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Vote for your board of directors by Oct. 8. See ballot insert for details on how to cast your vote.

OCTOBER 2013 / Vol. 43, No. 10

The search is over! Welcome Elizabeth Kiker Taking the helm by Daniel Weise, President, Board of Directors

by Elizabeth Kiker, Executive Director

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7400 Sand Point Way NE, Suite 101S Seattle, WA 98115 www.cascade.org

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ver the last several months, the board of directors has conducted a comprehensive nationwide search to hire the club’s next leader. We are pleased to welcome Elizabeth Kiker as the club’s next executive director. Her first day at the helm was Thursday, Sept. 5. Elizabeth brings proven experience building collaborative relationships among members, supporters, external partners, community leaders and diverse communities that will be essential to the continued success and growth of bicycling in our region. Elizabeth joins Cascade with a strong background in bicycle advocacy, having worked at the League of American Bicyclists for almost eight years, and most recently served as the organization’s Executive Vice President. While at the League, Elizabeth launched a successful major donor program, led an overhaul of the member relationship management system, and helped streamline and grow the Bicycle Friendly America program. In accepting the position, Elizabeth said: “I’m excited to work with the board and staff at Cascade to build on its incredible success and history. Outstanding recreational rides and effective advocacy work will continue to be the hallmarks of the organization. We will continue to build collaborations and take advantage of Cascade’s excellent staff, committed board and dedicated membership to continue to transform the Pacific Northwest into one of the most bicycle-friendly regions in the country.” Elizabeth is particularly committed to engaging “interested but concerned” cyclists in the region. While at the League

Welcome Elizabeth Kiker! of American Bicyclists, she helped create and raise funding for a strategic plan for the successful launch of the Women Bike program. She hopes to continue similar work at Cascade, with programs that encourage and increase the number of cyclists in the region. She was critical in building relationships with businesses and foundations while at the League, and helped the organization grow during an important period in its history. Elizabeth has a strong network of advocates, colleagues and leaders throughout the bicycling world that will be strong assets as she takes the helm at Cascade. “As bicycling continues to increase in popularity, Cascade’s work continues to increase in importance. Helping craft a farreaching Seattle Bicycle Master Plan, ensuring that bicycle facilities are top-quality and region-wide, and increasing the popularity of cycling in King County and beyond are all on Cascade’s to-do list. I look forward to meeting with our members, partners, and supporters and uniting our community behind a vision for growth through collaboration.” Elizabeth is originally from Houston, Texas, where she began cycling to school as a child. As an adult, a colleague convinced her she could ride the 11 miles to work from Washington, D.C., to Tysons Corner, Va., and with that trip, a cycling advocate was born. After creating a bike club at her office, she went to work at the League of American Bicyclists. She has completed two Cycle Oregon events and a 2006 crosscountry tour that began in Seattle. She and her husband, Jason, are parents to three young children, two of whom already love to ride. Please join me at the club’s annual meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 8 where we can welcome Elizabeth Kiker into this exciting next chapter of the Cascade Bicycle Club.

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he work of Cascade Bicycle Club is nationally known, recognized and admired. I’ve been a fan of the club for years. As I applied for the executive director position, and throughout the search process, the reasons for the club’s success became clear: you have an excellent staff and board working on behalf of Cascade. I’m so excited to join your passionate, professional team and work on strategy and direction with your smart, dedicated board. Of course, as my work here begins, I want to take a moment to thank the thousands of dedicated members, hundreds of previous board members and staff, as well as past Executive Director Chuck Ayers and Interim Executive Director Joe Platzner. These people worked hard to get us this far, and they have set the stage for our continued growth.

Cascade’s dedication to creating an entirely bicycle-friendly Puget Sound region through excellent rides and events, strong advocacy work and our nationallyrecognized education program is strong. We are redoubling our efforts to respond to members quickly and effectively, and working to transform who bicycles as well as where we bicycle. I do have one issue with the Seattle region, though ... I was promised that the rain would be light and drizzly. The downpour that I rode through on my first day, pedaling in my completely drenched and useless East Coast raincoat, was neither light nor drizzly. Can anyone swear there will be no snow? Regardless of the weather, I see only sunny days ahead for the Cascade Bicycle Club. I hope to see you at our annual member meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 8, and I look forward to meeting (and riding with!) many of you in the months and years to come.

Meet the board of directors candidates by Kevin Carrabine, Vice President, Board of Directors

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t’s October, and another Cascade board election is upon us. It’s a very exciting time at the Club. Our new executive director, Elizabeth Kiker, is on board. We have just celebrated another year of our Cascade Champions program. Many highly skilled new staff have joined the organization this past year. Plans are afoot for relocation of the club’s offices. And “another” election cycle is coming up, one in which Cascade plays a prominent role through our advocacy efforts and endorsement process. Everyone who contributes to the success of Cascade (staff, board, volunteers, members, community stakeholders) agrees that the potential to fulfill our mission of Creating a Better Community through Bicycling has never been greater. We are happy that you participate in some way with us, either as a rider, volunteer, contributor or supporter. As a member, and voter, we hope that you will make your voice heard in this year’s board elections. The board of directors is accountable to the members and sets the strategic direction of the organization, hires and evaluates the club’s executive director, and approves the budget of the organization -- all with the input from Cascade staff and community stakeholders. The Nominations Committee, chaired by Maggie Sue Anderson, with senior staff and

Read the candidate statements on the next page. A ballot with voting instructions has been inserted into this issue. Board help, worked diligently to present a slate of candidates for election to fill the vacant Board seats. Please vote in this year’s Board election and take your participation to the next level. We appreciate it. On the following pages, you’ll have an opportunity to read candidate statements from the eight candidates (three incumbents, five non-incumbents) who are running for the board this year. You can meet the candidates and ask questions of them on the Cascade forums at http://bitly.com/ Board-Forum. Reading the forums is open to anyone, but if you want to post, you must first join the forum by setting up an account. As the ballot included with this Courier indicates, you can vote online, by mailing the paper ballot, or by bringing your paper ballot to the Annual Membership Meeting, on Tuesday, Oct. 8, from 6 - 8 p.m. at the Seattle REI. Thank you for your continued involvement in helping us realize the Club’s mission and vision.

In This Issue Board Candidates.............................................2-3

Seven More Bike Counters in Seattle................8

Annual Membership Meeting..............................3

Announcing 2014 Cascade Club Tours..............9

Electing Bike-Friendly Champions......................4

Octber classes......................................................9

Cascade Endorsments..........................................4

Cyclist of the Month.........................................10

Bike-friendly Schools...........................................4

Bikenomics.........................................................10

October Rides...................................................5-7

Volunteer for Bicycle and Pedestrian Counts.11

Rides Chatter.......................................................7

Cascade contacts...............................................11

Working with South Snohomish County...........8

Welcome New Members....................................12

October 2013

CASCADE BICYCLE CLUB BOARD OF DIRECTORS George Durham*

On a typical day, I ride with my kids to school and then commute approximately five miles from Ballard to South Lake Union. I love riding with my family and friends. I usually describe myself as a “utilitarian cyclist,” as my bike is what generally gets me from point A to point B. A highlight of 2013 was riding STP with my nine-year-old daughter, as well as riding my first Rockwell Relay in southern Utah (530 miles through gorgeous desert country)! I’m an experienced marketing and communications professional with deep experience in corporate social responsibility, global communications and technology product marketing. I’m a principal with Linksbridge, a small consulting/ advisory firm in Seattle that provides strategy consulting and research services to NGOs, nonprofits and social impact organizations. Prior to joining Linksbridge, I managed marketing for a digital consumer product at Amazon.com, created the corporate communications and community engagement functions for a publicly traded specialty financial services company, and helped manage community engagement and global Technology for Good programs at Microsoft. I have experience leading two Seattle-area non-profit volunteer organizations. I’ve served on Cascade’s board of directors since 2011, after being elected by the club’s members. The then-brand new board asked me to serve as its President and during my tenure as board chair/ president I helped guide the board and the club through some of the turbulence it had recently experienced. I would love to serve an additional term on the board. I’m confident in and optimistic about the position and future of the club, and hope to help our new executive director build and expand upon the strengths that Cascade has. I bring important perspective, experience, temperament, and stability to the board and I’ve worked hard to strengthen the organization’s community outreach and leadership. I believe in Cascade’s mission and strongly support the club’s work in advocacy, education, and recreation. Cascade provides wonderful opportunities to cyclists of all stripes: from kids to families to regular commuters to competitive cyclists, Cascade is a tremendous resource to Seattle and the region. I sincerely ask for your consideration and your vote, as well as your ongoing support and confidence as we – together – continue to build a strong, capable, and energetic bicycle club.

Rob Harrison

Two years ago I sublet half of my space in the Vance Building to Cascade, so the Club could have a downtown office. Rubbing elbows with Cascade’s staff I have learned a lot about the delicate art of bicycle advocacy. I have been impressed with the intelligence, commitment and passion of my officemates. I’m honored that Cascade staff recruited me to run for the Board. I was an active (mostly) car-free cyclist in Seattle 1990~1998, and first became a Cascade Bicycle Club member back then. I rode the Chilly Hilly and Flying Wheels a number of times, and the STP in 1996. After a dozen-year hiatus I returned to pedal power in 2008. We became the first family to give up two vehicles in Seattle’s One Less Car Challenge, going gasoline-free for two years, and I started commuting rain or shine on my Rivendell Saluki from Southeast Seattle to downtown. I had my big recreational riding comeback with Flying Wheels and STP in 2010. I was a Commute Challenge participant in 2011 and 2012, and a Team Captain in 2013. My son attended Dirt Camp at Duthie Hill 2011 and 2012 while I tootled around

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Boot Camp [trail] on my Bridgestone MB-3. I filled one table at the 2012 Bike-to-Work Breakfast, and two tables in 2013. New adventures await for my 10-year-old son and me on our mid-‘90’s Univega Tandem Tour. In 21 years of work as a green architect, I’ve developed a broad knowledge of the issues around climate change, sustainable urbanism and equitable transportation. In 1992 I cofounded a regional non-profit, the Northwest EcoBuilding Guild. My non-profit experience also includes terms on the Boards of the Pike Market Child Care and Preschool and Alex Steffen’s Worldchanging. I’ve developed cordial relationships with a number of elected officials and City employees in my advocacy for Passivhaus, the ultra-low energy design approach. As a father I fervently want the streets of Seattle to be a safe place for children to ride. I would like to see bicycle education integrated into the curriculum of all schools—for young riders and future drivers. As a resident of Southeast Seattle I feel our neighborhoods have been underrepresented in bicycle infrastructure. I would work to correct that. I have good friends who (among them) enjoy almost every type of bicycling—randonneuring, Cascade’s organized rides, mountain biking, road racing, toddler tootling on Bicycle Sundays, family biking with kids to and from school, cargo biking, daily commuting, and bicycle camping, and I enjoy participating in (or watching) all of these aspects of bicycling myself. I believe Cascade Bicycle Club represents all of those folks, and I would nurture those interests in my work on the Board.

Catherine Henning

As a Cascade Bicycle Club member, volunteer and community advocate, I have been working hard for the last five years to make our community a safe, fun place for bicycling. I believe that service on the Cascade Board will allow me to make an even bigger contribution. Raising a family in Seattle, I did not feel safe bicycling in the city for many years, and the only riding I did was on the Burke-Gilman Trail or on Bicycle Sundays. Then several years ago I gathered the courage to start commuting to work by bike, with the help of a Cascade program to encourage individuals to become regular bicycle commuters. Now I use my bicycle as a primary form of transportation, whether biking to work, running errands by bike or biking for fun and exercise. My husband and I even have a bike trailer that we call our “San Juan-mobile” for weekend trips to the islands on our bikes! After overcoming my own fears and rediscovering the joy of bicycling, it seemed natural to jump into advocacy to foster an environment in which more people would be comfortable riding bikes. But it was the tragic death of one of my coworkers as he was bicycling home from work in South Lake Union that was the real call-to-action. In the wake of his death, I played a leadership role in bringing together a group of large employers in South Lake Union to advocate for programs and infrastructure that will increase safety for bicycling. Over the past five years, I have served as the vice chair of the Citizen’s Advisory Committee for Seattle Children’s Hospital and worked to ensure that the hospital’s expansion is mitigated by a substantial package of bicycle and pedestrian improvements. Finally, I was very excited to be able to participate in the first Advocacy Leadership Institute offered by Cascade. With master’s degrees in both science and business, I have spent my career facilitating the

* indicates incumbent candidate.

commercialization of biomedical research. My skills and strengths include complex negotiations, creative problem solving, and building public-private partnerships. I have spent 20 years working for non-profit organizations. I understand the important role that the board fills in working with the leadership team to set high level strategy and provide support to reach individual goals. Despite the fact that Seattle has fallen behind other major cities in investing in bicycle infrastructure, I love that every day I share the road with more cyclists. We are on the verge of a major shift in thinking about transportation options, and we have an exciting opportunity to increase public support for bicycling. Cascade has the reach and influence to make a major impact. My advocacy experience, skills, and strengths will help Cascade fulfill its vision of creating a community where everyone bicycles.

Janie Mathis

When I was 16 my parents grounded me. I will always be grateful. With my driving privileges gone, I went everywhere on my light blue Schwinn touring bike. That’s when it started—my lifelong love of cycling. I grew up in a small town in Western Kentucky in a medical family with two brothers and an identical twin sister. I attended University of Kentucky undergraduate, University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy, then went to medical school in Iowa and Internal Medicine Residency at University of Tennessee. After my residency, I moved to Eugene for its cycling and running culture. Later in 2004, I moved to Seattle to be with my partner, also an avid cyclist and physician. In Seattle I met Zac Daab at Cascade Bicycle Studio (where I bought my lucky Seven) and Craig Undem at Cycle University. Both have helped me hone my cycling skills and are true mentors to all levels of cyclists. I discovered Cascade Bicycle Club when I registered for the 2004 RSVP. Day one of the ride was torrential rain, one foot of visibility, and I was soaked to the bone with water sloshing out of my shoes. I dried out my passport and day two was cycling nirvana. I met amazing people and bonded with the club itself. I have not missed an RSVP since. I have been an internist in the NW for 13 years. As a physician, patients come first, and every patient matters. In cycling every cyclist matters and every cyclist should be represented by the Cascade Bicycle Club. Cascade Bicycle Club’s focus on safety, advocacy, legislative efforts and camaraderie is the gold standard of cycling organizations. It is this vision, along with my passion for cycling, that makes me want to contribute personally to the work of CBC. I hope you will support my candidacy for the Cascade board. I am determined to help Seattle become the number one cycling city in the country. If elected, my focus will be on creating and encouraging women’s racing and non-racing teams and on creating more alliances with Seattle’s businesses, health care organizations, and universities. And it goes without saying, that I will continue CBC’s crusade for safe bike paths. Cascade Bicycle Club already does great work. As a dedicated physician and tenacious cyclist, I can bring a health-oriented perspective and fresh insight that will raise the organization to the next level. A board that represents all the segments of the cycling community is one that can grow exponentially to serve all its diverse pieces. Like any business model, diversity in leadership is always a win/win position! Thanks for your support and your vote!

Merlin Rainwater, RN, MN

I’ve enjoyed biking for transportation most of my life. As a nurse, I see riding a bike as the cornerstone to my personal well-being, and as the answer to most of the world’s problems. I first joined Cascade as a Bike To Work Team Captain. At the time I was the only person biking to work at my office, and I was pleased and surprised when five co-workers joined me. Both those who chose to ride on my team, and those who declined had similar questions and concerns: “I don’t know how to find a safe route to ride!” “I’m scared to ride in traffic!” “What about the hills and the rain?” I had easy suggestions for the rain (right gear) and the hills (right gears), and I thought it should also be easy to help my co-workers plan good routes. After all, I’ve been riding my bike all over Seattle for years! Looking at the streets through my co-workers eyes however, the disappearing bike lanes, sharrows leading riders into heavy traffic, and complete gaps in mapped bike routes jumped out at me. I became an even stronger advocate for biking, walking and transit. When I retired last year from my career as a hospice nurse, I redoubled my commitment to making Seattle “a better community through bicycling.” Last summer, right after I retired, I had the privilege of participating in Cascade’s first Advocacy Leadership Institute. With the support of Cascade’s advocacy staff and friends in Seattle Neighborhood Greenways, I initiated a project called Safe Routes to Health, calling on Seattle’s healthcare institutions to be champions for safe streets where people of all ages and abilities can enjoy biking, walking or traveling in wheelchairs. I’m becoming a ride leader with the goal of adding more “easy” and “leisurely” rides to the Cascade daily ride calendar, especially in Central and South Seattle. As a member of Cascade’s board, my goals are to • be a strong voice for my friends who would like to ride bikes but are deterred by unsafe and confusing conditions in our communities; • insure that Cascade is a welcoming club that reflects King County’s full range of diversity; • expand efforts that encourage people to begin riding bikes, including the Major Taylor Project, Family Riding events and classes, and school-based events such as bike rodeos and Bike to School efforts; • expand “easy” and “leisurely” ride offerings for beginning bicyclists, families and older adults; • advocate for a transportation system that integrates biking with walking and transit to create vibrant, sustainable communities. Thank you for the opportunity to serve.

Jessica Szelag

Currently I work as a Program Manager at Commute Seattle and I’m also Chair of the Seattle Bicycle Advisory Board. Through my job and volunteer activities, I’m working daily to improve Seattle’s bicycling infrastructure and to create a supportive environment for all ages and abilities of bike riders. Cascade Bicycle Club has been instrumental in growing my passion for bicycling by providing access to a community of cyclists who bike for many different and wonderful reasons, by championing projects, supporting elected officials, and lobbying for the types of improvements I’d like to see in the Puget Sound Region. Biking is my hobby, my personal passion and a lifestyle choice for me and my family.

www.cascade.org

Vol. 43, No. 10

Annual Membership Meeting Most of my time on the bike is spent Monday through Friday heading to or from Phinney Ridge to Downtown Seattle for work. There’s nothing I love more though than exploring new areas on my bike with friends. My favorite rides are through Woodway to Edmonds, NE Perkins Way to Kenmore, Vashon, Bainbridge and Whidbey Islands and the North Cascades Highway. My interest in becoming a member of Cascade’s Board of Directors is to use my skills, background and passion for biking to help the organization meet its mission and goals. My experience in non-profit management, strategic planning and budgeting has given me a great foundation to be able to contribute to the Board of Directors and I’m hopeful that through Cascade’s rides, classes, youth and commute programs, and policy work we will continue to see more and more people using their bicycles for everyday transportation. While there are so many wonderful benefits of cycling, including, health, cost savings, environmental benefits, etc, my main love for biking comes from the reality that it is a fun and excellent way to get around! Sharing the joy of bicycle riding with a wonderful community of riders is what I’m truly inspired by.

Don Volta*

I’m an avid cyclist and ride leader. My greatest passion is leading and participating in Cascade Daily Rides with my wife, Jane, along with riding the Cascade events. We are also deeply engaged in Cascade’s work in supporting and expanding cycling programs for kids. I have served as a board member since 2010, as Secretary, VP and now Treasurer. I want to continue to serve on the board to help Cascade achieve the following vision: Significantly expand the free Daily Rides program, including increasing participation, diversity, geographical coverage, offerings for new riders and rider satisfaction Offer more event riding opportunities for members and newer riders, with a focus on enjoyment and safety • Significantly increase membership by enhancing member loyalty, reducing turnover and increasing Cascade’s visibility • Build the financial means and political power to influence cycling’s infrastructure and safety needs, including the development of greenways and safer cycling routes • Provide the online tools and presence to support our members’ needs and our growth objectives • Enhance the volunteers’ experience and involvement in all aspects of the club • Use partnerships to help advocate for and support the cycling cause • Invest in programs that get more kids on bikes, riding safely for fun, fitness and transportation Having been deeply involved with Cascade for many years and actively participated in all of its activities, I have the experience to help the organization achieve these goals. I also have the critical commitment required, as demonstrated by my ten years as a ride leader and Rides Committee member and leader, including several years spent expanding and managing the Cascade Training Series. As a board member, I have served on the finance, technology, governance, and executive committees, and have devoted myself tirelessly to the success of the club. Jane and I have recently started a fund raising campaign to expand the Basics of Bicycling program in our school district and are committed to continuing this work to reach all schools.

There are many external objectives that we must continue to work toward. Among those that I put as a priority are the Eastside Rail Corridor (42 mile bikeway from Renton to Snohomish), completion (finally) of the BurkeGilman Trail missing link, funding for the Montlake walking/cycling connections to new SR520, and support for and expansion of the greenways and safe cycling routes. Cascade is perfectly positioned to increase its influence in the cycling cause and to meet the needs of an expanding membership. With a sound balance sheet, investments in future programs and growth, a plan and vision for a new club facility, and new executive director leadership, there are no limits to our potential. Please give me the opportunity to help lead the club to this future.

C

ascade Bicycle Club is at an exciting time in its 44-year history, with more members than ever before, a new executive director and visions for a new community space. Please join us at the Annual Membership Meeting to get to know your club, other members, its staff and its leaders. This is also your last chance to vote for the next board of directors. This year’s meeting is extra special. We’re delighted to invite you to meet our new executive director, Elizabeth Kiker! We will also be joined by ZGF Architects, board members and staff who have been leading our way toward a new home base for Cascade — a “Cascade Cycling Center.”

Daniel Weise*

I’ve been on the Cascade board for nearly three years, the last two as the chair of the board. Why do I want to be reelected to the board? Because I want to continue creating more and safer riding opportunities for everyone who cycles or would like to cycle: commuters, recreational cyclists, those running errands, and anyone else wanting to use two wheels. The community needs safer and more bike routes, well maintained roads and trails, more alert, aware drivers, and more bicycles on the road. The club has proven its mettle in all these areas, and has the size and power to continue getting results as it strives to do more and more. During my time on the board, the club has increased riding opportunities. As just a sampling of its increased growth and reach, the club has dramatically grown its daily rides program, created two new event rides, helped local cities to pass safe streets laws and regulations, grown the Commute Challenge run in May, developed the BizCycle program to certify businesses that support bicycle commuting by employees, and created the Advocacy Leadership Institute to train new bicycle advocates. The club is facing a huge transition with the passing of the baton from Chuck Ayers to Elizabeth Kiker. I’m very excited about the selection of Elizabeth Kiker as the club’s new Executive Director, and was on the search committee that hired her. Elizabeth will bring new ideas, methods, and insights to the club. My reelection will help bring stability to the board and club, serving a stable bridge between the old and the new. I remain committed to advocacy that has the goal of changing the laws and culture to work for us, and not just for cars. For example, bicycle trails, completing the “Missing Link,” road diets, traffic signals that detect bikes, harsher penalties for Driving While Distracted, and the “Idaho rolling stop” all improve safety, and all require government action in the form of laws and budgets. The Cascade Bicycle Club must continue its leadership in advocacy, as well as its collaboration with other advocacy groups such as the Bicycle Alliance of Washington. One of my pet projects at Cascade has been the complete renewal of its website and data technologies. By December you should be experiencing a modern website instead of the ancient system we have now. I serve on the boards of both non-profit (I’m currently a board member at Climate Solutions and the Washington Environmental Council) and for-profit organizations. I understand governance, strategy, tactics, and group dynamics. Follow and question me at www.WeiseForCBC.com.

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

Tuesday Oct. 8, 6 - 8 p.m. REI - Seattle

Come see sketches for Cascade’s future home! (images courtesy of ZGF Architects.)

M.J. Kelly, Editor Diane English, Editorial Assistant; Susan Hiles, Photography; October contributors: Kevin Carrabine, Ryann Child, Brock Howell, Peter Hallson, Elizabeth Kiker, Evan Manvel, Sue Matthews, Robin Randels, Anne-Marije Rook, Julie Salathé, Anna Telensky, Daniel Weise

The contents of this newspaper do not necessarily represent the views of the Club or any of its members. The views expressed are those of the individual contributors. Submissions guidelines: Article ideas should be discussed with the Editor in advance as the publication calendar is planned two months prior to publication. Final materials are due the first Tuesday of the month, though earlier is appreciated.  Articles submitted after that will be considered on a space-available basis. Queries can be emailed to. m.j.kelly@cascadebicycleclub.org. If you send text attachments, please format files as native MS Word files or .RTF. For line art please use an .eps format and for photos please use .jpg or .tiff format. The Courier is printed at 300 dpi, so a small 72 dpi photo will not reproduce. If you attach your name and phone number, I will do my best (conditions permitting) to discuss any major changes with you. All submissions are subject to editing for comprehension, grammar or space requirements. Please be concise!

Inserts:  We have room for 6 single sheet qualifying inserts in each issue.  Please contact Leah Pistorius, (913) 579-7629 leah. pistorius@cascadebicycleclub.org, for a copy of our insert policy and request form. The request and fee are due by the first of the month prior to the desired month. Advertising: Advertising: Display ads can be placed in the Courier. To check availability and reserve space, contact Leah Pistorius, (913) 579-7629 leah.pistorius@cascadebicycleclub.org Reprints:  Articles may be reprinted or abstracted in publications of nonprofit groups provided that the author and Club are credited.  Please send us a copy of the reprinted material. Membership Information:  Club records and finances are available to members upon request from the club office at 206522-3222.

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October 2013

With your help, we can elect bike-friendly champions by Evan Manvel, Director of Policy, Planning and Government Affairs

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ho we elect matters – a lot. Think of the bicycle infrastructure project you want completed most: completing the Missing Link of the Burke-Gilman Trail in Ballard, creating the Cross Kirkland Corridor, completing the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trail, or making your downtown city streets safer for families to use their bicycles. To build those projects, we need elected leaders who will champion the cause. That’s why Cascade Bicycle Club works hard to elect leaders who will prioritize making our communities safe for families to bike in — whether it’s helping kids bike to school, moms and dads bike to work or grandparents bike for recreation. These elected leaders will decide on policies and budgets that determine whether we’ll race towards a bike-friendly region — or remain stuck in the status quo. After reviewing candidates’ records, reading their answers to questionnaires and, when necessary, conducting interviews, Cascade has endorsed the candidates throughout the region who will best move our vision forward, and help us create a better community through bicycling. Now it’s up to you. Many of these races will be decided by a narrow margin – a few dozen or few hundred votes. Please make sure to vote.

From Bellevue to Mukilteo, Seattle to the State Senate Local elected officials make the vast majority of day-to-day decisions of how much our communities invest in making the region a great place to ride. Therefore most of Cascade Bicycle Club’s electoral work is focused on local elections. We’re working hard to help re-elect Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn. Mayor McGinn has been one of the highest profile supporters of biking in Seattle – and his support has gone way beyond the soap box. Mayor McGinn has worked to lay the groundwork to finally complete the Missing Link of the Burke-Gilman Trail, while pushing forward a network of neighborhood greenways and protected bike lanes. He’s hired SDOT Director Peter Hahn and Traffic Engineer Dongho Chang, championed a vastly improved Bicycle Master Plan, found one-time pots of money to invest in biking, and worked to boost our long-term resources. Mayor McGinn commutes on his bike, and shows that bikes mean business. We’re also working to re-elect Councilmembers Mike O’Brien, Nick Licata, Richard Conlin and Sally Bagshaw, each of

CASCADE ENDORSEMENTS State Races State Senate District 23

The difference between a candidate’s victory and defeat — between better communities for bicycling or the status quo — is our ability to talk with voters in these local races. Be the difference, commit to volunteering on our campaign work by contacting Emily Kathrein at emilyk@cascade.org.

whom has contributed to making Seattle a great place to bike. Electing Steve Kasner to the Bellevue City Council is another Cascade priority. We already know the Bellevue City Council will get better through electing Lynne Robinson or Vandana Slatter. The election of Kasner would solidify a bike-friendly council majority, just in time to make big improvements in Bellevue’s Comprehensive Plan update set for 2014, as well as the final adoption of other city plans. We’re past due to have King County’s second largest city supporting biking in a serious way. Cascade is also working to elect State Senator Nathan Schlicher. The Washington state legislature adopts multi-billion-dollar transportation budgets and transportation packages. We need to ensure our legislators understand the value of investing in trails and bicycle safety projects across the state; electing Senator Schlicher is an important off-year step this November. Finally, we’re working to elect local officials in many jurisdictions across the region – from Snohomish County’s Bill Blake to Mukilteo mayoral candidate Jennifer Gregorson (who wrote a study of bike sharing as a planning student), to Bainbridge Island candidates Val Tollefson and Roger Townsend, to Lake Forest Park’s Hilda Thompson and John Resha, and Federal Way’s Martin Moore and Jeanne Burbidge. For the full set of Cascade’s endorsements – see the table at right. Make Sure to Register and Vote! Whoever you’re supporting this November, please make sure to vote. Make sure your registration is current – by visiting http://www.sos.wa.gov/elections/ and cast your ballot by November 5. Thank you!

Nathan Schlicher

County Races King County Executive

Dow Constantine

King County Council, Pos. 1

Rod Dembowski

Snohomish County Council, Pos. 1

Bill Blake

Snohomish County Council, Pos. 5

Dave Somers

Port Races Port of Seattle, Pos. 1

John Creighton

Port of Seattle, Pos. 3

Stephanie Bowman

City Races Auburn Mayor

Nancy Backus

Auburn City Council, Pos. 6

Rich Wagner

Bainbridge Island City Council, North Ward

Val Tollefson

Bainbridge Island City Council, South Ward

Roger Townsend

Bellevue City Council, Pos. 4

Steve Kasner

Bellevue City Council, Pos. 6

Lynne Robinson & Vandana Slatter

Bremerton City Council, Pos. 4

Greg Wheeler

Burien City Council, Pos. 1

Lauren Berkowitz

Burien City Council, Pos. 5

Nancy Tosta

Des Moines City Council, Pos. 7

Dave Kaplan

Edmonds City Council, Pos. 3

Adrienne Fraley-Monillas

Federal Way City Council, Pos. 6

Martin Moore

Kenmore City Council, Pos. 4

Nigel Herbig

Kirkland City Council, Pos. 1

Jay Arnold

Kirkland City Council, Pos. 3

Penny Sweet

Kirkland City Council, Pos. 5

Amy Walen

Kirkland City Council, Pos. 7

Doreen Marchione

Lake Forest Park City Council, Pos. 1

Hilda Thompson

Lake Forest Park City Council, Pos. 3

John Wright

Lake Forest Park City Council, Pos. 5

Mark Phillips

Lake Forest Park City Council, Pos. 7

John Resha

Issaquah Mayor

Fred Butler

Mercer Island City Council, Pos. 2

Dan Grausz

Mercer Island City Council, Pos. 5

Tana Senn

Mukilteo Mayor

Jennifer Gregorson

Mukilteo City Council, Pos. 3

Randy Lord

Sammamish City Council, Pos. 1

Kathleen Huckabay

Seattle Mayor

Mike McGinn

Seattle City Council, Pos. 2

Richard Conlin

Seattle City Council, Pos. 4

Sally Bagshaw

Seattle City Council, Pos. 6

Nick Licata

Seattle City Council, Pos. 8

Mike O’Brien

Shoreline City Council, Pos. 3

Will Hall

Shoreline City Council, Pos: 7 Tacoma City Council, Pos. 2

Chris Roberts Robert Thoms

Let’s make sure our future schools are safe and convenient for all modes of transportation by Julie Salathé, Education Director

S

hould the driveway to a school parking lot cross the main sidewalk where pedestrians and bicyclists are entering the school? Is a separated bicycle lane or greenway possible leading up to a school? What elements make for a safe and welcoming school entrance? These are some of the difficult questions that the City of Seattle School Traffic Safety Committee discussed in a mid-September meeting with architects, school principals, bike/walk partners, construction managers involved in the construction and planning of three new schools as part of the BEX levy. With the recent attention on traffic safety around schools, the Traffic Safety Committee (TSC) requested a meeting with the archi-

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tects and construction managers for several of the planned new buildings. Among the organizations represented on the TSC were Cascade Bicycle Club, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle Department of Transportation’s Safe Routes to School (SRTS), Feet First and Seattle Neighborhood Greenways. That meeting was exciting for us, as it marked the first time in recent memory that the committee discussed bike and pedestrian accessibility in the planning stages of new schools. What may look like a great design to the architects and landscape designers -- taking into account all of the site restrictions and neighborhood codes -- may still fall short when viewed through the lens of bike and pedestrian access. So after the architects had presented their ideas, community representa-

tives and bike/ped experts were encouraged to provide their comments in the hopes of building schools that are safe and convenient for all modes of transportation. The following bike/ped improvements are examples of the proposals that will be considered: One of the schools is constrained by space limitations and limited neighborhood parking. A proposal suggests that a city park located just two blocks away could serve as a remote drop-off site for parents and/or buses if there’s a walking school bus in place to take the kids the remaining two blocks to school. This park could potentially also be used for outdoor school activities given the lack of an outdoor field on the small school building lot.

In another school design, the architects had proposed a bus drop-off area on the paved playground due to the limited neighborhood parking spaces. Instead, they are now exploring the option of moving the buses to a place where they won’t come in conflict with children and families walking and biking to school. A welcoming “community entrance archway” for walkers and bikers could be build where the bus entrance to the playground would have been. This meeting is an example of what can be accomplished when we give opinions and options in the early stages of a planning process, before the plans are finalized. We are inspired by what these future schools can look like, and thank the architects for being receptive to our ideas. www.cascade.org

Vol. 43, No. 10

OCTOBER RIDES More daily rides are listed online at www.cascade.org/dailyrides

Cascade Bicycle Club Ride Classification In order to pick the rides that suit your skills and energy level, use the following guidelines: • PACE: The speed on level ground without breaks: Easy: Under 10 mph Leisurely: 10-12 mph Steady: 12-14 mph Moderate: 14-16 mph Brisk: 16-18 mph Strenuous: 18-21 mph Super Strenuous: 22+ mph • TERRAIN: These descriptions should be considered in the context of the pace and length of the ride: Mostly Flat: Trails and/or mostly flat roads with a possible gentle upgrade Rolling: Climbs are short and easy, not too numerous. Some Hills: A few short steep hills, some moderate upgrades and/or longer gentle climbs. Hilly: Many true hills, but none outrageous.

Extremely Hilly: Steep & long climbs with grades >9% and/ or mountain passes Unlimited: “Out of category”; only for those very sure of their ability to climb any grade, any length at the advertised pace. Off Road: Significant unpaved sections. • M AP: Whether a map or cue sheet is provided. • REGROUP: None and Occasional regroup categories expect experienced riders who can fix their own mechanical problems and follow a map/cue sheet if they are separated. • RAIN: Weather conditions that cancel the ride. Helmets are required on all rides. When using a cell phone you must pull off the road/trail and STOP. Put away all earbuds/headphones/music devices before the ride starts.

TUESDAY, OCT. 1

Year-round training rides for one-day STP riders. Rides stress safety, cooperation, and group riding skills. Fast pacelines with regroups from Renton to surrounding areas. Large turnout splits into multiple groups. ** No parking in Coulon Park parking lot. Lights required.

TREATS: Gas Works to Edmonds 30-35 mi • Steady • Hilly • Map • Stay together • 10:00 a.m. • Gas Works Park, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Peter Hallson, 425-673-4816 Let’s go for lunch in Edmonds. Ride through UW campus, visit Hamlin Park, and return from Edmonds via Interurban Trail.

Cycle Tuesdays 25-35 mi • Super strenuous • Some hills • No Map • Occasional regroup • 5:45 p.m. • Gene Coulon Park, next to Kidd Valley, Renton • Ice/snow cancels • Pete Grey, 425-558-0451, pgrey@hotmail.com • Vince Haag, 425-7857451, vehaag@comcast.net Year-round training rides for one day STP riders. Rides stress safety, cooperation and group riding skills. Fast pacelines with • regroups from Renton to surrounding areas. Large turnout splits into multiple groups. No parking in Coulon parking lot.

Eastside Tours Evening Ride 20-30 mi • Brisk • Hilly • No Map • Frequent regroup • 6:30 p.m. • Marymoor Park, east (free) parking lot, Redmond • Showers cancel Eric Gunnerson, 425-753-6032, eric_ gunnerson@hotmail.com Join us for our 16th year of evening rides as we explore the Eastside. The route varies from week to week. Our pace on the flats is approximately 17 MPH. This is a hilly ride; we will climb around 1500 feet on an average ride. Hills are climbed at your own pace and we regroup at the top of all hills. Please see website for more details before attending. Lights Required!

WEDNESDAY, OCT 2 WRUMPS: Snohomish/Lake Roesiger/ Monroe 48 mi • Steady • Some hills • Map Online • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Centennial Trailhead, Snohomish • Showers cancel • Loretta Goetsch, 206-525-4714, lagoetsch@ aol.com Starts at the Centennial Trailhead located just past the corner of Maple and Pine in Snohomish. No restrooms at trailhead. Public restrooms are on corner of 1st St and B Avenue in Snohomish. Lunch stop is 31 miles into ride. Bring a snack.

THURSDAY, OCT 3 THUMPS: Home for Lunch 20-35 mi • Moderate • Some hills • No Map • Stay together • 9:30 a.m. • Leschi Starbucks, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Mike Nelson, 206-325-9068 Be home in time for lunch after some urban exploration. Fixies and single speed bikes welcome. Ride leader will be riding a single speed.

More Cycle Tuesdays 25-35 mi • Super strenuous • Some hills • No Map • Occasional regroup • 5:45 p.m. • Gene Coulon Park, next to Kidd Valley • Restaurant, Renton • No rain cancellation • Lola Jacobsen, 425-829-8765, lolaj@ outlook.com • Tom Baker, 425-221-0631, tommbaker@hotmail.com

All riders are required to sign a waiver form. Rides are cancelled or are no longer considered Cascade rides in the event that the ride leader does not show up or does not

Eastside Tours Evening Ride 20-30 mi • Brisk • Hilly • No Map • Frequent regroup • 6:30 p.m. • Marymoor Park, east (free) parking lot, Redmond • Showers cancel • Eric Gunnerson, 425-7536032, eric_gunnerson@hotmail.com Join us for our 16th year of evening rides as we explore the Eastside. The route varies from week to week. Our pace on the flats is approximately 17 MPH. This is a hilly ride; we will climb around 1500 feet on an average ride. Hills are climbed at your own pace and we regroup at the top of all hills. Please see website for more details before attending. Lights Required!

FRIDAY, OCT 4 Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 1: Steady 60 mi • Steady • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:00 a.m. • Pioneer Park, Walla Walla, http://goo.gl/maps/IA7N7 • Steady rain cancels •Nan Haberman, 206-399-0466, n.haberman@frontier.com • Christie Winter, 206-930-3552 cell, happybeingme@live.com Join several of your Cascade Bicycle Club Rider Leaders for a beautiful cycling weekend in the Walla Walla area. We have organized a free daily ride for each day from Oct 4-6 with various paces and distances offered*. We will start the weekend off with a 50-60-mile ride, followed by an 80-100-mile ride the next day, and 30-40mile ride the last day. Please come to enjoy one or all rides as you are able. You will get a chance to interact with locals as we are co-posting these rides with the Wheatland Wheelers. These rides are not supported. We will provide short rest stops along the route, but please come prepared with your own food and beverages. Hotel accommodations are to be handled by riders individually as needed. Group discounts could be offered if there is enough interest. Please email Ride Director Alexa Volwiler, (alexa.volwiler@ gmail.com), 360-303-0526. Please note that safe riding rules will be followed. Helmets, water bottles, and all necessities necessary to fix a flat are required. While we don’t plan on riding at night, please bring a taillight and headlight in case of mechanical issues. The ride leaders are not responsible for helping to fix flats or mechanical issues. RSVPs are strongly encouraged, though not required. Please visit our Meetup page to RSVP and learn more about the routes, daily ride plans, and to join the conversation. *Paces are classified as Steady (12-14 mph on flats), Moderate (14-16 mph on flats), Brisk (16-18 mph on flats), and Strenuous (18-21 mph on flats). Faster riders are encouraged to join, but the route will be self-guided. Climb hills at your own pace and we regroup at the top.

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

provide a waiver form for signatures of riders. Riders are expected to be ready to ride at the time listed (i.e. that’s not the time to drive into the parking lot with a full bladder and empty tires) and to ride in a safe, courteous, legal manner. Riders are expected to cooperate with the leader(s) and ride within the advertised pace. If unsure of your ability to keep up, try a slower level ride to get an idea of ride paces. For “Hilly” rides, consider choosing a pace down from your usual level. Unless indicated, it is not necessary to RSVP the ride leader to participate in a ride. Youth riders may also join regular club rides. Permission must be obtained from the ride leader at least 24 hours in advance for youth to join a regular club ride. Children 15 and under must be accompanied by parent or legal guardian OR must have parent/legal guardian sign a consent form designating a guardian for them on the ride; youth ages 16-17 may ride without a parent or guardian with advance permission of the ride leader AND a signed parental

consent form (available at www.cascade.org) which must be given to the ride leader at the start of the ride. Cascade does not sponsor or endorse any non-bicycling activities that people may participate in while on these rides. Each cyclist is responsible for his/her conduct and decisions while on a Cascade ride. Cascade membership and activities are open to anyone able and willing to participate in a safe, courteous and cooperative manner and in support of the purposes of the club. Ride information is also available at: www.cascade.org. Only Cascade certified ride leaders may post and lead Cascade Daily Rides. See Ride Leader Information on our website or email the Rides Chair at cbcrides@cascadebicycleclub.org. On Twitter? Tag your tweets and twitpics with #dailyrides.

Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 1: Moderate

are required. While we don’t plan on riding at night, please bring a taillight and headlight in case of mechanical issues. The ride leaders are not responsible for helping to fix flats or mechanical issues. RSVPs are strongly encouraged, though not required. Please visit our Meetup page to RSVP and learn more about the routes, daily ride plans, and to join the conversation. *Paces are classified as Moderate (14-16 mph on flats), Brisk (16-18 mph on flats), and Strenuous (18-21 mph on flats). Faster riders are encouraged to join, but the route will be self-guided. Climb hills at your own pace and we regroup at the top.

60 mi • Moderate • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:00 a.m. • Pioneer Park, Walla Walla, http://goo.gl/maps/IA7N7 • Steady rain cancels • (John) Jack Nolan, 206-9402225 cell, jacknolan62@comcast.net Join several of your Cascade Bicycle Club Rider Leaders for a beautiful cycling weekend in the Walla Walla area. We have organized a free daily ride for each day from Oct 4-6 with various paces and distances offered*. We will start the weekend off with a 50-60-mile ride, followed by an 80-100-mile ride the next day, and 30-40mile ride the last day. Please come to enjoy one or all rides as you are able. You will get a chance to interact with locals as we are co-posting these rides with the Wheatland Wheelers. These rides are not supported. We will provide short rest stops along the route, but please come prepared with your own food and beverages. Hotel accommodations are to be handled by riders individually as needed. Group discounts could be offered if there is enough interest. Please email Ride Director Alexa Volwiler, (alexa.volwiler@ gmail.com), 360-303-0526. Please note that safe riding rules will be followed. Helmets, water bottles, and all necessities necessary to fix a flat are required. While we don’t plan on riding at night, please bring a taillight and headlight in case of mechanical issues. The ride leaders are not responsible for helping to fix flats or mechanical issues. RSVPs are strongly encouraged, though not required. Please visit our Meetup page to RSVP and learn more about the routes, daily ride plans, and to join the conversation. *Paces are classified as Moderate (14-16 mph on flats), Brisk (16-18 mph on flats), and Strenuous (18-21 mph on flats). Faster riders are encouraged to join, but the route will be self-guided. Climb hills at your own pace and we regroup at the top.

Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 1: Brisk 57 mi • Brisk • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Pioneer Park, Walla Walla, http://goo.gl/maps/IA7N7 • Steady rain cancels • Alexa Volwiler, alexa.volwiler@ gmail.com • Wilfried Mack, wilfried.mack@ gmail.com Join several of your Cascade Bicycle Club Rider Leaders for a beautiful cycling weekend in the Walla Walla area. We have organized a free daily ride for each day from Oct 4-6 with various paces and distances offered*. We will start the weekend off with a 50-60-mile ride, followed by an 80-100-mile ride the next day, and 30-40mile ride the last day. Please come to enjoy one or all rides as you are able. You will get a chance to interact with locals as we are co-posting these rides with the Wheatland Wheelers. These rides are not supported. We will provide short rest stops along the route, but please come prepared with your own food and beverages. Hotel accommodations are to be handled by riders individually as needed. Group discounts could be offered if there is enough interest. Please email Ride Director Alexa Volwiler, (alexa.volwiler@ gmail.com), 360-303-0526. Please note that safe riding rules will be followed. Helmets, water bottles, and all necessities necessary to fix a flat

Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 1: Strenuous 57 mi • Strenuous • Some hills • Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Pioneer Park, Walla Walla http://goo.gl/maps/IA7N7 • Steady rain cancels • Bob Dennis, 206679-4639, Bob.Dennis993@gmail.com • Mitchel Schoenfeld, 206-579-5473 cell, oksurewhynot@mac.com Join several of your Cascade Bicycle Club Rider Leaders for a beautiful cycling weekend in the Walla Walla area. We have organized a free daily ride for each day from Oct 4-6 with various paces and distances offered*. We will start the weekend off with a 50-60-mile ride, followed by an 80-100-mile ride the next day, and 30-40mile ride the last day. Please come to enjoy one or all rides as you are able. You will get a chance to interact with locals as we are co-posting these rides with the Wheatland Wheelers. These rides are not supported. We will provide short rest stops along the route, but please come prepared with your own food and beverages. Hotel accommodations are to be handled by riders individually as needed. Group discounts could be offered if there is enough interest. Please email Ride Director: Alexa Volwiler, (alexa.volwiler@ gmail.com), 360-303-0526. Please note that safe riding rules will be followed. Helmets, water bottles, and all necessities necessary to fix a flat are required. While we don’t plan on riding at night, please bring a taillight and headlight in case of mechanical issues. The ride leaders are not responsible for helping to fix flats or mechanical issues. RSVPs are strongly encouraged, though not required. Please visit our Meetup page to RSVP and learn more about the routes, daily ride plans, and to join the conversation. *Paces are classified as Moderate (14-16 mph on flats), Brisk (16-18 mph on flats), and Strenuous (18-21 mph on flats). Faster riders are encouraged to join, but the route will be self-guided. Climb hills at your own pace and we regroup at the top.

FRUMPS: Kenmore Ramble 30-40 mi • Moderate • Some hills • No Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Tracy Owen Station (Logboom Park), Kenmore Showers cancel • Dan Garretson, 425-9858570 We will ride from Logboom Park to an unknown destination. The location and distance will be determined by the weather. There will be a lunch stop.

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October 2013

OCTOBER RIDES www.cascade.org/dailyrides FRIDAY RIDERS: Explore Husky Stadium and Lake Union ~25 mi • Leisurely • Mostly flat • No Map • Frequent regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Gas Works Park, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Bill Lemke, 206-284-2843 The remodeled UW Stadium and additional fields for track, softball, soccer, and baseball make the stadium and north parking lot a destination. We’ll also explore South Lake Union while biking around Lake Union and time permitting some of Ballard. The ride will have a coffee/lunch stop.

SATURDAY, OCT 5 Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 2: Steady 85 mi (4000’) • Steady • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:00 a.m. • Pioneer Park, Walla Walla, http://goo.gl/maps/IA7N7 Showers cancel • Joni Griffis, 206-817-6580 cell, joni.griffis@gmail.com • Ann Silvernale, 206-794-4008 cell, annsilvernale@hotmail. com *Please see Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 1 description, 10/4 for details regarding this ride.

Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 2: Moderate 85 mi (4000’) • Moderate • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:00 a.m. • Pioneer Park, Walla Walla, http://goo.gl/maps/IA7N7 Showers cancel • (John) Jack Nolan, 206-9402225 cell, jacknolan62@comcast.net • Jake Wright, 206-271-6703, vaelin4@gmail.com *Please see Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 1 description, 10/4 for details regarding this ride.

Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 2: Brisk 85 mi (4000’) • Brisk • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:00 a.m. • Pioneer Park, Walla Walla, http://goo.gl/maps/IA7N7 Showers cancel • Wilfried Mack, wilfried. mack@gmail.com • Alexa Volwiler, alexa. volwiler@gmail.com *Please see Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 1 description, 10/4 for details regarding this ride.

Annual Ride to the Harvest Festival at the Fall City Methodist Church 17/23 mi • Steady • Rolling • Map • Frequent regroup • 10:30 a.m. • Tolt McDonald Park, Carnation • Ice/snow cancels • Jan Johnson, 425-672-0617 This event is earlier this year. Last year we stopped at the organic farm to see the pumpkins and take pictures. I’m hoping that’s available again. This is a recreational bicycle ride to the annual Fall City Methodist Church Harvest Festival. If there is heavy rain, we will drive, after meeting at MacDonald Park at 10:30 a.m. and picking up maps. Bring cash, (about $7.50/$8.00, please no big bills) for a fixed-price lunch of HOMEMADE soup, bread, drink, and pie(s). The church members cook and serve the food. NEW this year homemade tamales! (Made by members of the Church whose heritage makes them experts.) Also available are bakery treats to buy. This is a bit of small town America (and replaces the November Christmas bazaar). Those who want to avoid any hills and ride the short route will have to retrace the route without the leader who will be on the “rolling hills” route. Tolt McDonald Park access road is west off Hwy 203 on the south outskirts of Carnation and before the bridge when traveling south. Drive down the road to the left parking lot. Note: do not confuse this with the ball fields that are right on Hwy. 203.

SPOKESPEOPLE Rides: Craftsman Homes of Ravenna Park 7 mi • Easy • Rolling • Map • Stay together 2:00 p.m. • Wallingford Playfield south end, N 42nd St & Densmore Ave N, Seattle • No rain cancellation • Cathy Tuttle, 206-5479569, 206-713-6269, cathy.tuttle@gmail. com • Michael Herschensohn, 206-412-0702, mh982501@gmail.com Join architect Larry Johnson of The Johnson Partnership http://www.tjp.us on a tour of historic homes. We’ll travel along Greenways in Wallingford and proposed Greenways in NE Seattle on an easy ride to the historic Ravenna Park neighborhood. Spokespeople rides on the

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first Saturday of every month on a fun, lowcarbon, family-friendly community ride. All Wallingford Spokespeople rides meet at the south end of Wallingford Playfield at N 42nd St & Densmore Ave N and ride on the road to an adjacent urban center. New riders welcome! Please come by 1:45 if you are new to riding in groups or if you need help with adjusting your helmet or bike. All ages and skill levels welcome! FAMILYFRIENDLY. All rides are on the road with traffic and include expert commuters who accompany us to offer encouragement and model good road riding techniques for new, returning and reluctant cyclists. Please join us! **Breaking news! Noted architectural historian, president of the Queen Anne Historical Society, and former MOHAI Director Michael Herschensohn will also join us and provide commentary. We’re delighted Michael is a regular Spokespeople ride leader.

SUNDAY, OCT 6 CAFES #1: Black Diamond Bakery 60 mi • Brisk • Some hills • Map Online • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • South Bellevue Park & Ride, 2700 Bellevue Way SE No rain cancellation • James Coliz, rider.x@ coliz.com Cycling in Autumn For Espresso Series (CAFES). Another cycling season draws to a close. Now what? Coffee time! Bring your rain bike and join me for six rides in six weeks from South Bellevue. We ride to a different coffee shop each time. Mileage will taper down to get you ready for winter hibernation. Long fenders are absolutely required unless it is bone dry out, and zero percent chance of rain forecast. Please visit the meetup.com posting (www.meetup. com/cascaderides/events/138283332) to review important details about the ride. While there, please RSVP, and do check back occasionally for updates. Ride Leader mentoring is available.

Walla Walla Weekend Getaway Day 3: Steady 31 mi • Steady • Rolling • Map Online • Frequent regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Pioneer Park, Walla Walla • Steady rain cancels • Sandi Navarro, 425-802-1171 cell, snavarro@fhcrc. org • Judy Fyffe, 425-681-6031 cell, judy_ fyffe@msn.com *Please see Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 1 description, 10/4 for details regarding this ride.

Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 3: Moderate 30 mi (1300’) • Moderate • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Pioneer Park, Walla Walla, http://goo.gl/maps/IA7N7 Steady rain cancels • (John) Jack Nolan, 206940-2225 cell, jacknolan62@comcast.net • Jake Wright, 206-271-6703, vaelin4@gmail. com *Please see Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 1 description, 10/4 for details regarding this ride.

Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 3: Brisk 30 mi (1300’) • Brisk • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Pioneer Park, Walla Walla, http://goo.gl/maps/IA7N7 Steady rain cancels • Alexa Volwiler, alexa. volwiler@gmail.com • Wilfried Mack, wilfried.mack@gmail.com *Please see Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 1 description, 10/4 for details regarding this ride.

Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 3: Strenuous 30 mi (1,300’) • Strenuous • Some hills • Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Pioneer Park, Walla Walla, http://goo.gl/maps/ IA7N7 • Steady rain cancels • Bob Dennis, 206-679-4639, Bob.Dennis993@gmail.com • Mitchel Schoenfeld, 206-579-5473 cell, oksurewhynot@mac.com *Please see Walla Walla Getaway Weekend Day 1 description, 10/4, for details regarding this ride.

MONDAY, OCT 7 MUMPS: Head Up North 45-65 mi • Brisk • Moderate • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Tracy Owen Station/Logboom Park, Kenmore Steady rain cancels • Craig Mohn, 425-890-

5234 cell, cmohn_cycling@comcast.net, (texts preferred to VM) A fun loop ride in south Snohomish County with a food stop en route. Distance and pace may vary to suit weather conditions and group. The pace will be Brisk; a Moderate pace group may be added if certified ride leader volunteers are available for both paces-if not, the needs of moderate riders will be addressed with more frequent regroups. Check with leader if weather appears questionable. Ride leader will try to have the route available on ridewithgps.com at least one day before the ride-search for “MUMPS 201309xx”, where xx is the date.

TUESDAY, OCT 8 TREATS: Cycle to Granite Falls 38-41 mi • Steady • Hilly • No Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • On the Centennial Trail where Maple meets Pine, ON THE NORTH EDGE of the City of Snohomish • Showers cancel • Jan Johnson, 425-672-0617 Although we start out on the Centennial Trail and use the restrooms about 20 minutes into the ride, this is not a trail-only ride. The leader will not start if there are showers. If there is any chance of rain bring your rain jacket in case it starts part way into the ride. This ride is for experienced cyclists due to a section of busy highway and long stretches of rural roads with no shoulders. There are no short cuts for those who get tired or wet and faster riders please do not race ahead and leave the leader and steady riders cycling alone. It is expected that cyclists regroup at the leader’s designated regrouping sites. Most of the hills are not long but are steep and cyclists must be able to shift quickly and smoothly. Take US-2 or SR-9 to the town of Snohomish. Travel east on 2nd Ave, turn left on Maple, continue for about 4 blocks around a slight curve where Maple meets Pine and there is a sign on a straight stretch of trail (not down in town center where the “official” start is.) Park along the street. We’ll have lunch in Granite Falls.

Cycle Tuesdays See Cycle Tuesdays, 10/1.

Eastside Tours Evening Ride See Eastside Tours, 10/1.

WEDNESDAY, OCT 9 WRUMPS: 3 SMALL LAKES AND A BIG ONE 42 mi • Moderate • Hilly • Map Online • Frequent regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Newport Hills Park & Ride (I-405 Exit 9), Bellevue Showers cancel • Alan Lawrence, 425-8917079, alan@jazzloft.com A very scenic ride with 4 lakes along the way. We’ll ride through the back streets of Bellevue to Marymoor Park where we’ll swing around Lake Sammamish before climbing up to the plateau. Once there, we’ll grab a coffee before the nice descent to the south side of the lake and head back to Bellevue. This is a friendly ride with regrouping at the top of hills. Ride leader mentoring opportunity available. Call the ride leader if questionable weather.

THURSDAY, OCT 10 THUMPS: Home for Lunch 20-35 mi • Moderate • Some hills • No Map • Stay together • 9:30 a.m. • Leschi Starbucks, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Mike Nelson, 206-325-9068 Be home in time for lunch after some urban exploration. Fixies and single speed bikes welcome. Ride leader will be riding a single speed.

More Cycle Tuesdays See More Cycle Tuesdays, 10/3.

Eastside Tours Evening Ride See Eastside Tours, 10/3.

FRIDAY, OCT 11 FRUMPS: Snohomish/Lake Roesiger/ Monroe 48 mi • Steady • Some hills • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Centennial Trailhead, Maple & Pine, Snohomish

Steady rain cancels • Bill Blake, 206-8566387, wpblake@comcast.net Social ride in rural Snohomish County. No restrooms at trailhead; public restrooms on corner of 1st and B Ave in Snohomish and again 4.8 miles into ride at Machias Station. Bring snacks; lunch stop is 31 miles into ride. Contact ride leader if doubtful about weather; due to the distance to Snohomish, leader will not be at start of ride if ride is cancelled due to weather.

FRIDAY RIDERS do North Seattle 25 mi • Leisurely • Some hills • No Map • Stay together • 10:00 a.m. • Gas Works Park, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • David Bordewick, 425-822-8546, theborde@aol.com Ride from Gas Works Park to the North Seattle area with a lunch stop at Lake Forest Park after a nice long downhill coast on NE Perkins Way. Return to Gas Works via the lakefront.

SATURDAY, OCT 12 WEST SEATTLE/MAGNOLIA/FREMONT LOOP 26+ mi • Leisurely • Hilly • No Map • Stay together • 10:00 a.m. • Jack Block Park, West Seattle • Showers cancel • Marge Evans, 206938-2247, cyclingmarge@msn.com • Ron Evans, 206-938-2247, deartoto@msn.com Fun ride from West Seattle over Magnolia and then down to the Ship Canal Trail. Lunch stop at PCC Fremont, then ride back to West Seattle via Dexter and downtown. Showers, high winds cancel.

SUNDAY, OCT 13 CAPES #2: Sandy’s Espresso/Carnation 50 mi • Brisk • Some hills • Map Online • Occasional regroup • 9:00 a.m. • South Bellevue Park & Ride, 2700 Bellevue Wy SE No rain cancellation • James Coliz, rider.x@ coliz.com Cycling in Autumn for Espresso Series (CAFES). Another cycling season draws to a close. Now what? Coffee time! Bring your rain bike and join me for six rides in six weeks from South Bellevue. We ride to a different coffee shop each time. Mileage will taper down to get you ready for winter hibernation. Long fenders are absolutely required unless it’s bone dry out, and zero percent chance of rain. Please visit the meetup. com posting (www.meetup.com/cascaderides/ events/138704702) to review important details about the ride. While there, RSVP and remember to check back occasionally for updates. Ride leader mentoring available.

MONDAY, OCT 14 MUMPS: Head Up North See MUMPS, 10/7.

TUESDAY, OCT 15 TREATS: Ride to the South Seattle Area 25 mi • Steady • Some hills • No Map • Stay together • 10:00 a.m. • Gas Works Park, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • David Bordewick, 425-822-8546, theborde@aol.com Ride via East Capitol Hill to the Beacon Hill neighborhood. Visit Jefferson Park, Chief Sealth Trail, and Lake Washington waterfront. Lunch stop in Columbia City. Return via the lakefront.

Cycle Tuesdays See Cycle Tuesdays, 10/1.

RIDE LEADER CERTIFICATION CLASS 6:30 p.m. • CBC Office, 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Bldg 138, Seattle • No rain cancellation • Ride Leader Certification Coordinator, 425-828-0138, rlcert@ cascadebicycleclub.org Have you cycled on 5 or more Cascade Free Daily Rides this year or last? Would you like to lead your own rides? Become a Certified Cascade Ride Leader! To register, send an email with your NAME, CASCADE MEMBER NUMBER, and a CONTACT PHONE NUMBER (home, cell, or work) to rlcert@cascadebicycleclub.org. Class size limited to 15. Details about becoming a Ride Leader at http://www.cascade.org/EandR/ Ride_Leader_Info.cfm.

www.cascade.org

Vol. 43, No. 9

OCTOBER RIDES www.cascade.org/dailyrides Eastside Tours Evening Ride See Eastside Tours, 10/1.

WEDNESDAY, OCT 16 For a complete list of this month’s rides, see www. cascade.org.

THURSDAY, OCT 17 More Cycle Tuesdays See More Cycle Tuesdays, 10/3.

Eastside Tours Evening Ride See Eastside Tours, 10/3.

FRIDAY, OCT 18 FRUMPS: Leschi/Issaquah/May Valley 47 mi • Steady • Some hills • Map Online • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Parking lot south of Madrona Park on Lk Washington Blvd, Seattle • Showers cancel • Loretta Goetsch, 206-525-4714, lagoetsch@aol.com Will cycle clockwise route to May Valley and return around south end of Lake Washington. Lunch at 31.4 mi into ride. Bring a snack.

FRIDAY RIDERS: Explore north from Lake Ballinger 26-28 mi • Leisurely • Some hills • No Map • Frequent regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Ballinger Lake Ball field by Ballinger Lake Community Ctr, 23000 Lakeview Drive, Mountlake Terrace • Showers cancel • Jan Johnson, 425672-0617 We’ll have a chance to explore on and off the Interurban Trail north with a food stop. This trail does go on roads with a lot of turns with short hills and busy road crossings. This is not a flat trail like the Burke-Gilman and is not suitable for novices. GPS and computer maps may have the old designation of “Ballinger Lake Golf Course” which was changed in 2013 to “Ballinger Ball Playfield and Community Center” as the golf course went broke and the land was turned into a park. There is a new sign at the entrance to the parking lots. From I-5 take Exit 177 (“Hwy 104/ Ballinger Way”); go west (as if to Edmonds); turn north/right on 76th at the light and then east/ right on 228th which curves to the parking lot on the right. (Note: there are many ways to get here; choose yours from the Internet if you wish.) Park in the lot at the ball field adjoining the Ballinger Community Center.

SATURDAY, OCT 19 See www.cascade.org/dailyrides for an updated listing.

SUNDAY, OCT 20 CAFES #3: Uptown Espresso/Magnolia 40 mi • Brisk • Some hills • Online Map • Occasional regroup • 9:00 a.m. • South Bellevue Park & Ride, 2700 Bellevue Wy SE • No rain cancellation • James Coliz, rider.x@ coliz.com Cycling in Autumn for Espresso Series (CAFES). Another cycling season draws to a close. Now what? Coffee time! Bring your rain bike and join me for six rides in six weeks from South Bellevue. We ride to a different coffee shop each time. Mileage will taper down to get you ready for winter hibernation. Long fenders are absolutely required unless it’s bone dry out, and zero percent chance of rain. Please visit the meetup. com posting (www.meetup.com/cascaderides/ events/138705072) to review important details about the ride. While there, RSVP and remember to check back occasionally for updates. Ride leader mentoring available.

MONDAY, OCT 21 MUMPS: Head Up North See MUMPS, 10/7.

TUESDAY, OCT 22 TREATS: Fall City to North Bend 25 mi • Steady • Rolling • Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Fall City Community Park, Fall City • No rain cancellation • Clarice Sackett, 425-478-8306

We’ll ride to North Bend on wooded back roads for lunch after a brief stop at Snoqualmie Falls. If nice weather, we may add 5 miles distance. Start at Fall City Park, which is north of river on west side of Route 203 (Fall City-Carnation-Duvall Highway).

Cycle Tuesdays See Cycle Tuesdays, 10/1.

Eastside Tours Evening Ride See Eastside Tours, 10/1.

WEDNESDAY, OCT 23 WRUMPS: Bellevue-Redmond Loop +/-40 mi • Steady • Hilly • No Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Robinswood Park, Bellevue • Showers cancel Jack Crumley, 425-746-5321 • George Meredith, 425-823-4924 This ride will take us through some of Bellevue’s residential areas, past Microsoft, then down to Redmond. We’ll climb over Education Hill, ride through Farrel McWhirter Park, go south on East Lake Sammamish PKWY to Issaquah then up SE Newport Way and back to the start. The exact route is yet to be determined but plan on something in the 40-mile range with a few steeper hills. To find Robinswood Park take I-90: for those coming from the west use Exit 11B toward 148th Ave SE; for those coming from the east take Exit 11 toward 156th Ave SE then follow the signs to 148th Ave SE; go north on 148th Ave SE then turn Right on SE 22nd St, then right into Robinswood Park’s north parking lot.

THURSDAY, OCT 24 More Cycle Tuesdays

Occasional regroup • 9:00 a.m. • South Bellevue Park & Ride, 2700 Bellevue Wy SE No rain cancellation • James Coliz, rider.x@ coliz.com Cycling in Autumn for Espresso Series (CAFES). Another cycling season draws to a close. Now what? Coffee time! Bring your rain bike and join me for six rides in six weeks from South Bellevue. We ride to a different coffee shop each time. Mileage will taper down to get you ready for winter hibernation. Long fenders are absolutely required unless it’s bone dry out, and zero percent chance of rain. Please visit the meetup. com posting (www.meetup.com/cascaderides/ events/138705442) to review important details about the ride. While there, RSVP and remember to check back occasionally for updates. Ride leader mentoring is available.

Pedaling for Posthumous Pastures 30 mi • Moderate • Some hills • Map • Frequent regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Burnett Linear Park, Renton • Showers cancel • Roger Salstrom, 206276-8348 Welcome to another yearly edition of cemetery exploration. As we near the night when ghosts, ghouls, and goblins appear to spook us all into giving them treats (scary, isn’t it?), we’ll again embark on a journey to the grave of Baby Monster. (I’m not kidding; just ask someone who’s been on the ride before). Take the Rainier Ave/Renton exit from I-405 at the interchange for SR-167 and head north into Renton on Rainier Ave. Move into right lane after crossing Grady Way, turn right onto S 7th St. Continue straight on 7th to Burnett. Turn left onto Burnett and follow it around the Park. Parking is north of the park. For more information, call ride leader at 206-276-8348.

See More Cycle Tuesdays, 10/3.

Eastside Tours Evening Ride See Eastside Tours, 10/3.

FRIDAY, OCT 25 FRUMPS: Bellevue Circumnavigation 40 mi • Moderate • Hilly • No Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Robinswood Park, Bellevue • Showers cancel Jack Crumley, 425-746-5321 A HILLY ride around Bellevue with a lunch stop along the way, so bring a few dollars. To reach Robinswood Park take I-90 east to Exit #11, to 148th Ave SE (Bellevue College exit); right onto NE 22nd St; right into Robinswood Park north parking lot.

FRIDAY RIDERS: Beacon Hill Food Forest 25 mi • Leisurely • Some hills • No Map • Stay together • 10:00 a.m. • Gas Works Park, Seattle • Showers cancel • Norm Tjaden, 206525-2366 We’ll visit the newly developed Food Forest near Jefferson Park; a community development with food-producing trees and shrubs. Return by Capitol Hill for lunch/dessert at Bakery Nouveau. Expect some hills and traffic.

SATURDAY, OCT 26 SPOKES: Bones to Bones Halloween Ride 15-20 mi • Leisurely • Some hills • Map • Frequent regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Sammamish River Park, Bothell • Steady rain cancels Michelle Burton, 425-890-4936 cell • Jim Hunt, 425-681-4640 cell SPOKES will start at the Sammamish River Park in Bothell. We’ll check a couple of cemeteries in Bothell, Kirkland, and/or Woodinville to get the Halloween ghoulish feel. Maybe toast bygones at a local coffee shop. To reach Sammamish River Park, located off 102nd Ave NE, take SR-522 to 102nd Ave NE and cross the small bridge over the Sammamish River. Turn into the unpaved parking area on the right just after crossing the bridge. Please note that steady rain cancels. For more info, please see the SPOKES web site: www.cbcspokes.org.

SUNDAY, OCT 27 CAFES #4: Brew/Bothell 40 mi • Brisk • Hilly • Online Map •

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

MONDAY, OCT 28 MUMPS: Head Up North See MUMPS, 10/7.

TUESDAY, OCT 29 TREATS: Seattle Loop 30 mi • Steady • Some hills • Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Gas Works Park, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Les Weppler, 206-789-1955 This will be an interesting and scenic city ride beginning with a loop through UW, Windermere and Laurelhurst before we head downtown via Interlaken Park and South Lake Union. We’ll then cross the Thomas St Bridge and take the Myrtle Edwards Trail toward Magnolia and a lunch break on Dravus St near the Interbay. After lunch we will climb to Discovery Park and then return through the Fisherman’s Terminal and on the Ship Canal Trail to GWP. Please arrive by 9:45 for a prompt departure at 10.00.

Cycle Tuesdays See Cycle Tuesdays, 10/1/

Eastside Tours Evening Ride See Eastside Tours, 10/1.

WEDNESDAY, OCT 30 For a complete list of this month’s rides, see www. cascade.org.

THURSDAY, OCT 31 More Cycle Tuesdays See More Cycle Tuesdays, 10/3.

Eastside Tours Evening Ride See Eastside Tours, 10/3.

Meet cycling legend Bob Roll! Saturday, Oct. 26, 7:30 p.m. Hales Palladium , 301 Leary Way North West Tickets at brownpapertickets.com

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ob is one of America’s most well-known retired professional cyclists who rode for the celebrated 7-Eleven and Motorola teams in the 1980s. A special fundraiser for the Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation, the event will include a 90-minute presentation followed by a Q&A session before event-goers will get a chance to meet and greet one of the biggest names in U.S. cycling.

RIDES CHATTER

“Ride Leader of the Year” recognition for 2013 by the Rides Committee

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nother year is screaming by, and yes, it’s already time to collect your nominations for the 2013 Ride Leader of the Year. We have more than 225 Ride Leaders who volunteer their time to lead in excess of 1,600 rides a year (including the Cascade Training Series), and some leaders definitely go the extra mile and deserve special recognition. The Rides Committee announces the recipient at Cascade’s annual Volunteer Recognition Party, held in December. This award was created in 2005 to specially recognize extraordinary contributions to our Rides Program. Over the years, our honorees have included Per and Shana Sunde, Norm Tjaden, Mike Kelly, Gary Strauss, Scott Kralik, Craig Mohn, Francis Gan and Jan Johnson -- all outstanding contributors to Cascade’s Daily Rides Program. Now, for 2013, we need your help. Whether you are a Ride Leader or a riding member, if you know a leader you believe deserves this recognition, we want to hear from you. Look back and ask yourself: did anyone go the extra mile in terms of cue sheets and maps, and really great routes? Was anyone particularly friendly, welcoming and helpful? Did the leader keep to the advertised pace, start on time and advocate good safety practices? All these factors add up, so if anyone stands out to you, please let us know. For each nominee, the Rides Committee will consider the number of rides led, if s/he answered the call when leaders or sweeps were needed, did s/he assist on CTS, and were waiver forms turned in on time (yes, these are important), as well as other factors. This is a significant honor, so please give it some thought and get back to us no later than Nov. 16. All nominations are confidential. Further, Rides Committee members are ineligible for this award. All nominees must have demonstrated their outstanding performance for more than two years. To be a repeat winner you must wait five years. Nominations can be made by email to cbcrides@cascadebicycleclub.org or by card/letter to Scott Boggs, Rides Chair, Cascade Bicycle Club Office, 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Suite 101S, Seattle WA, 98115.

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October 2013

Working with the South Snohomish County community to increase bicycling by Ryann Child, Commute Program Assistant

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arlier this year the Verdant Health Commission awarded Cascade Bicycle Club a multi-year grant to increase bicycling in South Snohomish County. Our vision: people in South Snohomish County will ride bikes more often as part of a healthy, active lifestyle; community leaders will work to make bicycling safer and more convenient; and kids will build healthy, active futures. Over the past few months—through an online survey, community study rides and business outreach—Cascade has been working alongside city staff, residents, commuters and businesses in the area to make that vision a reality. While a complete network of safe and comfortable infrastructure across the county remains a figment of the future, we’ve gained sense of the barriers and opportunities for bicycling in the area to direct us on the path ahead. Currently, less than 1 percent of Snohomish County residents bike to work: 0.2 percent in Brier, 0.4 percent in Edmonds, 0.3 percent in Mountlake Terrace and 0 percent in Woodway. From a survey sent out to residents throughout South Snohomish, however, more than 98 percent of the 333 respondents own a bicycle and nearly 70 percent strongly agreed with the statement, “I would like to travel by bike more than I do now.”

What’s stopping them?

We conducted a series of rolling bicycle “audits” of South Snohomish streets to collect community input on network gaps, safety concerns and other barriers to more people bicycling. In June, Cascade held the first of these study bike rides, taking a critical look at bicycle access to transit facilities in Lynnwood, Mountlake Terrace and Edmonds. A second audit in August focused on connections to reach popular destinations in just the city of Edmonds, such as the ferry terminal, Edmonds Station, the Interurban Trail and schools, by bike. We also brought employers and business leaders into the conversation in a special session of our Bike Business Forum held at Swedish/Edmonds Hospital midSeptember. At these events, we listened and learned. Below are a few challenges and opportunities identified: 1. Wayfinding. At every event including both bike audits and the Bike Business Forum, several people identified the need for more signage to highlight local attractions and important destinations. With steep topography, limited safe cross-county routes and missing links on the Interurban Trail, wayfinding is an opportunity to direct bicyclists to existing infrastructure and safe places to ride.

2. Connectivity. Existing bike lanes don’t always connect people on bikes to the places they need to go, such as a bike lane on 200th Street SW in Lynnwood that doesn’t reach the transit center and drops westbound bicyclists at the intersection of Highway 99. Compounding on this challenge, Washington 99 and I-5 slice the county, limiting east-west connectivity. Cascade recommends prioritizing routes that connect people to critical destinations such as transit, schools, trails and employers to make getting there by bike a more attractive transportation choice. 3. Design for all ages and abilities. Rather than filling in network gaps with sharrows, now is the time for jurisdictions within South Snohomish to update plans and implement projects that reflect new infrastructure designs attractive to riders of all ages and abilities, such as protected bike lanes that separate fast moving cars from bicycles and intersection designs that promote predictability and safety. 4. End-of-trip facilities. Overheard on a bike audit: “Edmonds is missing a bet leaving out bikes in planning, [there is] lots of money in cyclists.” It’s true—bicyclists make great customers if you give them a place to lock up. We also heard a primary barrier in biking to work is a lack of secure bicycle parking at workplaces. Cascade plans to provide guidance to employers and retailers through our BizCycle Best Practices Guide and encouraging businesses to apply for certification.

Seven more bike counters in Seattle

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f you’ve biked across the Spokane Street Bridge or Fremont Bridge, you have probably already spotted Seattle’s two automated bike counters. In early September, the Seattle City Council Transportation Committee authorized the acceptance of a gift of funds from the Mark and Susan Torrance Foundation and Rails to Trails Conservancy to be applied toward the purchase of seven more bike counters. The ordinance now goes before full city council for a vote. Unlike the two existing bike counters in West Seattle and Fremont, not all of the proposed bike counters will have the electronic display totems. But while they may not be as visually appealing, these counters will be an important addition to the Seattle Dept. of Transportation’s data collection program. These counters will allow improved measurements of the city’s progress toward getting more people to travel by bike and to help determine what additional bike infrastructure would be most beneficial. SDOT is interested in distributing them across the city to reach as broad a spectrum of cyclists as possible. “The more that we have information and data on the use of the city’s streets by

bicyclists, the more we’ll be able to plan successfully and build successfully for a great bicycle system,” said Seattle City Councilmember Tom Rasmussen during the transportation committee hearing. “So these counters will help us a great deal.”

Benchmarked for 2014, the proposal calls for the following counters: •

A bicycle counter and display on the Burke-Gilman Trail at 15th Ave Ne • A combined bicycle and pedestrian counter on: • Bridge the Mountains to Sound Trail near the I-90 Bridge • the Elliott Bay Trail in or near Myrtle Edwards Park • the Chief Sealth Trail • the Burke-Gilman Trail (exact location TBD) • Bicycle counters without a display on: • the Broadway Cycle Track • along a neighborhood greenway (exact location TBD) Like the current counters, the data collected by these counters will be posted on a website for the public to see: www.seattle. gov/transportation/bikecounter.htm

What’s next?

This November Cascade will hold a two-day version of our Advocacy Leadership Institute for South Snohomish community members interested in leading campaigns in their communities. The training will provide community activists the tools to advocate effectively. Contact Emily Kathrein (emily.kathrein@cascadebicycleclub.org) for more information. There’s work to be done, yes, but the community participation and enthusiasm for change we’ve encountered so far is inspiring. We look forward to working together to make South Snohomish County a better place to live, work, do business and of course, bicycle.

The Fremont Bridge bike counter celebrates one year of counting bicyclists this month. Photo by Seattle Dept. of Transportation

Mark your calendar for the Seattle Bicycle Expo! March 1 - 2, 2014 Member of Cascade Bicycle Club and Bicycle Alliance of Washington. Sponsor of Fischer Plumbing, Bikesale.com, Recycled Cycles Racing, Garage Racing, Cucina Fresca, Blue Rooster Racing, SCCA/Starbucks and Lakemont Cycling Teams.

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We’re happy to announce that we will be returning to the Smith Cove Cruise Terminal 91 for the 2014 Seattle Bicycle Expo, which will take place a weekend earlier than usual on March 1 and 2. Registration for new vendors will open in early November. Returning vendors will be automatically notified when registration opens. If you’re interested in being a new vendor and would like to be placed on the notification list email annat@cascadebicycleclub.org.

www.cascade.org

Vol. 43, No. 10

Announcing 2014 Cascade Club Tours by Sue Matthews, Tours Committee

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ur Club led tour schedule is ready for 2014! These tours, led by volunteer Cascade-certified ride leaders, have been immensely popular and have received high ratings from participants. Next year there will be four week-long and three extended-weekend tours as listed below. Full tour details are online at www.cascade.org. Registration lotteries for the early-season tours – Arizona, Eastern Washington, Idaho and Bend – will open on Tuesday, Oct. 22 at 10 a.m., and close on Monday Oct. 28 at noon. Lotteries for Southern Oregon and the Wallowas will open in late February 2014. See the club website for details on lottery registration.

ARIZONA ESCAPE – 7 DAYS April 12-19, 2014 Moderate pace Tour leaders: Sue Matthews and Jan Van Fredenberg The Arizona Escape tour explores southern Arizona, starting and ending in Tucson. The route explores canyons, creeks and wildlife preserves where birds abound, goes through historic towns skirting the Mexican border, and visits military sites, missions, national monuments and amazing caverns. This 407 mile, seven-day tour provides BASIC support (no lunches, one SAG vehicle), a small group, lightly travelled roads, variety in scenery and a chance to escape the spring gloom in Washington and find the sun in Arizona. Your tour price includes eight nights lodging.

EASTERN WASHINGTON – 3 DAYS May 16-19, 2014 Brisk/strenuous pace Tour leader: Albert Meerscheidt We’re bringing this tour back after a long hiatus. The forerunner of the popular fourday tour, this three-day tour covers some of the same territory in reverse, but offers new scenery as well. It also starts in Chelan, but follows the Columbia River toward Brewster and Bridgeport before heading to Grand Coulee. After a lovely warm up cycling along the Columbia, the second day challenges your early season fitness, climbing Disautel and Loup Loup Passes on the way to lodging in the center of Winthrop, nestled in the

spectacular Methow Valley. Our last day gives us the opportunity to cruise downhill along the Methow River before turning back along the Columbia to our tour end in Chelan. Popular for years, we are excited to bring this tour back to you for 2014.

EASTERN WASHINGTON – 4 DAYS May 29-June 2, 2014 Brisk/moderate pace Tour leader: Albert Meerscheidt This tour has been run every year since 2008. It starts in Chelan along the Columbia, climbs along the Methow River toward Twisp and over Loup Loup Pass to Omak. The next day climbs over Wauconda Pass to the tiny western town of Republic. On the third day, we cruise down the Sanpoil River, over a big hill and down into Coulee Dam to stay at the base of the dam. The final day includes a climb out of the Columbia River valley, a ride across a rolling plateau, and a descent of stunning McNeil Canyon before returning to Chelan. This tour is gorgeous and has been considered by many repeat participants as the necessary training ride for a summer of great riding.

IDAHO PANHANDLE – 7 DAYS June 7-14, 2014 Moderate pace Tour leaders: Sue Matthews and Jan Van Fredenberg Starting and ending in Spokane, Washington. The route travels north on the spectacular Centennial trail toward Chewelah before heading east to Sandpoint, Idaho on little travelled scenic roads. After following Lake Pend Oreille and the Clark Fork River into Montana, the route heads southwest over Thompson Pass back to Idaho and the small town of Kellogg where we have a rest day. We then spend a day following the spectacular Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes through the small towns of Harrison and Plummer, ID. We end our tour continuing into Washington amidst rolling farmlands back to Spokane. This 397 mile, 7 day tour has something for everyone, tremendous variety in scenery, mountain passes, lakes and streams, plentiful opportunities for sighting wildlife, and two beautiful trail systems.

Take a tour!

BEND AND CENTRAL OREGON – 4 DAYS June 19-23, 2014 Moderate difficulty, steady pace 4-Day Hub and Spoke (All 4 nights same Hotel) Tour leaders: Loretta Goetsch and Sue Matthews Mountain views, river canyons, quiet roads through scenic farmland, and sunny weather highlight this four day fixed-base tour in the Bend area. Cycle past lakes and descend past Bachelor, enjoy the scenic bikeway to Smith Rock State Park, cycle through high desert, canyons, and along the Crooked River. A short drive is required to some daily start points on this tour. Your tour price includes five nights lodging.

SOUTHERN OREGON – 7 DAYS September 6-13, 2014 Moderate difficulty, steady pace Tour leaders: Loretta Goetsch & Sue Matthews

OREGON WALLOWAS AND HELL’S CANYON – 6 DAYS September 21-27, 2014 Moderate pace Tour leader: Sue Matthews Explore the stunning beauty of Eastern Oregon, where cowboy country and wilderness meet the deepest canyon in the U.S. Bucolic back roads populated by cattle, miles and miles of wilderness roads with nary a car in sight, diverse and breathtaking landscapes, historical landmarks, and activities to complement the scenery. Be sure to bring walking shoes to enjoy the art and bronze works in Joseph, the hiking trails on Mt. Howard (after the tram ride!), the interpretive walk in Hells Canyon (after your jet boat ride!) and the Oregon Trail interpretive center. Bring your swimsuit for Wallowa Lake and of course your camera to capture it all!

Cycling on quiet, smooth roads in sunny warm weather with the Rogue River often your companion makes Southern Oregon an ideal place to visit on a bike. Lunch at the edge of Crater Lake, an evening in Ashland with its Shakespeare Theater, and a day off in Galice, a Rogue River rafting community, are some of the extras on this Southern Oregon Tour. Your tour price includes eight nights lodging.

October classes by Robin Randels, Classes Coordinator

Roll up your sleeves! There are two more months of classes before we take our winter hiatus in December. Fall is an excellent time to learn the maintenance that you’ve been meaning to get around to but have been too busy riding your bike. Space is still available in our October and November classes. If you’ve decided to ride your bike more or to make year round riding a reality, join our Urban Cycling Techniques Class. Learn how to stay visible and ride predictably in traffic as well as build your bike handling and hazard avoidance skills. You’ll learn a thing or three about various types of bikes – is there a new bike in your future? We’ll discuss how to dress for the weather, traffic law, various bike facilities, basic maintenance and locking techniques. Become a skilled and confident rider. Urban Cycling Techniques qualifies as a pre-requisite (TS 101) for the League of American Bicyclists League Certified Instructor Seminar in February. Here is the lineup for October classes:

FIX A FLAT

URBAN CYCLING TECHNIQUES

Monday, Oct. 7, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Learn this simple and important skill to minimize delays the next time your tire fizzles. We’ll take the mystery out of wheel and tire removal, patching a tube and putting it all back together. Learn what tools to carry for a quick and speedy repair. Our class is handson-your-bike -- so bring it along. We’ll send you home with patch kit and a step by step guide for the next encounter with a flat tire.

Two day class on Thursday, Oct. 24, 6 – 9 p.m. and Saturday, Oct. 26, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. We’ve designed this class to help bicyclists gain the knowledge to make informed decisions while riding in traffic and the confidence to balance caution, assertiveness and the skills necessary for safer urban riding. Recreational or transportational cyclists who want to learn to interact positively and safely with urban traffic will learn: • traffic laws as they pertain to bicyclists • proper helmet fit • basic maintenance and overview of how to fix a flat • practical riding skills, effective braking techniques, scanning, avoiding obstacles and signaling • on-bike crash-avoidance techniques

CHAINS AND DERAILLEURS Wednesday, Oct. 23, 6:30 – 9 p.m. Learn basic methods for working on chains and derailleurs that will keep your drive-train and shifting system in tip top shape. We’ll cover chain maintenance, derailleur adjustment and troubleshooting system problems. This is a hands-on-your-bike class, so bring it along with a multi-tool if you’ve got one -- we will have tools available if you don’t. You will go home with a smoother shifting bike and our new refresher how-to guide booklet.

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

We will practice on-road skills such as: • lane positioning, communication with drivers and left-turn techniques • group riding skills • bike fit and nutrition as time allows

The first session is presentation only -- no bike required. The second session is outside, on your bike. Optional half-hour League of American Bicyclists exam afterwards. Our “Via Bike” handbook, a reference for the skills learned in this course, is included. Bring working bike and helmet to second session. Bring your lunch and be sure to wear weather appropriate clothing.

BRAKES, WHEELS AND TIRES Wednesday, Oct. 30, 6:30 – 9 p.m. Learn basic methods for working on various types of rim brakes. We’ll cover rim care and cleaning, brake pad inspection, cleaning, adjustment and replacement. We’ll also cover how to inspect spokes for correct tension and tires for wear. Bring your bike and any tools you have -- we’ll have tools on hand if you don’t.

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October 2013

BIKENOMICS

[I like biking] because I like to go fast… I like to go to parks so I can get exercise like at gym daycare.

Honey by Beecycle Business: Urban Bee Company Founder: Bob Redmond Industry: Agriculture

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CYCLIST OF THE MONTH

WYATT BROOKS by Anne-Marije Rook, Staff Writer Age: 3 Wheels: Blue Strider balance bike and orange pedal bike Occupation: being a kid he only person of his household to currently hold a Cascade Membership, Wyatt “the Riot” Brooks, age 3, is arguably our youngest card-holding individual member. Perhaps one of the happiest bicyclists we have ever seen, Wyatt has been on a bike since he was 18 months old. “[I like biking] because I like to go fast. I go biking with mom or daddy, and we go to the parks,” said Wyatt. “I like to go to parks so I can get exercise like at gym daycare.” Growing up along the Interurban Trail, Wyatt is exposed to a lot of bikes, explained his father, John. “He sees a lot of bikes. And when I saw the Strider bike, I was intrigued,” said John. “We first got him on the bike partially because he’s a high-energy kid and to focus his energy on biking instead of breaking things. He just loves it.” Now progressing to his first pedal bike, Wyatt has been receiving safe riding lessons from his neighbor, Sound Transit’s Bicycle Program Coordinator, Rebecca Roush. “When I found out he had a bicycle I thought, ‘boy, this is great.’ This is somebody I can help learn how to ride, learn how to ride safe and learn how to ride right,” said Roush. “So I asked his parents if I could start riding with him and they said yes. We go out at least every other weekend – if not every weekend – and just ride around the neighborhood. He loves it. He loves riding that bike.” Together, Roush and Wyatt ride to the park, to the coffee shop, even to the new cycletrack on Linden. And while he’s still a bit too young to grasp the concept and danger of traffic and riding in a straight line, Wyatt knows to look for cars before crossing the street, to stop at corners and that the sidewalk is the safest place for him to ride.

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“Reb has been integral in Wyatt’s bike riding. More often than not she’s the one who takes him on bike rides,” said Wyatt’s mom, Kate. We are so grateful to have her. She takes him everywhere – it’s great.” Wyatt is also fortunate to be living along a bicycle-friendly street. “One of the good things about living along the Interurban is that he does see people riding bikes back and forth all day, and so he is exposed to bike riding everywhere and not just as a means of exercise but also as a means of commuting,” said Kate. Inspired by Roush and Wyatt, Kate looks forward to getting back on a bike herself as well. “I bought my road bike about six months before I got pregnant and went on my first 60-mile-ride maybe a week before I got pregnant and subsequently put my bike in the garage. Two kids later…the bike was tuned up last week. So [the youngest] is four months old and I’m ready to get back on the bike,” she said. “I want to be the mom with the bright pink cruiser with a bucket on the front and carrying my kids and bikes and pails and snacks.” Additionally, Kate and Wyatt even tried their hands at bike racing, lining up for their first Cyclocross races last month. Whether as a commuter or a racer, something tells us this kid will grow up to be an inspiring bicyclist. Know a cyclist who deserves some special recognition? Nominate them for cyclist of the month! Send your ideas to Anne-Marije Rook at  amrook@cascadebicycleclub.org.

f a worker bee were a human bicyclist, its days would be spent bicycling 1,440 miles daily, carrying 72 pounds of nectar for half the distance while maintaining a speed of 60 mph. The fittest human being in the world couldn’t do that for even one hour, let alone for weeks on end. Out of respect for this incredible feat, Bob Redmond and his bicycle-centered Urban Bee Company delivers honey by bicycle – or “beecycle” as Bob calls it – a simple hybrid Bianchi with at least 5,000 miles on it. Arguably the nation’s first bicycle-centered honey producer, Bob started backyard beekeeping in 2009 as a hobby. Living in an apartment, Bob kept bees in a friend’s backyard, transporting the harvested honey by bicycle simply because he owned no other vehicle. When the interest in his honey and hives grew, Bob had to start transporting his bees and five or six tons worth of equipment by a borrowed truck or Zipcar rental, but he continued to deliver honey to retail shops and buyers by bike. “It started purely by accident,” said Bob. “Now, we deliver all our honey by bicycle to really drive home the message of sustainable transportation. The impacts of using fossil fuel as the basis for food production are extreme. We try to do as much as possible with human power.” Since Urban Bee Company was founded, it has grown to maintaining numerous hives on 16 carefully selected locations – including five community gardens. And with a goal to change the way people think about food, to create a local food system and to be a model for other producers, Urban Bee Co. offers educational programs and fosters collaborative partnerships. Bob and the Common Acre nonprofit even convinced the Port of Seattle to allow them to put hives on the Sea-Tac Airport property, turning some of the wasted flight path and into a nesting habitat for native pollinators. World-wide, whole colonies of bees are dying because of loss of habitat, the use of pesticides and disease. Seattle is no exception. Project Flight path will turn 50

acres into a native bee habitat to raise local, disease-resistant and pesticide-free bees to be distributed to local beekeepers while educating surrounding communities at the same time. “Bees are the ultimate example of sustainable food transportation,” said Bob. “I like the juxtaposition of the airport – this fuel-based human transportation – versus the bees, model operators of sustainable transportation.” Sixteen hives have already been installed on the property with many more to come. “If we inspire and educate people about pollinators and the need for locally-grown food, that will help the local food system grow. If we rehabilitate land right here in the city, that will reduce our dependence on fossil fuel and support our local economies,” Bob explained, adding that this project will serve as a model for many projects to come. As part of Project Flight Path, the airport will open a bee-themed art and education exhibit in early 2014 to illustrate this connection between food and transportation. “The conclusion I have reached after years of beekeeping is that the future of beekeeping is in native bees and trying to create habitats for native bees,” said Bob. “I encourage people to look at the big picture and support pollinators of all kinds not just the honey bees. Of course, the honey bees made this business possible because I’ve been able to sell their honey.” Learn more and sign up for honey delivery by beecycle at www.urbanbee.com.

Bikenomics is a feature series to spotlight the greater Seattle area’s growing bike businesses. Know a business that should be featured? Send me an email at amrook@cascadebicycleclub.org.

www.cascade.org

Vol. 43, No. 10

Volunteer for the 2013 State Bicycle and Pedestrian Counts! October 1, 2 or 3 by Ryann Child, AmeriCorps Commute Programs Assistant

CASCADE CONTACTS Home Page: www.cascade.org Office phone: 206-522-3222 or 206-522-BIKE Fax: 206-522-2407 Email: info@cascadebicycleclub.org

STAFF Note: All email address are @cascadebicycleclub.org Jeff Aken, Principal Planner (206) 300-5932 • jeff.aken@ … Jenny Almgren, Education Program Assistant

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ake bicycling and walking count! Cascade is looking for volunteers in more than 30 cities around Washington to help count bicyclists and pedestrians between 7 – 9 a.m. and 4 – 6 p.m. If you are available to help out, please contact Ryann Child at cpa@cascadebicycleclub.org or (206)8619890. Every year since 2008, Cascade Bicycle Club has worked with the Washington State Department of Transportation to coordinate the annual Washington State Bicycle and Pedestrian Documentation Project in 20 – 30 cities. This data collection effort was initiated by the state to track progress toward increasing bicycling and walking in communities statewide. The data also helps to justify investments in bicycling and pedestrian projects. 2013 Count Cities: Bainbridge Island, Bellevue, Bellingham, Bothell, Bremerton, Burien, Ellensburg, Everett, Ferndale, Gig Harbor, Issaquah, Kelso, Kent, Kirkland, Lake Forest Park, Lakewood, Longview, Lynden, Mercer Island, Milton, Mountlake Terrace, Oak Harbor, Olympia, Orting, Parkland, Puyallup, Redmond, Renton, Richland, Seattle, Shoreline, Spokane, Tacoma, Tukwila, University Place, Vancouver, Walla Walla, Wenatchee and Yakima.

(206) 694-9148 • jenny.almgren@ … Ryann Child, Americorps Member, Commute Programs (206) 861-9890 • cpa@ … David Douglas, Event Producer (206) 522-BIKE • david.douglas@ … Noah Down Development Associate (206) 245-0001 • noah.down@ … Ed Ewing Major Taylor Project Director (206) 778-4671 • ed.ewing@ … Ellison Fidler Hub of the Club (206) 957-7944 • ellison.fidler@ … Brock Howell Policy and Government Affairs Manager (206) 856-4788 • brook.howell@ … Liz Johnson Americorps Member, Major Taylor Project (206) 957-6960 • mtpa@ … Emily Kathrein Field Programs Manager (402) 699-4739 • emily.kathrein@ … M.J. Kelly Director of Communications & Marketing (206) 853-2188 • m.j.kelly@ … Elizabeth Kiker Executive Director (206) 523-9495 • elizabeth.kiker@ … Diana Larson Volunteer Coordinator

Bicycle Accident?

Avoid The Mistakes That Can Leave You Holding The Bag.

When the insurance company calls wanting a recorded statement and asking you to sign a few forms, what should you do? Politely hang up and get the MOST important information about Washington Bicycle Accident claims before talking to the insurance company, hiring a lawyer, or signing anything. Order this NO COST Book at:

(208) 870-9406 • amrook@ … Julie Salathé Education Director (206) 523-1952 • julies@ … Anna Telensky Events and Sponsorship Coordinator (206) 778-6099 • annat@ … Kim Thompson Event Registrar (206) 526-1677 • kim.thompson@ … Alan Van Vlack Database and Accounting Coordinator (206) 226-1858 • alan.vanvlack@ … Peter Verbrugge Event Producer (206) 399-9565 • peterv@ … Stacey Williams Membership Growth and Rides Coordinator (206) 330-4484 • staceyw@ … Tarrell Wright Development Director (206) 240-2235 • tarrell.wright@ …

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Note: All email address are @cascadebicycleclub.org President Daniel Weise • daniel.weise@... Vice President Kevin Carrabine • kevin.carrabine@... Treasurer

David Lee Rides Director

Don Volta • don.volta@cascadebicycleclub.org

(415) 203-4578 • david.lee@ …

Secretary

Serena Lehman Community Outreach Manager

Charles Ruthford • charles.ruthford@...

(206) 291-4032 • serenal@ …

Executive Committee Member-at-large

Kathy Mania Finance Director

Maggie Sue Anderson • maggiesue.anderson@…

Evan Manvel Director of Policy, Planning & Gov’t Affairs

Ever had a car turn left directly in front of you without even looking? If you are hit by a car do you know what to do? Do you know who to talk to and who you shouldn’t? Do you know what mistakes some people make in the days or weeks following the accident that wreck an injury case? Find the answers in this free book.

Anna-Marije Rook Staff Writer

(206) 852-6827 • diana.larson@ …

(206) 498-2607 • kathy.mania@ …

Don’t make one of the 7 Biggest Mistakes That Can Wreck Your Washington Bicycle Accident Case.

Cascade Bicycle Club 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Suite 101S Seattle, WA 98115

(206) 369-9049 • evan.manvel@ … Kathy McCabe Deputy Director (206) 409-0429 • kathy.mccabe@ … Tim O’Connor Tech Manager

Directors George Durham • george.durham@... Dr. Rayburn Lewis • rayburn.lewis@... Mo McBroom • mo.mcbroom@... Emily Moran • emily.moran@…

(206) 660-7922 • tim.oconnor@ …

Joe Platzner • joe.platzner@…

Lindsey Parker Americorps Member, Youth Programs

Bill Ptacek • bill.ptacek@...

(206) 861-9875 • ypa@ …

Ron Sher • ron.sher@...

Leah Pistorius Communications Specialist

Michael Snyder • michael.snyder@...

(913) 579-7629 • leah.pistorius@ …

Ed Yoshida • ed.yoshida@cascadebicycleclub.org

Robin Randels Classes Coordinator (206) 390-3945 • robin.randels@ …

www.WashingtonBicycleBook.com or call 425.242.5595

MEMBERSHIP FORM Please detach form and return to: Cascade Bicycle Club •7400 Sand Point Way NE, Suite 101S • Seattle, WA 98115 o New member o Renewal FIRST NAME

MI LAST NAME

M/F DATE OF BIRTH

EMAIL

STATE

ZIP

ADDRESS CITY HOME PH

WORK PH

CELL PH

To help promote cycling, we occasionally share names with other organizations. We never share telephone numbers or email addresses, only postal addresses. May we share your name? ◊ Yes ◊ No TYPE OF MEMBERSHIP 1 YEAR 2 YEARS GIFT SOCK SIZE OFFICE NOTES

Individual Household/Family* Supporter* Advocate* Champion* Student/limited income (e-news only)

o $ 35 o $ 60

o $ 65 o $ 115

o $ 100 o $ 250

o $ 195 o $ 495

o $ 500 o $ 15

o $ 995 o $ 25

Cycling socks

S M L XL

Cycling socks

S M L XL

Cycling socks

S M L XL

Tax-deductible donation to the CBC Education Foundation** TOTAL ENCLOSED o

A check payable to the Cascade Bicycle Club is enclosed. ($20 fee for returned checks.)

o

Please charge my VISA/MASTERCARD: — — ��� Cardholder’s name (Please print):

Exp. date /

Cardholder’s signature: *Contributing members may include household and family members on their membership. **The Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation (CBCEF) is an IRS 501(c)(3) charity. Donations to the CBCEF are tax-deductible. Membership contributions or gifts to the Cascade Bicycle Club 501(c)(4) are not deductible as charitable contributions for federal income tax purposes.

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

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October 2013

Welcome New Members Burton Alesse Rose Amano Jeff Askins Laura Barboza Rob Barker Seth Bedwell Charles Beek Susan Beek Simon Bennett Jim Benoit Dena Berkey Frank Boosman Daniel Brands Jennifer Brewer Wyatt Brooks Bruce Bulloch Jarratt Burch Paul Burkhart David Burroughs Roger Chick Ellen Chu Douglas Crawford Emily Criddle James Criddle Patty Criddle Norman De Asis JoAnn Debo Regina Densmore Ethan Dobbeck Drew Dresman Jeff Dubrule

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Stephen Elliott Howard Frumkin Alfred Fung Amanda Goodin Terrie Green Jones Zach Hale Faith Hammel Peri Hartman Marisa Herrera Mike Hersey Thomas Holland Anna Hong Tom Jacobs Mark Johnson Mike Johnson Roger Jones Jessica Karnes Weston Karnes Mike Korn Carla Lee Jack Leighan Mary Lovejoy William Loveless Matt Megaard John Messerly Edward Michor Sara Morris Tom Nance Liz Norton Ryan O’Keven Christopher Peace

Eric Peters Cyndie Piesche Ralph Piesche Eric Read Kelly Reavell Lisa Rivera Michael Robb Joe Rodriguez Tony Roth Emily Sachwald Mike Sawicki Theresa Shea Dan Stevens Sara Storck Steven Storck Bryan Thresher Paul Tobin Stace Van Eps Gordon Waddell Judith Wagonfeld Joseph Weaver Erika Weber Eric Webster Dick Wieland Jo Ann Williams Steve Williams Samuel Wohlstadter

The Cascade Courier is printed on recycled paper. We support recycling. Please recycle this paper when you are finished with it.

www.cascade.org


October 2013 Cascade Courier