieder at 954-649-4053, for information. o Drawing Fundamentals: Call Instructor Dawn V. at 954-646-8609, for information. o Drawing 101: Call Instructor Dawn V. at 954-646-8609, for information. o Mandala Art Workshop: Call Instructor Lily Mazurek, M.A. at 954- 610-2163, for information. o Basic Forensic Art: Call Instructor Detective Nelson Martinez at 954-478-1954, for information. o Urban Pop (basic graffiti-oriented techniques): Call Instructor Ruben Ubiera at 954-961-6067, for information. o The Art of Polymer Clay: Call Instructor Carol Dickler at 954-554-3412 for information. o Open Figure Drawing Class: Sessions held the last Thursday of every month. $15 per session. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Must be over 18. Call 954-961-6067 for more information.

Tune In to City TV AT&T broadcasts Pembroke Pines “Our City Television (OCTV) on Channel 99 and through Comcast on Channel 78. Tune in for live and repeat coverage of City Commission meetings and original programming related to city departments, events and services.

City NotesDid You Know? How was our city named? Many don’t realize that Pembroke Pines residents share a historical link with their neighbors across the pond. While researching information for the city’s 50th anniversary last year, Commissioner Angelo Castillo learned that the city was officially named with the help of Sir Edward James Reed, a Member of Parliament for the County of Pembroke between 1874 and 1880. Sir Reed purchased and farmed land in the 1880s which today occupies much of what we call Dania. The road put through his land came to be known as Pembroke Road. When this road was extended westward, it reached our area. In 1960, Dr. Seth Kipnis, the first mayor, suggested the name Pembroke Pines because of pine trees growing near Pembroke Road. To learn more about the city’s history, stop by the Pines Historical Museum, open Tuesdays and Thursdays, noon to 4 p.m., at 6700 SW 13 Street, Pembroke Pines.

Annual Thanksgiving Food Drive Targets Families in Need For more than 10 years, the Southwest Focal Point Senior Center has joined with public and private schools, city departments, and the residents of Pembroke Pines to ensure that Thanksgiving dinner is enjoyed by 80 families who are not as fortunate as others in the community. Donations include various canned and dried foods, turkeys, monetary donations and supermarket gift cards. Proceeds from last month’s “Empty Bowls Pottery” sales by Artists in Action, students of the pottery class at SWFP, also went towards the food drive. All donations from the community can be dropped off at the Center. To volunteer to help sort or distribute donations, please call Diane Showcross at 954-450-6888. All donations must be in by Monday, November 14.

Health Fair Open to All The Southwest Focal Point Senior Center will hold a “Commitment to the Community Health and Education Fair” on Wednesday, November 2 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. This innovative health fair is open to residents of all ages. For more information call 954-450-6888.

From the Clerk’s Desk: Homeowners Association Reminder Homeowner and Condominium Associations are mandated to provide the city with current names and contact information for their property management company and certain board officers. This is per a City Ordinance passed by the Pembroke Pines City Commission in 2006. For those not updated, please provide correct information to the City Clerk’s office as soon as possible via fax: 954-4356592, website: www.ppines.com/ cityclerk/hoa/index.html or mail to City Hall.

October-November 2011

Don’t Miss the 16th Annual Pembroke Pines Antiques & Collectibles Show

For the past eight years, collectors, antique enthusiasts and dealers alike have flocked to the Southwest Focal Point Senior Center, 301 NW 103 Ave., to browse through furniture, linens, retro 50s items, vintage jewelry, china and a myriad of other timeless items at the Pembroke Pines Antiques & Collectibles Show being held Saturday, October 15, 9 a.m.

to 5 p.m. and on Sunday, October 16, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $3 per person with children under 12 free. Parking is also free. More than 50 dealers will be in attendance, including an orchid dealer. Space proceeds benefit the Center’s programming, events and classes. For more information on renting a dealer space, call 954-450-6888.

Code Corner From alligator and rat problems to dog walking complaints, the city’s code division has the answer. Got a gator as a neighbor? Contact the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission at 1-800-432-2046. If a wildlife officer determines the alligator is a danger, it can be removed.

Rats have recently become a topic of concern in several neighborhoods. The best approach is prevention. Remove rubbish from your property and make sure garbage can lids fit tightly. Remove ripe fruit and even pet foods that are left outside. Trim heavy vegetation, including the bottom portions

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The Seed Has Been Planted Today, community gardens are growing faster than they can be counted. Overall, it is estimated that there are over 20,000 community gardens throughout the United States and Canada, according to the American Community Gardening Association. For many, community gardens are a labor of love. They have become a great way to get both children and adults involved in working with nature, and growing fresh produce and plants. Last year, City Mayor Frank C. Ortis proposed that the Landscape Advisory Board look into establishing a Community Garden run by the city. Much research has been done and land has even been put aside behind City Hall on Palm Avenue for the project. “We are now in the planning stage where we must determine bylaws, regulations, rules and how to proceed,” said Gloria McCluskey, Chairman of the Landscape Advisory Board. “We’re looking forward to the day when our residents can show up in droves to plant and work the land, but first there are many details to be worked out.” The Board met last month to discuss garden specifics. They are also looking into grants and getting corporate sponsors. Once details are finalized, they will advertise for volunteers and set organizational meetings to proceed further. of areca palms and the top areas of other palms. If you have a rat problem, talk to your neighbors so every one can take preventative measures. You can obtain a pamphlet from The Broward Health Department about rats by calling 954-467-4806. And dog walkers, please be considerate of others. A City Ordinance prohibits dogs from defecating on property other than their owners. Dog owners should carry a plastic bag with them and remove any dog waste as they walk their dogs.

“We’re very eager to have residents involved,” added McCluskey. “As soon as they can be, we’ll let everyone know.”

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October-November 2011

The Demands of Care-Giving Take a Toll The demands of caring for a loved one can be overwhelming, especially if the caregiver has little control over the situation or they are in over their head. Though caring for family members is a centuries-old act of kindness, love and loyalty, due to an increase in life-expectancies and advancement in medicine, today there

are more and more caregivers struggling with the stress and frustration that comes on a daily basis. Studies show that approximately 15 million caregivers living in the United States are in need of support, education, resources, and most importantly a feeling of hope while caring for their loved ones.

The Southwest Focal Point Senior Center, located at 301 NW 103 Ave., offers a weekly Caregiver Support group for those caring for loved ones living with progressive/chronic illness and memory impairment disorders. The group meets every Wednesday, 10:30 a.m. to noon, at the Center. Participants must be 18 or over to join. They meet in a confidential setting with discussions on caring (bathing, dressing, wandering, new behaviors) for a loved one, community resources, caregiver stress (anger, anxiety, exhaustion, irritability), changing roles, feelings of disconnection from family and friends, and the daily struggles of caring for someone. November is National Family Caregivers Month so those in need are encouraged to attend the support group. For more information, contact the Social Services Department at 954-450-6888.

PINES PLACE

Citizens Action Center A

Click Away An easy online tool is now available on the City’s website at www. ppines.com on the homepage called the Citizens Action Center. Visitors to the site can ask a question, report a problem, register a complaint and find answers quickly to some of their most asked questions. Does the City process passports? Can I get a copy of my home or business floor plan from the City? What are the rules and guidelines for holding a garage sale? The answers to these and many other questions are just a click away.

8210 Florida Drive, Pembroke Pines, Fl 33025 954-965-6240 954-894-1185

Now is your opportunity to rent at Pines Place, a spectacular rental community featuring spacious one and two bedroom apartments. Pines Place offers affordable apartments for persons of all ages in the heart of Pembroke Pines. Pines Place is located at 8210 Florida Drive, on the Howard C. Forman Human Services Campus at University Drive between Pines Boulevard and Pembroke Road.

Pines Place Requirements:

Applicants must be 18 years of age or older

 Have an annual minimum income of $16,300 for one person and $18,650 for two persons. If unable to qualify by income, a guarantor must be provided.

The apartments include:  Washer and dryer Well designed Kitchen & Bathroom  Screened Patio  A gated community

 

Three different models available Amenities include: water, garbage, maintenance, exterminating and cable.

Pets are not allowed

La Ciudad de Pembroke Pines

Pines Place ofrece comodos apartamentos para personas de todas las edades en el corazon de Pembroke Pines.

October-November 2011

Pembroke Pines City Connect

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Heritage and Diversity Committee Reaches Out Home to people from 52 countries, Pembroke Pines has recently established the Heritage and Diversity Committee to promote awareness of

this rich melting point. The Committee, comprised of seven members, will advise the Commission on projects and pro-

grams that celebrate heritage and diversity. Among other duties, they will also suggest activities to bring together the Hispanic, Irish, British, Afro American and Asian & Pacific communities to celebrate, share, and enjoy each other’s similarities and differences.

The ultimate goal of the committee is to make Pembroke Pines a more congenial place to live, celebrate and enjoy the diverse cultural, social and family life. Members, appointed by the Mayor in consultation with the Commission, will meet once a month.

Flea Markets An Excellent Shopping Source From left to right: Yue Shen, Carol Miles (Vice Chair), Savy Mathew (Chair), Alberto Darby, Greg Batista, Marie Yeung. (Absent - James Amps)

With today’s challenging and ever-changing economy, flea markets have become a favorite place for consumers to not only find inexpensive treasures, but also get the satisfaction of saving money while rescuing potential trash from the landfills. Bargain hunters can take advantage of a two-day Flea Market & Bazaar at the Southwest Focal Point Senior Center, held Saturday November 5, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday November 6, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Over 100 vendors will be participating, making this a true shopper’s paradise for many. A wide selec-

tion of items will be available for purchase – all proceeds will benefit senior programs at the Center. Here are a few tips for flea market shopping: the best selection happens early but the best bargains come at the end of the day; if you love it, buy it before it’s gone; bring a tape measure, a notebook, a tote bag and cash; and most of all, have fun. Remember, all proceeds are for a great cause. The SWFP Senior Center is located at 301 NW 103 Ave, Pembroke Pines. Parking and admission is free and food is also available for purchase.

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Pembroke Pines City Connect

October-November 2011

On the Write Path The Fourth Grade class at the Pembroke Pines Charter West Elementary Campus isn’t sitting on the laurels of last year’s class that achieved a high writing score on the FCAT. They are working hard at their writing skills and getting prepared to do an excellent job in February. To help them stay on the path of writing success, the 4th graders were invited to attend writing camps to help them with their writing. The school also trained teachers to feel comfortable about their writing, so the students can feel good about theirs. “We try to find new and exciting ways to reach our students, make

writing fun, and help them to draw from their own experiences when they write,” said Assistant Principal JoAnne DiGioia of the Pembroke Pines Charter Elementary School West Campus. “We actually start in Kindergarten and continue the process of seeing where each student stands and how we can help them.” This school year, the FCAT Writing portion had a major overhaul. However, DiGioia remains confident that the school’s efforts will end in successful results. Last school year, 16 fourth grade students earned a 6.0 in writing, the highest score to achieve on the FCAT Writing Assessment.

Board Meeting Dates City Commission Meeting: meets the first and third Wednesday of the month at 7 p.m. in the Commission Chamber, City Hall Charter Elementary Middle School Advisory Board (meets the 1st Tuesday of the month, locations rotate between the three campuses). Meeting time is 6 p.m. October 4, 2011 – Central Campus (12350 Sheridan Street, Pembroke Pines) November 1, 2011 – West Campus (18500 Pembroke Road, Pembroke Pines) December 6, 2011 – East Campus Charter High School Advisory Board (meets the second Monday of each month) Location: SW Regional Library, 16835 Sheridan Street. Meeting time is 6 p.m. October 10, 2011 November 14, 2011 December 12, 2011 Education Advisory Board (meets forth Tuesday of each month) Location: SW Focal Point Senior Center, 301 NW 103rd Avenue. Meeting time is 7 p.m. October 25, 2011 November 22, 2011 December 27, 2011

Board of Adjustment (meets first Thursday of each month) Location: Commission Chambers, City Hall 10100 Pines Blvd. Meeting time is 6:30 p.m. October 6, 2011 November 3, 2011 December 1, 2011 Other Post Employment Benefits: meets quarterly, next meeting will be October 31, 2011 at 3 p.m. in the fourth floor conference room at City Hall. Landscape Advisory Board: meets first Tuesday of each month, except July, at SWFP Senior Center 7 p.m. Arts & Culture Advisory Board: meets second Tuesday of each month, except July, at SWFP Senior Center 7 p.m. Economic Development Board: meets third Thursday of each month, except July, at SWFP Senior Center 6:30 p.m. FSU Charter Elementary School Board: meets when requested. Discipline Review Panel: meets when requested. The Planning and Zoning Board: meets on the second and fourth Thursday of every month, except in July, in the Commission Chambers at 6:30 p.m.

Learning With Nature Whether it’s sitting on a rock studying review science questions or weeding the herb garden, students in Wendy Rago’s AP Environmental Class at Pembroke Pines Charter High School look forward to spending time in the school’s outdoor classroom. The outdoor classroom, originally built last year by the students, now has an herb garden. The students learned how to plant each plant carefully so that the sun would hit it, and because of the slanted elevation of the gardens each plant is assured enough water. Students volunteer to water the plants at least twice a week and give the herbs enough water so they are healthy. “The herbs are doing so well, many of the students took some home to use in their meals,” said Rago. “It’s amazing to watch these 11 and 12 graders who have never picked up a shovel in their lives be so dedicated to weeding and making sure all the plants are healthy.” The recipient of several acknowledgements, the outdoor classroom was most recently named as one of three finalists for the Peacock Award presented by the Broward League of Cities for the best beautification project. It has also received a $500

grant from Miami-Dade Water Management through the Green School Challenge to help fund the herb garden, and earned top school points for the last three years from Fairchild Tropical Gardens Challenge. The location of the classroom on the school’s campus was strategically placed to not only benefit the school, but also county library visitors, Broward College Students and FIU students. Teachers in other grades have also been using the outdoor classroom, and a table and podium have been added. According to Rago, this school year they hope to build a table in the classroom that can be used for labs and also add more plants to this natural environment.

October-November 2011

Pembroke Pines City Connect

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Pines Charter FSU Elementary Believes in the Power of Dads While children may not always recognize the importance dad plays in their lives, numerous studies have shown that most children do long for and need a loving, involved and responsible father or father-figure on a consistent basis. With this in mind, the Pembroke Pines Charter FSU campus is participating for the 5th consecutive year in “All Pro Dads,” a monthly gathering of fathers and their kids with the simple purpose of growing closer to each other while enjoying breakfast and participating in father-child activities. The PTA sponsors the breakfast in conjunction with Chick-fil-A. The dads and their kids meet six Thursdays throughout the school year in the school cafeteria. “I love watching the dads interact

with their kids during the school breakfast through this terrific program,” said Assistant Principal Alan Pfau. “Last school year we covered such topics as The Power of Words & Validation, Daddy Loves You, the Power of Joy and being careful not to judge.” Each breakfast is led by volunteer dads called Captains who make sure there are laughs and good memories by all. They are joined by the sixfoot-tall Chick-fil-A cow from Pembroke Lakes Mall. Each breakfast concludes with a raffle that includes games and sports game tickets from the Heat, Panthers, Marlins and Strikers. “All Pro Dad” meetings are scheduled for October 20th, November 17th, January 26th, March 1st and May 3rd.

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Pembroke Pines City Connect

October-November 2011

Giving Students A Competitive Edge The middle school years are a critical stage in the development of a student’s education, and are often the most challenging. Students are given more responsibilities, exams are more frequent, concepts become more challenging, and overall growth and academic development excels. Devarn Flowers, principal at Pembroke Pines Charter Middle School West Campus, however, finds middle school to be an extremely exciting time for the students. “When you set high standards, students will rise to the challenge,” said Flowers. “We have a vision for our students and begin the process of maximizing our students’ potential when they enter Kindergarten. Whether they want to go to college or work at a trade, they will have the competitive edge they need to succeed.” Flowers feels that partnering with parents is critical in helping students excel. If a student has academic weaknesses and needs in Kindergarten, communication with the parent and addressing the deficiencies right away is important.

The school also calls on resources and support by other teachers to ensure each student is on the right path. Teachers go beyond the ordinary for their students. They often align with other teachers so that with each new school year, the student can progress properly. Throughout summer there is continuing staff development, and they are willing to come back early for training and workshop days. An involved PTA also helps in that they provide programs to honor students for their behavior and progress, boosting their esteem. Advanced technology, such as interactive white boards, add diversity to a student’s education level. Electives such as art, music and physical education round out a student’s academic life. “When you combine involved parents, aware and highly qualified teachers, a supportive PTA and advanced technological tools, students really have the best opportunity to be the best that they can be,” said Flowers. “This type of learning environment allows them to thrive.”

An Alarming Problem Can Be Solved False burglar alarms can be a nuisance to not only the homeowner and their neighbors, but they also place an undue burden on local police departments. This is why the City implemented a false alarm ordinance last year – to encourage alarm users to maintain operational reliability, promote proper use of the alarm systems and reduce the amount of false alarms dispatched to police officers. A reminder to all residents that the ordinance requires alarm systems to be registered with the City annually. No fee is charged for registration or renewals. The first two instances of a false alarm will not incur a fine. However, for the third false alarm and each one thereafter within a 12 month period, a $100 fine will be levied. If police respond to an alarm that has not been registered, the alarm user will have 30 days to register the alarm or a $50 fine will be assessed. The following are some tips to help reduce the possibility of false alarms in any home or business: Make sure the alarm company knows if a pet has been added to the family. There are pet motion detectors available that are able to pick up a person, but ignore an animal. In the case of a cat, however, it’s advisable to look at other

alternatives to a motion detector because they jump so quickly it often fools the motion detector into thinking it’s a person. Carefully review alarm monitoring procedures for cancelling accidental alarms. Do not call 911 if an alarm is accidently set off. Never leave mylar balloons in a room with a motion detector. They often float in view of the motion detector and set it off. Shut and lock all doors and windows completely before arming the alarm. Know how to clear a wrong code if a mistake is made on the keypad. Educate anyone authorized to enter the home or business on how the system works. Ensure no spider or cob webs exist around the motion detectors. Placing a moth ball behind the motion detector greatly deters bugs that can set off the alarm. Never leave remotes out. Some remote controls have panic buttons on them. If left out, a child or pet can trigger a false panic alarm. For more tips, frequently asked questions and false alarm ordinance information, go to www.crywolf.us/ pembrokepines . You can also register at this site.

October-November 2011

Music For All Ages – A Possible Brain Booster A Stanford University research study found that playing a musical instrument can be good for the brain. Their study indicated that musical training improves how the brain processes the spoken word and may even have cognitive benefits. The study cited that for children, who typically aren’t good at rapid auditory processing and may be at high-risk for becoming poor readers, there may be increased benefits from musical training. To boost one’s brain or to simply enjoy the pleasure of playing an instrument, the City’s Parks & Recreation Department offers several music classes for residents of all ages. At the Fletcher Art and Cultural Center, located at 7960 Johnson Street, three classes are available: o PIANO/KEYBOARD CLASSES FOR KIDS &YOUTH: Ages 8 and up, all abilities, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays or Saturdays, 45 minute lessons/once a week. o ADULT PIANO/KEYBOARD:

Ages 17 and up, all abilities, 45 minute lessons/once a week. o GUITAR LESSONS: Ages 8 -17, all abilities, Saturdays or Tuesdays, 45 minute lessons/once a week. Students must have their own acoustic guitar. At the Pembroke Pines River of Grass Art Spark, located at 17189 Sheridan Street, two classes are offered: KIDS, YOUTH & ADULT KEYBOARD/PIANO LESSONS: Ages 8 and up, Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays or Saturdays, 45 minute lessons/once a week YOUTH GUITAR LESSONS: Ages 8 -17, Mondays, Wednesdays, or Thursdays (Remove Saturdays) 45 minute lessons/once a week All classes cost $40 per 4-week month. Payments/registration is due by the 20th of the month for the upcoming month’s classes. Bring a child’s original birth certificate and an adult’s driver’s license when registering. For more information and class schedules call 954-986-5027 after 1 p.m.

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Baby Boomer Help This year, the very first Baby Boomers turned 65. Though many feel mid-life may have already passed them by, with today’s medical advances, people are living longer. Sixty-five has become the new time for mid-life crisis for the Boomers. Just who are the Baby Boomers? According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Baby Boomers are those born between January 1, 1946 and December 31, 1964. To help alleviate mid-life challenges and impending life style changes, evolving emotions, struggles and transitions in daily life roles, Boomers en Accion, a free support group for Spanish speaking women and men, is available. Topics such as life transitions, economical strains, relationships and dating, and life after retirement

are just a few of the topics discussed. All meetings take place at the Southwest Focal Point Community Center at 301 NW 103rd Ave. Participants must be 47 years of age or over and a registered member of the SWFPSC (registration is free). Meetings are held every Wednesday from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. in room 212 at the Center. Please call the Social Service Department at 954-450-6888 for details and registration information.

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Pembroke Pines City Connect

October-November 2011

CITY OF PEMBROKE PINES 2010 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report We are pleased to present to you The City of Pembroke Pines Annual Water Quality Report for 2010. This report is designed to inform you about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of quality drinking water. Our water source is ground water drawn from the Biscayne Aquifer at a depth of 110’. Our system has 9 wells. Since the water is obtained from ground water sources, it is softened, filtered, chlorinated for disinfection and then fluoridated for dental health purposes. The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: A. Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment, plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. B. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming. C. Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses. D. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also, come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems. E. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In 2009 the Department of Environmental Protection performed a Source Water Assessment on our system. The assessment was conducted to provide information about any potential sources of contamination in the vicinity of our wells. There are three (3) potential sources of contamination identified for this system with a high susceptibility level. The assessment results are available on the FDEP Source water assessment and protection program website www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health. The City of Pembroke Pines routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules, and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2010.

2010 (January 1st through December, 31st) Water Quality test results

Microbiological Contaminants: Contaminant and Unit of Measurement

Dates of sampling (mo./yr.)

Total Coliform Bacteria (Positive Samples)

01/201012/2010

MCL Violation Y/N

Highest Monthly percentage / number

MCLG

MCL

For systems collecting at least 40 samples per month: Presence of coliform bacteria in > 5% of monthly samples

N

1.47

0

Likely Source of Contamination

Naturally present in the environment

Radioactive Contaminants: Contaminant and Unit of Measurement

Dates of sampling (mo./yr.)

MCL Violation Y/N

Highest Monthly percentage / number

MCLG

MCL

Likely Source of Contamination

Gross alpha (pCi/L)

05/2008

N

0.249

NA

15

Erosion of natural deposits

Radium -226 and radium-228(pCi/L)

05/2008

N

0.763

NA

5

Erosion of natural deposits

Inorganic Contaminants: Contaminant and Unit of Measurement

Dates of sampling (mo./yr.)

MCL Violation Y/N

Level Detected

Range of Results

MCLG

MCL

Likely Source of Contamination

Barium (ppm)

07/2010

N

0.0035

N/A

2

2

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits

Cyanide (ppb)

07/2010

N

1.1

N/A

200

200

Discharge from steel/metal factories; discharge from plastic and fertilizer factories

Fluoride (ppm)

07/2010

N

0.83

N/A

4

4

Erosion of natural deposits; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories. Water additive which promotes strong teeth when optimum levels between 0.7 and 1.3 ppm.

Nitrate (as Nitrogen) (ppm)

07/2010

N

0.017

N/A

1

1

Runoff from fertilizer use, leaching from septic tanks, sewage, erosion of natural deposits.

Sodium (ppm)

07/2010

N

18

N/A

N/A

160

Salt water intrusion, leaching from soil

Lead and Copper: (Tap Water) Contaminant and Unit of Measurement

Dates of sampling (mo./yr.)

AL Violation Y/N

90th Percentile Result

No. of sampling sites exceeding the AL

Range of results

MCLG

AL (Action Level)

Copper (tap water) (ppm)

08/2010

N

0.073

0

0.00140.15

1.3

1.3

*Lead (tap water) (ppb)

08/2010

N

0.0017

0

ND 0.0067

0

0.015

Likely Source of Contamination

Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural deposits, leaching from wood preservatives Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural deposits

Disinfection By-Products: Contaminant and Unit of Measurement

Dates of sampling (mo./yr.)

MCL Violation Y/N

Level detected

MCLG

MCL

Total Trihalomethanes (ppb)

01/201012/2010 (Quarterly)

N

59.6

46.6-69.2

N/A

80

By-product of drinking water Disinfection

Total Haloacetic Acids (ppb)

01/201012/2010 (Quarterly)

N

36.3

28.2 – 36.0

N/A

60

By-product of drinking water Disinfection

Total Chlorine as Chloramine (ppm)

01/201012/2010

N

3.3

0.6-3.5

N/A

4

Water additive used to control microbes

Range of results

Likely Source of Contamination

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CITY OF PEMBROKE PINES 2010 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report *If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The City of Pembroke Pines is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires monitoring of over 80 drinking water contaminants. Those contaminants listed in the table above are the only contaminants detected in your drinking water. As you can see by the tables, our system had no violations. We’re proud that your drinking water meets or exceeds all Federal and State requirements. Definitions and Abbreviations: • Initial Distribution System Evaluation (IDSE):

An important part of Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR}. The IDSE is a one-time study conducted by water systems to identify distribution system locations with high concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Water systems will use results from the IDSE, in conjunction with their stage I DBPR compliance monitoring data, to select compliance monitoring locations for the Stage 2 DBPR. • Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. • Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants. • Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.

Landlords, businesses and homeowner associations are encouraged to share this report with non-billed water users. If you have any questions about this report or to receive additional copies of this report, please contact customer service at (954) 450-6900 or (954)435-6577. Spanish translated version of this information can be requested by calling (954) 450-6900. Esta información es muy importante! Para obtener la traducción de este reporte por favor llamar al (954) 450-6900, Gracias.

MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. • Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow. • Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. • “ND” means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis. • “NA” means not available. • Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) – one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by weight of the water sample. • Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (µg/l) – one part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts by weight of the water sample. • Picocuries (pCi)-unit of measurement for radionuclides. Tropical fish owners, please take notice: “Water in fish tanks need to be dechlorinated and treated with Ammo chips before use.” In an unlikely event of a water service emergency, like Water Main Break/Interruptions, boil drinking water until further notice. According to EPA and CDC, a rolling boil for a period of one minute is sufficient to render the water microbiologically safe.

To report an after hours water related Emergency, please call (954) 986-5011. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (1-800-426-4791). Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

Environmental Services Division Public Services Department 13975 Pembroke Road Pembroke Pines, Florida 33027 (954) 450-6900 or (954)435-6577

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Oct/Nov 2011 City Connect Volume 1 Issue 1