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Fall Bulb Festival 2013

Welcome to the Fall Bulb Festival A very warm welcome to visitors attending the Woman’s Board of the Chicago Horticultural Society’s 2013 Fall Bulb Festival, from October 4 to 6 at the Chicago Botanic Garden. In our 14th year, we will offer more than 200 varieties of bulbs and also feature an exciting array of vendors displaying their wares. As the centerpiece of the festival, our collection of tulip, narcissus, amaryllis, and other specialty bulbs has been carefully selected by our Woman’s Board committee in collaboration with Garden horticultural experts and the best Dutch bulb suppliers. We stock the finest and freshest top-size bulbs, which arrive by air from the Netherlands just prior to our sale and are chosen for both exceptional beauty and hardiness. Knowledgeable staff and volunteers will be available with advice on bulb selection, sequence of bloom, and color harmony. All proceeds from our sale support the restoration of the English Walled Garden and replacement of trees damaged by the emerald ash borer. Special in 2013 will be an area with collections of tulips featured in the Rose Garden and the Crescent, and on the Learning Campus. We will have several special blends available, such as Tommy crocus and pink daffodils. We will also feature amaryllis and paperwhite bulbs for the indoor gardener; they may be planted during the winter months and are especially lovely during the holiday season. Select bulbs for online preordering will be available from September 3 to 27. Our festival is designed for families, with something interesting for all ages and with a full spectrum of activities. Vendors will be on site to sell honey, baked goods, fresh produce, hand-thrown pottery, and much more. Visitors can enjoy a straw bale maze and a gourd display. We are most grateful to Bulb Festival chair Anne Healy and vice chair Michelle McCarthy for their capable leadership. Stephanie Lindemann, manager of horticultural events, guides us with grace, efficiency, and expertise. The Woman’s Board is always thankful for Judy Cashen, director of volunteer services, and her volunteers for their hours of assistance, and to Jodi Zombolo, director of visitor events and programs, and her staff for their creativity and organizational skills. And we are most appreciative of the support and interest of Sophia Siskel, the president and CEO of the Chicago Botanic Garden, who reflected on the joy next spring will bring when the bulbs we are selling this fall begin to bloom. Finally, we sincerely thank you, our valued customers, for visiting the Fall Bulb Festival. Barbara Metzler, President, Woman’s Board

Tulipa clusiana ‘Lady Jane’

2013 Bulb Sale Administration Anne Healy Woman’s Board Chair Michelle McCarthy Woman’s Board Vice Chair Jill Delaney, Mary Hill, Beth Jernigan. Joani Lowry, Ann Merritt, Holly Rothschild Woman’s Board Committee Members Chicago Botanic Garden Staff Stephanie Lindemann Manager of Horticultural Events Sarah Paar Coordinator of Flower Shows Jill Selinger Manager of Continuing Education

Cover: Leucojum aestivum‘ Gravetye Giant’

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Bulb Sale Hours

Bulb Sale Preordering

Members Only Friday, October 4, 10 a.m. to noon

Bulb Sale preorder is exclusively available from September 3 to 27, 2013.

General Public Friday, October 4, noon to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, October 5 and 6, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The sale will be held in the Regenstein Center at the Chicago Botanic Garden. Please park in the main parking lots and follow the signs directing you to the bulb sale.

Payment We encourage you to assist us in maximizing our support of the Garden by using cash or checks. However, we gladly accept Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express.

Order your bulbs online at www.chicagobotanic.org/bulb to ensure that you receive the items you want. Our prices are extremely competitive and our bulbs are fresh from Holland. Select from 17 of our most popular bulbs available for preorder. Get these beautiful and highly sought-after bulbs before they sell out! Allium ‘Gladiator’ – Ornamental Onion Allium ‘Silver Spring’ – Ornamental Onion Anemone blanda ‘Mix’ – Anemone Crocus vernus ‘Pickwick’ – Crocus Galanthus ikariae – Snowdrops Hippeastrum ‘Charisma’ – Amaryllis Hyacinthus orientalis ‘Peter Stuyvesant’ – Hyacinth Muscari armeniacum – Grape Hyacinth Narcissus ‘Avalon’ – Large-Cupped Daffodil Narcissus ‘Altruist’ – Small-Cupped Daffodil Narcissus ‘Bell Song’ – Jonquilla Daffodil Narcissus ‘Bridal Crown’ – Double Daffodil Tulipa ‘Cash’ – Darwin Hybrid Tulip Tulipa ‘Christina Van Kooten’ – Lily Flowered Tulip Tulipa ‘Comeback’ – Darwin Hybrid Tulip Tulipa ‘Havran’ – Triumph Tulip Tulipa ‘Montreux’ – Double Early Tulip The bulb sale and preorder pick-up area are located in Burnstein Hall of the Regenstein Center. Preordering is available to everyone. All preorders must be entered by credit card via the website. Preorders may be picked up during Fall Bulb Festival hours from Friday to Sunday, October 4 to 6, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Additional bulbs may be purchased during these times at the festival. Preorders are processed in the order received. Bulbs are subject to availability, and substitutions are not allowed. To ensure that you receive what you want, we encourage you to preorder your bulbs early. Orders cannot be shipped.

Disclaimer Bulbs are offered for sale at retail only. This is a benefit bulb sale and funds are to be contributed to the Chicago Botanic Garden. Therefore, there are no discounts offered either to professionals or to members of our support groups or auxiliary boards. We make every effort to price the bulbs fairly. All sales are final. Bulbs cannot be exchanged or returned for refunds. All bulbs are of premium quality. They are shipped directly from growers in Holland and the United States. They are hardy and viable for planting in U.S. Department of Agriculture Zone 5, unless noted otherwise. We cannot be held responsible for losses due to extreme weather conditions, improper storage conditions, delayed planting, improper site conditions, or improper climate plantings. We strive to be accurate in both our catalog descriptions and labeling. We suggest you use the catalog as a source of information for determining how these bulbs will perform in your landscape. Although information is based upon the fact that the Chicago area is located in Zone 5, bloom time, height, and color are approximations and can be affected by weather and site conditions. We suggest that you call our Plant Information Hotline at (847) 835-0972 for any “how-to˝ questions, or for information regarding the growth habits of the bulbs you purchase. The Chicago Botanic Garden is one of the treasures of the Forest Preserves of Cook County.

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Table of Contents Allium (Ornamental Onion)...................................... p. 6 Narcissus (Daffodil)................................................ p. 7 Tulipa (Tulip)......................................................... p. 12 Speciality Bulbs................................................... p. 17 Forced Bulbs....................................................... p. 24 Woman’s Board Members................................... p. 26 Index................................................................... p. 26

Catalog Symbols Full Sun

Partial Shade

New to the Sale Z Fragrant Wildlife Resistant

Full Shade

Simple Tips on How to Grow Bulbs You’ve made the decision to add spring bulbs to your garden. Now, you need to choose the best location for them in your garden. The area should receive full sun for at least six to eight hours a day. This location should also be well drained. If you notice standing water in the area after a rainstorm, it is not the best location. Too much moisture can lead to bulb rot. Adding a little bit of compost to the soil will improve your chances for a dazzling display. A layer of compost about an inch thick spread over the top of the soil should be sufficient. Turn the soil over with a shovel to incorporate the compost into the soil. This helps to move the organic matter into the root zone of the bulb and will make your planting easier. Ideally, you should place your bulbs about 6 inches apart. If you’re looking for a lush display, you can plant 4 inches apart. The rule of thumb for planting depth is twice the height of the bulb. Tulips are generally planted 6 inches deep and daffodils are planted about 8 inches deep. Once your planting is complete, lightly water the area to help settle the soil and provide immediate moisture to the bulbs. If you have a problem with pests digging in your garden, you can place deer netting over the planted area. Sod staples will hold the netting in place and its black color makes it almost invisible. A light layer of leaf mulch provides a neater appearance as well as additional protection, since most animals are deterred by the smell. Liz Rex is a horticulturist at the Chicago Botanic Garden. She currently supervises and manages the Bulb Garden.

It is the policy of the Chicago Botanic Garden to purchase bulbs that are certified to be nursery-propagated.

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Tips on Planting Plant your bulbs as soon as the weather turns consistently cool but before the ground has frozen. Soil that is rich in organic matter with a neutral pH will provide the best environment. Since most bulbs prefer to be relatively dry during their dormant period, they may perform best when planted in welldrained soil or in elevated beds. Most bulbs will not thrive in an area with poor drainage. Determine the proper planting depth for each variety according to the chart below. Loosen the soil 2 to 3 inches below the approximate planting depth to allow for optimum root development. Firmly place each bulb in the hole with the pointed end upright. If it is difficult to determine which is the top of the bulb, plant it on its side; it will grow upward and perform normally.

Water at least once after planting and at least once a week in spring if the garden does not receive a half-inch of rainfall per week during the growing season. Avoid planting bulbs in the path of daily dousing from an irrigation system. Dormant bulbs are susceptible to fungal diseases when subjected to constant dampness. In spring, remove flowers when they have faded, leaving foliage to photosynthesize, a process necessary if flowers are to bloom again the following year. Never cut, tie, braid, or bend foliage; instead, remove it when it begins to yellow and fall over. Bulbs are best left in the ground to regenerate for the following year.

Carefully cover the bulbs with soil to prevent breaking off any sprout growth. Do not put fertilizer in the hole with the bulb, as it may burn the tender new roots as they develop. Top-dress with a bulb fertilizer upon planting and each autumn thereafter for best continuing spring bloom. A cover of mulch 2 to 3 inches thick helps to retain ground moisture, reduce weeds, and protect the bulbs from heaving when temperatures spike.

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A. ‘Hair’ 12-18˝ This odd-looking Allium produces hanging green leaves from aerial bulbils, resembling a head full of hair! Blooms in late May–early June. A. ‘Mount Everest’ 3-4´ Beautiful 6˝pure-white snowball-like flowers appear in June. It is long lasting and vigorous. A. ‘Pinball Wizard’ 6-8˝ This shorter, very showy selection has substantial 6˝ to 8˝ globe-shaped clusters of silvery lilac-purple florets in June. Dried flower heads provide textural interest.

Allium sphaerocephalon

Allium

Ornamental Onion

Ornamental onions are elegant and spectacular. Their blooms range from a huge 12˝ to a tiny 1˝, in colors that vary from purple to pink to white to yellow. Best of all, allium are wildlife resistant. Plant the small ones in rock gardens or as border plants. Plant the larger ones in perennial gardens where other plants will hide the yellowing foliage. They make wonderful cut flowers. Allium ‘Gladiator’ 3-4´ A very tall stem supports the tightly formed, softball-sized, bluish to lilac-purple flower head. A great sculptural effect in the garden. Blooms in late May–early June. A. ‘Globemaster’ 2-3´ This is the biggest of them all! It has a 10˝ globe of silvery pinkish-purple florets that last up to a month in early June. A. ‘Graceful’ 12-16˝ This delightful new introduction features 3˝ globe-shaped blossoms that are composed of white to pale pink florets with darker stamens. Blooms in late May–early June. A lovely flower and good performer in the garden.

A. ‘Silver Spring’ 26˝ These dazzling 4˝ clusters of silvery lilac-white florets with garnet-purple centers have a remarkably appealing licorice fragrance. A beautiful selection from Israel that blooms in early June. A. ‘Summer Drummer’ 6´ Perched on purple stems, these 8˝ balls of purple-and-white florets create a dramatic display and make an effective focal point in the garden. A. atropurpureum 1-2´ Very dark purple, star-shaped florets create the tennis-ballsized flower heads that appear in late May–early June. The color is so rich it often appears purple-black. Combines well with other light-colored Allium. A. caeruleum Blue Globe Onion 1½´ Delicate, true-blue, 1˝ round flower head is borne on 1-1½´ stem in late May–early June. Easily grown; divides readily and naturalizes well. Great in perennial beds and makes a wonderful cut flower. A. jesdianum ‘Early Emperor’ 24-30˝ Arriving two weeks earlier than most, these 6˝ clusters of violet-purple florets, tipped with silver-white, are sure to please.

Bloom periods may vary based upon weather and individual site conditions.

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A. moly ‘Jeannine’ Lily Leek 1´ This selection has two 3˝ clusters of long-lasting, brightyellow, starlike flowers on 1´ stems in late May–early June. It has been grown in Southern Europe for centuries to bring good luck and prosperity. This variety will perform well in partial shade. Very effective when planted among ground covers, it eventually develops into a broad clump about 1´ tall. A. schubertii Schubert Onion 2´ In June, the uniquely beautiful spheres created by pale-rose florets sit on several stems varying in length from 18-24˝. The striking, airy flowers are ideal for cutting. Although this is a non-hardy variety, it will often overwinter if planted in a welldrained, sheltered location with winter protection. You can also dig and store the bulb for spring planting. Blooms in late May–early June. A. sphaerocephalon Drumstick Onion 2-3’ The rich burgundy florets of this selection form a tight oval blossom about 1˝ in diameter. The unusual flowers are very long lasting and emerge in late May-early June, creating an eye-catching display. One of the most reliable of all allium. A. unifolium Oneleaf Onion 1-1½´ Domed 2˝ clusters of pink to lavender-pink bell-shaped flowers appear on 1-1½´ stems atop grasslike foliage in June. This native prefers moist soils.

Narcissus ‘ Golden Echo’

Narcissus

Daffodil

Nothing can compare to a host of daffodils as a joyful and cheerful harbinger of spring. Due to their unique combination of beauty, versatility, and durability, daffodils are one of the best-loved perennials. All varieties are resistant to disease and unpalatable to most pests (especially deer and squirrels). Daffodils prefer well-drained soil and thrive in full sun to partial shade. They are ideal for naturalizing. Once established, they will bloom radiantly and reliably for many years with very little care. We have researched at great length the diversity of all 13 divisions of daffodils. We have traveled to Holland and Virginia to select those cultivars that perform brilliantly while giving you the most eye appeal. We are proud to present some of the finest varieties from some of the best growers and breeders in the world.

Blends The Woman’s Board is pleased to offer four blends of daffodil bulbs that provide excellent selections for naturalizing, superior fragrance, extended bloom time and pink flowers. Let us do the work of creating just the right mix for you! Naturalizing Meadow – A wonderful selection of smaller daffodils—perfect for naturalizing. 14-18�� (100 bulbs) Fragrant Meadow –You’ll be glad you planted this selection of fragrant daffodils when they bloom from late winter to midspring. (100 bulbs) All Spring Mix – A terrific mix of 15 daffodils, this blend provides 12 weeks of glorious blooms from early to late spring. 10-20˝ (100 bulbs)

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Pink Sensation –‘Bell Song’, ‘Capree Elizabeth’, ‘Chromacolor’, ‘Katie Heath’, ‘Pink Wonder’. (50 bulbs)

Division I—Trumpet Daffodils One flower per stem with a cup (corona) that is as long as or longer than the petals (perianth segments). Trumpets are best used as bedding plants to create a focal impact. Narcissus ‘Dutch Master’ – Early to Midseason 18˝ This historic bulb heralds a tall yellow bloom with a deepgolden trumpet. Good for forcing or naturalizing. N. ‘Goblet’ – Midseason 16-18˝ This award-winning bicolor has a partially overlapping, glistening white perianth and a trumpet-shaped, brilliant goldenyellow cup with a ruffled edge. The cup pales to lemon yellow as it matures. N. ‘Honey Bird’ – Midseason 18-20˝ A glowing, pastel yellow flower with a cup that eventually matures to creamy white with a bright yellow rim. At maturity, the base of the cup is surrounded by a halo. N. ‘Lorikeet’ – Midseason 16-20˝ Soft yellow petals with a halo at the base make a glowing background for a long, flaring, salmon-pink trumpet. N. ‘Marieke’ – Early to Midseason 18-24˝ Z This large, showy, upward-facing golden-yellow flower has a green eye. An excellent selection for massing or forcing. Exceptionally floriferous! N. ‘Rijnveld’s Early Sensation’ – Very Early 12-14˝ This lovely yellow flower is just a shade darker at the tip of the cup. This is the earliest trumpet to bloom, often in February, and is easily forced.

N. ‘Avalon’ – Midseason to Late 14-16˝ Its substance and perfect form make this a sturdy, long-lasting, blueribbon winner. The yellow petals take on a buff hue with time, and the cup turns pure white as it matures. N. ‘Bantam’ – Midseason 8-13˝ This pretty, smaller flower has nicely formed overlapping petals and a yellow-orange cup rimmed in darker orange, almost red. Wonderful in containers. N. ‘Capree Elizabeth’ – Midseason to Late. 14-16˝ The coral-pink trumpet of this charming flower is surrounded by a white halo on buttercup-yellow petals—an appealing and unusual color combination. N. ‘Carlton’ – Midseason 14-16˝ Z This large, clear-yellow daffodil is a superb English introduction. It’s a vigorous and reliable selection that perennializes well and has a lovely vanilla fragrance. N. ‘Chromacolor’ – Midseason to Late 14-16˝ A knockout with pure-white petals and a very large, deep coral-pink cup. The color deepens inside the cup.

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N. ‘Fellows Favorite’ – Early to Midseason 12-16˝ Z Long-lasting yellow to yellow-orange flowers that are strong and sweetly fragrant make this a winning selection from Brent and Becky Heath. Named for Fellows Riverside Gardens in Youngstown, Ohio. N. ‘Fragrant Breeze’ – Midseason 18˝ Z The milky-white petals of this 4˝ bloom surround a cup that opens orange then fades to a rich, buff yellow. In warm weather the cup may continue to open, becoming almost flat against the petals. A wonderfully showy and sweetly fragrant selection.

Division II—Large-Cupped Daffodils One flower per stem with a cup (corona) that is more than one-third, but less than equal, to the length of the petals (perianth segments). These varieties are good for bedding, cutting, naturalizing, and forcing.

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N. ‘Fragrant Rose’ – Late 16-18˝ This perfectly formed flower has overlapping waxy petals of ivory, a reddish-pink cup, and a greenish-white eye. Its fragrance is similar to a rose, with just a hint of raspberry.

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N. ‘Gigantic Star’ – Early to Midseason 18-24˝ Z This is one of the finest giant yellow daffodils available—a long-lasting perennial with a fragrance similar to vanilla. N. ‘Ice Follies’ – Early to Midseason 16-18˝ The creamy white petals of this beautiful flower surround a very broad, “wide-open˝ yellow cup that matures to pure white. A long-term perennial and good forcer! N. ‘Misty Glen’ – Midseason to Late 16-18˝ One of the finest white daffodils, the excellent form of this selection is difficult to surpass. Wonderful for bedding and a superb cut flower. N. ‘Peridot’ – Late 14-16˝ Surrounded by sparkling white petals, the cup of this lovely daffodil is yellow with a green eye and a slightly darker rim. A great choice for any garden!

N. ‘Jamestown’ – Midseason to Late 14-17˝ The bright white petals of this beautiful daffodil surround a bowl-shaped, golden-yellow cup with an orange-edged, frilled rim, and a glowing-green center. N. ‘Mint Julep’ – Midseason to Late 16-18˝ An incredible charmer, this flower features very pale yellow, rounded, overlapping petals and a beautifully formed greenish-yellow cup. N. ‘Royal Princess’ – Late 14-16˝ This elegant flower is composed of pure white petals surrounding a frilled cup with a small green eye and a butterscotchorange rim.

Division IV—Double Daffodils These flowers look like roses. They are lovely when used for bedding and cutting. The large flowers hold best when provided with protection from heavy winds and rain.

Division III—Small-Cupped Daffodils One flower per stem with a cup (corona) that is not more than one-third the length of the petals (perianth segments). These selections are long-lasting perennials good for naturalizing and bedding.

N. ‘Bridal Crown’ – Midseason to Late 14-16˝ Z This multiflowering white and saffron-colored selection has three to six flowers per stem. One of the earliest doubles to bloom, this incredibly fragrant daffodil is a great forcer.

N. ‘Altruist’ – Late 14-18˝ The shallow crimson-orange cup and the yellow-orange petals of this stunning flower lighten slightly as they mature. A dazzling and award-winning selection.

N. ‘Double Smiles’ – Midseason 10-14˝ The whorls of vivid yellow petals and delightful fragrance of this gorgeous, full flower will bring a smile to your face and lift your spirit!

N. ‘Birma’ – Early 16-18˝ Deep yellow petals surround the vivid orange-red cup of this dazzling selection. Excellent for perennializing. Performs best when sited in partial shade.

N. ‘Replete’ – Midseason to Late 18-20˝ This large, 4˝ double flower has a soft salmon-pink center is surrounded by creamy white petals. Blossoms stand tall over slender foliage and work well in containers and as cut flowers.

N. ‘Goose Green’ – Midseason 12-16˝ Z The white petals of this Irish awardwinner surround a bright yellow cup with a green eye. A great performer in the garden with a spicy-sweet fragrance.

N. ‘Sweet Pomponette’ – Midseason 18˝ Z A bright and cheery choice, the lemon-yellow, double cup of this flower is encircled by petals slightly lighter in color. Sweet fragrance is a bonus!

Bloom periods may vary based upon weather and individual site conditions.

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N. ‘Tahiti’ – Midseason to Late 14-16˝ The large, long-lasting, beautifully shaped flowers are soft sulphur-yellow with bright orange-red inner segments. This showy flower has particularly strong stems. N. ‘Wave’ – Midseason 16-18˝ The white petals of this stunning selection embrace a frilly lemon-yellow cup with snow-white highlights, suggesting the foam made by splashing waves. N. ‘Yellow Cheerfulness’ – Late 14-16˝ Each stem of this 1937 heirloom holds two to three soft, primrose-yellow, double flowers that have a touch of orange at the center.

Division V—Triandrus Daffodils Two to three nodding or pendulous flowers per stem. All have flowers with a fruity fragrance. These graceful varieties are good for bedding, rock gardens, cutting, and containers. N. ‘Katie Heath’ – Midseason 12-14˝ This is a precious, perfectly formed, long-lasting selection with pure-white petals that surround a lovely pink cup. Introduced by Brent and Becky Heath and named in honor of Brent’s mother. N. ‘Lemon Drops’ – Midseason 12-24˝ These downward-facing, soft yellow flowers have a cup that is slightly darker than the surrounding petals. Three to four flowers per stem. N. ‘Stint’ – Midseason 12-14˝ Z This floriferous selection features two to three pendulous, lemony-yellow flowers per stem. A wonderful choice for massing. Z N. ‘Thalia’ – Midseason to Late 12-14˝ An heirloom outward-facing flower and one of the few that opens pure white with up to five flowers per stem.

Division VI—Cyclamineus Daffodils The graceful, trumpetlike cup (corona) has flared petals (perianth segments). The foliage is small and low growing. These are very early flowering and perform well in borders and containers. They are also good for naturalizing and forcing.

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N. ‘Itzim’ – Midseason to Late 10-12˝ The deep yellow petals of this delightful miniature sweep back gracefully from the deep orange-red, trumpet-shaped cup. Plant masses of this long-lasting award-winner and watch your spring garden take flight. N. ‘Jack Snipe’ – Early 8-10˝ Reflexed, creamy white petals that blend to yellow at the base surround the buttercup-yellow trumpet of this early bloomer. N. ‘Jetfire’ – Early to Midseason 12-14˝ A lovely, prolific variety with very reflexed, deep yellow petals that frame the bright red-orange cup. This reliable selection has a great substance and form. One of the best to perennialize. N. ‘Prototype’ – Midseason 10-14˝ A rose-pink trumpet surrounded by reflexed greenish-yellow petals make this a charming and unusual flower. N. ‘Rapture’ – Early 12-14˝ This nodding yellow-on-yellow daffodil with flared petals resembles a shooting star.

Division VII—Jonquilla Daffodils Many small flowers per stem, with a honeysuckle or jasmine fragrance. The dark-green, reedlike foliage is finer than that of most daffodils. These varieties thrive in hot summers. They are good for naturalizing, bedding, and cutting.. N. ‘Bell Song’ – Late 12-14˝ This strong-growing American-bred variety is white with a very smooth salmon-pink cup. It has a delicate sweet fragrance.

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N. ‘Golden Echo’ – Midseason 12-16˝ Z The bright golden-yellow, long trumpet-shaped cup of this flower runs right into creamy white petals. Terrific fragrance. Ideal for pots.

N. ‘Hillstar’ – Midseason to Late 14-16˝ Yielding two to three flowers per stem, this showstopper has bright lemon-yellow petals and a buff-white halo around the base of the ivory cup.

Division IX—Poeticus Daffodils

N. ‘Pueblo’ – Midseason 12-14˝ Z This exquisite flower features a pale yellow cup surrounded by petals that open pale lemon-yellow and lighten over time to a lovely ivory-white. Floriferous and fragrant: an unbeatable combination!

N. ‘Actaea’ – Midseason to Late 14-16˝ Beautiful white rounded petals surround a yellow cup that has a dark red rim. This wonderful heirloom from 1927 was named for one of King Solomon’s concubines.

N. ‘Quail’ – Midseason 12-14˝ Z This is one of the most prolific of all daffodils. It has two to four deep golden-yellow flowers per stem.

N. ‘Angel Eyes’ – Late 12-14˝ The cup of this lovely flower, rimmed in red-orange with a green center, stands out beautifully against the surrounding bright-white petals.

N. ‘Sweet Love’ – Midseason 14-16˝ Z This Brent Heath hybrid is ivory white with wavy, ivoryedged, butter-yellow cups that mature to ivory with yellow throats. N. ‘Sweetness’ – Midseason 12-14˝ Z A spectacular variety with very fragrant golden-yellow flowers. This prolific grower quickly naturalizes and often produces a secondary bloom cycle. It responds well to forcing and is great in containers.

Division VIII—Tazetta Daffoldils Many flowers per stem with a musky-sweet fragrance. These are excellent perennializers and are great for bedding, cutting, and forcing. This division contains a subgroup of nonhardy tazettas. These cultivars can be forced without a cold period. N. ‘Avalanche’ – Midseason 16-18˝ Each stem produces a cascade of sweetly fragrant, yellow-andwhite flowers. This long-lasting selection is thought to be a cultivar of the eighteenth-century heirloom ‘Seventeen Sisters’. A favorite in the perennial garden, this selection is also easily forced indoors. Narcissus ‘Canaliculatus’ – Early to Midseason 4-6˝ Z This tazetta is a miniature, with up to seven flowers per stem. The fragrant flowers have white petals and a yellow cup. N. ‘Falconett’ – Midseason 12-14˝ Z A dazzling flower, this selection features clear yellow petals surrounding an orange cup. Expect up to five fragrant flowers per stem. Works well in both borders and containers.

These have flowers with a red-rimmed yellow cup (corona) and white petals (perianth segments). They all have a spicy fragrance. Perfect for naturalizing, borders, and cutting.

Z N. ‘Felindre’ – Midseason 12-15˝ The pristine white petals of this Welsh heirloom surround a broad cup with a ruffled red edge and yellow center band that fades into a rich green eye. A fragrant selection that won’t disappoint!

Division XI—Split-Corona Daffodils The cup (corona) of the flower is split for at least one-third of its length. The large, upward-facing blooms make this one of the showiest types of daffodils. Excellent when used in mass plantings and as cut flowers. This division contains a subgroup called the papillion, or “butterfly˝ types. They have a sunburst of color that radiates outward from the center of the cup (corona). N. ‘Blazing Starlet’ – Early to Midseason 13-16˝ A gorgeous flower with lemon-yellow petals and an overlying, split, vivid-yellow cup that has frilled, golden-orange edges. N. ‘Parisienne’ – Midseason 14˝ Pure white petals encircle a split, ruffled, orange cup that may have a touch of white or yellow at the margin. N. ‘Pink Wonder’ – Midseason 16-18˝ The ruffled, peachy-pink cup of this stunning and unusual selection is split and layered between whorls of creamy white petals making it a sensational addition to borders and a wonderful cut flower. N. ‘Sorbet’ – Midseason to Late 14-16˝ Lush, white petals surround a split yellow cup with a green eye and scarlet–orange accents.

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N. ‘Trepolo’ – Midseason to Late 14-18˝ This eye-catching flower features a split orange cup that creates an explosion of color above pure white petals. Plant in mass for a dramatic display, or in smaller clumps to highlight a spring border.

Division XIII—Botanical Daffodils These types are distinguished solely by botanical name. N. albus plenus odoratus – Late 12-14˝ Z This extremely fragrant, double, pure-white variety has flowers that resemble a gardenia. N. jonquilla simplex – Late 10-12˝ Z An heirloom grown since the mid-1700s, this daffodil produces several small golden-yellow, side-facing flowers with small cups. Sweetly fragrant.

N. ‘Segovia’ – Div. III Midseason 6˝ Glistening white petals reflex slightly at the tips to provide a perfect foil for its delicate, clear-yellow cup. A prolific selection, it is a blue-ribbon winner. N. ‘Small Talk’ – Div. III Early to Midseason 4-6˝ A sweet, early-blooming selection with delicate petals and a long, stove-pipe cup. N. ‘Toto’ – Div. XII Midseason to Late 4-6˝ Each stem holds numerous precious little flowers with pristine-white petals and a straight yellow cup that matures to creamy white. Bloom periods may vary based upon weather and individual site conditions.

N. obvallaris – Early 8-10˝ This golden-yellow flower with a broad, upward-facing trumpet looks like a baby ‘King Alfred’. An heirloom from before 1800, it forces easily. N. x odorus flore pleno – Early 10-12˝ Z A beautiful yellow hybrid, this features fragrant double flowers. Each stem holds two to three blooms.

Other—Miniature Daffodils N. ‘Baby Moon’ – Div. VII Midseason to Late 4-8˝ Petite and pretty! Grasslike foliage with quarter-sized, sweetly fragrant, golden-yellow flower. Perfect for rock gardens and containers. N. ‘Hawera’ – Div. V Midseason to Late 8˝ This heirloom charmer is loaded with long-lasting, fragrant, pale-yellow flowers. Petals are slightly swept back and present a paler, cup-shaped crown. Very adaptable—thrives in partial shade or full sun, naturalizes well, and is also a good forcer. An all-around winner! N. ‘Minnow’ – Div. VIII Midseason 5-6˝ Z This variety has four to five fragrant flowers with white or yellow petals and tiny buttercup-yellow cups. The dainty flowers give an impressive display in containers.

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Tulipa ‘Sweetheart’

Tulipa Tulip The stars of the garden in April and May, tulips, with their wide range of colors and sizes, are some of the most versatile of ornamental plants. They are great when used in perennial borders, city gardens, and containers. Since most varieties thrive for only a few years, gardeners should treat tulips as short-lived perennials. However, there are a number of varieties that perform exceptionally well year after year. We have selected several of these perennial tulips and they are noted in the descriptions below. Tulips grow best in full sun (some will adapt to partial shade) and well-drained soil. They will not tolerate over watering during their dormancy. Plant 6-8˝ deep. We have listed the varieties alphabetically by type. Each description lists the name, type, season of bloom and height, followed by a brief description.

Blends Each spring the Chicago Botanic Garden is brimming with delightful displays of tulips designed by talented members of the Garden’s staff. The Woman’s Board is pleased to offer the bulb combinations from three of their favorite displays conveniently packaged for easy layout and planting. The Garden Blends contain ten bulbs of each variety. When planted together, they provide a long-lasting parade of beautiful blooms. Recreate a piece of the Garden in your own back yard! The Crescent –‘Havran’, ‘Passionale’, ‘Shirley’. Learning Campus – ‘Gavota’, Golden Parade’, ‘Negrita’, ‘Yellow Present’. Rose Garden – ‘Angelique’, ‘Christina van Kooten’, ‘Maureen’, ‘Van Eijk’.

Single Early Types These single-flowering varieties are among the earliest to bloom. Since they open earlier in spring, the flowers tend to hold longer than those of later-flowering varieties. They have strong and durable stems and flowers, many of which are fragrant. Use in borders, containers, or for forcing. Tulipa ‘Beauty Queen’ 16˝ Z A true beauty, the flowers of this stunning award-winner are an artful blend of apricot, salmon and rose pink. Lightly fragrant. T. ‘Purple Prince’ 14˝ The slightly scalloped petals of this lovely tulip are lilac-purple on the outside with a rich purple interior.

Double Early Types These are long-lasting, early flowering selections with blossoms that resemble a peony or rose. They are typically shortstemmed and very sturdy. Excellent for beds and borders, containers, and forcing. T. ‘Foxtrot’ 10-12˝ Multiple shades of rose combine to create this lovely, fully double blossom. Ideal in combination plantings, it blends well with many colors.

T. ‘Montreux’ 16˝ This soft yellow flower typically takes on a reddish glow as it matures. A stunning and beautiful color combination.

Single Late Types Formerly referred to as cottage tulips, these are great for borders, beds, and cutting. T. ‘Bleu Aimable’ 36˝ Shades of lilac with tinges of blue make this award-winning flower an unusual and appealing selection. T. ‘Dordogne’ 18-24˝ Beautiful and somewhat variable, the petals of this award winner are a delightful blend of rose, nasturtiumred, and soft orange. Paint your border with masses of this charming flower. T. ‘Kingsblood’ 30˝ A beautiful flower with cherry-red flowers and scarlet edges. Like other single-late tulips, the flowers have a single row of petals and long stems, making them excellent cut flowers. T. ‘La Courtine’ 26˝ This selection has a striking yellow, oval-shaped flower with red flames extending from the base. T. ‘Maureen’ 26˝ The creamy white, oval-shaped flowers of this tulip make it both a stunning and versatile selection. Works equally well in large mass plantings and smaller, more intimate spaces, and combines easily with other colors. T. ‘Queen of Night’ 24˝ Deep velvety-maroon hues characterize these elegant flowers that add shadows to a sunny garden. Looks beautiful with Narcissus ‘Thalia’.

Bloom periods may vary based upon weather and individual site conditions.

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Double Late Types These are late-flowering double flowers that resemble peonies and roses. They are wonderful anywhere in the garden and are great for cutting. T. ‘Angelique’ 16˝ This exquisite blush-pink flower is flushed with shades of pink, white, and sometimes creamy yellow. The petals are ruffled and gracefully incurved in this fragrant and beloved selection. T. ‘Belicia’ 10-12˝ A dazzling double flower that has white petals outlined in reddish pink. These exceptional flowers deserve a special place in the border. T. ‘Black Hero’ 20˝ This stunning sport of ‘Queen of the Night’ is fully double. The rich, glossy, nearly black flowers are unique. T. ‘Crème Upstar’ 14˝ Z One of the loveliest and most fragrant tulips in existence. The flowers are variable in color and have creamy to pale-yellow petals wrapped with cream and pink overlays. All of the colors intensify as the flowers mature. Simply magnificent! T. ‘Mount Tacoma’ 16˝ The beautiful pinkish-green buds of this flower open to longlasting, creamy white flowers. T. ‘Sun Lover’ 18˝ These outstanding large, double flowers burst into shades of golden yellow, with orange-red accents. A dazzling and vigorous selection that won’t disappoint.

T. ‘Big Smile’ 26˝ You’ll be all smiles when you see how well this large, bright yellow tulip performs in the garden! A longlasting flower that combines well with other late-blooming selections.

T. ‘Gavota’ – Midseason 12-18˝ These maroon blooms have a vibrant-yellow edge and are held on sturdy stems which can withstand most spring storms and winds. T. ‘Havran’ – Midseason 26˝ The striking and sumptuous, dark purple to crimson shades of this flower will bring a dramatic flourish to your garden. For a dazzling display, combine with whites and pinks. T. ‘Negrita’ – Midseason 16˝ This reddish-purple flower with beetroot-purple veins is great in masses or combined with other, contrasting colors—an excellent mixer! T. ‘Passionale’ – Midseason 16˝ You’ll be passionate about these large, lilac-purple flowers with deeper purple flames. The interior is beetroot-purple with a yellow base. Strong stems make this an excellent cut flower. T. ‘Shirley’ – Midseason 20˝ These charming flowers are composed of ivory-white petals edged and splashed, in varying degrees, with shades of purple and lavender. For best effect, plant in drifts. T. ‘White Dream’ 18-20˝ An exceptional ivory-white tulip, this sturdy selection makes an excellent forcer and cut flower.

Triumph Types This is the largest group of tulips with the widest range of colors. The flowers are on strong stems of medium height and are slightly smaller than the Darwin types. These are the best tulips for forcing and work well in borders and containers. T. ‘Atlantis’ – Late 18-26˝ Large flower heads of amethyst-violet petals with broad white to cream margins make this a sensational selection. Plant in masses for an impressive display. Also an excellent cut flower, and readily forced. An all-around winner!

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T. ‘Yellow Present’ – Midseason 14˝ The petals of this sweet flower combine a soft yellow exterior with a canary-yellow interior for a lovely overall effect. Both stems and flowers are very strong.

Darwin Types

Lily Flowered Types

Among the most versatile of varieties, these are perfect for naturalizing, borders, cutting, and forcing. They are very coldand drought tolerant. The brilliant flowers are long-lasting on strong stems and hold up well against wind and weather. These are regarded as the longest-lasting perennial tulips.

This late-flowering favorite has reflexing, curving petals. Lily-flowered tulips are known for their tall, strong stems and elegant blooms. Great for containers.

T. ‘Apricot Impression’ – Midseason 20˝ A lustrous flower with varying shades of smoldering tangerineorange, nasturtium-red and persimmon, with a warm pink glow.

T. ‘Christina van Kooten’ – Late 22˝ These striking flowers have deep rose outer petals with creamyellow flames brushed with rose. The overall marbled effect is captivating. T. ‘Marilyn’ – Midseason 22˝ Beautiful white arching petals are splashed with red at the base.

T. ‘Burning Heart’ – Midseason 20˝ Striking award-winner with flowers that are ivory white with red flames on the exterior and soft yellow with red flames on the interior. T. ‘Cash’ – Early to Midseason 20˝ This sensational flower has sunshine-yellow to gold petals that are splashed with red to rose flames. Plant masses of this bold newcomer and set your garden on fire! T. ‘Comeback’ – Midseason 18˝○ The name could not be more appropriate! This variety, with its deep blood-red flower accented with a tiny green base, is said to be the most reliable tulip in the garden. You can be assured of years of enjoyment from this great perennializer. T. ‘Daydream’ – Midseason 20˝ Z Opening clear yellow, the color of this lovely flower gradually transforms into soft apricot-orange with a touch of rose. Mass plantings will show multiple colors at one time. Mildly fragrant. T. ‘Golden Parade’ – Midseason 24˝ These radiant buttercup-yellow flowers that have a yellow interior with a black base will light up your spring garden. It’s easy to see why this tulip is an award winner! T. ‘Van Eijk’ – Midseason 22˝ Create an impressive display with this robust and prolific rosy-pink tulip. A long-flowering selection, this is an excellent choice for any garden.

T. ‘Purple Dream’ – Midseason to Late 18-20˝ An elegant flower with rich purple petals that arch outward to reveal a white base. T. ‘Red Shine’ – Midseason 24˝ The deep, velvety-red petals of this flamelike tulip will set your garden on fire! T. ‘West Point’ – Late 20˝ Z These dazzling, primrose-yellow flowers with deeply flared petals will call out to you from across the garden! An heirloom selection that is also very fragrant.

Fringed Types Similar to parrot tulips but less frilly, they are edged in crispy, short, spiky fringes. Most flower late in the season. They are best used in the garden and for cutting, but do not force easily. T. ‘Fancy Frills’ – Late 18˝ These striking pink tulips have a splash of white on each petal and a finely ruffled edge. T. ‘Lambada’ – Late 16-22˝ The petals of this variety are slightly more pointed than other fringed tulips and fade from orange to yellow.

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Viridiflora Types These single late-flowering varieties are green with one or more secondary flower colors. They are striking and will add character to any spot in the garden. These long-blooming varieties are great as cut flowers and typically do not force easily. T. ‘China Town’ – Late 10-14˝ This stunner features bright, clear-pink flowers marked with moss-green feathering. Rich green foliage is edged in creamy pink. T. ‘Formosa’ – Late 16˝ These golden-yellow flowers have a prominent, broad, feathered green stripe down the center of the petal.

T. k. ‘Ice Stick’ – Early 6-10˝ The petals of these eye-catching flowers have a white interior and dark red to purplish exterior, and surround a yellow heart. Striking and best planted in masses.

Fosteriana Types These early-blooming flowers are typically large and also quite long-lived. Broad green to gray-green foliage is often mottled or striped for additional interest. T. ‘Flaming Purissima’ – Early 16˝ This extremely showy variety has a rich cream flower streaked with pink to raspberry-red hues. Rather variable in coloration, it provides a perfect all-in-one color-coordinated mixture.

T. ‘Spring Green’ – Late 18˝ An elegant, waxy, white flower with soft-green feathering down the center of each petal.

T. ‘Orange Emperor’ – Early 14˝ A lovely selection, this has pure orange flowers with a yellow base that flushes upward. A dramatic flower that mixes well with others.

Parrot Types The heavily fringed and scalloped petals are multicolored and showy. Superb when used in beds, borders, and containers. Excellent as cut flowers. T. ‘Apricot Parrot’ – Late 18˝ Z A lovely rose, apricot, and yellow flower delicately flecked with green, this fragrant flower is a novelty in the garden or a smashing addition to an arrangement.

T. ‘Sweetheart’ – Early 14˝ This wonderful variety is a delicious combination of colors. It has a yellow base that feathers up into the creamy white petal edges. Simply delightful!

Greigii Types T. ‘Carmine Parrot’ – Late 18˝ A fabulous combination of carmine and cherry-red is accentuated by a blue heart. It has great substance and is very long lasting. Absolutely stunning!

These are known for their striking purple-striped foliage. The large chalice-shaped flowers open wide to reveal interior colors. They perennialize well and are perfect companions for midseason daffodils.

T. ‘Cream Lizard’ – Midseason to Late 12-16˝ The outer petals of this delightful primrose-yellow parrot tulip are brushed with cream and have a pink tinge.

T. ‘Oratorio’ – Early 8-12˝ These superb, deep-rose flowers with an orange-pink interior and black base are well balanced by green leaves with purple variegation. A lovely, harmonious composition!

Kaufmanniana Types These long-lived, low-growing perennial tulips flower very early in spring. The flowers usually open flat and wide, like a water lily. Great in rock gardens, beds, borders, and containers.

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T. ‘Professor de Monsseri’ – Midseason 10-12˝ The long, primrose-yellow petals of these flowers are lighter at the margins with brilliant red tips and an interior lemonyellow base. The dazzling display is complemented by slightly mottled foliage.

T. ‘Quebec’ – Midseason 14˝ A multiflowering delight, this selection has rosy-red flowers edged in cream. The excellent blend of colors combines well with other bulbs.

Species Types These are often the first tulips to bloom in spring. Originally found in the wild, they are now in cultivation. Good for rock gardens, borders, naturalizing, and containers. Provide an area with rich, well-drained soils. T. bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’ – Early to Midseason 8˝ Soft lilac-pink, star-shaped flowers open wide and almost lie flat, and have a large bright-yellow center. “I planted this next to a walkway in the midst of pachysandra. The flowers looked beautiful floating above the green ground cover. I’m definitely planting dozens more!˝ — Lee Randhava

Anemone blanda ‘Blue Shades’

Specialty Bulbs T. clusiana ‘Lady Jane’ – Midseason 6-7˝ This unique selection has striking flowers with alternating, overlapping red-and-white petals creating a candy-stick-like appearance. A vigorous tulip that will perennialize easily. T. c. chrysantha ‘Tubergen’s Gem’ – Midseason 8-10˝ An award winner, this flower is brick red outside and bright canary yellow inside. The striking contrast in color is very dramatic in mass plantings. T. humilis ‘Persian Pearl’ – Early 6˝ This marvelous, early spring bloomer features magenta-rose flowers with interior buttercup-yellow stars. Exterior of petals have a silvery-gray flush. T. tarda – Early 4˝ The interior is white with a big yellow center. These tulips form colonies and are perfect for naturalizing.

While these varieties are categorized as specialty bulbs, they are some of the easiest and most reliable to grow.

Anemone

Anemone/Windflower Daisylike flowers are perfect under early tulips, daffodils, and woody plants. They prefer to be sited in bright shade and will adapt to most soil conditions. Free from pest and wildlife problems, they are good for forcing in small pots. Soak the tubers overnight before planting them on their sides. We recommend planting in quantities of at least 25 for an effective display. Plant 4˝ deep and 2˝ apart.

Anemone blanda ‘Blue Shades’ 3-4˝ These wonderfully rich, pale to dark blue flowers have yellow centers and bloom in April–May. A. b. ‘Mix’ 6˝ Cute, colorful, carefree, daisylike blooms appear in a mix of hot pink, pure white, and deep purple. They naturalize easily to provide a welcome spring spectacle year after year. A. b. ‘White Splendour’ 3-4˝ Featuring a pure-white flower with a yellow center, this variety is the best perennializer. Bellevalia pycantha 7-8˝ This intriguing Muscari lookalike has dense spikes of blueblack flowers with narrow greenish-yellow margins, and it blooms in April–May. Combine these captivating flowers with cream/white or pink tulips for astonishing spring displays.

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Calochortus

Fairy Lantern

This unusual selection with swordlike foliage and striking, bowl-shaped flowers blooms in late spring to early summer. Needs well-drained soils and does not like freezing and thawing; protection with winter mulch is advised. Annual fertilization is beneficial to success. Perfect for bedding; long lasting as cut flowers. Plant 4˝ deep. Calochortus ‘Cupido’ 3-5˝ º A tiny, soft-violet flower resembles the butterfly for which it was named.

Camassia

Wild Hyacinth

Tall spikes of many starlike florets appear in May–June. These varieties will naturalize and thrive, and are adaptable to the heavy clay soils of the Chicago area. Stunning when placed in a border or at a pond edge. This native plant was used as food by early Native Americans. Plant 5˝ deep. Camassia cusickii Light, metallic-blue, star-shaped flowers.

28-32˝

C. f. ‘Pink Giant’ 6-8˝ An unusual, slightly larger form with up to ten starlike, blushed-pink flowers per stem in March–April. C. luciliae 12˝ These vibrant blue flowers with a somewhat lighter center “pop” in the garden. Each bulb produces many stems. Naturalizes well. C. luciliae ‘Violet Beauty’ 3-5˝ The violet-pink color of these flowers becomes lighter toward the center, creating a lovely luminous effect. A good choice for naturalizing.

Colchicum

The flowers appear in September–October and the foliage in the spring. Plant these 4” deep immediately upon receiving them. They are beautiful when interplanted with ground covers, are pest-free, and will readily naturalize. An unexpected surprise in the fall, these giant blooms will add dramatic color to your garden.

C. leichtinii ‘Caerulea’ 32˝ Lavendar-blue, starry flowers with six petals and tall, leafless spikes.

Colchicum ‘Lilac Wonder’ 8˝ The very large, goblet-shaped flower has narrow amethystviolet petals with white lines in the center. One of the most free- flowering varieties.

C. quamash 1-2´ Long racemes of rich, deep-blue-violet flowers sparked by contrasting bright-golden stamens top the grasslike foliage. Lovely for cutting.

C. ‘Waterlily’ Double, lilac-pink flower.

6-8˝

C. autumnale ‘Album’ A prolific bloomer, this has lovely white flowers.

4-6˝

C. q. ‘Blue Melody’ 1-2´ Similar to the preceding, this selection has very attractive green and golden-yellow variegated foliage.

Crocus Chionodoxa

Glory of the Snow

Extremely hardy, this is one of the first bulbs to bloom. It produces brilliant starlike flowers with white centers. Very attractive when used with Scilla and Muscari in a woodland setting, these plants will easily colonize. Plant 4˝ deep. Matures to 6˝. C. forbesii ‘Blue Giant’ 8˝ The abundant, starry blue flowers are sure to brighten up your garden in early spring. Highly wildlife resistant.

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Autumn Crocus

Fall Crocus

Flowering at a time in the fall when there is little in bloom, these fill an important spot in the garden. Fall crocuses are best planted in protected, sunny locations like a rock or herb garden. Crocus kotschyanus 4˝ Lilac, goblet-shaped flowers with yellow centers appear in autumn before their leaves. Plant immediately, like Colchicum.

C. speciosus ‘Cassiope’ 3-5˝ A late autumn bloomer, these aniline-blue flowers that have a yellow base are a delightful way to mark the end of the season, and they mix well with other fall- blooming perennials. Plant immediately, like Colchicum.

Crocus

Spring Crocus

These wonderful bulbs herald the end of winter. They often bloom just as the snow melts, before winter finally retreats. These are perfect wherever you want color in very early spring—ideal when planted in rock gardens, tucked between perennials in the border or under trees and shrubs, or interplanted in ground covers. Good for naturalizing. The grasslike foliage will die back by late spring. An added bonus is the ease with which these plants can be forced. Plant 4˝ deep.
 Crocus chrysanthus ‘Lady Killer’ 3-4˝ The petals of this early bloomer are purple with white edges on the outside and white inside. The dramatic color combination works well when planted in quantities or in combination with other purple-and-white cultivars. Crocus chrysanthus ‘Prince Claus’ The white flowers of this charming, early-blooming crocus have blue patches and are edged in white. The interior is white with a spattering of blue. C. flavus ‘Yellow Mammoth’ 5˝ This rich, golden-yellow gem will create brilliant, sunny tapestries on your lawn. C. sieberi ‘Firefly’ 4-6˝ Soft, blush-pink with a bold yellow center, this early bunchflowering crocus multiplies rapidly and blooms quite early.

C. t. ‘Mix’ A delightful mix of the three Tommy crocus bulbs are offered here: Crocus tommasinianus, C. t. ‘Lilac Beauty’, and C. t. ‘Roseus’. C. t. ‘Roseus’ 3-6˝ This beautiful selection has violet-rose petals with a tiny white heart accented with yellow stamens. Flower petals of this variety separate completely when fully open. C. vernus Large-Flowering Crocus This is the familiar giant crocus that makes a good companion for early tulips and daffodils. C. v. ‘Jeanne d ’Arc’ Pure white flowers with a bright orange pistil.

C. v. ‘Pickwick’ 4-6˝ Lilac-and-white-striped petals with bright orange stamens. Produces about three flowers per stem. C. v. ‘Purple Fiction’ 5˝ This sensational mix features three Crocus vernus cultivars in harmonious shades of purple including ‘King of the Striped’, an amethyst-violet flower with paler stripes; ‘Grand Maitre’, a lavender-violet flower with pale margins; and ‘Flower Record’, a pale violet flower with a darker base. C. v. ‘Vanguard’ 4-6˝ The petal exterior is light lavender and the interior is rich purple. Blooms in early spring.

Eranthis hyemalis C. tommasinianus Tommy Crocus 3-6˝ A beautiful selection, this has flowers that vary from pale to deep lilac with a white center, often with silver or creamy exteriors. “Very reliable, and this species is squirrel resistant.”— Boyce Tankersley

4-5˝

Winter Aconite 3-4˝

In early spring, usually between February and April, beautiful yellow blooms are borne over a mound of rich green foliage. This is good for the border, in rock gardens, under trees and shrubs, or in woodland settings. We recommend planting en masse for the best effect. Soak tubers overnight and then plant immediately. Naturalizes in wooded areas. Plant 4” deep.

C. t. ‘Lilac Beauty’ 4˝ Narrow, soft lilac petals with a pink violet interior create a starlike effect.

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Eremurus

Foxtail Lily

An incredible plant features a tall spike of flowers in early summer. Perfect for a vertical effect or to give height to the border, it makes an excellent cut flower. Protect from strong winds. These are the stars in the border of the English Walled Garden in June. Eremurus ‘Cleopatra’ 4-5´ This creates a bright, eye-catching display, with its tall spikes of burnt-orange flowers accented with a red midrib. E. bungei (syn. E. stenophyllus) 3-6´ The bright yellow flower matures to orange, then russet brown.

Fritillaria

Fritillary

This most unusual group of plants comes in a variety of sizes and colors. They all have bell-shaped, usually pendulous, flowers. They perform best when sited in moist, rich, well-drained soils. Pest-free. Keep the bulbs moist before planting. Fritillaria imperialis ‘Lutea’ Crown Imperial 32-40˝ Clear lemon-yellow flowers bloom below a tufted “crown” of green leaves. This is the only bulb with foliage above the flowers. F. i. ‘Rubra Maxima’ 24-32˝ This classic has been on the market since 1665! Bright redorange petals. F. meleagris Guinea Hen Fritillary 6-8˝ In April–May, this selection has wonderful, nodding flowers with a faint creamy white, checkered pattern over the reddishpurple petals. It has distinctive charm and performs well in a damp location with dappled shade.

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Galanthus elwesii Giant Snowdrop 4-6˝ This vigorous plant with broad glaucous foliage is topped with enormous white flowers accented by lovely green inner segments. G. ikariae 5-8˝ Plant large clumps of these delicate white flowers that have a touch of green at the base of the inner petal. These harbingers of spring that sparkle even through a late- winter snow are always a welcome sight. G. nivalis ‘Flore Pleno’ 4-6˝ The beautiful double, bell-shaped, fragrant flower is white, tipped with spots of green. Excellent for naturalizing in woodlands.

Hyacinthoides Bluebells One of the most adaptable bulbs. Charming bell-shaped flowers in May–June hover over low-growing foliage that quickly disappears. Very attractive when mixed with late-spring tulips, hosta, and ferns. Will colonize and spread, so give them room. Hyacinthoides hispanica ‘Dainty Maid’ Spanish Bluebells 12-15˝ This award-winning selection produces abundant violet-pink flowers on strong stems. H. h. ‘Excelsior’ 8-12˝ This beautiful plant is likely the best of the species. It has the largest blossoms and most vigorous habit of all. The rich, deep blue, bell-shaped flowers flare at the edge.

F. m. ‘Alba’ 6-8˝ This variety has solitary bell-shaped flowers. White, with a barely discernible grey-green checkering.

H. non-scripta English Bluebells 8-12˝ Z The smaller and more pendant blue-violet flowers of this variety open with a heavenly fragrance on spikes about a week earlier than their Spanish relatives. This graceful English wildflower carpets the woodland floor with soft blue as it colonizes under deciduous trees across the landscape. A 1597 heirloom and a great companion to camassia, late daffodils, and species tulips.

Galanthus Snowdrop

Hyacinthus orientalis Hyacinth

One of the first to bloom in the spring, usually in February– March, these extremely hardy plants naturalize well. Plant in a mulched bed. Distasteful to deer and other wildlife. Performs best in rich, moist soils. Plant 4˝deep.

These large, fragrant, vividly colored flower spikes are a springtime favorite. Plant in rich, well-drained soil or force indoors. Flowers in mid- to late May. 8-10˝.

Hyacinthus orientalis ‘City of Harlem’ 10-12˝ Z Since 1898, this flower has been the best yellow hyacinth available on the market. The clear yellow matures to a creamy white. Mix this with several shades of blue grape hyacinths for a French country look. H. o. ‘Delft Blue’ 10˝ Z The soft, lilac-blue florets of this reliable early forcer are beautifully fragrant. H. o. ‘Gypsy Queen’ Z This unique selection has warm coral flowers highlighted with salmon and peach. Z H. o. ‘Peter Stuyvesant’ 10-12˝ This wonderful variety features rich purple flowers with deepblue highlights. The stems are bronze colored. Very fragrant. H. o. ‘Woodstock’ 8-12˝ A vivid selection, this has intense reddish-purple flowers.

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I. u. ‘Rolf Fiedler’ Striking, bright, electric-blue flower.

3-4˝

I. u. ‘White Star’ Clear white-flowering selection.

3-4˝

Iris

Dwarf Iris

Very small, early, and fragrant, these are best in rock gardens, woodlands, or the front of the border, as well as for forcing. Blooms in May. Iris bucharica Juno Iris 14-16˝ Beautiful compact flowers with white standards and clearyellow falls appear in early April.

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I. danfordiae 2-3˝ Z Brilliant yellow flowers are accented with greenish-brown spotting. Although smaller, these darlings are very vigorous.

Double Hyacinth H. o. ‘Chestnut Flower’ 12˝ Z A very floriferous, dense spike of soft-pink, double flowers are darker pink in the center. H. o. ‘Hollyhock’ 12˝ Z Double flowers bloom in a rich shade of carnation pink. Exceptional fragrance. Spikes are formed of double florets of bright raspberry-red flowers. H. o. ‘Snow Crystal’ Double ivory-white flowers.

10˝

I. histrioides ‘Katharine Hodgkin’ 4˝ Z This hardy, early blooming dwarf iris has blue petals with white, yellow, and violet highlights. The exceptional selection is a great choice for rock gardens.

Z 4˝ Z I. reticulatea ‘Frans Hals’ Pale-violet flowers have dark-purple and yellow accents.

Ipheion uniflorum

I. graeberiana Juno Iris 8˝ Z This lovely blue iris has tinges of purple and falls with a white central ridge that bisects a strongly veined area. A diminutive species with great visual impact!

Spring Starflower

In April–May this has long-lasting, 1˝, star-shaped flowers that show amazing tolerance for temperature extremes. The grasslike foliage has a faint garlic fragrance when crushed—so hungry wildlife and other pests overlook it. Perfect for rock gardens or perennial borders. Ipheion uniflorum ‘Charlotte Bishop’ 3-4˝ Lovely star-shaped pink flowers are slightly darker at the center—a welcome site in late winter.

I. r. ‘Harmony’ 4˝ Z The flower has rich-blue standards and a royal-blue fall with white edges; accented with subtle yellow spotting. One of the best dwarf irises. I. r. ‘J.S. Dijt’ 4˝ Also a reticulata iris. One of the latest to bloom, this has a purple flower with a reddish-purple fall.

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Leucojum aestivum

Summer Snowflake

These pendulous white, flaring, bell-shaped flowers tipped with green rise just above the foliage in late April or May. Lightly fragrant. Pest resistant and adaptable to a variety of light and soil conditions. Moisture tolerant and naturalizes well if left undisturbed. Plant 4˝ deep. Leucojum aestivum ‘Gravetye Giant’ 1½-2´ Z A larger, more robust selection, this is great when combined with the species or planted in masses.

Muscari

Grape Hyacinth

These long-lasting, fragrant clusters of grapelike blooms thrive and naturalize rapidly. Great when used under other bulbs, in lawns, or under trees and shrubs. The Dutch use them to create “rivers˝ that flow through the garden, and this effect is breathtaking. The foliage of these pest-resistant bulbs reemerges in fall, making it a great garden marker to help locate other spring-flowering bulbs needing attention. We recommend that you always plant these in masses. Plant 4˝ deep. Muscari ‘Mixed’ 3-6˝ Many shades of blue with white mixes create a dramatic effect.

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M. a. ‘Christmas Pearl’ 4-6˝ Z This is an extremely early flowering variety with cobalt-blue blossoms. An ideal selection for forcing, little or no cold period is needed. A perfect companion for early-flowering daffodils. M. a. ‘Saffier’ Up to 12˝ Z These French dark blue, small, bell-shaped flowers often have a white rim. M. aucheri ‘Mount Hood’ 6˝ Z This spectacular new selection features royal-blue flowers that grow paler at the top until eventually fading to white. It gives the effect of snow on the mountain; hence its name. Precious and eye-catching. Blooms in mid-spring. M. botryoides ‘Album’ Italian Grape Hyacinth 6˝ Dense spike of shimmering pure-white “pearls˝ of flowers appear in April. Fragrant.

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M. comosum ‘Plumosum’ Feather Hyacinth 8˝ Lavender-violet, feathery, plumelike flowers are present in May–June. The most unusual form of the genus.

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M. latifolium Giant Grape Hyacinth 8-10˝ Z Free-flowering and large, the bicolor spikes present in April–May have smoky, dark violet-blue on the bottom and soft lilac-blue near the top. The flowers are accompanied by one large leaf. Combines beautifully with tulips in mid- to late spring. M. ‘Ocean Magic’ 8˝ Z The flowers of this dazzling cultivar are white at the tip, gradually blending to a deep cobalt blue at the base. Plant in waves for the best effect! M. ‘Pink Sunrise’ – Midspring 7˝ Z Opens blush pink and matures to an even paler whisper of pinkish white. M. ‘Valerie Finnis’ 6-8˝ Z Extremely pale lavender-blue with tightly formed “grapes,˝ their beautiful color makes a complete color palette for the serious garden artist. M. armeniacum – Midseason Spikes of heavenly dark blue flowers.

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Z

Nectaroscordum siculum Sicilian Honey Garlic 2-3´ This interesting Allium relative has many bell-shaped flowers that are greenish-white and tinged with rose. The flowers are borne in loose clusters on long, arching stalks in May. They are superb as cut flowers and dry beautifully.

Paeonia

Peony

The large, showy flowers of this garden mainstay appear in late spring to early summer. Strong stems make these blooms excellent for cutting. Plants are long lived if given rich, welldrained soil in a sunny part of the border. When planting, position the “eyes” (buds) facing up, 2˝ below the soil surface in a hole large enough to accommodate the entire root. Refill the hole, water thoroughly, and mulch the first winter. It is safe to plant right up until the time that the ground freezes.

Paeonia ‘Bowl of Beauty’ 32˝ These large, fragrant flower heads are composed of a dramatic cluster of pale-yellow staminodes surrounded by sumptuous fuschsia-pink petals. A stunning selection with strong stems, it makes it an excellent cut flower. May–June. P. ‘Buckeye Belle’ – Early 30˝ An excellent semidouble, maroon selection has flowers formed of larger outer petals that cup the smaller, inner petals. P. ‘Coral Charm’ 36˝ The deep coral buds of this award winner open to bowlshaped, semidouble flowers composed of coral-peach petals surrounding a glowing mass of stamens. Early-blooming flowers are dramatically set against deep green foliage. P. ‘Festiva Maxima’ 34˝ An old reliable, with large, fully double, fragrant white flowers that have flecks of crimson. May–June. P. ‘Moonriver’ 28˝ These fully double blooms are deep cream with a lovely pink blush and have a roselike fragrance. Flowers midseason. P. ‘Raspberry Sundae’ 30˝ This large bomb-shaped, double flower is a scrumptious confection of layered cream and pink petals that deepen to raspberry toward the center. Sweetly fragrant. A Klehm introduction that blooms early to midseason.

Puschkinia

Scilla

Squill

In March and April, a wonderful blanket of flowers announces the arrival of spring. One of the best bulbs for the Chicago area, this selection adapts easily to almost any soil and light condition. Plants readily naturalize. Use them in lawns, perennial beds, woodland gardens, and meadows. Scilla bifolia 4-8˝ The star-shaped flowers of the Alpine squill slightly nod atop spikes from straplike leaves. The colors of this variety range from bright blue to lilac to pale blue. Wildlife resistant. S. b. ‘Rosea’ 4-8˝ The earliest to bloom, this squill is a very unusual heirloom circa 1601 with delightful, delicately scented trusses of light pink, star-shaped flowers. Combines beautifully with earlyflowering daffodils. S. mischtschenkoana 3-4˝ Charming light blue to white flowers have a dark blue midrib. S. siberica Siberian Squill

4-8˝

This selection, with its beautiful blue flowers, is the most familiar in our area. It readily naturalizes, creating a wonderful blue carpet. S. s. ‘Alba’ An elegant, white-flowering form.

4-6˝

Striped Squill

Puschkinia scilloides var. libanotica Striped Squill 4-6˝ Pale blue to white, starlike flowers with dark-blue striping are clustered at the top of the stems in April. These are wonderful in rock gardens, perennial borders, and under trees and shrubs. They are undemanding, remain trouble-free, and increase rapidly. Puschkinia s. var. l. ‘Alba’ 4-6˝ Pure white flowering selection. Combines beautifully with Vinca.

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Forced Bulbs Hippeastrum

Amaryllis

These are wonderful indoor bulbs with long, straplike foliage and large, trumpet-shaped flowers. They are stunning when used as centerpieces, accent plants, or cut flowers. Planted indoors from October through April, these bulbs should bloom within six to 12 weeks. Plant in a deep, welldrained pot 2-3˝ wider than the bulb. Cover ¾ of the bulb with soil, leaving ¼ of the bulb and its neck exposed. Firm soil to stabilize the bulb. Water sparingly until a bud forms, then gradually increase the amount of water. Provide a warm environment to encourage blooming. Stake flower stems for support. Cooler room temperatures prolong the flower show. Fertilize twice a month and move the plant outdoors in summer. When foliage yellows or prior to first frost, bring the pot indoors and store bulb in a dark, cool, dry location for six weeks before beginning growth cycle again.

H. ‘Misty’ 12-18˝ Although a miniature, this is packed full of charm. Its luminescent petals are ivory with raspberry-pink striations feathering from a green starburst center. H. ‘Naranja’ 20˝ Warm up to the deep orange shades of these large, audacious flowers. The perfect antidote to winter in Chicago!

Hippeastrum ‘Alfresco’ 14-16˝ Create a dramatic holiday display with these spectacular double flowers that are creamy white with a petite green eye.

H. ‘Picotee’ 18-22˝ Large, white blossoms have fine red petal margins. A very clean and distinctive look.

H. ‘Blossom Peacock’ 24-36˝ This incredible, perfectly formed, rich reddish-purple flower has three layers of petals. The flowers are accented with a white throat and petal midribs. Up facing flowers are mildly fragrant.

H. ‘Pink Impression’ 24-36˝ This lovely flower is a fantastic blend of rosy pink and soft, creamy pink petals that lead to a chartreuse throat.

H. ‘Charisma’ 24-32˝ The eye-catching flower with red-edged pink petals has flushes of red on the upper petals, and a deep-red throat. A charmer! H. ‘Double Dragon’ 12-24˝ An excellent new red amaryllis that features double flowers loaded with petals—sure to be a winner! H. ‘Fairy Tale’ 16-20˝ The beautiful star-shaped flowers of this smaller selection are composed of white petals with red stripes. H. ‘Jewel’ 12-24˝ The glistening, pure-white flowers of this beautiful amaryllis often have double petaloids in the center, creating lavish blossoms.

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H. ‘La Paz’ 12-18˝ Slender, pointed petals radiate from a light green throat to form a star-shaped flower. Upper petals are dark coral; lower petals are greenish-white edged with coral and accented by a coral midvein. A Cybister amaryllis, this exotic-looking species-type variety is evergreen and should be grown in a good-sized pot throughout the year without a dry dormancy period.

H. ‘Purple Rain’ A brilliant fuschsia-pink-and-white flower with dark red throat and fuchsia-pink anthers.

18˝

H. ‘Red Pearl’ 30-35˝ This gorgeous flower is rich red with a dark red throat H. ‘Trentino’ 10-16˝ This prolific variety has flowers of creamy white with narrow, pale-magenta petal margins and a radiant-green throat. H. ‘Tres Chic’ 18˝ A striking red flower brushed with white accents blends into a green heart. Fill your house with this floriferous selection for a dramatic holiday display or thrill your friends with the perfect seasonal gift.

Narcissus

Daffodil

Notes:

We are offering the following paperwhites, which we believe to be the best for forcing. They have many musky-sweet fragrant flowers per stem. Plant small groups of bulbs in soil, covering the bulbs completely. Water well and allow to drain. Place in a cool, 55-65º F. location out of direct sunlight. When foliage reaches 3-4˝ in height, move the plant into bright light at typical room temperatures. Once in bloom, cooler room temperatures prolong flowering. Provide staking as needed. Bulbs can also be planted in pebbles, glass beads, or in a bulb glass. When planting in pebbles or glass beads, cover bulbs to the neck to anchor and provide support. Be sure the water level remains just below the base of the bulb. A tablespoon of charcoal in the bottom of the container will assist in preserving water freshness. Narcissus ‘Inbal’ 12-16˝ Z A white paperwhite with a soft fragrance, this needs to be planted in soil rather than letting stand in water. N. ‘Paperwhites’ 14-16˝ The classic paperwhite. White petals surround a yellow center.

Z

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Woman’s Board of the Chicago Horticultural Society President Barbara Metzler Members Dora Aalbregtse Cheri Allen Liz Bacon Ann Balusek Janice Beck Marianne Bestler Deedee Borland Calvine Bowen Faffie Bowers Mary Boyer Barbara Brown Peggy Carr Bean Carroll Chris Chandler Maggie Coleman Sue Cozzens Alicia Crawford Liz Crowe Betty Dean

Jill Delaney Cathie Denckla Nancy Dorr Jody Elting Marilyn Farrar Liz Farwell Valerie Foradas Lynn Foster Alice Goltra Susan Green Barbara Hansen Lorill Haynes Anne Healy Marilyn Heath Judy Herb Lucia Heyworth Mary Hill Penny Horne Betsy Hough Hélène James Gina Jannotta Beth Jernigan Betsy Karp

Index Allium atropurpureum – Ornamental Onion......................................... 6 Allium caeruleum – Blue Globe Onion.................................................. 6 Allium ‘Gladiator’ – Ornamental Onion............................................... 6 Allium ‘Globemaster’ – Ornamental Onion.......................................... 6 Allium ‘Graceful’ – Ornamental Onion................................................ 6 Allium ‘Hair’ – Ornamental Onion...................................................... 6 Allium jesdianum ‘Early Emperor’ – Ornamental Onion....................... 6 Allium moly ‘Jeannine’ – Lily Leek........................................................ 7 Allium ‘Mount Everest’ – Ornamental Onion....................................... 6 Allium ‘Pinball Wizard’ – Ornamental Onion...................................... 6 Allium schubertii – Schubert Onion...................................................... 7 Allium ‘Silver Spring’ – Ornamental Onion.......................................... 6 Allium sphaerocephalon – Drumstick Onion.......................................... 7 Allium ‘Summer Drummer’ – Ornamental Onion................................ 6 Allium unifolium – Oneleaf Onion....................................................... 7 Anemone blanda ‘Blue Shades’ – Wind Flower...................................... 17 Anemone blanda ‘Mix’ – Wind Flower................................................... 17 Anemone blanda ‘White Splendour’ – Wind Flower.............................. 17 Bellevalia pycantha – Bellevalia.............................................................. 17 Calochortus ‘Cupido’ – Fairy Lantern.................................................... 18

Carolyn Katz Barbara Kehoe Kitty Kirby May Cat Kneibler Judy Konen Nancy Kurz Peggy Leider Joani Lowry Roberta Lynch Patsy Magner Jennifer Martay Michelle McCarthy Gwen McConnaughy Madeleine McMullan Julie McNulty Ann Merritt Gail Miller Mary Alice Miller Weezie Monroe Brooks Morgan Kate Morris Louellen Murray Ginny Noyes

Jane Pearsall Janet Meakin Poor Juli Priebe Elizabeth Pruett Marina Puryear Carole Read Glo Rolighed Patti Ross Holly Rothschild Carole Sandner Beth Schroeder Heather Scott Missy Shennan Susan Spears Lois Steans Margie Strauch Louise Tausché Susan Tupper Jeanie Van Nice Cassandra Vermillion Kim Visokey Susie Volckens

Camassia cusickii – Camass................................................................... 18 Camassia leichtinii ‘Caerulea’ – Camass................................................. 18 Camassia quamash ‘Blue Melody’ – Camass.......................................... 18 Camassia quamash – Camass................................................................. 18 Chionodoxa forbesii ‘Blue Giant’ – Glory of the Snow........................... 18 Chionodoxa forbesii ‘Pink Giant’ – Glory of the Snow........................... 18 Chionodoxa luciliae – Glory of the Snow............................................... 18 Chionodoxa luciliae ‘Violet Beauty’ – Glory of the Snow....................... 18 Colchicum autumnale ‘Album’ – Colchicum.......................................... 18 Colchicum ‘Lilac Wonder’ – Colchicum................................................ 18 Colchicum ‘Waterlily’ – Colchicum....................................................... 18 Crocus chrysanthus ‘Lady Killer’ – Crocus.............................................. 19 Crocus chrysanthus ‘Prince Claus’ – Crocus............................................ 19 Crocus flavus ‘Yellow Mammoth’ – Crocus............................................ 19 Crocus kotschyanus – Fall Crocus............................................................ 19 Crocus sieberi ‘Firefly’ – Crocus.............................................................. 19 Crocus speciosus ‘Cassiope’ – Fall Crocus................................................ 18 Crocus tommasinianus – Crocus............................................................. 19 Crocus tommasinianus ‘Lilac Beauty’ – Crocus....................................... 19 Crocus tommasinianus ‘Roseus’ – Crocus............................................... 19 Crocus vernus ‘Jeanne d’ Arc’ – Crocus.................................................. 19 Crocus vernus ‘Pickwick’ – Crocus......................................................... 19

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Crocus vernus ‘Purple Fiction’ – Crocus................................................. 19 Crocus vernus ‘Vangaurd’ – Crocus........................................................ 19 Eranthis hyemalis – Winter Aconite....................................................... 19 Eremurus ‘Cleopatra’ – Foxtail Lily........................................................ 20 Eremurus bungei – Foxtail Lily............................................................... 20 Fritillaria imperialis ‘Lutea’ – Fritillary.................................................. 20 Fritillaria imperialis ‘Rubra Maxima’ – Fritillary................................... 20 Fritillaria meleagris – Fritillary............................................................... 20 Fritillaria meleagris ‘Alba’ – Fritillary..................................................... 20 Galanthus elwesii – Snowdrop............................................................... 20 Galanthus ikariae – Snowdrop............................................................... 20 Galanthus nivalis ‘Flore pleno’ – Snowdrop........................................... 20 Hippeastrum ‘Alfresco’ – Amaryllis........................................................ 24 Hippeastrum ‘Blossom Peacock’ – Amaryllis.......................................... 24 Hippeastrum ‘Charisma’ – Amaryllis..................................................... 24 Hippeastrum ‘ Double Dragon’ – Amaryllis........................................... 24 Hippeastrum ‘Fairy Tale’ – Amaryllis..................................................... 24 Hippeastrum ‘Jewel’ – Amaryllis............................................................ 24 Hippeastrum ‘La Paz’ – Amaryllis.......................................................... 24 Hippeastrum ‘Misty’ – Amaryllis........................................................... 24 Hippeastrum ‘Naranja’ – Amaryllis........................................................ 24 Hippeastrum ‘Picotee’ – Amaryllis......................................................... 24 Hippeastrum ‘Pink Impression’ – Amaryllis........................................... 24 Hippeastrum ‘Purple Rain’ – Amaryllis.................................................. 24 Hippeastrum ‘Red Pearl’ – Amaryllis..................................................... 24 Hippeastrum ‘Trentino’ – Amaryllis....................................................... 24 Hippeastrum ‘Tres Chic’ – Amaryllis..................................................... 24 Hyacinthoides hispanica ‘Dainty Maid’ – Wood Hyacinth..................... 20 Hyacinthoides hispanica ‘Excelsior’ – Wood Hyacinth............................ 20 Hyacinthoides non–scripta – English Bluebells........................................ 20 Hyacinthus orientalis ‘Chestnut Flower’ – Double Hyacinth.................. 21 Hyacinthus orientalis ‘City of Harlem’ – Hyacinth................................. 21 Hyacinthus orientalis ‘Delft Blue’ – Hyacinth........................................ 21 Hyacinthus orientalis ‘Gypsy Queen’ – Hyacinth................................... 21 Hyacinthus orientalis ‘Hollyhock’ – Double Hyacinth........................... 21 Hyacinthus orientalis ‘Peter Stuyvesant’ – Hyacinth............................... 21 Hyacinthus orientalis ‘Snow Crystal’ – Double Hyacinth....................... 21 Hyacinthus orientalis ‘Woodstock’ – Hyacinth....................................... 21 Ipheion uniflorum ‘Charlotte Bishop’ – Spring Star Flower.................... 21 Ipheion uniflorum ‘Rolf Fiedler’ – Spring Star Flower............................ 21 Ipheion uniflorum ‘White Star’ – Spring Star Flower............................. 21 Iris bucharica – Dwarf Iris..................................................................... 21 Iris danfordiae – Dwarf Iris.................................................................... 21 Iris graeberiana – Juno Iris..................................................................... 21 Iris histriodes ‘Katherine Hodgkin’ – Dwarf Iris..................................... 21 Iris reticulata ‘Frans Hals’ – Dwarf Iris.................................................. 21 Iris reticulata ‘Harmony’ – Dwarf Iris.................................................... 21 Iris reticulata ‘J.S. Dijt’ – Dwarf Iris...................................................... 21 Leucojum aestivum ‘Gravetye Giant’ – Summer Snowflake.................... 22 Muscari armeniacum – Grape Hyacinth................................................ 22 Muscari armeniacum ‘Christmas Pearl’ – Grape Hyacinth..................... 22 Muscari armeniacum ‘Saffier’ – Grape Hyacinth.................................... 22 Muscari aucheri ‘Mount Hood’ – Grape Hyacinth................................ 22 Muscari botryoides ‘Album’ – Italian Grape Hyacinth............................. 22

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Muscari comosum ‘Plumosum’ – Feather Hyacinth................................ 22 Muscari latifolium – Giant Grape Hyacinth.......................................... 22 Muscari ‘Mixed’ – Grape Hyacinth....................................................... 22 Muscari ‘Ocean Magic’ – Grape Hyacinth............................................ 22 Muscari ‘Pink Sunrise’ – Grape Hyacinth.............................................. 22 Muscari ‘Valerie Finnis’ – Grape Hyacinth............................................ 22 Narcissus ‘Actaea’ – Div. IX Daffodil––Poeticus..................................... 11 Narcissus albus plenus odoratus – Div. XIII Daffodil––Species/Wild Form....12 Narcissus ‘Altruist’ – Div. III Daffodil––Small Cupped.......................... 9 Narcissus ‘Angel Eyes’ – Div. IX Daffodil––Poeticus.............................. 11 Narcissus ‘Avalanche’ – Div. VIII Daffodil––Tazetta.............................. 11 Narcissus ‘Avalon’ – Div. II Daffodil––Large Cupped............................ 8 Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ – Miniature – Div. VII Daffodil––Jonquilla...... 12 Narcissus ‘Bantam’ – Div. II Daffodil––Large Cupped.......................... 8 Narcissus ‘Bell Song’ – Div. VII Daffodil––Jonquilla............................. 10 Narcissus ‘Birma’ – Div. III Daffodil––Small Cupped............................ 9 Narcissus ‘Blazing Starlet’ – Div. XI Daffodil––Split Corona................. 11 Narcissus Blend – All Spring Mix – Narcissus Blend.............................. 7 Narcissus Blend – Fragrant Meadow – Narcissus Blend......................... 7 Narcissus Blend – Naturalizing Meadow – Narcissus Blend................... 7 Narcissus Blend – Pink Sensation – Narcissus Blend.............................. 8 Narcissus ‘Bridal Crown’ – Div. IV Daffodil––Double.......................... 9 Narcissus ‘Canaliculatus’ – Div. VIII Daffodil––Tazetta........................ 11 Narcissus ‘Capree Elizabeth’ – Div. II Daffodil––Large Cupped............ 8 Narcissus ‘Carlton’ – Div. II Daffodil––Large Cupped.......................... 8 Narcissus ‘Chromacolor’ – Div. II Daffodil––Large Cupped.................. 8 Narcissus ‘Double Smiles’ – Div. IV Daffodil––Double......................... 9 Narcissus ‘Dutch Master’ – Div. I Daffodil––Trumpet.......................... 8 Narcissus ‘Falconet’ – Div. VIII Daffodil––Tazetta................................ 11 Narcissus ‘Felindre’ – Div. IX Daffodil––Poeticus.................................. 11 Narcissus ‘Fellows Favorite’ – Div. II Daffodil––Large Cupped............. 8 Narcissus ‘Fragrant Breeze’ – Div. II Daffodil––Large Cupped.............. 8 Narcissus ‘Fragrant Rose’ – Div. II Daffodil––Large Cupped................. 8 Narcissus ‘Gigantic Star’ – Div. II Daffodil––Large Cupped.................. 9 Narcissus ‘Goblet – Div. I Daffodil––Trumpet...................................... 8 Narcissus ‘Golden Echo’ – Div. VII Daffodil––Jonquilla....................... 10 Narcissus ‘Goose Green’ – Div. III Daffodil––Small Cupped................. 9 Narcissus ‘Hawera’ – Miniature – Div. V Daffodil––Triandrus.............. 12 Narcissus ‘Hillstar’ – Div. VII Daffodil––Jonquilla................................ 11 Narcissus ‘Honey Bird’ – Div. II Daffodil––Large Cupped.................... 8 Narcissus ‘Ice Follies’ – Div. II Daffodil––Large Cupped....................... 9 Narcissus ‘Inbal’ – Div. VIII Daffodil––Non–Hardy Tazetta................. 25 Narcissus ‘Itzim’ – Div. VI Daffodil––Cyclamineus............................... 10 Narcissus ‘Jack Snipe’ – Div. VI Daffodil––Cyclamineus....................... 10 Narcissus ‘Jamestown’ – Div. III Daffodil––Small Cupped.................... 9 Narcissus ‘Jetfire’ – Div. VI Daffodil––Cyclamineus.............................. 10 Narcissus jonquilla simplex – Div. XIII Daffodil –Species/Wild Form.... 12 Narcissus ‘Katie Heath’ – Div. V Daffodil––Triandrus........................... 10 Narcissus ‘Lemon Drops’ – Div. V Daffodil––Triandrus........................ 10 Narcissus ‘Lorikeet’ – Div. I Daffodil––Trumpet................................... 8 Narcissus ‘Marieke’ – Div. I Daffodil––Trumpet.................................... 8 Narcissus ‘Minnow’ – Miniature – Div. VIII Daffodil––Tazetta............ 12 Narcissus ‘Mint Julep’ – Div. III Daffodil––Small Cupped.................... 9 Narcissus ‘Misty Glen’ – Div. II Daffodil––Large Cupped..................... 9

Narcissus obvallaris – Div. XIII Daffodil––Species/Wild Form.............. 12 Narcissus ‘Paperwhites’ – Div. VIII Daffodil––Non–Hardy Tazetta....... 25 Narcissus ‘Parisienne’ – Div. XI Daffodil––Split Corona........................ 11 Narcissus ‘Peridot’ – Div. II Daffodil––Large Cupped........................... 9 Narcissus ‘Pink Wonder’ – Div. XI Daffodil––Split Corona.................. 11 Narcissus ‘Prototype’ – Div. VI Daffodil––Cyclamineus........................ 10 Narcissus ‘Pueblo’ – Div. VII Daffodil––Jonquilla................................. 11 Narcissus ‘Quail’ – Div. VII Daffodil––Jonquilla................................... 11 Narcissus ‘Rapture’ – Div. VI Daffodil––Cyclamineus........................... 10 Narcissus ‘Replete’ – Div. IV Daffodil––Double.................................... 9 Narcissus ‘Rijnveld’s Early Sensation’ – Div. I Daffodil––Trumpet........ 8 Narcissus ‘Royal Princess’ – Div. III Daffodil––Small Cupped............... 9 Narcissus ‘Segovia’ – Miniature – Div. III Daffodil––Small Cupped...... 12 Narcissus ‘Small Talk’ – Minature – Div. I Daffodil––Trumpet............. 12 Narcissus ‘Sorbet’ – Div. XI Daffodil––Split Corona............................. 11 Narcissus ‘Stint’ – Div. V Daffodil––Triandrus...................................... 10 Narcissus ‘Sweet Love’ – Div. VII Daffodil––Jonquilla.......................... 11 Narcissus ‘Sweet Pomponette’ – Div. IV Daffodil––Double................... 9 Narcissus ‘Sweetness’ – Div. VII Daffodil––Jonquilla............................. 11 Narcissus ‘Tahiti’ – Div. IV Daffodil––Double...................................... 10 Narcissus ‘Thalia’ – Div. V Daffodil––Triandrus.................................... 10 Narcissus ‘Toto’ – Miniature – Div. XII Daffodil––Misc....................... 12 Narcissus ‘Trepolo’ – Div. XI Daffodil––Split Corona........................... 12 Narcissus ‘Wave’ – Div. IV Daffodil––Double....................................... 10 Narcissus x odorus flore pleno – Div. XIII Daffodil––Species/Wild Form..... 12 Narcissus ‘Yellow Cheerfulness’ – Div. IV Daffodil––Double................ 10 Nectaroscordum siculum – Sicillian Honey Garlic................................... 22 Peonia ‘Bowl of Beauty’ – Peony........................................................... 23 Peonia ‘Buckeye Belle’ – Peony.............................................................. 23 Peonia ‘Coral Charm’ – Peony............................................................... 23 Peonia ‘Festiva Maxima’ – Peony........................................................... 23 Peonia ‘Moonriver’ – Peony.................................................................. 23 Peonia ‘Raspberry Sundae’ – Peony....................................................... 23 Puschkinia libanotica alba – Srtiped Squill............................................. 23 Puschkinia scilloides var. libanotica – Striped Squill................................ 23 Puschkinia scilloides var. libanotica ‘Alba’ – Striped Squill....................... 23 Scilla bifolia – Squill.............................................................................. 23 Scilla bifolia ‘Rosea’ – Squill.................................................................. 23 Scilla mischtschenkoana – Squill............................................................. 23 Scilla siberica – Squill............................................................................ 23 Scilla siberica ‘Alba’ – Squill................................................................... 23 Tommy Crocus Mix – Tommy Crocus Mix.......................................... 19 Tulipa ‘Angelique’ – Double Late.......................................................... 14 Tulipa ‘Apricot Impression’ – Darwin Hybrid....................................... 15 Tulipa ‘Apricot Parrot’ – Parrot.............................................................. 16 Tulipa ‘Atlantis’ – Triumph.................................................................... 14 Tulipa bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’ – Species.................................................. 17 Tulipa ‘Beauty Queen’ – Single Early.................................................... 13 Tulipa ‘Belicia’ – Double Late............................................................... 14 Tulipa ‘Big Smile’ – Triumph................................................................ 14 Tulipa ‘Black Hero’ – Double Late........................................................ 14 Tulipa Blend – The Crescent – Tulip Blend........................................... 13 Tulipa Blend – Learning Campus – Tulip Blend................................... 13 Tulipa Blend – Rose Garden – Tulip Blend........................................... 13 Tulipa ‘Bleu Aimable’ – Single Late....................................................... 13

Tulipa ‘Burning Heart’ – Darwin Hybrid............................................. 15 Tulipa ‘Carmine Parrot’ – Parrot........................................................... 16 Tulipa ‘Cash’ – Darwin Hybrid............................................................. 15 Tulipa ‘China Town’ – Viridiflora......................................................... 16 Tulipa ‘Christina van Kooten’ – Lily Flowered...................................... 15 Tulipa clusiana ‘Lady Jane’ – Species..................................................... 17 Tulipa c. chrysantha ‘Tubergen’s Gem’ – Species.................................... 17 Tulipa ‘Comeback’ – Darwin Hybrid.................................................... 15 Tulipa ‘Cream Lizard’ – Parrot.............................................................. 16 Tulipa ‘Creme Upstar’ – Double Late................................................... 14 Tulipa ‘Daydream’ – Darwin Hybrid.................................................... 15 Tulipa ‘Dordogne’ – Single Late............................................................ 13 Tulipa ‘Fancy Frills’ – Fringed............................................................... 15 Tulipa ‘Flaming Purissima’ – Fosteriana................................................ 16 Tulipa ‘Formosa’ – Viridiflora............................................................... 16 Tulipa ‘Foxtrot’ – Double Early............................................................. 13 Tulipa ‘Gavota’ – Triumph.................................................................... 14 Tulipa ‘Golden Parade’ – Darwin Hybrid............................................. 15 Tulipa ‘Havran’ – Triumph.................................................................... 14 Tulipa humilis ‘Persian Pearl’ – Species.................................................. 17 Tulipa kaufmanniana ‘Ice Stick’ – Kaufmanniana................................. 16 Tulipa ‘Kingsblood’ – Single Late.......................................................... 13 Tulipa ‘La Courtine’ – Single Late......................................................... 13 Tulipa ‘Lambada’ Fringed...................................................................... 15 Tulipa ‘Marilyn’ Lily Flowered.............................................................. 15 Tulipa ‘Maureen’ – Single Late.............................................................. 13 Tulipa ‘Montreux’ – Double Early........................................................ 13 Tulipa ‘Mount Tacoma’ – Double Late................................................. 14 Tulipa ‘Negrita’ – Triumph.................................................................... 14 Tulipa ‘Orange Emperor’ – Fosteriana.................................................. 16 Tulipa ‘Oratorio’ – Greigii..................................................................... 16 Tulipa ‘Passionale’ – Triumph................................................................ 14 Tulipa ‘Professor de Monsseri’ – Greigii................................................ 16 Tulipa ‘Purple Dream’ – Lily Flowered.................................................. 15 Tulipa ‘Purple Prince’ – Single Early..................................................... 13 Tulipa ‘Quebec’ – Greigii...................................................................... 17 Tulipa ‘Queen of Night’ – Single Late................................................... 13 Tulipa ‘Red Shine’ – Lily Flowered........................................................ 15 Tulipa ‘Shirley’ – Triumph.................................................................... 14 Tulipa ‘Spring Green’ – Viridiflora........................................................ 16 Tulipa ‘Sun Lover’ – Double Late......................................................... 14 Tulipa ‘Sweetheart’ – Fosteriana............................................................ 16 Tulipa tarda – Species............................................................................ 17 Tulipa ‘Van Eijk’ – Darwin Hybrid....................................................... 15 Tulipa ‘West Point’ – Lily Flowered...................................................... 15 Tulipa ‘White Dream’ – Triumph.......................................................... 14 Tulipa ‘Yellow Present’ – Triumph......................................................... 14

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Fall Bulb Festival Catalog 2013