Issuu on Google+

A Compilation of Philippine Games in fulfillment Physical Education under Prof. Christopher John R. Torres, 1st Semester 2009-2010

mga

Larong Kinagisnan

University of the Philippines Los Ba単os Department of Human Kinetics Physical Education 2 Philippine Games

Larong Kinagisnan mga

Prepared

by:

Bukid, Marinel Carabuena, Juan Paulo de Silva, Christerbert Gaviola, Jon Guro, Sheila Marie PE 2: PG-C

Prologue

Filipinos have always been known for their ingenuity and resourcefulness. From their clothes, homes, and weapons of war, they have always been creative in selecting and creating the most useful yet unique materials. The very same ideals have crossed over to the country’s most popular and well-loved recreational activity--its games.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan is an archive of traditional and modern Filipino games. It is a compilation articles on games--terminologies, instruments, mechanics, gameplay, and even techniques. More than just sheer enjoyment, the one thousand and one games have brought friends and families closer together. From duels, team-ups, to entire neighborhood plays, Filipinos have discovered that games are yet another way to strengthen ties not just with relatives but with the community as well. The popularity of Western sports and technological gadgets have relegated traditional Filipino games into relative obscurity. Nowadays, children are clueless whenever they hear the word tumbang preso, luksong-tinik, and other similar games. A sad reality, considering that such traditional Filipino games are part of the culture and heritage of the Filipino people. It is not true, however, that the Filipino Street Games are no longer played. Some say that it has vanished in Philippine society. In many urban and rural areas, a great majority of Filipino children still find time to play outdoor street games with their neighborhood friends, as most of them are still unable to own expensive high-tech gadgets. Games like Patintero, Tumbang Preso, Piko, Sipa, Turumpo, and many others, are very much alive and played daily in the neighborhood. Magna Kultura Foundation, an NGO that advocates of Filipino Traditional games, cites that a primary reason why children would stop playing the Pinoy games is because Western sports activities (i.e., basketball or volleyball) are prominently organized in local Barangays and in schools. With lack of organized sports activities for Filipino street games, children would just move on leaving the games of their childhood in the the streets. Mga Larong Kinagisnan

i

Philippine Games

Larong Kinagisnan

Table

of

Contents

Prologue … i

mga

Table of Contents .. ii Agawang Sulok … 1 Araw Lilim ... 2 Bolador … 2 Bordon ... 2 Bulong Pari … 4 Chinese Garter … 5 Dama … 6 Habulan Estatwa ... 8 Halap-halap … 8 Holen … 9 Iring-iring … 10 Juego de Prenda … 11 Labtikaray ... 12 Laglag Panyo … 12 Lawin at Sisiw ... 13 Luksong Lubid … 13 Luksong Tinik … 14 Pabitin … 15 Palo Sebo … 16 Paluan Palayok … 18 Patintero … 19 Piko …20 Pusa at Aso … 21 Serereng ... 22

Siato … 22 Siklo … 23 Sintak … 24 Sipa … 25 Sipang Lata … 29 Gagamba … 30 Sulot ... 32 Sungka … 32 Taguan ... 35 Takip-Silim … 35 Tawanan ... 36 Teks … 36 Tiyakad … 37 Tumbang Preso … 38 Turumpo … 39 Viola … 41 Bibliography … 42 PG-C Played the Games … 43

A gawang Sulok Get a Corner Number of Players: 5, 7, or 9 Where to play: outdoors or gymnasium A rectangular playground is marked off on the ground or floor. Diagram A is for five players, B for seven players, and C for nine players.

All the players but one (the tagger) stay in the corner and on the bases. The tagger stands in the middle of the ground. The players in the corners will try to exchange places by dashing across from place to place. The tagger must try to secure a corner or base by rushing to any when it is vacant. In order to confuse the tagger, the players on the bases may leave their bases and suddenly rush back to them, as if stealing a base. Whenever the tagger secures a base, the odd player becomes the tagger for the next game. This game is sometimes called “Vende, Vende Candela.�

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

1

Philippine Games

A raw-Lilim Day and Night Number of players: 10 to 20 or more players Outdoors This game is played wherever there is light and shade. It can be played on a sunny day or a moonlit night. One player is the tagger. He tries to tag or touch any one of the players who is in the light. A runner saves himself from being tagged by staying in the shade. The one tagged becomes the tagger in the next game. If many are playing, the game is made more interesting by having two or three taggers `at the same time.

B olador Kite Fighting A popular traditional game in the Philippines. Bolador literally means “kite.” The term is used interchangeable with “sarangola” or “saringola.” History It is believed that the earliest kites were found in China. They created aerodynes that took on the shape of birds. The oldest from of kite is made from tissue paper and bamboo. Legend has it that a farmer’s hat blew from his head in a gust of wind and he thought of tying a string to keep it close so that the next time it blew off it remained airborne. Evidence suggest that kite were being flown in China as early as 200 BC. They noted a General named Han Hsin who use kite for military purposes. People began to adore this magnificent invention and it spread across Asia and Europe. Researchers [have found in Egypt ancient pictures of people flying kites. They were believed to have been drawn thousands of years, maybe even before the pyramids were built. Stories of kite fighting are found in the Sanskrit religious writings o]f the Veda and in the epic, the Rayamana. In many regions of Asia, kite fighting is considered as a sport. Countries like Thailand, Malaysia, Japan and Korea has a traditional kite fighting festival held every year. Objective The objective of the game is to hit and damage the opponent’s kite and force it to plunge down. Mga Larong Kinagisnan

2

Philippine Games

Fighting Every person must have his own bolador - which is made of “papel de hapon” or rice paper and bamboo frameworks. Each player tries to place his kites close enough to the opponent’s, but he maneuvers the kite string in such a manner that his kite is not hit by the other. He tries to make a hole on the other kite or to cut its string. The first kite to be damaged and to plunge to the ground losses. Sometimes a big kite is called gorion and is pitted against a small one called sarangola. When the match is deemed uneven, the owner of the smaller kite makes the first move to try to puncture the larger one as soon as possible. The reason for this is that all gorions are equipped with sharp objects, even razor blades, on its string which cuts string of sarangolas. Culture In the Philippines, kite flying season starts in January. The first months of the year are perfect for flying kite. January, February, and March are tropical springtime in the Philippines. Kites are flown in colors, shapes, and sizes. Boca-boca are small kites made from square paper tied to a short string. There are also four-sided square or rectangular box kites and the three-sided varieties. The chopi-chopi are pointed competitive kites. The quiron are the big, beautiful kites that come in many shapes and “dance” in the wind.

Kids playing Bolador in barrio

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

3

Philippine Games

Bordon Bordon is a parlor game usually played after prayers for the dead or during wakes. Any number of players can play this game. The participants sit in a circle with both hands joined. A leader (IT) stays at the center. A ring is secretly passed around by a member as they sing the bordon (you can substitute a song of your own here if you don’t know the bordon song). The leader tries to guess where the ring is. He continues guessing until he succeeds in pointing at the person who holds it. The holder of the ring guessed by the leader becomes the “it”, and he takes the place of the leader.

B ulong Pari Whisper to the Priest This is a game that consists of 10 to 20 or more players that can be played whether indoor or outdoor. Mechanics The players are divided into two teams with an equal number of players. One player is chosen to be the priest and two others to be the leaders of teams A and B. The two teams stand in parallel lines facing each other. The priest stands or sits in front of the teams at about five meters from the two teams. The leaders of the teams stand at the head of the line. The leader of team A goes to the priest and whispers one of the names of the players of the team B. Then he returns to his place and the priest calls out, “Lapit!” (“Approach!”) One of the players of team B approaches him. If it happens to be the very one whom the leader of team A mentioned, the priest says, “Bung!” He then falls out of line and stays somewhere near the priest as a prisoner. If he is not the one who was mentioned, he is allowed to approach. He whispers to the Priest the name of one of the players of team A. The game thus continues, and the team which has no player left is the loser. Penalty Each of the players of the losing team carries one player of the winning team on his back to and fro as many times as agreed. This game is also known in the Visayan region of the Philippines as “Honghonganay.” Mga Larong Kinagisnan

4

Philippine Games

Chinese Garter Chinese Garter, a game requiring flexibility, balance and coordination, is a popular game for Filipino children, most specifically among girls during their elementary years. The game revolves around an ordinary garter, around two to three yards long, which can be brought from the sewing store at around twenty pesos or less. The Game Players are divided into two or more teams, with a minimum number of two members per team. During the game, two members of the “it” team shall serve as “game posts” as they stand opposite each other and hold each end of the garter. The objective of the game then is to be able to successfully jump over the garter as it is gradually held higher by the game posts. Just like in the game 10-20, each team also has its own team leader, more commonly known as the “Mother”. Once a team member either touches the garter or fails to jump at a certain level, the Mother can still save her team by taking her team member’s turn. Failure to do so will lead to the team’s elimination by making them the new game posts and will bring the game back to the first level.

A common game for little girls in the Philippines

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

5

Philippine Games

Levels The Chinese Garter game is usually subdivided into ten levels. Most of the time, however, the players may decide for their desired number of levels for their game. Here is an example of the levels being used to give you an idea of the game: Level 1 – The garter is being held by the posts closer to the ground. Level 2 – Knee high Level 3 – Around the height of their hips Level 4 – Waist high Level 5 – Chest high Level 6 – Shoulder high Level 7 – Head high Level 8 – At the tip of the head Level 9 – A few inches above the head Level 10 – Also known as the Father / Mother Jump, as high as a kid raising his arms high on tip toes Variation The game usually ends after the highest jump. However, some kids would continue playing the game backwards. Instead of raising the garter higher, the posts shall hold the garter back to its lower position. The game now has a new objective: to be able to reach the garter by bending backwards. The game continues this way until the player reaches back to the lowest level.

Dama Dama is a famous traditional board game in the Philippines. The game is played in a wooded board with 10 squares and 14 end points. Today, Dama has evolved from a mere Filipino pastime to an educational tool in the Philippines, with the introduction of Damath. History Countries around the world have their own versions of the game called “checkers”, a name which gets its roots from North America. In the Philippines and in Armenia, the game is called dama. According to experts, the game actually originated from Ancient Egypt. Archaeologist found traces of the game in an excavation dig in Ur, Iraq and speculated that the game existed at around 1400 B.C. Ancient Egyptians called the game “alquerque”, which had a 5x5 board with a grid and diagonal lines intersecting the grids. There were only 10 pieces per side, moving along the intersections. Historians claimed the invention of modern checkers evolved from the 12th century game they called “ferses” (or “fierges”) which combined the rules of alquerque with the chess. Around the 16th century, the game’s name evolved to “dames” and became popular in France. The game was then exported to England and America where the British called it “draughts”. In a related research, historians found books written on the game in Spain and in England. Mga Larong Kinagisnan

6

Philippine Games

Playing Dama The game is played by two people, each with 12 pieces of pitsas made from bamboo, stones, or bottle caps. Player position the 12 pieces of “pitsa” on the end points of the diagram. They move from point to point, and like chess, the game ends once the opponents pitsas are caputured. In some parts of the Philippines, the game is played using a chess board and its pieces. The pawns, knights, and rooks are usually used at the start, while the kings, queens, and bishop are used when a player reached the “dama”. The “dama stage” is reached when a player gets his piece to the last row of the board. There are also several other versions of dama within the Philippines. One of which is the popular “pildi-dama” (or perdigana) which comes from a Bisayan word “pildi” which means “to lose”. Important Notes • The pitsas can only move diagonally along the intersection of lines or squares in chessboards. • Pitsas cannot eat or capture backwards. • Pieces that have reached the “dama stage” can move from row to row diagonally. Philippine Culture and Damath In the Philippines, dama has evolve to be a popular educational activity, which is known as “Damath.” The word comes from the game “dama” and Mathematics. The game is a combination of dama as a stategy game and mathematical operations. The game then boosted its popularity and since then the game has been played in schools in the Philippines with national tournaments held every year. Today, the game has also evolved to “Sci-Damath” which is a combination of Damath and scientific operations.

Damath challenge for elementary students

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

7

Philippine Games

Habulan Estatwa Players draw an “IT”. Players are all in a variety of random motion. When “IT” yells “STATUE!”, all players stop moving and pretend to be like statues so that they are in frozen, stationary state. These players could be in the process of walking, raising a hand, talking, etc.. The “IT” tries to tempt the “statues” to get to move (e.g., smile, laugh, giggle, put a foot down, etc.). Anyone who gets caught moving becomes the next “IT”.

H alap-Halap Blindfold This game is played outdoor with any number of players either boys or girls. A big circle about five feet in diameter is drawn on the ground. The players stand on the circle drawn facing each other. Blidfold one of the players as the “It” or taya in tagalog. Let him/her stay in the middle of the circle formed by the other players with hands joined. At the signal of the starting game, the taya runs after the other players. Upon catching one of the players, he/she guesses his/her name. If the guess is correct the identified player becomes the next taya

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

8

Philippine Games

H olen Marbles History Signs of marble-playing have been found in countries all over the world and according to historians, marbles may have been played by children in Egypt, Rome, and North America during ancient times. Marbles used by people during those days were not like those of today. They used stones, clay balls, bones, polished nuts and fruit pits. In modern times, marbles evolved into marbles made of glass, china and real chips of marble. Object of the Game There are various types of games using marbles. Two of the most common variants of these games are: first, the type in which the players try to knock their opponents’ marbles out of a circle with their own marble (and so win them); and second, the type in which the players try to hit a target and roll their marble through a hoop or into a hole by rolling, throwing or knuckling the marble. Mga Larong Kinagisnan

9

Philippine Games

Shooting Knuckling down Among the many techniques mastered by those who play holen is “shooting”, done by holding the marble between the bent index finger and the knuckle of the thumb then flipping the marble forward towards its target by the straightening action of the thumb. This must be done “knuckles down” which means that the knuckle of the hand doing the shooting must be pressed to the ground when the marble is released.

IDrop ring-Iring the Handkerchief 10 to 20 or more players Outdoors or indoors All players but one stand or sit in a circle. Everybody in the circle must look toward the center and must not turn to look back. The odd player walks around outside the circle formation with a handkerchief which he drops behind one of the circle players. He drops it in such a way that the circle player is unaware of it being dropped. The seated players may feel behind them to check whether or not the handkerchief was dropped, or they will watch the one walking around, noticing if he still has the handkerchief in his hand or not. Once the circle player behind whom the handkerchief has been dropped becomes aware of the handkerchief, he quickly picks it up and, as a rapidly as possible, chases the one who dropped it. If the player who dropped the handkerchief is tagged before he reaches the vacant place left by the one chasing him, he must take the latter’s place in the circle of players. A player who does not discover that the handkerchief has been dropped behind him after one trip around the circle is chased by the dropper. He is struck with the handkerchief until he reaches his place. Then the same handkerchief-player drops the handkerchief in the next game.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

10

Philippine Games

JGame uego de Prenda of Penalty During a vigil for the dead, or Lamayan in tagalog this game is played so that people will not fall asleep while watching the dead. There is no limit to the number of players that can play. Players sit in a circle with the leader in the middle. Each player adopts a name of a tree or flower that is given by the leader. The leader recounts the story of a lost bird that was owned by a king. He or she says, “The bird of the king was lost yesterday. Did you find it, Ylang-Ylang?” The player who adopted the name of the Ylang-Ylang tree at once answers that he or she has not found it, so the leader continues to ask the other “trees” whether the bird has hidden in them. If a player cannot answer after the third count, he or she is made to deposit a thing he or she owns to the leader until the leader has been able to gather a lot of things from the members. Each one can only regain his or her belonging by reciting a prayer or a verse. Once a player has complied with the penalty, the item that he or she has deposited is returned to him or her. A variation of the penalty might be truth or consequence.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

11

Philippine Games

Labtikaray Labtikaray a filipino traditional game played between 2-4 players indoors or outdoors. This game uses rubber bands (goma) and is played on ground surface. The players face each other as they bet as many rubber bands as they wish and then entangle the rubber bands together. Then the mano(first player) flicks the rubber band to separate them one at a time. The player who succeeds in separating the most number of entangled rubber bands becomes the winner.

Laglag Panyo A traditional Filipino game played by any number of players. A handkerchief and a single circle is needed to play this game. The objective is to chase the “it’ or taya before he reaches the vacated space. Movements 1. Players are in a circle formation sitting on the floor/ground, while the “It” or taya carries a handkerchief in his hand and walks around the circle. 2. The “It” tries to drop the handkerchief unnoticed, behind a player and runs around the circle. 3. If the handkerchief remains unnoticed, the “It” picks it upon his return and whips the player with it as the latter runs ahead of him. 4. The “It” then walks around the circle again and drops the handkerchief behind another player. If the player notices that the handkerchief has been dropped behind him, he picks it up and chases the “It” around the circle. If he can touch “It” before the latter reaches the vacant place, he may take his former place. If not, he becomes the new “It”.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

12

Philippine Games

L awin at Sisiw Hawk and Chicken 10 to 20 or more players Outdoors, gymnasium One player is chosen as the hawk and another as the mother hen. The rest of the players are chickens. The chickens are arranged one behind the other, holding each other’s waists. The hen leads the chickens and goes around in search of food. The hawk meets them and tries to buy a chick from the hen. The hawk asks the hen, “Will you let me buy one of your chickens?” The hen replies, “Yes, choose anyone you like.” The hawk sits down and chooses a fat one. Finally, after bargaining for the price, he pays the hen and takes the chicken with him. He then takes the chicken off and asks her to find grains of rice for his dinner. When the hawk falls asleep, the chicken escapes and returns to the hen. When the hawk discovers that the chicken had escaped, he looks for her and chases her. The hen and the other chickens prevent the hawk from catching the chicken. If the hawk succeeds in catching the chicken, he takes her again and punishes her by making her dig around for rice grains; if he fails, the game is started again, and he tries to buy another chicken.

Luksong Lubid This is another common game played usually by three or more young Filipina girls. This is usually played outdoors when the weather is good and indoors during the rainy season. The length of the abaca rope depends on the players involved. The game is played first using two ‘its’ or taya in tagalog. The two ‘its’ then hold the rope and make circular movement where their opponent/s must jump within without touching any part of the rope. If the opponent/s touched the rope with any part of her body, she/they they become the new ‘its’. Mga Larong Kinagisnan

13

Philippine Games

L uksong Tinik Jump over Thorns 4 to 8 players Outdoors, gymnasium The players are divided into two equal teams. Two players are chosen as mothers of the teams. The rest of the players are children. The mothers are supposed to be high jumpers, for the object of the game is for players to able to jump the height of the hands placed one on top of the other without touching them. The first to jump will be decided by the mothers, who toss a slipper or wooden shoe. The mother who wins the toss will have the first jump, and the other team players will be the taya (on base). Two players on the base will sit facing each other with their right feet touching. The jumpers jump over the feet. Then one hand is placed above the feet with palms and fingers open, then another, and so on until all the fingers are piled one on top of the other. Before an additional hand is placed all the players must have jumped over the file. Oftentimes, the hand of another player is placed at the gap to prevent the jumpers from jumping over it. Sometimes, five hands are used and a fourth player is called upon to fill the file of the hands. When the jumpers jump over the hands without touching the hands with any part of their body, or dress, the game is repeated and they will be the jumpers again. If the mother’s “children” (rest of the team) touch the hands while jumping over them, its is considered a “fault” (an error), and the mother will jump for them. But if it is the mother who fails, then the team will have to take the place of the team on base.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

14

Philippine Games

P abitin Lattice of Goodies Is a popular game in the Philippines. It is usually played in birthday parties and town fiestas. Preparations The game is played with kids ages 9 to 15. It is traditionally played during Santa Cruz de Mayo. A lattice is made during the day where fruits, candies, toys, are hung before the balag is hung from a tree or in modern versions of it parallel wires. It is hung in such a manner that it can be easily raised or lowered. The children assemble under it and a man is choses to raise and lower the balag. The players main objective is to get as many goodies as they can when the balag is lowered. Reaching the Prize The balag is moved up and down. The children jump and try to reach some of the prizes. The child who gets the most prizes is given an extra serving in the feast table. Other versions of the game is played with teams. They select a captain and the captain of each group will do the jumping and grabbing of the goodies. Other members will try to block the members of the other team from getting any goodies. Other teams will try to get a small boy on their shoulders and in that vantage position, the small boy can grab the goodies enough for his team. Cultural Background The game is a direct influence of the Catholicism brought by Spain to the Philippines. It is sometimes called “paagaw� (anything for Grabs) and is a special game during Santa Cruz de Mayo, a commemoration of the search for Christ’s cross by Saint Helen and her son, Constantine the Great.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

15

Philippine Games

P alo Sebo Greased Bamboo Climbing Palo Sebo or Palosebo is a traditional Filipino game that involves climbing a greased bamboo with ones bare hands and feet to get the flag atop of it. The player who reaches the top, gets the flag, and brings it back down to the ground, is declared the winner and will be given a prize. This game is usually played by two (2) or more boys during town fiestas and other celebrations in the provinces of the Philippines. It may use only one pole or multiple poles, and may be played individually or as a team. The Game Before the game starts, a long, straight and well-polished bamboo pole, with a small flag or bag at the top, is lavishly greased to make it very slippery. The pole is then set upright in an open area, commonly in town plazas, and then planted securely on the ground. Colorful strips of paper are attached to the pole to match the festivities. In most areas, a town brass band usually provides musical background on the event. The participants are asked to gather around the bamboo pole to determine the order of climbers. The first climber will position himself at the foot of the pole, while other participants stand behind him and wait for their chance to show their individual climbing skills. At a given signal, the first participant will scamper up the pole, using only his bare hands and feet, to try and reach the flag as fast as he can.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

16

Philippine Games

In case the first climber fails or slides down to the ground without the flag, he is immediately replaced by the player next to him. The game will continue until a player reaches the top of the pole, unties the flag, and reaches the ground with the flag on his hand. The declared winner will then be given a prize by the town officials or the organizers of the game. Variations The more popular version of this Filipino game is the individual event, where only one bamboo pole is used and only contestant is declared winner. In some provinces, the palo sebo is played by using two or more bamboo poles where participants compete with each other by climbing simultaneously. This version is usually practiced in the northern parts of Luzon. The palo sebo can also be played in teams, where three (3) to four (4) boys help one of their teammates reach the flag faster than the opposing team. The first team to reach the flag shall be declared winner. In case the entire team slides down the ground without the flag, a new team shall be organized until a winner is declared. In Ormoc, Leyte, another version of the palo sebo, Palomba Og Saka sa Lobe (Racing up a greased coconut tree), is played during the town fiesta to honor its patron saints -- St. Peter and St. Paul. In this version, a coconut tree is used instead of the bamboo pole and is greased six feet from the ground. The participants will try to reach the top where a coconut husk containing a silver coin awaits them.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

17

Philippine Games

P aluan Palayok Hit the Pot

is a popular game in the Philippines. It is usually held in fiestas and birthday parties. Children enjoy this game because of the prizes that awaits them. History Paluan ng Palayok is generally known as Piñata. According to some scholarly articles, the game may have originated in China. During Marco Polo’s stay in China, he found Chinese fashioning of figures of cows and buffaloes covered with colored paper and adorned with harnesses and trappings. When the Chinese knocked the figure with hard sticks, seeds spilled forth. The figure is then burned and the remains are gathered as a good luck charm. This custom is then passed into Europe in the 14th Century and was adapted to the celebrations of Lent. The word Piñata is an Italian word “pignatta” which means “fragile pot.” Also the Latin prefix “piña” implies a cluster of flowers or fruits. In the 16th century, the tradition spread to Spain and pot decorations were added. They used Piñata to attract converts to their ceremonies as the Spanish conquered North America. Later the Spaniards found that the Native Americans had a similar tradition. Indigenous people break pots in a pole to celebrate the birthday of Aztec the god of war. Mayans played a game where the player’s eyes were covered while hitting a clay pot suspended by string. Spaniards used this games and transformed them into religious instruction. The Game In the Philippines, Filipinos used or buy clay pots and put candies, money and other prizes on it. The pot is then suspended by a string high enough for the children to reach. The players of the game will then form a line. The smallest player will be the first one to hit the pot. The player’s eyes is covered with handkerchief and then the facilitator will turn him in his position three times. This is to make the player confused with the location of the pot. When the player missed the pot the next player will have his turn. When the player hits the pot, the players will jump and tries to grab as many prizes as they can.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

18

Philippine Games

Patintero

Patintero, also called Tinubigan, Patubig or Lantay-lantay, is a popular street game among Pinoys. It is considered to be best played and enjoyed at night especially when the moon is full. The players start off the game by marking the ground with a rectangular shape about five to six meters, all divided into equal parts. Chalk or water is the most common kind of marker being used for this game, although sometimes the players may just draw lines on the ground by dragging their feet. The players are then divided into two teams of equal number. One team guards the area and tries to tag the members of the other team without stepping off the lines. The other team tries to get through all the two or three lines without being tagged. Both teams take turns to be runners and guards. Some of the game’s players include the patotot, the pulis and “around the world”. The playing area is marked-off in a rectangle about five to six meters in, divided into four equal parts. Diagram A is for 6 players, B for 8 or more players. Winning the toss entitles the players on that team to be runners. The taggers stand on lines 1, 2, and 3. Number 1 can go anywhere to tag the runners. The objective of the runners is to get through all the lines (1, 2, 3) back and forth without being tagged. Taggers 1 and 2 tag the runners as they cross their lines or as they get near them. As soon as one of the runners crosses line 3, he returns to line 1 and calls out, “Tubig!” This means a night (a point) is scored in favor of his team. The team which scores three consecutive “nights” (or three points) is the winner, and will be the runners of the next game. If a runner is tagged while crossing a line or while trying to cross, the teams exchange places. Some of the game’s players include the patotot, the pulis and around the world. This street game is also best played and enjoyed during the night especially when the moon is full. Penalties Losers of the game are given either of the following punishments by the winning team: 1. The losers carry the winners on their backs, to and fro. 2. The winners pat the hands of losers 10 to 20 or more times. 3. The losers crouch and pass underneath the legs of the winners Mga Larong Kinagisnan

19

Philippine Games

P iko Hopscotch 2, 4 or 8 players Outdoors, gymnasium Numbers 1, 6, 7, and 8 = buan (moon). Numbers 2 and 5 = dibdib (chest). Numbers 3 and 4 = pakpak (wings). A flat stone, shell, or fruit peeling, is used for pamato (object to be thrown). The first player is determined as follows: The players stand on the corners of the playground, and each one throws his or her stone. Whoever succeeds in putting the pamato at the intersection of the diagonals has the first play. The next nearest is second and so on. Part I. The players, before starting the game, choose their own moon. The first hopper will begin in her moon. She throws her pamato in her moon and then hops inside and kicks the pamato out of the moon. Then she throws it again in 2, then in 5, and 6. She hops in and kicks it out after each throw. In hopping, she hops on either left or right foot but lands on both feet when she reaches 3 and 4, and hops again on 5 and 6. Every player plays the game twice; the first time he begins in his moon, and the second time in his opponent’s moon. When he is through, back and forth, then the second part is started. Care must be taken in throwing the pamato into their exact places, in hopping and in kicking it out. The pamato and the player’s foot must not touch any of the lines. Should the pamato or the player’s foot touch the line, he stops, and the other player will have his turn. If the second player fails or makes a mistake, then player number one will resume the game.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

20

Philippine Games

Part II. The second part of the game is exactly the same as Part I, but instead of hopping, the player walks with his eyes looking towards the sky. After throwing the pamato, he steps in, without looking at the ground, to take the pamato. At every step, he asks, “Have I stepped on the line?” Should he step on the line, the othe rplayer will have his turn. The game goes on as in Part I. The player who finishes Parts I and II is the winner. PENALTY: The winner pats the loser’s hand rather heavily from ten to thirty times according to the agreement. This is called bantilan (patting). Another kind of penalty is the following: The winner blindfolds the loser and takes him to different places. The loser takes a stick or his pamato with him. He drops it at the command of the winner. He is then moved about to many places in order to be confused before he is realeased to look for the stick or pamato. This is called hanapan (to look for something).

P usa at Aso Cat and Dog 10 to 20 or more players Indoors or outdoors A large circle is marked on the ground or floor. At the center of the circle are sticks, slippers, and other objects which represent the “bones”. One player is chosen as the aso (“dog”) and stays inside the circle guarding the “bones”. The other players, who are the pusa (“cats”), stay outside the circle. The goal of the “cats” is to take the “bone” from the “dog” without being tagged or touched by him. The “dog” may tag the “cats” with his feet or his hands, but he must remain seated by the “bones.” The “cats” may tease him by stepping in and out of the circle. While he is busy trying to tag some of the “cats”, others attempt to steal the “bones”. If the “cats” succeed in stealing the “bones” from the “dog” without being tagged, the same player remains as the “dog” in the next game. If he succeeds in tagging any one of the “cats”, the one tagged becomes the “dog” of the next game.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

21

Philippine Games

Serereng Serereng a traditional Filipino game played by 10 players or more, where one of them acts as a dog, and the rest cats. The objective of the dog is to protect his bones from the cats who try to get the bones from the circle occupied by the dog. The cats must not be tagged/ touched by the dog or he/she becomes the next dog in the succeeding game. Equipments 1. A circle about five feet in diameter (or larger depending on the number of players) is drawn on the ground. 2. Slippers, sticks, shoes, books, or any items that may represent bones. These will be placed inside the circle together with the dog. Movements One player is chosen as dog through a system of draws. The dog must try to protect his bones from foraging cats. The cats must avoid being tagged by the dog. The cats may tease the dog by stepping in or out of the circle, while the dog is busy tagging other cats. If the cats succeed in taking all the bones from the dog without being tagged, the player remains as dog for the next game. All the bones are replaced again in the circle. Only if he succeeds in tagging any of the cats, will the dog become one of the cats, and the one he tagged becomes the next dog.

Siato Siato - a popular Filipino game between two or more players. Two sticks are used to play this game. One is about two feet long, and the other one about half a foot long. A small hole in the ground is made where the smaller stick will be placed with one end at the bottom and the other end sticking out. The player will hit the smaller stick with the longer one so that the smaller stick flies to the air. At mid-air, the player then hits again the smaller stick with the longer one. This is repeated three times. Whoever hits it to the farthest distance wins the game. As punishment, the loser will be forced to shout the word “siato� without interruption while running back to the original starting place. Mga Larong Kinagisnan

22

Philippine Games

S iklot Jack Stones Siklot is a popular traditional game in the Philippines. Some say that it is the Filipino version of “jackstones” which is sometimes called “sintak.” This game is usually played by female children ages ranging from 7 to 16. Getting Started Each player provides herself with six or more seeds, pebbles, shells or marbles. The players must decide who goes first. In deciding turns, each player puts her stones in her hand, throws them all in tha air, then catches them with the back of her hand; tosses the stones in the air again, and catches them with the palm of the hand. She must try hard not to drop any stone in this last stage. The player who drops none or the least number of stone starts the game. The two players sit accross each other and the game is played on the space between them.Then each player puts the same number of stones in the game. Flicking Stones The main objective of the game is to successfully flick the stones that are dropped on the floor two at a time. The first player collects all the stones from other players. The player then tosses the stones in air and catches the with the back of her hand and tosses them again and catches them in the palm of her hand. The player holds the stones she catches in one hand. Mga Larong Kinagisnan

23

Philippine Games

When there are already stones on the floor. The player looks for a cue stone and place it on the thumb over the index middle finger and flick the stone so to touch the other stones. The player flicks every pair of stones on the floor until nothing remains. After each successful game, she puts aside one stone called “baboy” then starts all over again. If the first player finishes the game without missing a stone the next player starts a new game. If the first player misses to hit the other stones the next player picks up where the game stopped until the first round is over. The player who has the most stone wins. Cultural Notes The name “baboy” (pig) is given to the stone acquired after every winning by a successful player is a symbol of a Filipino’s savings. In the rural areas, families try ro raise their own pigs and fowls plus some vegetables for home consumptions as well as for extra money. One pig is always kept for future use to help finance special occasions like a baptism, a wedding, a fiesta, etc. The Tagalog folk speech, “nagpapataba ng baboy” (fattening a pig) means “saving for a rainy day” or “saving for a special occasion.”

Sintak Sintak, a traditional Filipino game played by any number of players although most effectively only by two. Objective To reach the last step of the game without missing the tossed stone according to its sequence or order. Equipment Stones (usually six small ones and a big one as mother stone) or any seeds or shells(sigay) Movements 1. Player 1 hides any number of stones in hand and asks player 2 to guess whether the number is odd or even. In case number 2 player fails to guess correctly, number 1 starts the game, or vice versa. 2. The small stones are held in the palm, while the mother stone is held between the thumb and the third and fourth fingers. The mother stone is tossed into the air, the small stones are quickly placed on the floor and the mother is caught when it drops down. 3. The mother stone is tossed into the air, the small ones on the floor are gathered up, and the mother stone is caught as it drops down. 4. If the player fails to catch the mother stone after gathering up the small ones, his opponent takes his place and executes steps 2 and 3. But, if the player catches the mother stone, she continues the game 5. The mother stone is tossed into the air, and the small ones are placed on the floor. Then the mother stone is again tossed, one small stone is picked up and placed in the palm, and the mother stone is catched as it drops. This is repeated until all the stones are picked up one at a time. This is repeated gradually increasing the pick up by twos, threes, and so on. Mga Larong Kinagisnan

24

Philippine Games

S ipa Kick Named after the manner in which the game is played, Sipa (in English: “Kick”) is the Philippines’ national and traditional game. This daytime outdoor game common to Filipinos, usually of two or more male players, requires kicking skills and is played by singles, doubles or quadruples. The Ball or Pató Similar to Sepak Takraw, Sipa originally uses a rattan ball. The spherical-shaped ball or pató is made of woven strips of rattan of about 2 to 3 millimeters thick. The strips are woven in such a manner that holes are placed symmetrically around the ball. The entire ball has a diameter of 9 to 10 centimeters and only weighs around 200 grams so that it can lightly bounce like a tennis ball. This sipa ball is commonly used in more formal sipa tournaments Other variations of the sipa ball includes that made of tingga or washer – a thin round metal with a small hole at the middle used to secure roof nails. Placed in its hole are strands of packaging straw, or colorful threads, which direct the sipa to fall with its flat-side first. The straws also help the motion of the washer while still in mid-air. This type, on the other hand, is often used in sipa game played in streets.

Filipino fathers playing sipa after a day of hardwork

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

25

Philippine Games

Mechanics The objective of the game is to kick the sipa ball as many times as the player can without it falling on the ground. The player needs to kick the ball in such a manner that it will be difficult for the opponent to return the ball, or in a way in which the opponent will have a high probability of committing errors. The last kick requires a certain height, that is, up in the air, above the head of other participants and the “it.” Version 1: Using rattan ball Before the game starts, the players decide the turns of the game through manuhán. The two opposing players (may also be the team leader of a group of two or four players) toss coins – whoever gets tail plays first (may vary depending on the preference of the players). Aside from toss-coin, players also use jack-en-poy (rock-paper-scissors) to decide the turns of the game. The players stand approximately 8 to 9 meters apart. The “it” throws the ball to the player who receives it with his foot and kicks it back to the opponent. The game goes on with the players fancily kicks the ball to make it harder for their opponent to receive and return it. The rule of the game is to keep the ball in the air only through kicking – no body parts other than the legs must touch the ball. Points are counted against a player or team. If one commits an error, the point is on him and serves as a demerit. The player or team who accumulated 11, 15 or 21 points (as agreed upon) losses.

The boy’s enthusiasm in kicking the ratan ball

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

26

Philippine Games

Version 2: Using washer In this version, the way of determining the “it” of the game is by counting, meaning, each players is to kick the sipa as many times as he can. Whoever gets the lowest count is the “it”. Being the “it” means he needs to catch the sipa upon the last kick of the player, and kick it as many times as desired by the previous player to save him from being the it all throughout the game. The “it” throws the sipa to the first player, who then starts kicking it until the count reaches the agreed number. He then kicks it as hard as he can, and as high as possible, while the “it” tries to save the sipa from dropping to the ground. The “it”, who now holds the sipa has to kick it as many times as told by the previous player. If the count is reached and the next player was not able to catch the sipa, the latter will then be the “it.” Unlike in the traditional version, this more popular version of sipa allows the use of palm, elbow and knee so long as the sipa does not hit the ground. Scoring in this version is different from that using rattan. Here, the error committed by a player or a team is equivalent to a point or so to the opposing player or team. The player or team with the highest score wins. Other Versions Bilangan is a version of the game played by points. A 15-meter by 9-meter rectangular court is drawn on the ground. Each short sides is divided to four equal parts, and both length sides are given a half-meter allowance for “neutral zones. This version uses rattan ball and the objective is similar to version one except in the manner of scoring. A team acquires a point when it has made two consecutive “good balls” (when a ball is received and returned by a player to another player of the opposing team). Composed of two teams having four male players each, four other people are needed in the game to serve as: referee (who will decide if a kick is a good or dead ball, and shall enforce the rules of the game); scorer (who will tally the points and errors made); and two linesmen (who shall monitor if the ball touches the line). Mga Larong Kinagisnan

27

Philippine Games

Lambatan is a version similar to Bilangan except that the court does not necessarily need to be divided into four equal parts at both short ends and a net is stretched at the middle of it. The “captain-ball” stands 7 meters from the net and his teammates scatter themselves in their territory on one side of the net. The objective is the same but players have to kick the ball as hard as they can for it to pass above the net. One is considered a “good ball” if: the ball is passed over the net and fell on the opponent’s court; a net ball is kicked by the other team; the ball fell within the line; and a ball misplaced by the other team. Mudansa is more of an exhibition game than a competition. Skilled sipa players exhibit fancy tricks and styles in kicking the ball. Usually, a mudansa game is played after a sipa game is over where the best and skilled players of the team entertain the crowd with their unique and amazing kicking styles.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

28

Philippine Games

S ipang Lata Kick the Can

Sipang Lata is the English version of “Kick the Can”, which is a famous children’s game in the Philippines. The game is like hide and seek but with a twist in it. In some parts of the world the game is famous for family fun activities and is played in various versions. Kick Off The game is usually played by boys and girls, ages 6 to 9. They use clean tin cans. The players must chose and “it.” A small circle is drawn on the ground. The can is placed inside the circle then the players scatter around. Selection of It The players sit or stand in a circle. The players then take turns tossing the can in the air. If the can stands on the end as it lands on the ground, the player who tossed it is excluded. Those who fail remain in the circle and keep on trying until they succeed. The last one left in the circle becomes the “it.” Objective The players are to kick a can as far as possible, then hide from the “it.”’ The “it’s” task is to secure that the can will not be kick by other players and at the same time finds all the players. Hiding and Kicking The “it” stands inside the circle, one foot in the can. A player kicks or throws the can as hard as he can and all the players run to hide. The “it” retrieves the can as fast as he can, returns it to the circle, then places his foot on it. The “it” searches for the other players. If he sees a player, he steps on the can and shouts the player’s name. When all of the players are found, the last player caught becomes the new “it.” Notes If the “it” is far from the can, the player may try to outrun him and kick the can. If the player succeeds, the game starts all over again. If the “it” puts his foot on the can first, an exchange of roles takes place between the two. The former “it” kicks the can, shouting the new “it’s” name and joins everyone in hiding. Nobody should kick the can when the “it” is stepping on it. This is considered a foul and whoever does this, automatically becomes the “it.” The “it” should not continuously keep his foot on the can he is guarding. Mga Larong Kinagisnan

29

Philippine Games

G agamba Spider Fighting Spider Fighting The game Gagamba (spider fighting) is a popular game among Filipino children. The game starts by placing two spiders at opposite ends of a stick. The first spider that falls of the stick three times loses. In some games, the spider should die first by being eaten by the opponent spider before being considered as defeated. History and Cultural Variations The history of fighting spider as of today is unknown, but traces of spider fighting culture are found in different countries in the world. In Japan, specifically in the Kajiki, the worlds largest arachnid fight club meets for its annual showdown, the Kumo Gassen. The Kumo gassen is an annual traditional event of spider-wrestling match. This event is a long unbroken tradition for four hundred years. Spectators and players gather here to watch hundreds of spider match and the game goes on for seven long hours. Perhaps the origin spider of fighting can be trace in this particular tradition, as Eastern culture dwells in this insect fighting culture. In some parts of Asia, spiders are not the only insect who are expose to fighting matches, crickets are also breed to fight. Japanese spiders who are mostly black and white Agriopes, which is a kind of garden spiders, are called “samurai spiders.� In the Philippines, spider fighting culture is emanent and many Filipino children are engage in this kind of game. Mga Larong Kinagisnan

30

Philippine Games

Cultivation The spiders are caught in trees although some prefer those found in electric wires which they believe are much tougher. After capture or fighting, the spiders are stabled in used matchboxes. These matchboxes usually have separate cells to house different spiders. Spiders are fed with insects and some are fed with secret formulas. In Japan, they cultivate spiders in large boxes. Mostly Agriopes spiders are breed. They raise spiders in powerful diet, like spraying sport juices in the web. v The Fighters In the Philippines, spiders who are caught in along power lines are thought to be more aggressive. “Damang� which is a Bisayan word for spider are found everywhere in the Philippines. Players do not have any particular preference on the kind, shape and size of the spider but they would choose spiders that are long-limbed and slender-bodied. They called their spiders in different names depending on the way they appear. Most damang lovers used Pulahan, which a kind of spider that has red marks on its back and mostly found in tamarind trees. There are also, Mantalan, Tiger, Ituman and the Yellow Spider which is usually found on horse-radish trees. The Game Rules of the games are simple, it starts by placing two spiders at opposite ends of a stick. The spiders must be of relatively the same size to have an even match. Before the duel, players usually tickle their spiders to get it agitated. The spider who falls off of the stick three times loses the match. In the Philippines, even adults engage in the game. Some even put bets on the matches, ranging from a P1 to as high as P50,000. Legal Issues The practice is now generally discouraged since it damages educational performance of children. They spend too much time hunting and training spiders that lessons and homework are missed. They might also be attracted to gambling. Ordinances against the sport are now in effect in some cities. The sport might also be indirectly responsible for crop damage since spiders are useful in controlling insect pest populations.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

31

Philippine Games

Sulot Sulot is a popular game in the Philippines. The game needs rubber bands or goma that are buried in a sandy or loose soil and two player thrust their stick simultaneously in search of the goma. It is sometimes called “hulilan ng silo” or “hanapang silo.” Preparations The game is played outdoors, where the soil is loose or sandy like in a seashore. Each player should have a string about a foot long, the end of which is tied into a loop and also a sharpened stick. The players must select an “it” using “jack en poy” (rock, paper, scissors) method. The “it” turns his back to his opponent and the other player walks a short distance away from the “it.” The objective of the “it” is to find the hidden string with a stick. The Hidden String The other player hides the lopped end of his string within an area of a foot square. The other end of the string is left on the surface of the ground in such manner as to mislead the “it.” The “it” must find the string and must thrust his stick into the place where he thinks the loop is hidden. If he succeeds in is his first attempt, he takes his turn in burying his loop. If he fails, he loses and the game is repeated all over again, with the two players having the same roles. Versions In “hulilan ng silo”, the players will turn back to back and both hide their string. They exchange places and the first player who finds the loop of the opponent he wins. If both of them finds the other’s loop the game is declared a tie.

Sungka

Sungká is a popular traditional board game in the Philippines. Played on a block of carvedout wood called sungkahan, the game is one of calculation over skill. Origin Experts say that malancala, an early version of sungká, may be the oldest game in the world, with almost every culture having some variation of it. Stones used in mancala boards have been found carved into the roofs of temples in Memphis, Thebes, and Luxor -- evidence that the game was played in Egypt before 1400 BC. Studies say that the boardgame may have evolved in Egypt from counters used for accounting and stock-taking. Evidence of these boards have also been found in Ancient Sumeria. In Africa, the game is considered a national pastime and is played by tribes numbering in the hundreds. Malancala, being Arabic in origin, makes some scholars suspect that the game progressed from west to east, meaning from Asia to the coast of Atlantic. As for the origin of the term “sungka”, researchers found traces of a similar game at a stream in Indonesia. The stream, widely known to travellers as the Red River, is called sonka by Mga Larong Kinagisnan

32

Philippine Games

early Asians. The theory maintains that the sungka game Filipinos know today may have been brought by Indonesians when they migrated to the Philippines. The Sungkahan The Sungkáhan is a hollowed-surfaced board that has regular intervals with sixteen circular holes, with one large hole at the end of each side - called mother or “ulo” (head). It is shaped like a boat with an artfully rounded ends. The large holes are five inches wide.The fourteen small holes are called bahay (houses) with a capacity of a handful tokens. They are hollowed out alongside at equal distances, seven holes in each row, approximately half an inch apart. These small holes are about two inches in diameter or big enough for a player to put five fingers at once. Shells, pebbles, or seeds are used as tokens. The board varies from 30 to 32 inches long, 7 to 9 inches wide, and 3 to 5 inches thick. Cultural Importance Sungká in the Philippines is embedded in different cultures. In the early times, Sungká was used by fortunetellers called bailan or manghuhula, for religious purposes. Other people find it helpful in finding their destination on a certain day or in deciding marriages. Filipino superstition tells people that the game should not be played indoors or else their house will be burn. Tournaments are also held in the country, the biggest tournament is at the Kadayawan Sports Festival in Davao. Playing Sungká The two players sit opposite each other with the game board between them. Each player claims the row of small holes nearest to him and the big hole at his left. Both players start simultaneously. Each one picks up all the shells from any one of his own Mga Larong Kinagisnan

33

Philippine Games

small holes and, moving to the left, distributes them one by one among the other holes. He continues clockwise till he reaches his mother hole, where he drops one token too. If he still has shells in his hand after reaching his big hole, he continues dropping them one by one into the holes of his opponent, still going clockwise, towards his opponent’s mother hole. If the last token of one player reaches an empty hole, he is declared “dead” (patay) and he stops playing. His opponent wins the preliminaries and continues playing. The winner of the pre-game once again picks up all the counters in any of his seven holes and sows them, one in each little hole, around the board towards the left, including, if there are enough, his own big hole and on into his opponent’s holes (but not his opponent’s big hole). If the player’s last counter lands in an empty hole on his own side, he captures all the opponent’s counters in the opposite pit and puts them in his own Mother hole, together with the capturing counter. The opponent gets a turn to play. If the player’s last counter falls in his own big hole, he gets another turn. If the last counter falls in an empty hole on his opponent’s side, the player “dies” and leaves his counter where it landed. The game is over when all seven pits or hole on one side are empty. The player with the most counters in the big hole wins. Rules of the Game • A player must drop only one shell at a time into every small hole and into his own big hole. • He must not drop any shell into his opponent’s big hole or in any “burnt house” (sunog or holes left empty due to lack of enough tokens accumulated by a player in his big hole). • The opponent is entitled to any shell which his rival drops carelessly in any “burnt house.” • A “burnt house” can only be refilled in the next game after a complete set of seven (or whatever number fills a hole) tokens are accumulated in the owner’s big hole. • The objective of the game is to accumulate more tokens in a players big hole than his opponent.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

34

Philippine Games

T aguan Hide and Seek

2 to 20 or more players Indoors or outdoors One player is chosen as the it. He remains at a base determined by all the players. The other players then hide, and when securely hidden, they call out “It!”. The it goes to search for them. Those who are hiding may repeat the call at their own discretion. The game ends when all of the players are found. The player who is first found will be the new it (the searcher) in the next round.

TAKIP-SILIM Blind Man

5 to 10 or more players Playground, gymnasium One player is blindfolded with a handkerchief or a piece of cloth. He is to be the it. He is made to turn three times before he is left alone. When all are ready, they call out “It!” or any other way to give some hints to the it to search for the rest of the players through their voices. When the it hears the call, he tries to catch any one of the players, who are not blindfolded and make noises or sometimes touch and tickle the it. They may keep silent, if they wish, in order to make him believe that they are far from him. When he succeeds in catching or tagging any one of the players, he exchanges places with him. The one caught will be the it in the next game. Mga Larong Kinagisnan

35

Philippine Games

T awanan Laughing Game 20 to 50 or more players Outdoors or indoors I. All the players are seated around in an irregular order. Before the game starts, all agree as to which side of a two-sided object (a coin for example) should allow them to laugh or stop laughing. The leader tosses up a coin, and, based on the agreement of the rest of the players, the players should either laugh or stop laughing when the object lands on the ground. This is an interesting game since the players start laughing, it would be very hard for many to suppress their laughter immediately if the coin lands on the side that the players are supposed to stop laughing. II. The leader tosses up an object and makes it a requirement that all must laugh while the object is in the air and stop as soon as it falls on the floor. By varying the height of the throw, laughter may be long or short.

T eks Texts Teks (from the English word text) is a popular Filipino card game played by children. The cards used in the game (called teks) are very small, about a quarter of the size of regular playing cards. Featured in the cards are cartoon storyboard clips of local films complete with characters’ dialogues and action sequences. The game relies heavily on betting which side will come up, and is decided by flicking the teks in the air. Some players slap the cards against each other in a high five for added effect. Mga Larong Kinagisnan

36

Philippine Games

Tiyakad Tiyakad is a Filipino traditional game played outdoor or in the playground. Equipment Two pairs of coconut stilts. This is made by boring a hole through one of the “eyes” of a half of the coconut shell. A string, about one or two meters long (depending on the height of the player) is pulled through the hole and a big, sturdy knot is tied at the bottom end inside the shell. Ground Preparation Two parallel lines are drawn 10 meters apart. One is the starting line and the other the goal line. The first player in each of the two teams of players puts a coconut shell under each foot, pulling the string between the big toe and the second toe of each foot while holding up the other end in his hand. Movements • At the signal, the two players at the start of the two rows/teams walk on their coconut stilts toward the goal line • Upon reaching the goal line, the players turn around still on their stilts and return to the starting line, where they pass on their stilts to the next two players who performs the same movements as the first players. • The team that reaches the starting line first wins the game.

Tiyakad is a famous game not just or kids but also for adults

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

37

Philippine Games

Tumbang Preso 5-10 or more players Outdoors or gymnasium

Each player is provided with a large throw-away object (could be slippers or a shoe) called “pamato”. An empty tin or plastic container (the size of an 8 or 12 oz. tins) is placed in upright position 6 or 8 meters from the throwing line. A player is chosen as the prisoner, guarding the empty tin or container. The other players stand at the throwing line. They take turns throwing their “pamato” at the empty tin. Everybody tries to knock the tin down. As soon as the can is knocked down, the prisoner must put back the tin in upright position before he can tag the any of the players attempting to recover their “pamato”. The prisoner can tag the players while recovering their “pamato” within the throwing line only. After each throw, a player must recover his “pamato”. Should he be tagged by the prisoner before he reaches the throwing line, he becomes the prisoner in the next game.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

38

Philippine Games

T urumpo Spinning Top

Turumpo or Trumpo (in English: Spinning Top) is a popular outdoor Filipino game of manipulating a wooden top to spin on an axis through a string twirled around it. It is composed of any number of players, although one can enjoy playing it on his own. Preparation A player needs to bring his own turumpo and string. Filipino turumpo is made of wood and has an egg-like shape where in one end is slightly pointed than the other. Driven in the pointed end of the spinning top is an iron nail, an inch of which is projected out. The end of the nail is sharpened to make it even more pointy. A meter-long string is also needed which will cause the spinning motion of the top. A two-or-more-feet diameter circle is prepared on the ground. A player may either use a stick or his foot to draw the circle. Ten feet from the circle is a starting line where players stand and throw their tops in the circle. Before the game starts, the turns of the game must be decided through manuhån. Players stand in the starting line with their turumpo in one hand ready to be thrown. Their target is the center point of the circle. Whoever gets to throw his top the nearest to the center plays first. The Game There are two popular versions of the game based on objective – (1) to inflict much damage on the opponent’s top; and (2) to make his top spin for the longest possible time.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

39

Philippine Games

Version 1: Top Targeting The objective of the game is to inflict damage on the opponent’s top – the player whose top receives the most damage losses. While the first player is twirling the string around his turumpo, the other players place their tops in the circle, in a bunch or in a row. The first player chooses his target top, aiming his own top on the target 10 feet away from the circle. If he hits his target, he may lasso his own top and start aiming to other tops again. If he missed, then he needs to wait until the spinning stops. His top needs to get out of the circle before it stops or else it will be the next target, and the opponent gets his and become the hitter. In case of a multiple-player game, the unsuccessful hitter’s turumpo has to join the rest of the target tops in the circle, and the next hitter will be the person designated “second” based on the manuhán. If a top is knocked out of a circle in the attempt of the hitter to hit his target, the former joins the rank of hitters outside the circle. All the players in line as hitter shall concentrate on targeting the remaining tops inside the circle. The game only ends when the last top in the circle gets out of it or is split open. Version 2: Last Top Spinning The objective of the game is to be the remaining top spinning. Players twirl the string around their tops’ and unleash these on the ground simultaneously. The duration of the top’s whirl depends on the manner by which it is thrown by the player. At times, the top makes a spinning whistle or buzzing sound as it whirl. The tops may collide on each other, and some can endure the strikes and continue spinning. Experts in playing the game can pick up the top in motion with their hand or a string and keep it spinning in the palms of their hands. The top which spins the longest wins. Maranao Turumpo The National Commission for Culture and the Arts and the National Museum recognizes the Maranao turumpo, or Batige, as the largest in the Philippines. The Batige is made of solid wood adorned by halved mother-of-pearls. This pearls are meticulously arranged around the top to make a pattern as it twirls. Retrieved from Lanao del Sur by archaeologists of the National Museum, this top has a length of 31 centimeters and a diameter of 15 centimeters. This is no child’s toy; only male adults play the batige. The twirling of this stop is used to attest a man’s skill and strength.

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

40

Philippine Games

V iola Straddie Jump 2 to 10 or more players Outdoors, gymnasium One of the players is chosen as captain of the team, and another as taya (base player). The rest of the players are jumpers. Two parallel lines about five meters apart are marked off on the ground. The base player stands one foot from the starting line on which a base is placed. He bends his trunk forward-downward and supports his body by putting his elbows on his thighs. The captain straddle-jumps over the base player, and the rest of the players do the same, one by one. Whatever jump the captain takes, the rest will imitate. After each successful jump by all the players, the base player moves a pace farther from the base. Should a player fail to do what the captain did, or should he touch the base player with his feet while he is jumping, or should he fail to touch the base before he jumps, he becomes the new base player in the next game. Mga Larong Kinagisnan

41

Philippine Games

Bibliography Books and Journals Lopez, Mellie Leandicho. A Study of Philippine Games. University of the Philippines Press: Quezon City, 2001. Barbosa, Artemio C. Traditional Games in the Philippines. (accessed on 02 April 2008). Paterno, Maria Elena. Treasures of the Philippine National Museum. Bookmark Inc. - Makati City, 1995. Websites http://www.bohol.ph/picture569.html http://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~mbarrien/projects/sungka_readme.txt http://simgames.wordpress.com/category/philippines/ http://www.tradgames.org.uk/games/Mancala.htm http://www.globalpinoy.com/ch/ch_category.php?category=pinoygames&name=Sungk a&table=ch_pinoygames&startpage=16&endpage=30 http://www.tagalog-dictionary.com/source.php?a=sungka http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1571/is_n32_v12/ai_18607632 http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/ceb/2002/12/02/news/dad.asks.city.hall.go.after.spider. men..html http://www.bulatlat.com/news/5-37/5-37-photoweek.html http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/142496.stm http://cableready.net/193/samurai-spider/ http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/ceb/2002/12/02/news/dad.asks.city.hall.go.after.spider. men..html http://www.gmanews.tv/story/57074/SunStar-Negros-folk-bet-as-high-as-P50000-on-spiderderbies http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/gen/2005/10/28/feat/games.big.boys.play.html http://familyfun.go.com/games/indoor-outdoor-games/game/famgam_kickcan/ http://www.gameskidsplay.net/GAMES/chasing_games/kick_the_can_2.html http://www.ehow.com/how_309_play-kick-can.html http://www.apa.si.edu/filamcentennial/filam_story/u4-part-09.html http://www.globalpinoy.com/ch/ch_category.php?category=pinoygames&name=Siklot& table=ch_pinoygames&startpage=16&endpage=30 http://84.84.87.163/tagtrans.php?search=numb&page=1&order=English http://www.livinginthephilippines.com/philculture/filipino_culture.html Mga Larong Kinagisnan

42

Philippine Games

PG-C played the games Relay-Relayan

(The First Game facilitated by the group)

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

43

Philippine Games

Finding The Way Out

(The Second Game facilitated by the group)

Mga Larong Kinagisnan

44

Philippine Games


Laro ng Lahi