Issuu on Google+

Let’s ride! High Pass Challenge, Sept. 8 Kitsap Color Classic, Sept. 29 Annual membership meeting, Oct. 8

SEPTEMBER 2013 / Vol. 43, No. 9

September cycling events: the High Pass Challenge and the Kitsap Color Classic HPC REGISTRATION

TAKE ON THE HIGH PASS CHALLENGE

Sunday, Sept. 8 114 miles, 600 rider limit 10-hour time limit Have you been biking to work regularly and taking in some long rides on the weekends? Did you breeze through the Group Health Seattle to Portland Bicycle Classic this year? Well maybe it’s time for a new challenge — the High Pass Challenge. The 2013 HPC is scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 8. If you’ve thought about signing up for the HPC, what are you waiting for? The HPC course follows a spectacular, challenging route. Expect incredible views of Mt. Rainier, Mt. Hood, Mt. Adams, and of course, of Mount St. Helens. As opposed to Johnson’s Ridge, Windy Ridge offers close-up views of the blast zone. One gets a real feel for the destruction wrought by the 1980 eruption (the one that canceled STP that year), especially when peering down at Spirit Lake on the way up to the viewpoint. If you’re planning on riding in this Cascade event, you’re in for a real treat.

Online registration is open through Sept. 6 and costs $80. All riders will receive a complimentary BBQ coupon good for an entrée and a soft drink at the finish line party. Visit www. cascade.org/hpc to sign up. There will be no day-of-event registration. While the High Pass Challenge is billed as an intermediate-level event, it’s doable if you’ve got a good fitness level. Though HPC is a recreational ride, not a race, it is a challenging endeavor best suited to experienced event riders. Beginners who want to try an organized event for the first or second time would be better to look ahead to the Kitsap Color Classic on Sept. 29.

RIDE THE KITSAP COLOR CLASSIC Sunday, Sept. 29

The autumn equinox ushers in a great time to ride a bike up, down and all around the Kitsap Peninsula on the 20th annual Kitsap Color Classic. Make your way across Puget Sound on Sunday, Sept. 29 for a pleasant event on the lovely Kitsap Peninsula. The Kitsap Color Classic is a fine way to finish out the Cascade event season, with rolling hills, scenic views and great company.

THE ROUTES This year we eliminated the Indianola loop in favor of safer routes. We now have two loops that you can combine or do separately. The route distances range from 25 miles, 39 miles or 57 miles. The 25-miler is a great starting point for friends who are new to recreational bicycle events. Invite them along!

REGISTRATION PRSRT STD US Postage Paid Seattle, WA PERMIT No. 2172

Online registration is open through Sept. 25 and offers the best rate. Adult registration is $23 to $35, depending on where you start and when you register. Kids under age 13 are $10. Cascade members receive a $5 discount. Ferry fare for you and your bike is included in the Edmonds start line registration. Be sure to leave enough time to catch one of the following ferries: 8:50, 9:40 or 10:30 a.m. Ferry times are subject to change when the fall schedule comes out. Visit Washington State Ferries website to confirm sailing times. Your Kitsap Color Classic bib is your ferry ticket. Fees for other ferries are not covered, but return rides are free.

EDMONDS PANCAKE BREAKFAST ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

7400 Sand Point Way NE, Suite 101S Seattle, WA 98115 www.cascade.org

TIME DATED MATERIAL

FERRY SCHEDULE

The Edmonds Bicycle Group is holding an all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast at the Masonic Lodge in Edmonds from 7 to 10 a.m. Funds raised support local bicycle advocacy work.

Is your membership expiring?

RENEW AT

www.cascade.org/renew

Your Board of Directors candidates

I

n next month’s Cascade Courier, you’ll find profiles of each of the candidates running for Board of Directors, a link to the online voting system and a paper ballot. The slate being put forth this year includes the following candidates:

Kevin Carrabine (i) George Durham (i) Rob Harrison Catherine Hennings Janie Mathis ANNUAL MEETING

Robbie Phillips Merlin Rainwater Jessica Szelag Don Volta (i) Daniel Weise (i)

(i) Indicates incumbent candidate.

Save the date! The annual business meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 8 at the REI – Seattle store. We hope to see you there. This meeting will also be the last chance to vote in the Board of Directors election.

Volunteer for the 2013 State Bicycle and Pedestrian Counts! October 1, 2 or 3 by Ryann Child, AmeriCorps Commute Programs Assistant

M

ake bicycling and walking count! Cascade is looking for volunteers in more than 30 cities around Washington to help count bicyclists and pedestrians between 7 – 9 a.m. and 4 – 6 p.m. If you are available to help out, please contact Ryann Child at cpa@cascadebicycleclub.org or 206-8619890. Count Background: Every year since 2008, Cascade Bicycle Club has worked with the Washington State Department of Transportation to coordinate the annual Washington State Bicycle and Pedestrian Documentation Project in 20 – 30 cities. This data collection effort was initiated by the state to track progress toward increasing bicycling and walking in communities statewide. The data also helps to justify investments in bicycling and pedestrian projects. 2013 Count Cities: Bainbridge Island, Bellevue, Bellingham, Bothell, Bremerton, Burien, Ellensburg, Everett, Ferndale, Gig Harbor, Issaquah, Kelso, Kent, Kirkland, Lake Forest Park, Lakewood, Longview, Lynden, Mercer Island, Milton, Mountlake Terrace, Oak Harbor, Olympia, Orting, Parkland, Puyallup, Redmond,

Renton, Richland, Seattle, Shoreline, Spokane, Tacoma, Tukwila, University Place, Vancouver, Walla Walla, Wenatchee and Yakima.  2013 Count Dates: October 1, 2 or 3 2013 Count Time Periods: 7 – 9 a.m. and 4 – 6 p.m.

Bike counters tell only part of the story. You can help tell the rest by volunteering for statewide bike counts in October.

In This Issue Building political power..................................2 Cascade Bike PAC party..................................2 Seattle Childrens invests in Bike Share.........2 Exciting news for Boeing employees.............3 Our votes elect bike champions....................3 Cascade Endorsementx.....................................3 Kirkland to remove tracks..............................4 Bike Training steams into fall........................4 July rides.......................................................5-7 Singletrack High...............................................7 Take a kid mountain biking..........................7

Welcome new staff..........................................8 Helmet sales.....................................................9 We’re hiring!.....................................................9 Bikenomics........................................................9 Cyclist of the month.....................................10 Adventure cycling campaign.........................10 Is it time to replace your helmet?.............10 Volunteers........................................................11 New member form........................................11 Cascade contacts............................................11 Welcome new members................................12

September 2013

Building political power for the bicycling movement

W

ill the leaders that we elect fight for a future where everyone has the freedom to safely ride their bicycle? Or will they go back to business as usual, focused on transportation planning that clogs our streets, pollutes our air, damages our children’s health and is a far cry from the Washington state we envision for our future? The choice is up to us. Well-heeled lobbyists have convinced politicians to spend the majority of our money on costly new highways instead of focusing on fixing the roads we already use, to make them safer and provide families more options to get around. Cascade Bike PAC complements the election work of the Cascade Bicycle Club to help elect pro-bike candidates. Our work is about electing, defending and rewarding the true champions for creating a better community through bicycling. Champions, who will work with us to influence the

budget and fund important projects, affect the policies that keep us safe on our streets and guide the plans that shape the future of our communities. It’s also about building not just bipartisan, but bike-partisan support for bicycling, because whether you’re conservative or liberal, we can all agree that roads and streets should be safer for all people. We have an opportunity to make our streets safe for our children and everyone who want to ride. We can connect our city with a complete network of protected bike lanes and neighborhood greenways and the candidates we help elect in 2013 will work to make bicycling a priority! Your support will help build political power for the bicycling movement Please consider making a donation either online at www.cascade.org/BikePAC or via check to: Cascade Bike PAC | PO Box 66591 | Seattle, WA 98166

Cascade Bike PAC Party Please join us for a fun evening of drinks, hors d’oeuvres and political hobnobbery in support of Cascade Bike PAC, the political arm of our work. Thursday, Sept. 5, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. ZGF Architects LLP 925 4th Ave Suite 2400 Seattle, WA

PARTNER NEWS

Seattle Childrens invests in Puget Sound Bike Share by Anne-Marije Rook, Staff Writer

O

n Monday, July 22, Seattle Children’s Hospital today became the first major Seattle-area employer to invest in Puget Sound Bike Share with a $500,000 grant. Puget Sound Bike Share is a nonprofit working with the support of local government agencies to bring a bike-sharing system to the Seattle area. The first phase of the program, scheduled to launch in spring 2014, will include 50 bike-share stations and 500 bikes near Seattle’s most popular urban destinations. The Seattle Children’s grant will provide the program with adult helmets at future bike-share stations in the Seattle area. As part of the partnership, Children’s employees will receive memberships to the bikesharing program, and Puget Sound Bike Share will operate two bike-share stations on Seattle Children’s main campus. “We are dedicated to supporting a healthy workforce and helping our employees find commute alternatives,” said Lisa Brandenburg, president of Seattle Children’s Hospital, in a statement. “Less than 40 percent of our employees drive to work alone. Bike sharing will be another great option our employees can use to get around the city.” The grant is part of Seattle Children’s overall commitment to providing sustainable alternate commute options for the Puget Sound region. As part of the hospital’s 20-year master plan, Seattle Children’s has already committed nearly $4 million for

neighborhood transportation improvements, including a cycle track along Sand Point Way NE and a new connection between the Burke-Gilman Trail and Sand Point Way NE. “Bike share will be a success in King County because of generous and visionary community partners like Seattle Children’s Hospital,” said Holly Houser, executive director of Puget Sound Bike Share. In addition to the Seattle Children’s grant, Puget Sound Bike Share has received $1.75 million in state and federal grants to date. “Seattle’s bike-share network will help provide a new option for people to get around, supporting health, safety and vibrant communities,” said Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn in a press release. “This program is a partnership with the private sector, and we hope other institutions in our community will step forward to match Seattle Children’s investment.” Cascade is excited by the potential for Puget Sound Bike Share to open the city to bicycling to whole new set of people. Puget Sound Bike Share, scheduled for rollout in spring 2014, will initially provide 500 bikes at 50 kiosks throughout the city for people to use on a short term basis. For more information, visit the Puget Sound Bike Share website at www.pugetsoundbikeshare.org. Send your note of thanks to Seattle Children’s, Mayor McGinn and Councilmember Rasmussen at http://bit.ly/BikeShareThanks.

RSVP by Sept. 4 to noah.down@cascadebicycleclub.org or (206) 245-0001

M.J. Kelly, Editor Diane English, Editorial Assistant; Susan Hiles, Photography; September contributors: Ryann Child, Brock Howell, Stacy Karacostas, Hanna McFall, Robin Randels, Anne-Marije Rook, Tarrell Wright

The contents of this newspaper do not necessarily represent the views of the Club or any of its members. The views expressed are those of the individual contributors. Submissions guidelines: Article ideas should be discussed with the Editor in advance as the publication calendar is planned two months prior to publication. Final materials are due the first Tuesday of the month, though earlier is appreciated.  Articles submitted after that will be considered on a space-available basis. Queries can be emailed to. m.j.kelly@cascadebicycleclub.org. If you send text attachments, please format files as native MS Word files or .RTF. For line art please use an .eps format and for photos please use .jpg or .tiff format. The Courier is printed at 300 dpi, so a small 72 dpi photo will not reproduce. If you attach your name and phone number, I will do my best (conditions permitting) to discuss any major changes with you. All submissions are subject to editing for comprehension, grammar or space requirements. Please be concise!

2

Inserts:  We have room for 6 single sheet qualifying inserts in each issue.  Please contact Leah Pistorius, (913) 579-7629 leah. pistorius@cascadebicycleclub.org, for a copy of our insert policy and request form. The request and fee are due by the first of the month prior to the desired month. Advertising: Advertising: Display ads can be placed in the Courier. To check availability and reserve space, contact Leah Pistorius, (913) 579-7629 leah.pistorius@cascadebicycleclub.org Reprints:  Articles may be reprinted or abstracted in publications of nonprofit groups provided that the author and Club are credited.  Please send us a copy of the reprinted material. Membership Information:  Club records and finances are available to members upon request from the club office at 206522-3222.

Top: Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn thanks Seattle Children’s for its investment in Puget Sound Bike Share. Below: Docking stations and bikes like Minneapolis’ Nice Ride program will soon be on our own streets. www.cascade.org

Vol. 43, No. 9

Our votes elect bike champions

CASCADE ENDORSEMENTS

by Brock Howell, Policy & Government Affairs Manager

B

uilding better communities where all people — from grandparents to kids — can safely bike to where they want to go requires elected officials who champion better bikeways and more funding. That’s why Cascade works so hard to elect candidates who share our values and push for better bicycling infrastructure. For the August 6 primary, all seven of Cascade’s candidates made it through their races. Cascade is now supporting 43 candidates for state senate, county office, port commission, mayor, and city councils across the region. During the primary, King County voters overwhelmingly approved Proposition 1, a renewal of two expiring levies supporting over 200 parks and 175 miles of regional trails that comprise the King County Parks system. Proposition 1 will complete key missing links in the regional trail system, pay for critical repairs and maintenance, and keep our parks clean, open and safe. “Our regional trails are some of the best places to ride with families and for recreation, as well as good connections to get to work, school and shop,” said Evan Manvel, Director of Policy, Planning and Government Affairs for the Cascade Bicycle Club. “From supporting bike-friendly candidates to bike trails, it’s clear that voters support helping families get on bikes.”

Cascade’s top priority this fall will be re-electing Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn.

Cascade will also be working several other priority races, including electing Sen. Nathan Schlicher to Senate District 26, as well as county council, port commission, mayoral, and city council races from Tacoma to northeast Snohomish County. Whether it’s completing the Missing Link or funding the Cross Kirkland Corridor, we need elected officials who will be champions for bicycle infrastructure. Join with us in helping elect bike-friendly candidates by volunteering with campaign or donating to Cascade’s political arm, Cascade Bike PAC Cascade endorses candidates who will be leaders for creating better communities through bicycling, as expressed by their positions and values and by their past leadership. In addition, Cascade only engages in races where the candidates actively seek our endorsement. Cascade is not partisan except insofar that we’re bike-partisan. We have endorsed both Democrats and Republicans, as we did this year. Now that you know who Cascade believes are the most bike-friendly candidates in the region, we need to work to get them elected. • Volunteer with Cascade by contact Emily Kathrein, Field Programs Manager (emily.kathrein@cascadebicycleclub.org) • Donate to the Cascade Bike PAC at www.cascade.org/BikePAC Learn more about all the candidates on www.cascade.org.

When it comes to the bicycle communi-

ties’ priorities, Mayor McGinn has the record of vision and accomplishment. He’s fought to complete the Missing Link of the Burke-Gilman Trail, launched a revolutionary update to the Bicycle Master Plan, funded critical neighborhood projects, empowered his traffic engineers to be innovative and quickly adopt best practices, and been an outspoken advocate for safer streets. Proven bicycle leaders deserve to be rewarded for their leadership.

Exciting news for Boeing employees and retirees! by Tarrell Wright, Development Director

A

s of Monday, Aug. 12, Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation is now approved to receive matching funds from The Boeing Company. Do you ride Cascade’s events, volunteer or give to the Education Foundation? Are you a Boeing employee or retiree? If so, please sign into Boeing’s “Total Access” website and log your contributions to Cascade. Cash or stock gifts from current employees and retirees are eligible for a match from Boeing. Current employees can also log volunteer hours and times spent riding Cascade’s paid events.

Details: MONETARY GIFT MATCH: Any Boeing employee or retiree who gives a cash or stock gift to the Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation can have their gift matched. Gifts will be matched by Boeing 1:1 for current employees and .50:1 for retirees. The maximum amount per year is $6,000 per employee for current employees and $3,000 per year for retirees. The minimum gift amount is $25.

VOLUNTEER MATCH: Any current Boeing employee who volunteers for Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation can register their time with Boeing and Boeing will give the Education Foundation a gift of $250 for every 25 hours volunteered – up to $6,000 per employee. This includes time spent on advocacy, time spent in the office on Education Foundation work, time spent volunteering on our paid rides such as the Group Health STP, etc.

State Races State Senate District 23

Nathan Schlicher

County Races King County Executive

Dow Constantine

King County Council, Pos. 1

Rod Dembowski

Snohomish County Council, Pos. 1

Bill Blake

Snohomish County Council, Pos. 5

Dave Somers

Port Races Port of Seattle, Pos. 1

John Creighton

Port of Seattle, Pos. 3

Stephanie Bowman

City Races Auburn Mayor

Nancy Backus

Auburn City Council, Pos. 6

Rich Wagner

Bainbridge Island City Council, North Ward

Val Tollefson

Bainbridge Island City Council, South Ward

Roger Townsend

Bellevue City Council, Pos. 4

Steve Kasner

Bellevue City Council, Pos. 6

Lynne Robinson & Vandana Slatter

Bremerton City Council, Pos. 4

Greg Wheeler

Burien City Council, Pos. 1

Lauren Berkowitz

Burien City Council, Pos. 5

Nancy Tosta

Des Moines City Council, Pos. 7

Dave Kaplan

Edmonds City Council, Pos. 3

Adrienne Fraley-Monillas

Federal Way City Council, Pos. 6

Martin Moore

Kenmore City Council, Pos. 4

Nigel Herbig

Kirkland City Council, Pos. 1

Jay Arnold

Kirkland City Council, Pos. 3

Penny Sweet

Kirkland City Council, Pos. 5

Amy Walen

Kirkland City Council, Pos. 7

Doreen Marchione

Lake Forest Park City Council, Pos. 1

Hilda Thompson

Lake Forest Park City Council, Pos. 3

John Wright

Lake Forest Park City Council, Pos. 5

Mark Phillips

Lake Forest Park City Council, Pos. 7

John Resha

Issaquah Mayor

Fred Butler

Mercer Island City Council, Pos. 2

Dan Grausz

Mercer Island City Council, Pos. 5

Tana Senn

Mukilteo Mayor

Jennifer Gregorson

Mukilteo City Council, Pos. 3

Randy Lord

Sammamish City Council, Pos. 1

Kathleen Huckabay

Seattle Mayor

Mike McGinn

Seattle City Council, Pos. 2

Richard Conlin

Seattle City Council, Pos. 4

Sally Bagshaw

Seattle City Council, Pos. 6

Nick Licata

Seattle City Council, Pos. 8

Mike O’Brien

Shoreline City Council, Pos. 3

Will Hall

Shoreline City Council, Pos: 7

Chris Roberts

Tacoma City Council, Pos. 2

Robert Thoms

WALKS/RUNS/BICYCLING MATCH: Any current Boeing employee who rides one of our paid events can have $100 per ride donated to the Education Foundation. THANK YOU! Your support of the Education Foundation provides for programs that help us get more people on bikes and fight for safer streets. Similar programs are available to employees of Microsoft and other companies. If you have any questions about match programs or are experiencing difficulties logging your donations/hours, please give me a call at (206)240-2235 or email tarrell.wright@ casacdebicycelclub.org.

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

The Boeing Company bicyclists out for a ride

3

September 2013

PARTNER & TRAIL NEWS

Kirkland gets go-ahead to remove tracks along Cross Kirkland Corridor Now, let’s fund a trail

by Anne-Marije Rook, Staff Writer

T

he request by Ballard Terminal Railroad Company to block rail removal along the Cross Kirkland Corridor was denied on Thursday, Aug. 1, giving Kirkland the go-ahead to remove the tracks. With this decision, the last major obstacle to building the proposed 5.75-mile trail on the former railway through Kirkland has been overcome. “We are delighted in and grateful for this decision,” said Kirkland City Manager Kurt Triplett. “We were confident in the merits of our case. And we are appreciative that the Surface Transportation Board recognized those merits.” The city has already contacted the rail removal contractor to begin removing the rails in the near future. The rail bed, however, will remain in place. In its seven-page decision, the Surface Transportation Board said the harm to the public interest of leaving the tracks in place outweighed Ballard Terminal’s reasons for keeping them there. “Ballard’s request for an injunction will be denied,” the board wrote. “Ballard has failed to demonstrate, based on the current record, that it will likely succeed on the merits because it appears to have insufficient financial resources and there is insufficient evidence of current shipper need. Given this weak showing, any harm to Ballard resulting from its inability to pay for or recover the cost of installing track is insufficient to warrant an injunction.” Ballard Terminal filed a motion in April with the Surface Transportation Board to reactivate the rail line. The following month, it requested injunctive relief, which resulted

in Kirkland suspending its contract with A & K Railroad Materials, Inc. to begin rail removal. This stretch is part of the 42-mile Eastside Rail Corridor, which once completed, will connect Renton, Bellevue, Kirkland, Woodinville and Redmond via a multi-use trail. For now, the abandoned railroad will be a temporary gravel trail – a possible prelude to a longer, paved trail. You can be a part of the 42-mile Eastside Rail Corridor with your gift to Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation. Your support provides for programs such as grassroots organizing, meetings with policymakers and keeping the drumbeat going for safe, connected bikeways on the Eastside. Help make this vision a reality with your support today! You can give online at www.cascade.org/EastsideTrails Trails or by check to: Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation c/o Eastside Trails, 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Suite 101S, Seattle, WA 98105.

Bike Training steams into fall by Robin Randels, Classes Coordinator

“B

ike trains” offer an active, social, healthy and fun way for children to get to school. Hop on an existing bike train or start your own – let Cascade Bicycle Club show you how. Save the date, Sept. 21, and join us for the fall session of Bike Training. Cascade Bicycle Club will be your conductor as we link up with local experts. Maya Jacobs, founder and organizer of the Thornton Creek and Wedgwood Bike Trains, and Morgan Scherer, of Familybike, will teach you how to organize and “train” your bike-train. Parents wishing to start a bike train will learn the basics of recruiting others, plan-

ning the route, rules and group riding skills with children. Join us on Sept. 21, from 1:30 to 4:30, when we’ll hear from Maya Jacobs about organizing, route-planning and outreach. Then we’ll roll onto the playground with Morgan Scherer for skills practice, rules of the road and how to ride with children. The session finishes with a ride around the neighborhood where parents role-play as children, conductors and the caboose. Bring your bike and a helmet, dress for the weather and get on board. Location is TBD, but likely in Ballard.

All aboard the bike train!

4

www.cascade.org

Vol. 43, No. 9

SEPTEMBER RIDES More daily rides are listed online at www.cascade.org/dailyrides

Cascade Bicycle Club Ride Classification In order to pick the rides that suit your skills and energy level, use the following guidelines: • PACE: The speed on level ground without breaks: Easy: Under 10 mph Leisurely: 10-12 mph Steady: 12-14 mph Moderate: 14-16 mph Brisk: 16-18 mph Strenuous: 18-21 mph Super Strenuous: 22+ mph • TERRAIN: These descriptions should be considered in the context of the pace and length of the ride: Mostly Flat: Trails and/or mostly flat roads with a possible gentle upgrade Rolling: Climbs are short and easy, not too numerous. Some Hills: A few short steep hills, some moderate upgrades and/or longer gentle climbs. Hilly: Many true hills, but none outrageous.

SUNDAY, SEPT 1 Alki Plus Coffee Run 40 mi • Brisk • Some hills • Online Map • Frequent regroup • 9 a.m. • Burnett Linear Park, Renton • Steady rain cancels • Jake Wright, 206-271-6703, vaelin4@gmail.com We start at Burnett Linear Park, 502 Burnett Ave S, then follow the Green River Trail through South Park and on to Alki. We’ll make a quick stop at Tully’s before returning to Renton via Des Moines Way Memorial Dr. Arrive early enough to ready your bike and sign the ride waiver. The pace of this ride is based on having no wind. If we have a headwind, the pace will be lower, if a tailwind, it may be higher. Keep this in mind when deciding to do the ride. From I-405 northbound take Exit 2A to Rainier Ave S, turn east on S 7th St, go straight through stop sign to Burnett Ave S; the park is on the right. From I-405 S, take Exit 2 to Rainier Ave S. and follow above directions. Fenders are appreciated in wet weather. Mentor opportunity available for prospective ride leaders with prior notice.

Mostly Trails/Interurban and BurkeGilman 23 mi • Steady • Some hills • Online Map • Occasional regroup • 9 a.m. • Woodland Park Baseball Field Parking, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Machiko Threlkeld, machikoshoji@yahoo.com Come join us for a short-ish weekend ride to explore both Interurban and Burke-Gilman trails. We’ll start at Woodland Park, by the baseball field, head north on Greenways to Interurban Trail to Shoreline. Then we go east to Lake Forest Park, where we catch the Burke-Gilman Trail to head back. There are a couple of hills to raise your heart rate a bit. There is no scheduled break for the ride. Bring plenty of water and some snacks. Arrive 10 min before 9 to sign a waiver and listen to the safety briefing for on time departure. Any updates will be post on www.meetup.com/cascaderides/ events/134034392.

MONDAY, SEPT 2 MUMPS: Cancelled today Craig Mohn, 425-890-5234 cell, cmohn_ cycling@comcast.net (texts preferred to VM) As in past years, there will be NO MUMPS RIDE this Labor Day. See you next Monday.

TUESDAY, SEPT 3 TREATS: Kenmore to Green Lake Loop 22-28 mi • Steady • Some hills • No Map • Frequent regroup • 10 a.m. • Logboom Park, Kenmore • Showers cancel • Jan Johnson, 425-672-0617 A recreational ride on mainly city streets with ups and downs. We will start out on the trail but go up a 2-block hill and continue on North Seattle streets. There will be some traffic and busy crossings, but mainly cycle friendly roads. The style will be relaxed but cyclists must be able to safely ride in some traffic. We will stop for some food.

Extremely Hilly: Steep & long climbs with grades >9% and/ or mountain passes Unlimited: “Out of category”; only for those very sure of their ability to climb any grade, any length at the advertised pace. Off Road: Significant unpaved sections. • M AP: Whether a map or cue sheet is provided. • REGROUP: None and Occasional regroup categories expect experienced riders who can fix their own mechanical problems and follow a map/cue sheet if they are separated. • RAIN: Weather conditions that cancel the ride. Helmets are required on all rides. When using a cell phone you must pull off the road/trail and STOP. Put away all earbuds/headphones/music devices before the ride starts. All riders are required to sign a waiver form. Rides are cancelled or are no longer considered Cascade rides in the event that the ride leader does not show up or does not

WEDNESDAY, SEPT 4 WRUMPS: Snohomish/Granite Falls/ East Lake Stevens 45 mi • Moderate • Hilly • Map • Frequent regroup • 10 a.m. • Centennial Trail Head South, Pine & Maple, Snohomish • Steady rain cancels • Saul Snatsky, 425-485-7896, 425-273-4156 cell, saulsnatsky@comcast.net We’ll take the Centennial Trail to Machias, then to Lake Roesiger and Granite Falls via rural roads. After lunch, we’ll take a due east route to the Centennial Trail, and then a short (and easy) jog off the trail to East Lake Stevens, down to Machias and back to Snohomish. Most of the uphill is modest, but there are a couple of harder hills. We regroup at the tops of hills and as needed to try to keep everybody on the ride. Most of the route is very scenic and rural and worth riding. Refer to www.meetup. com/cascaderides/events/132227952, for route profile. Printed cue and map available online or at start. Route may vary a bit depending upon weather and riders.

Deep South #2—A Taste of Tacoma, Gig Harbor and Fircrest 40-45 mi • Moderate • Some hills • Map • Stay together • 10 a.m. • War Memorial Park, East side of Narrows Bridge, Tacoma • Showers cancel Jim Shedd, 206-772-0955 Join us for a 3-loop tour of Tacoma, Gig Harbor and Fircrest. From War Memorial Park (aka Skyline Park-n-Ride, east end of the Narrows Bridge), we begin with a 20-mile trip thru Tacoma’s north end including the UPS campus, Ruston Way waterfront, and Pt Defiance Park, then back to the start. Then it‘s a 16-mile loop across the Narrows Bridge connecting with the Cushman Trail down to Gig Harbor for lunch at the Tides Tavern, then back across the bridge. We cap this off with a short 8-mile tour thru University Place and Fircrest. NOTE: lunch is at the 30-mile point, so plan accordingly. There are no restrooms at the start, but we’ll stop in 2.5 miles at Jefferson Park. Drive south on I-5, past the Tacoma Dome, and take Hwy 16 west (about a mile past the Dome). In another 5 miles take Exit #4 Jackson Ave. Turn left at the traffic light on Jackson, then go 0.2 miles to 6th Ave traffic light and turn left. In another 0.2 miles turn left on McArthur St into Skyline Park. On day of ride, I can be reached on my cell, 206-3212655.

MEETS Marymoor: Steady 25 mi • Steady • Some hills • Online map • Occasional regroup • 6 p.m. • Marymoor east parking lot (free), NE 65th St, Redmond • Steady rain cancels • Rick Urton, 253-677-4897 cell, prurton@ comcast.net • Nan Haberman, 206-3990466, n.haberman@frontier.com RSVP on www.meetup.com/cascaderides/ events/135029452 ahead of time if you plan to ride so additional ride leaders can be recruited if necessary. Check the Meetup link for updates the day of the ride. RSVP is not required, but would be MUCH appreciated. These Midweek Eastside Evening Training Series, MEETS rides, are held Wednesday evenings at 6 p.m. from

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

provide a waiver form for signatures of riders. Riders are expected to be ready to ride at the time listed (i.e. that’s not the time to drive into the parking lot with a full bladder and empty tires) and to ride in a safe, courteous, legal manner. Riders are expected to cooperate with the leader(s) and ride within the advertised pace. If unsure of your ability to keep up, try a slower level ride to get an idea of ride paces. For “Hilly” rides, consider choosing a pace down from your usual level. Unless indicated, it is not necessary to RSVP the ride leader to participate in a ride. Youth riders may also join regular club rides. Permission must be obtained from the ride leader at least 24 hours in advance for youth to join a regular club ride. Children 15 and under must be accompanied by parent or legal guardian OR must have parent/legal guardian sign a consent form designating a guardian for them on the ride; youth ages 16-17 may ride without a parent or guardian with advance permission of the ride leader AND a signed parental

consent form (available at www.cascade.org) which must be given to the ride leader at the start of the ride. Cascade does not sponsor or endorse any non-bicycling activities that people may participate in while on these rides. Each cyclist is responsible for his/her conduct and decisions while on a Cascade ride. Cascade membership and activities are open to anyone able and willing to participate in a safe, courteous and cooperative manner and in support of the purposes of the club. Ride information is also available at: www.cascade.org. Only Cascade certified ride leaders may post and lead Cascade Daily Rides. See Ride Leader Information on our website or email the Rides Chair at cbcrides@cascadebicycleclub.org. On Twitter? Tag your tweets and twitpics with #dailyrides.

Marymoor Park. The training rides incorporate local hills and range between 20-25 miles and from ~1200 to 2000 feet of elevation. Three paces are offered: Brisk (16-18 mph on flats); Moderate (14-16 mph on flats) and Steady (12-14 mph on flats). All use a common course each week. Riders should be able to sustain the appropriate pace for their selected group, read a cue sheet, change a flat (and have the requisite equipment), and have a positive attitude! Faster riders and better climbers are welcome to join but for them the ride becomes self-paced and self-guided. Riders can ride on their own, in small groups, or with the appropriate pace ride leader. A limited number of cue sheets will be available at ride start so please print your own just in case. The final route and cue sheets will be available the weekend prior to each ride. There are no planned rest stops as these are short rides. There is a restroom at the park and ride but is a little distance away, so please plan accordingly. Regroup policy: This is a training series, so we ride with the best interest of the group in mind. Riders may need to fall back to a slower pace group, unless you are riding in the last group, in which case the group will regroup as needed to avoid dropping riders. We want everyone to ride hard and have fun and there are multiple pace options to support all riders so no one should feel left behind. Please make sure that you print a cue sheet in case you want to ride ahead or get separated for some reason. Please make sure to print your contact information clearly on the waiver so that we can reach you as necessary.

in the last group, in which case the group will regroup as needed to avoid dropping riders. We want everyone to ride hard and have fun and there are multiple pace options to support all riders so no one should feel left behind. Please make sure that you print a cue sheet in case you want to ride ahead or get separated for some reason. Please make sure to print your contact information clearly on the waiver so that we can reach you as necessary.

MEETS S. Bellevue: Moderate 20-25 mi • Moderate • Some hills • Map • Occasional regroup • 6 p.m. • South Bellevue Park & Ride, 2700 Bellevue Way SE • Steady rain cancels • Alexa Volwiler, alexa.volwiler@ gmail.com Please RSVP on www.meetup.com/cascaderides/ events/133052552. And check back for updates the day of the ride. RSVP is not required, but would be MUCH appreciated. Midweek Eastside Evening Training Series, MEETS rides, are held Wednesday evenings at 6 p.m. These training rides incorporate local hills and range between 20-25 miles and from ~1200 to 2000 feet of elevation. Three paces are offered: Strenuous (18+ mph on flats); Brisk (16-18 mph on flats); and Moderate (14-16 mph on flats). All use a common course each week. Riders should be able to sustain the appropriate pace for their selected group, read a cue sheet, change a flat (and have the requisite equipment), and have a positive attitude! Faster riders and better climbers are welcome to join but for them the ride becomes self-paced and self-guided. Riders can ride on their own, in small groups, or with the appropriate pace ride leader. A limited number of cue sheets will be available at ride start so please print your own just in case. The final route and cue sheets will be available the weekend prior to each ride. There are no planned rest stops as these are short rides. There is a restroom at the park and ride but is a little distance away, so please plan accordingly. Regroup policy: This is a training series, so we ride with the best interest of the group in mind. Riders may need to fall back to a slower pace group, unless you are riding

MEETS S. Bellevue: Brisk 20-24 mi • Brisk • Some hills • Map • Occasional regroup • 6 p.m. • South Bellevue Park & Ride, 2700 Bellevue Way SE • Steady rain cancels • Wilfried Mack, wilfried.mack@ gmail.com • James Coliz, rider.x@coliz.com Please RSVP on www.meetup.com/cascaderides/ events/133052552. And check back for updates the day of the ride. RSVP is not required, but would be MUCH appreciated. Midweek Eastside Evening Training Series, MEETS rides, are held Wednesday evenings at 6 p.m. These training rides incorporate local hills and range between 20-25 miles and from ~1200 to 2000 feet of elevation. Three paces are offered: Strenuous (18+ mph on flats); Brisk (16-18 mph on flats); and Moderate (14-16 mph on flats). All use a common course each week. Riders should be able to sustain the appropriate pace for their selected group, read a cue sheet, change a flat (and have the requisite equipment), and have a positive attitude! Faster riders and better climbers are welcome to join but for them the ride becomes self-paced and self-guided. Riders can ride on their own, in small groups, or with the appropriate pace ride leader. A limited number of cue sheets will be available at ride start so please print your own. The final route and cue sheets will be available the weekend prior to each ride. There are no planned rest stops as these are short rides. There is a restroom at the park and ride but is a little distance away, so please plan. This is a training series, so we ride with the best interest of the group in mind. Riders may need to fall back to a slower pace group, unless riding in the last group, which will regroup as needed to avoid dropping riders. We want everyone to ride hard and have fun and there are multiple pace options to support all riders so no one should feel left behind. Please make sure that you print a cue sheet in case you want to ride ahead or get separated for some reason. Make sure to print your contact information clearly on the waiver so that we can reach you.

THURSDAY, SEPT 5 THUMPS: Home for Lunch 20-35 mi • Moderate • Some hills • No Map • Stay together • 9:30 a.m. • Leschi Starbucks, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Mike Nelson, 206-325-9068 Be home in time for lunch after some urban exploration. Fixies and single speed bikes welcome. Ride leader will be riding a single speed.

More Cycle Tuesdays 25-35 mi • Super-strenuous • Some hills • No Map • Occasional regroup • 5:45 p.m. • Gene Coulon Park, next to Kidd Valley Restaurant, Renton • No rain cancellation • Lola Jacobsen, 425-829-8765, lolaj@outlook.com

5

September 2013

SEPTEMBER RIDES www.cascade.org/dailyrides • Tom Baker, 425-221-0631, tommbaker@ hotmail.com Year-round training rides for one-day STP riders. Rides stress safety, cooperation, and group riding skills. Fast pacelines with regroups from Renton to surrounding areas. Large turnout splits into multiple groups. ** No parking in Coulon Park parking lot. Lights required.

RIDE LEADER CERTIFICATION CLASS 6:30 p.m. • CBC Office, 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Bldg 138, Seattle • No rain cancellation • Ride Leader Certification Coordinator, 425-828-0138, rlcert@ cascadebicycleclub.org Have you cycled on 5 or more Cascade Free Daily Rides this year or last? Would you like to lead your own rides? Become a Certified Cascade Ride Leader! To register, send an email with your NAME, CASCADE MEMBER NUMBER, and a CONTACT PHONE NUMBER (home, cell, or work) to rlcert@cascadebicycleclub.org. Class size limited to 15. See details about becoming a Ride Leader at http://www.cascade.org/EandR/ Ride_Leader_Info.cfm.

FRIDAY, SEPT 6 FRUMPS: Redmond/North Bend ~55 mi • Moderate • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Marymoor Park, Redmond (East Parking Lot) • Showers cancel • Chris Nelson, 206-349-4846, chris. nelson166@gmail.com Spectacular river and mountain scenery mostly on country roads. Restroom stops at Beaver Lake Park and Snoqualmie Falls. Lunch in North Bend. A hilly ride but we will regroup at the top of the longer climbs. Please arrive at Marymoor Park early enough to prepare yourself for a 9:30 a.m. departure.

FRIDAY RIDERS: Go to Swansons/ Carkeek Park/Golden Gardens ~25 mi • Leisurely • Some hills • No Map • Frequent regroup • 10 a.m. • Gas Works Park, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Bill Lemke, 206-284-2843 We’re pedaling to Swansons and then on to Carkeek Park. Newer riders, young and older, are encouraged to come. We’ll ride the Burke-Gilman Trail to 8th Ave NW and then it’s a slow and steady uphill most of the way to Swansons and Carkeek Park, then mostly downhill to Golden Gardens. We’ll be on paved trails, streets and some unpaved trail in Carkeek Park. Lunch or snack stop

SATURDAY, SEPT 7 Redhook/Lake Sammamish Loop 34 mi • Steady • Some hills • Online Map • Frequent regroup • 9 a.m. • Redhook Brewery, 14300 NE 145th, Woodinville • Steady rain cancels • Matthew Wong, 425-443-8151 cell, matthew.wong@comcast.net • Marizel Miller, 818-590-8167, marizelsmiller@kmmiller.net Join us for a steady-paced ride from Redhook Brewery to Marymoor Park and a counterclockwise loop around Lk Sammamish. We’ll have a quick midpoint break at Tully’s in Issaquah and afterwards we reward ourselves with some yummy food and carb-replenishing at the brewery. Do not park directly in front of the brewery as that space is specifically for customers. Take the 124th St exit from I-405. Head east, down and across the valley. At light, turn left onto Redmond-Woodinville Rd. At second roundabout, turn left onto NE 145th St. Redhook is on the right just past Willows Lodge and before Columbia Winery. Come with all necessary equipment to fix a flat and ride safely. Ride Leaders will not stop for flats or mechanical issues. The ride pace is based on no wind. If there is a headwind, pace will lower, if tailwind, may be higher. Consider this when deciding to ride. You may RSVP for ride updates and to help leaders determine number of ride leaders necessary at: www.meetup.com/cascaderides/ events/133849372.

Blizzards By Bicycle (D.Q. ride #3) 40 mi Steady Rolling Map Frequent regroup • 9:30 a.m. Cle Elum Bakery, 501 East First St, Cle Elum • Steady rain cancels • Steven Andreasen, 206-44-2808,

6

steven.w.andreasen@gmail.com Each Blizzards By Bicycle ride ends at or near a Dairy Queen, for a post-ride ice cream treat. Get out of the city and enjoy the fall alpine scenery on lightly travelled roads. Take I-90 east to Cle Elum—Exit 84—approximately 90 minutes from downtown Seattle. Meet at the bakery at 9:30 for coffee and a pastry. We’ll leave the bakery at 10:00 for a short drive to the start. Route goes east out of Cle Elum and then north along the North Fork of the Teanaway River. Ride is out and back. Gradual grades; no steep hills. Cumulative elevation gain is 1400’. Bring food and water; no stores along the route. Lunch at turn-around, which is the 29 Pines Campground. Ice cream in Cle Elum after the ride!

SUNDAY, SEPT 8 Blizzards By Bicycle (D.Q. Ride #4) 40 mi • Steady • Rolling • Map • Frequent regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Cle Elum Bakery, 501 East First St, Cle Elum • Steady rain cancels • Steven Andreasen, 206-44-2808, steven.w.andreasen@gmail.com Each Blizzards By Bicycle ride ends at or near a Dairy Queen, for a post-ride ice cream treat. Get out of the city and enjoy the fall alpine scenery on lightly travelled roads. Take I-90 east to Cle Elum—Exit 84—approximately 90 minutes from downtown Seattle. Meet at the bakery at 9:30 for coffee and a pastry. We’ll leave the bakery at 10:00 for a short drive to the start point. Route follows Hwy 903 northwest out of Cle Elum, through Roslyn and Ronald. The road becomes Salmon La Sac. The route follows the east shore of Lk Cle Elum with nice views. At the north end of the lake, the road continues along the east side of the Cle Elum River heading north. We’ll have lunch at the Salmon La Sac picnic area and campground on the river. Picnic tables and restrooms available. Bring water and a lunch. Ride is out and back with rolling hills. Estimated 1500‘ elevation gain. All paved roads. Ice cream after ride at D.Q.!

MONDAY, SEPT 9 MUMPS: Head Up North 55-80 mi • Brisk • Moderate • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • Tracy Owen Station/Logboom Park, Kenmore • Steady rain cancels • Craig Mohn, 425-890-5234 cell, cmohn_cycling@comcast.net, (texts preferred to VM) A fun loop ride in south Snohomish County with a food stop en route. Distance and pace may vary to suit weather conditions and group. The pace will be Brisk; a Moderate pace group may be added if certified ride leader volunteers are available for both paces—if not, the needs of moderate riders will be addressed with more frequent regroups. Check with leader if weather appears questionable. NOTE the return to the 10 a.m. start time. Ride leader will try to have the route available on ridewithgps.com at least one day before the ride - search for “MUMPS 201309xx”, where xx is the date.

9/4 for very important details regarding this ride series. ALSO, check the Cascade website, www.cascade.org, for possible MEETS rides in BOTH locations, S. Bellevue and Marymoor, for paces not listed in the Courier.

THURSDAY, SEPT 12 More Cycle Tuesdays See More Cycle Tuesdays, 9/5.

FRIDAY, SEPT 13 FRUMPS: Seven Cities 40 mi • Moderate • Some hills • No Map • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • Tukwila Community Center, Tukwila • Showers cancel • Michael Moreland, 206-439-9890 The first half will be hilly and the second half will be relatively flat. Lunch stop will be in Des Moines. Tukwila Community Center is at 12424 42nd Ave S near the intersection of 42nd Ave S and Interurban Ave S in Tukwila.

SATURDAY, SEPT 14 Three Fish and the Sea 90 mi • Brisk • Hilly • No Map • Stay together • 7:30 a.m. • Downtown traffic circle straight up from the ferry, Edmonds • Steady rain cancels • David Baker, 206-3545718 Bring on the winds of Passion And you will live in ways Beyond the fury of belief Until the end of days The building storm Will drive you on In a magnificent quest The truth be told Greek Gods would speak That bike and you are blessed! Meet traffic circle Edmonds. Ride to Mukilteo, ride to Keystone, lunch at Belmont in Port Townsend, ride to Kingston. Edmonds finish. Bring $ for two ferry trips and lunch.

Gas Works Saturday Bakery Ride 18 mi • Leisurely • Hilly • Map • Stay together • 9:30 a.m. • East end of the Gas Works Park parking lot, Seattle • Ice/ snow cancels • Scott Kralik, 206-523-6042, scottk@cascade.org Explore Seattle’s backstreets at a comfortable pace with a sociable crowd, and stop for donuts and other baked delights along the way (expect chocolate). We’ll venture places seldom seen via routes seldom taken and, though we won’t go looking for a challenge (we won’t ride the Counterbalance), neither will we avoid one (we’ll top a hill or two and wait for the sightseers among us). Heavy rain means we skip the drenching and bike straight to the Essential Baking Company for a late breakfast.

SUNDAY, SEPT 15 For a complete list of this month’s rides, see www.cascade.org

TUESDAY, SEPT 10 TREATS: McCollum Park to Everett Waterfront 20-30 mi • Steady • Some hills • No Map • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • McCollum Park, EAST of I-5 Exit 186, Martha Lake • Showers cancel • Jan Johnson, 425-672-0617 • BRING FOOD. This ride is for experienced adult cyclists because there are two very steep downhills and some city traffic. Exact route and distance will depend on the weather. Take I-5 Exit 186 EAST and go 1/2 mile towards the P&R; enter at the McCollum Park sign, TURN right and park next to the swimming pool which should now be closed.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT 11 MEETS S. Bellevue: Moderate 20-25 mi • Moderate • Some hills • Map • Occasional regroup • 6 p.m. • South Bellevue Park & Ride, 2700 Bellevue Way SE • Steady rain cancels • Alexa Volwiler, alexa.volwiler@ gmail.com Please check the MEETS S. Bellevue: Moderate,

WEDNESDAY, SEPT 18 WRUMPS: Bellevue to Black Diamond Bakery Run 57 mi • Moderate • Some hills • Map • Frequent regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Newport Hills Park & Ride (Exit 9, I-405) • Showers cancel • Alan Lawrence, 425-891-7079, alan@jazzloft.com Join me for this great ride through beautiful country. We’ll ride down May Valley Rd and over to the Cedar River Trail before heading out to the Black Diamond Bakery. The ride out is such a gradual grade you won’t even notice. The ride back is mostly downhill until we reach Issaquah. You will love this ride! Ride leader mentoring opportunity available. Call the leader one hour before the ride if questionable weather.

THURSDAY, SEPT 19 More Cycle Tuesdays See More Cycle Tuesdays, 9/5.

FRIDAY, SEPT 20 FRUMPS: Kenmore to Snohomish 45-55 mi • Moderate • Hilly • No Map • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • Logboom Park (Tracy Owen Station) Kenmore • Showers cancel • Dan Garretson, 425-9858570 We will ride from Kenmore to Snohomish for lunch. Route will depend on the weather.

Friday Riders: Around Mercer Island 25 mi • Leisurely • Some hills • No Map • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • Gas Works Park, Seattle • Showers cancel • Norm Tjaden, 206-525-2366 A counterclockwise ride around the island with a lunch stop.

SATURDAY, SEPT 21 BIKE ME 86-100 mi • Brisk • Hilly • No Map • Frequent regroup • 8 a.m. • McDonalds @ Colman Dock Ferry Terminal, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • David Baker, 206354-5718 When life gave him a second chance, “It’s not about the Bike” said Lance! However if you are to dance, To Tango it takes TWO! If you consider circumstance, And give each thought a second glance, I’m sure you’ll have no resistance, It is about the BIKE, and YOU! A hilly ride to lunch with compassion, respect and teamwork. Bring $$ for lunch and ferry fare.

SUNDAY, SEPT 22 For a complete list of this month’s rides, see www.cascade.org.

MONDAY, SEPT 23 MUMPS: Head Up North See MUMPS, 9/9.

MONDAY, SEPT 16 MUMPS: Head Up North See MUMPS, 9/9.

TUESDAY, SEPT 17 TREATS: Fremont to Edmonds 37 mi • Steady • Some hills • Map • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • Gas Works Park, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Les Weppler, 206-789-1955 A recreational ride to Edmonds for lunch via the Interurban Trail, Innis Arden and Woodway, then return by way of Perkins Way and BurkeGilman Trail.

TUESDAY, SEPT 24 TREATS: Redmond Ridge/Snoqualmie Valley/Maltby 40 mi • Steady • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • QFC Redmond Ridge, 23475 NE Novelty Hill Rd, Redmond • No rain cancellation • Clarice Sackett, 425478-8306 Meet at QFC parking lot, northwest corner. We’ll ride south along Redmond Ridge, east along Union Hill Rd, north along Snoqualmie Valley Rd, continue on to High Bridge Rd. Lunch at Maltby, return via Paradise Lk Rd.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT 25 WRUMPS: Home for Lunch 20-35 mi • Moderate • Some hills • No Map • Stay together • 9:30 a.m. • Leschi Starbucks, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Mike Nelson, 206-325-9068

www.cascade.org

Vol. 43, No. 9

SEPTEMBER RIDES www.cascade.org/dailyrides Be home in time for lunch after some urban exploration. Fixies and single speed bikes welcome. Ride leader will be riding a single speed.

THURSDAY, SEPT 26 THUMPS: Home for Lunch 20-35 mi • Moderate • Some hills • No Map • Stay together • 9:30 a.m. • Leschi Starbucks, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Mike Nelson, 206-325-9068 Be home in time for lunch after some urban exploration. Fixies and single speed bikes welcome. Ride leader will be riding a single speed.

More Cycle Tuesdays See More Cycle Tuesdays, 9/5.

FRIDAY, SEPT 27 FRIDAY RIDERS: Go North from Green Lake 20-28 mi • Leisurely • Some hills • No Map • Frequent regroup • 10 a.m. • S. W. Corner of Green Lake next to Rest Rooms, Seattle • Showers cancel • Jan Johnson, 425-672-0617 A recreational ride mainly on city streets, going north to Shoreline and then looping back to Green Lake. Meet at the restrooms at the southwest corner of Green Lake by the rowing center. Park across the street in the paved parking lot. Be sure to pump up your tires and check your brakes the night before. Any icy conditions also cancel.

FRUMPS: Kenmore/Snohomish 45-50 mi • Moderate • Hilly • Map • Stay together • 10 a.m. • Tracy Owen Station/ Logboom Park, Kenmore • Steady rain cancels • Peter Hallson, 425-673-4816 Rural ride to Snohomish for lunch, then return on Broadway through Maltby and Woodinville.

SATURDAY, SEPT 28 SPOKES: Go Country 7 15-20 mi • Leisurely • Mostly flat • Map • Frequent regroup • 10 a.m. • Quigley Park, Fall City • Steady rain cancels • Michelle Burton, 425-890-4936 cell • Jim Hunt, 425-681-4640 cell SPOKES (Sunday Pedalers On Kinda Easy Streets) will head over to Fall City to enjoy the country atmosphere of the Snoqualmie Valley. We’ll stop for lunch in Carnation. Quigley Park is on the Redmond-Fall City Rd (SR-202); from SR-520 take Redmond-Fall City Rd exit to Fall City; from I-90, take Exit 22 through Preston to Fall City. For more information or questions, check www.cbcspokes.org or contact leaders. Day of the ride, call Michelle at 425-890-4936 or Jim at 425-681-4640.

PARTNER NEWS

Take a Kid Mountain Biking Day by Stacy Karacostas, Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance

W

hat’s more fun than Take Your Child to Work Day? Take a Kid Mountain Biking Day! For many years Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance and Cascade have partnered to make this amazing day a reality. In 2012, almost 200 kids and 100 adults turned out for a stellar day of exploring the trails at King County’s Duthie Hill Mountain Bike Park in Issaquah. This year’s event includes trail riding, an obstacle course for the little ones, a exciting jump show from local and pro riders, a barbecue, and tons of prizes! It’s a terrific way to get kids outside in the woods having fun on bikes. All ages are welcome – from tots to teens – they just need a working bike and helmet to participate.

So bring your kids, your neighbor’s kids, or your friends with kids and come ride bikes on the trails with us. Volunteers are also needed to make the day a success. Please email stacy@evergreenmtb.org if you’d like to help. Date: Saturday, Oct. 5 Time: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Location: Duthie Hill Park, Issaquah Ages: All ages welcome! Cost: FREE!! Register on Evergreen’s calendar: http:// tinyurl.com/TKMBD Questions? Contact Stacy Karacostas at stacy@evergreenmtb.org.

SUN. SEPT 29 For a complete list of this month’s rides, see www.cascade.org.

MONDAY, SEPT 30 MUMPS: Head Up North See MUMPS, 9/9.

Opening night of the 2013/14 Bicycle Film Series! Singletrack High

Friday, Sept. 27 at 7 p.m. REI Seattle, 222 Yale Ave. N. $10 for Cascade Bicycle Club & Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance members $15 for General Public Tickets available online: www.brownpapertickets.com

W

ant to be inspired? Come out and discover the wide-ranging, life-changing impacts mountain biking has on teens – and find out what’s happening with student mountain biking in Washington. First, follow the lives of six teenage mountain bike racers in Northern California, and see what it means to keep riding at the age when most of their peers have left their bikes gathering dust in the garage, in Singletrack High. Then enjoy a special short video featuring Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance’s Washington Student League’s (WSL) coaches and team members sharing their experiences in their own words. And meet some of the WSL coaches and participants in person! In a time when technology addiction and

obesity are huge problems among our youth, it seems more and more teens are choosing a different path far from the couch, TV or cell phone. High school mountain biking teams have been growing nationwide for more than a decade and participation continues to increase. The Washington Student League’s comprehensive mountain bike program grew to 20 teams with students representing 55 different middle and high schools statewide, in its first year alone! More than just a race league, WSL members participate in team rides, skill building clinics, a leadership summit, stewardship projects, and healthy, supportive competition. Instead of playing video games after school, these students are heading into the woods, and riding towards greater self-confidence, better health and a host of skills that will serve them well for a lifetime. Buy your tickets now for this special youth mountain biking benefit night! Link to Singletrack HighTrailer: http:// vimeo.com/45295483 Link to Wash. Student League: http:// washingtonleague.org/

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

7

September 2013 Beyond his passion for better communities through transportation and land use decisions, Brock tries to find time to run, bike, hike and drink microbrews. Most mornings you can find him sipping a doppio at his neighborhood coffee shop, and pedaling around town on a stylish Linus Gaston 5 while wearing a suit.

Welcome new staff! by Anne-Marije Rook, Staff Writer

David Lee, Rides Director

Jeff Aken, Principal Planner

W

e’re excited to introduce you all to our newest staff members, Jeff Aken, Brock Howell and David Lee.

Jeff Aken, Principal Planner

Jeff holds a master’s degree in urban planning from the University of Washington and prior to joining Cascade, he was a program manager at Forterra. He also served as program coordinator at the College of Forest Resources at the UW. In his past work, Jeff focused on working with planning staff from communities around the Puget Sound region to advance policies and plans that created great communities. This work included passing Complete Streets ordinances in Edmonds and Ocean Shores; and advancing policies that will transform Central Issaquah from mostly parking lots to a walkable, bikeable series of neighborhoods with jobs, housing and convenient connections to places people need to go. “As a planner, I believe it’s my job to advance policies, plans and projects that cre-

Brock Howell, Policy & Government Affairs Manager

David Lee, Rides Director

ate better communities for everyone. In my experience the most livable neighborhoods are those that are comfortable for walking and biking,” said Jeff. “I was excited to come to Cascade and continue to push for the infrastructure that makes cycling safe, comfortable, useful and interesting for all ages and abilities. Cascade combines advocacy, education and recreation in a way that is powerful. Jeff said his past experience is a good fit for Cascade because he believes that in order to reach cyclists that are “interested but concerned” it is more than having the right answers about cycling infrastructure, it will take work to educate business owners, neighbors and others about the value of these investments and the benefits they bring to everyone in the community. Looking ahead, Jeff said he’s excited to be working on the Seattle Bike Master Plan update as well as working outside of the city of Seattle. “I’m excited about the Seattle Bike Master Plan. It’s an opportunity to advance a compelling vision and the concrete steps that make cycling an integral part of getting where you need

to go in Seattle. It provides an opportunity for Cascade members to comment and advocate for improvements in their neighborhoods.” “I’m also really excited about the work in South Snohomish County,” added Jeff. “Some bicycle infrastructure exists, but there are great opportunities to make it easier to use, improve connections and advance streets that work for all users, not just cars.” Originally from Colorado, Jeff has lived in the Northwest since he was a teenager, and loves the incredible access to the mountains in the Puget Sound region. “There are not too many places where you can Nordic ski after work or take the bus to go mountain biking.” A lifelong cyclist, Jeff said he’s “a bike racer, commuter, advocate, recreational rider and a father teaching his three-year-old son to ride.” “[Bicycling] is my time to think, my exercise and the best way to take in the landscape,” he said.

Brock Howell, Policy & Government Affairs Manager

Brock was hired at the end of June as Cascade’s Policy & Government Affairs Manager. Brock has a J.D. degree from the Vermont Law School, and comes to us from Futurewise, where he had worked as King County Program Director since 2011. He previously served as Futurewise’s interim legal director in 2008, and spent two years working as a state policy advocate for Environment Oregon. Brock was born and raised in Prosser, Wash., on a small cherry orchard with four siblings. Growing up, bicycling meant having the freedom to ride into town to visit parks and friends whenever he wanted. But with fast cars and loose gravel, Brock saw that big improvements needed to be made so more people could be safe and feel comfortable riding a bike. After breaking his leg in college, Brock bought a road bike to speed up his recovery and quickly fell in love with 50- to 80-mile rides through the Palouse hills of Eastern Washington.

David Lee has been hired as our new rides director. In this new position, David will oversee, manage and promote Cascade Bicycle Club’s Rides Program, including daily rides, tours, training series and other rides. David comes to us with years of program management and legal experience in a range of industries. He worked as a director and field instructor for the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS), managed field programs and campus facilities in Baja, Calif., worked as Corporate Counsel for Wizard of the Coast Inc., and served as Corporate Counsel for Delta Dental Plan of California. His love for bicycling, however, is more of a recent development. It wasn’t long ago that David himself was a new rider and student of Cascade’s bicycle education program. David bought his first bicycle as an adult in August 2009. “I rode mostly on the sidewalks because I was uncomfortable riding in traffic. Along with the bicycle, I purchased a tube, pump and tire irons but had no idea how to actually fix a flat,” recalled David. “After an Internet search, I signed up for Bike Ed 101 at an organization I had never heard of at the time called Cascade Bicycle Club. “After two days of classroom instruction and riding on streets, I received my diploma on August 23, 2009. I know this date well because the diploma hangs prominently on the wall of my home and has changed my life.” Next, David dove into Cascade’s free daily ride program and grew more and more confident with each ride. “If it were not for the class and Cascade’s daily ride program, I do not believe I would be a recreational cyclist today,” said David. “In all likelihood, my bicycle would be collecting dust in the garage.” Over the past four years, David has found joy in bike touring and rode his loaded touring bike from Colorado to Virginia. He has also become a Cascade volunteer, offering up his time and bike mechanic skills to rebuild donated children’s bikes for Cascade’s Major Taylor and Earn-a-Bike programs. “I have made countless friends through cycling with the Cascade daily rides program as well as Club tours. I look forward to sharing my passion for cycling as recreation and as a way to build community,” said David.

AvAilAble At Any vehicle licensing office or get A mAil-in ApplicAtion from bicycleAlliance.org

8

www.cascade.org

Vol. 43, No. 9

BIKENOMICS

Pedal-powered advertising – a new medium Business: Biking Billboards Owner: Andrea Lieberman Industry: Marketing & Advertising

I

f you’ve spent much time downtown, at neighborhood farmers markets or at local events in the past two years, you’ve probably seen the mobile billboards being pulled around town on bicycles. The highly-visible yellow-and-black color scheme and friendly, personal engagement is hard to miss. Behind this simple yet effective form of advertising is a Seattle-based company called Biking Billboards – an out-of-the-box idea developed by a mother and her teenage son. When Andrea Lieberman’s father passed away in 2009, she inherited “some horrible real estate decisions,” including a 96-unit condo building on the Eastside. With the economic downturn and no budget for landscaping, let alone marketing, Lieberman was having a hard time selling the condos. One day, as she was headed to the property to do some yard work herself, she noticed a crowd filing into the Chateau Ste. Michelle grounds for a summer concert. “I thought, ‘There’s my target demographic! How do I get in front of them?’” recounted Lieberman. She thought about hiring a pedicab –with billboards promoting her condos on its side –to offer rides to the concert goers. But it didn’t work out. That’s when her teenage son, Jace, decided he would do it. He fashioned a plywood sandwich board onto an old Burley bike trailer, and rode by the concert goers throughout the summer. “So Jace essentially started the business,” said Lieberman. “I thought, you know, it’s a good college resume builder but it grew and grew!” When Jace got too busy preparing for college, Lieberman took the biking billboard concept to the next level, and created the business. Today, two-and-a-half years later, the business has moved out of Lieberman’s garage and into a University District-based hub. It’s also expanded to having a presence in Portland and “pop-ups” at events like SXSW and the Sundance Film Festival in Utah. The client base includes local organizations such as the Woodland Park Zoo and the Seattle Symphony as well as big companies such as T-Mobile and Pemco. “It has been surprisingly successful,” said Lieberman, whose previous work experience

includes everything from travel writing to fundraising to real estate. The concept is simple: carefully-trained staff bicycle out to dense, slow moving areas where the billboards will be seen by a client’s identified target audience. Unlike other advertising mediums, Biking Billboards staff can then engage with the audience by handing out samples, flyers and brand messages. It’s mobile yet interactive. “It’s really about unique and authentic engagement of the public with the brand,” said Lieberman, who refers to her staff as ‘brand ambassadors’. Lieberman even brings in comedians from Jet City Improv to train her staff how to have positive and fun 10-second, 30-second or 2-minute interactions with the public. “It’s about creating a fun and funny engagement experience for everybody,” said Lieberman. “Plus, these one-on-one interactions allows us to report back to the client about what customers like and do not like about their product or service.” Lieberman currently has a fleet of 12 trailers and billboards, and a list of up to 70 trained riders. And manufacturing billboards takes as little as one week. “We want companies to realize that this is a viable medium, and a separate approach to one-on-one advertising,” said Lieberman. “It’s really about the human interaction and it’s the only medium that’s truly social.” Additionally, pedal-powered advertising is fun, cost-effective and eco-friendly as riders burn calories instead of fossil fuels. Simple and effective – the business model seems to be taking off and Lieberman said she’s looking to expand to more cities in the near future. Jace, meanwhile, has caught the entrepreneurial bug since co-founding the company, and has been working for Startup Weekend and Techstars. “He still rides for us occasionally,” said Lieberman. “He’s the best brand ambassador we have, and he really loves the [business] model.” Learn more about Biking Billboards at their website, bikingbillboards.com. Bikenomics is a feature series to spotlight the greater Seattle area’s growing bike businesses. Know a business that should be featured? Send me an email at amrook@ cascadebicycleclub.org.

THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS!

We’re hiring! YOUTH PROGRAMS MANAGER

T

he Youth Programs Manager develops and manages creative and fun youth bicycle programs with specific focus on building healthy habits in youth and getting kids excited about bicycling. Current programs serve more than 20,000 students per year. Youth Programs Manager works with Cascade staff, volunteers and community partners to further Cascade’s goal of getting more people riding bikes. Review full position description online at www.cascade.org/jobs. To Apply: Submit a cover letter, resume, and three professional references (no more than four pages long) all in a single PDF document to education.job@cascadebicycleclub.org. Please mention how you heard about the position. Applications are due Sept 5, 2013.

MEMBERSHIP GROWTH AND RIDES COORDINATOR The Membership Growth and Rides Coordinator provides a resource to expand Cascade’s Rides Program to reach a greater geographical area and a larger and more varied riding community. He/she will work with the Rides Director to ensure the Rides Program’s alignment with the Club’s strategic plan. The Coordinator provides staff support and coordination for all activities and processes of the Rides Program as developed with the Rides Director and Rides Committee

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

and approved by the Executive Director and Board of Directors as necessary. As a participant in the Rides Committee, its sub-committees and its activities, the Coordinator provides staff perspective and processes to the work of the committee to ensure that the Rides Program is fully supportive of the Club’s plans, goals and other Club activities. This is a working position designed to assist in accomplishing tasks that are beyond the capacity of the volunteer Rides Committee. As a staff member, the Coordinator reports to the Rides Director and represents the Rides Committee and its programs in normal staff processes to ensure that the Rides Program is well supported and represented. A major purpose of this position is to support the Rides Committee in planning and executing the Cascade Training Series. Additionally, the Membership Growth and Rides Coordinator provides a resource to grow our membership significantly in the next two years through enrolling new members and improving member retention. The coordinator will engage with our members to determine how Cascade can best meet their needs as well as be a powerful advocate for our members. The selected individual will work with the Rides Director and Development Director to develop and implement a strategy to rapidly increase membership and improve membership retention. To Apply: Email cover letter, resume and writing sample to membershipandrides@ cascadebicycleclub.org with “Membership Growth and Rides Coordinator” by Sept. 6 or until filled.

9

September 2013

PARTNER NEWS

Stephanie Frans’ next adventure as fulltime bike-commuting mama

Adventure Cycling Campaign Raises Over $128,000 for U.S. Bicycle Route System

A

CYCLIST OF THE MONTH

STEPHANIE FRANZ by Anne-Marije Rook, Staff Writer Age: 39 Wheels: 10-year-old Specialized Stumpjumper; Raleigh Port Townsend with upright bar (I couldn’t ride in the drops when I was pregnant); Bianchi Giro with a triple. Occupation: fulltime, out-and-about, bikecommuting mama fter over four years of living, breathing and working the mission of getting more butts on bikes, Stephanie Frans announced she would be leaving her post as Commute Programs Manager at Cascade Bicycle Club to become a fulltime, “awesome, bike-commuting mama”. Knowing Stephanie, she will be anything but a “stay-at-home mom”. Instead, we expect to see her biking all over town with her daughters Audrey, 3, and Jackie, 1. From commuting to bike touring to bike racing, Stephanie is a skilled bicyclist no matter what kind of bike you put her on. When she joined Cascade in April 2009, she was a natural fit. Stephanie had become an avid bike commuter after coming to Seattle to attend Grad School at the UW. Before making the move, she decided to leave her car at home and try living car-free and save some money while in school. “I was a nervous Burke-Gilman commuter,” recalled Frans, who was living in Wedgewood at the time and commuted to UW. “I was just not fit. I will always remember the first time I rode home all the way and didn’t have to push my bike up the hill.” But practice makes perfect and over time Frans became a very confident bike commuter. She even landed a job at Children’s Hospital helping others get out of their cars and explore alternative transportation options. She also got involved with Cascade by volunteering with helmet fits and serving on the Bike Month committee. When a Commute Programs position opened up at Cascade, she was quick to apply. In fact, when she applied for the position, she was sitting in an internet café in Cappadocia, Turkey, at the end of fourmonth bike tour through Eastern Europe. It was late 2008, and Stephanie and her husband, Bill, had been travelling around the globe for the past year, after giving up their jobs in search of adventure. Their adventure started in South America, where the couple bussed, climbed and mountain biked their way across the continent. But upon their return, they felt like we were missing a lot by travelling by bus. Inspired by a documentary of a globetrotting, bike-touring couple from Quebec, Stephanie and Bill decide to travel by bike. “We just loved the sense of exploration and the ability to go on any road we’d want,” said Frans. As practice, Stephanie and Bill embarked on a 400-mile “mini tour” from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, to the middle of Indiana. “Biking in the Midwest in July –we learned everything about what not to do,” said Stephanie. With their new-found experience, the couple headed to Frankfurt, Germany, to embark on their bike touring adventure. “We just decided to pick a starting point and see how far we could go – no itinerary or plan. We took it day-by-day. I loved that

A

10

about it,” said Stephanie. “We didn’t take smart phones, and we made it all the way to Bulgaria without a proper map. In a world in which everything is so easy, it was cool to make mistakes, to explore and overcome obstacles. When you’re bike touring, everything is a challenge, and you’re always pushing your physical abilities,” Stephanie continued. “Bike touring was by far the most challenging thing I have done but also the most rewarding.” After traversing nearly 3000 miles across Eastern Europe their journey ended in Ankara, Turkey. Winter was looming and their water bottles froze while wild camping at night. “We had to go south quickly, but we didn’t want to fly anywhere,” Stephanie said. But this was late 2008 and there were political upheavals in Georgia, Iraq, Syria and Iran. Stuck in Turkey, running out of safe places to go by bike as well as money, Bill and Stephanie headed back home for the holidays. Back in the States, Stephanie and Bill decided to stick around and look for jobs. “We thought, ‘if a job pans out, we’ll work. If it doesn’t, we’ll travel’,” said Stephanie. Sure enough, Stephanie joined Cascade just months later, and for the past four years Stephanie has been instrumental in getting more people riding bikes. The travel bug settled and Stephanie embarked the new adventure of starting a family and being a family rider. After her oldest was born, Stephanie couldn’t wait for her daughter to be old enough to support a helmet so they could ride together. And while pregnant with her second child, Stephanie even intended to ride to her C-section appointment. “I just knew I wasn’t going to be on a bike for a while with two kids and one of them being a newborn,” explained Frans. “I thought it would be a nice way to relax before my C-section.” Unfortunately, on the morning of her scheduled C-section, it was pouring rain, and she bussed instead. Now, with two little ones on board, Stephanie’s bike rides may not be as fast as when she raced or as exciting as traversing across foreign countries, but Stephanie is very excited to dedicate all her energy to her girls and to be part of the bike movement in a different capacity. “Just because I will no longer be on staff, I assure you that I will still be an active participant in our movement,” she said. “I’m excited to have the time to go to neighborhood meetings and an engaged citizen.” Know a cyclist who deserves some special recognition? Nominate them for cyclist of the month! Send your ideas to Anne-Marije Rook at  amrook@cascadebicycleclub.org.

dventure Cycling Association’s fourth annual Build It. Bike It. Be a Part of It. campaign raised more than $128,000 for the U.S. Bicycle Route System (USBRS) during Bike Month, and Cascade Bicycle Club was proud to support the effort. “We greatly appreciate the support of our members, donors, and other cyclists,” said Development Director Amanda Lipsey. “These funds will help us work side by side with more volunteers in more states to expand the U.S. Bicycle Route System in 2014.” To date, 5,616 miles of U.S. Bicycle Routes have been designated, helped in part by funds raised during Adventure Cycling’s annual spring campaign which has brought in more than a quarter of a million dollars for the project since 2010. This year, major donors provided a $35,000 matching challenge at the outset of the campaign that was met in less than two weeks by contributions from individual donors. Business sponsors gave $7,500, as well as providing $4,000 in in-kind donations, used as giveaways to inspire individuals to contribute. Business sponsors included the following companies: Bikeflights.com, BOB Gear by Britax Child Safety, Inc., Ortlieb, Planet Bike, Primal Wear, and TeamEstrogen.com. In-kind sponsors included Bikeflights.com, Cygolite, Hans Bagworks, J&B Importers, Nutcase, Ortlieb, Osprey Packs, Planet Bike, and Primal Wear. Two bike clubs, Almaden Cycle Touring Club and Cascade Bicycle Club, contributed $2,000 total to fuel a special “club week” matching challenge. Adventure Cycling Association coordinates the U.S. Bicycle Route System under the auspices of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), providing technical assistance to states implementing routes. AASHTO is a

nonprofit, nonpartisan association representing highway and transportation departments in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. A powerful voice in the transportation sector, AASHTO’s primary goal is to foster the development of an integrated national transportation system. In 2013, AASHTO contributed $7,500 to support the U.S. Bicycle Route System. In early May, just after the fundraiser kick-off, AASHTO’s Special Committee on U.S. Route Numbering approved a new section of U.S. Bicycle Route 45 in Minnesota, U.S. Bicycle Route 76 in Missouri, and realignments for U.S. Bicycle Route 76 in Kentucky. These new approvals brought the U.S. Bicycle Route System to 5,616 miles of official U.S. Bike Routes in 10 states: Alaska, Kentucky, Illinois, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Carolina, and Virginia. Presently, more than 40 states are working on U.S. Bicycle Routes. “Adventure Cycling members and other cycling supporters rally around this campaign each year as we raise funds and promote the vision of an America connected by bicycle routes and trails,” said Ginny Sullivan, director of travel initiatives at Adventure Cycling Association. “We are so lucky that each year we have also celebrated the on-the-ground expansion of the USBRS, marked by new route designations at AASHTO’s spring meeting. It’s been a fantastic way to celebrate National Bike Month!” In 2013, Adventure Cycling’s work on the U.S. Bicycle Route System was also supported in part by generous grants from the Lazar Foundation, New Belgium Brewing, Climate Ride, and the Tawani Foundation. Learn more about the U.S. Bicycle Route System on Adventure Cycling Association’s website, www.adventurecycling.org/usbrs.

Is it time to replace your helmet? by Hanna McFall, AmeriCorps Community Programs Assistant

C

ascade Bicycle Club sells helmets for $15 and also provides them for free* throughout the Puget Sound region to those in need. You, your family members and friends can be fitted for a helmet at the Cascade office Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. by making an appointment with the Community Programs Assistant at (206) 957-6623 or emailing cmpa@cascadebicycleclub.org.

You can also purchase a helmet at our helmet sales: Sunday, Sept. 1, Seward Park from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 15, Seward Park from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21, Green Lake from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 22, Seward Park from 1 to 4 p.m. We need volunteers to help with our community helmet sales. If you can help us get more helmets on heads, contact Hanna at (206) 957-6623. *Funding for our free helmet program is generously provided by the Steve Sitcov Law Group.

Member of Cascade Bicycle Club and Bicycle Alliance of Washington. Sponsor of Fischer Plumbing, Bikesale.com, Recycled Cycles Racing, Garage Racing, Cucina Fresca, Blue Rooster Racing, SCCA/Starbucks and Lakemont Cycling Teams.

www.cascade.org

Vol. 43, No. 9

September Volunteers

CASCADE CONTACTS

High Pass Challange

Kitsap Color Classic

Date and Time: Sunday, Sept. 8, 6:30 a.m. to the finish (5 volunteers). Task or Event: HPC Support Driver. Where: Packwood, Wash. How Long: All day. Doing What: Drive support vehicles to supply riders with extra food, water and mechanical. Will pay mileage if driver uses his/her own vehicle with bike rack for 3-4 bikes.

Date and Time: Sunday, Sept. 29, 7 – 10:30 a.m. (10 volunteers) Task or Event: KCC start line. Where: Edmonds, Masonic Lodge. How Long: 4 hours. Doing What: Packet Pickup, Cashiers, Greeters and Volunteer at large.

Date and Time: Sunday, Sept. 8, 6:30 – 8:30 a.m. (2 volunteers). Task or Event: HPC start line. Where: 1896 Homestead Campsite on Huntington Rd, Packwood, Wash. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Greet and check in riders. Date and Time: Sunday, Sept. 8, 1st shift 8 a.m. – noon, 2nd shift noon – 4 p.m. (4 volunteers, 2 per shift). Task or Event: HPC Food Stop. Where: Iron Creek Picnic Area. How Long: 4 hours. Doing What: Set up food stop, distribute snacks to riders. Date and Time: Sunday, Sept. 8, 9:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. (2 volunteers). Task or Event: HPC Food Stop. Where: Cascade Peaks. How Long: 3.5 hours. Doing What: Supply food to riders. Date and Time: Sunday, Sept. 8, 1st shift 1– 4 p.m. (3 volunteers), 2nd shift 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. (2 volunteers). Task or Event: HPC finish line. Where: 1896 Homestead Campsite on Huntington Rd, Packwood, Wash. How Long: 2.5 hours. Doing What: Hand out souvenirs and medals.

Home Page: www.cascade.org Office phone: 206-522-3222 or 206-522-BIKE Fax: 206-522-2407 Email: info@cascadebicycleclub.org

Cascade Bicycle Club 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Suite 101S Seattle, WA 98115

STAFF Note: All email address are @cascadebicycleclub.org

Joe Platzner, Interim Executive Director

Jeff Aken, Principal Planner

joepcascade@gmail.com • (425) 679-9593

(206) 300-5932 • jeff.aken@...

Robin Randels, Classes Coordinator

Jenny Almgren, Education Program Assistant

(206) 390-3945 • robin.randels@ …

(206) 694-9148 • jenny.almgren@ …

Anne-Marije Rook, Staff Writer

Ryann Child, Americorps Member, Commute Program

(208) 870-9406 • amrook@cascadebicycleclub.org

(206) 861-9890 • cpa@ …

Julie Salathé, Education Director

Date and Time: Sunday, Sept. 29, 7 – 10:30 a.m. (2 volunteers) Task or Event: KCC start line. Where: Edmonds, Ferry Dock. How Long: 4 hours. Doing What: Bike control and rider count.

David Douglas, Event Producer

(206) 523-1952 • julies@ …

(206) 522-BIKE • david.douglas@ …

Lindsey Parker, Americorps Member, Youth Programs

Noah Down, Development Specialist

(206) 861-9875 • ypa@ …

(206) 245-0001 • noah.down@ …

Kat Sweet, Youth Program Manager

Liz Johnson, Americorps Member, Major Taylor Project

(206) 427-3090 • kat.sweet@ …

(206) 957-6960 • mtpa@ …

Anna Telensky, Events and Sponsorship Coordinator

Ed Ewing, Major Taylor Project Manager

(206) 778-6099 • annat@ …

Date and Time: Sunday, Sept. 29, 8 – 11 a.m. (4 volunteers) Task or Event: KCC start line. Where: Kingston, Kitsap Bank. How Long: 4 hours. Doing What: Packet Pickup, Cashiers.

(206) 778-4671 • ed.ewing@ …

Kim Thompson, Event Registrar

Ellison Fidler, Administrative Coordinator

(206) 526-1677 • kim.thompson@ …

(206) 957-7944 ellison.fidler@...

Alan Van Vlack, Database and Accounting Coordinator

Brock Howell, Policy and Government Affairs Manager

(206) 226-1858 • alan.vanvlack@ …

(206) 856-4788 • brock.howell@ …

Peter Verbrugge, Event Producer

Hanna McFall , Americorps Member, Community Programs

(206) 399-9565 • peterv@ …

(206) 957-6623 • cmpa@ …

Tarrell Wright, Development Director

Mike Inocencio, Corporate Development Director

(206) 240-2235 • tarrell.wright@ …

(206) 522-2403 • mikei@ …

Tim O'Connor, Tech Manager

Emily Kathrein, Field Programs Manager

(206) 660-7922 • tim.oconnor@ …

Date and Time: Sunday, Sept. 29, 1st shift 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. (3 volunteers), 2nd shift 11:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. (3 volunteers). Task or Event: KCC Food Stop. Where: Kingston, Kitsap Bank. How Long: 3.5 hours. Doing What: Supply food for riders. Date and Time: Sunday, Sept. 29, 1st shift 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. (3 volunteers), 2nd shift 11:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. (3 volunteers). Task or Event: KCC Food Stop. Where: Poulsbo. How Long: 3 hours. Doing What: Supply food for riders. Date and Time: Sunday, Sept. 29, 5:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. (2 volunteers). Task or Event: KCC Truck Drivers. Where: Kitsap Peninsula. How Long: All day. Doing What: Deliver food to the food stops and return material to the CBC office.

(402) 699-4739 • emily.kathrein@... M.J. Kelly, Director of Communications & Marketing (206) 853-2188 • m.j.kelly@ … Diana Larson, Volunteer Coordinator (206) 852-6827 • diana.larson@ … David Lee, Rides Director (415)203-4578 • david.lee@... Sander Lazar, Rides Program Coordinator (206) 694-9108 • sander.lazar@ …

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Note: All email address are @cascadebicycleclub.org President Daniel Weise • daniel.weise@... Vice President Kevin Carrabine • kevin.carrabine@... Treasurer

Serena Lehman, Community Outreach Manager

Don Volta • don.volta@cascadebicycleclub.org

(206) 291-4032 • serenal@ …

Secretary

Kathy Mania, Finance Director

Charles Ruthford • charles.ruthford@...

(206) 498-2607 • kathy.mania@ …

Executive Committee Member-at-large

Evan Manvel, Director of Policy, Planning,

Maggie Sue Anderson • maggiesue.anderson@…

and Government Affairs (206) 226-1040 • evan.manvel@... Kathy McCabe, Deputy Director (206) 409-0429 • kathy.mccabe@ … Erica Meurk, Grant Writer (206) 522-7517 • erica.meurk@ …

Directors George Durham • george.durham@... Dr. Rayburn Lewis • rayburn.lewis@... Mo McBroom • mo.mcbroom@... Emily Moran • emily.moran@…

Tim O'Connor, Tech Manager

(On leave of absence) Joe Platzner • joe.platzner@…

(206) 660-7922 • tim.oconnor@ …

Bill Ptacek • bill.ptacek@...

Leah Pistorius, Communications Specialist

Ron Sher • ron.sher@...

(913) 579-7629 • leah.pistorius@ …

Michael Snyder • michael.snyder@... Ed Yoshida • ed.yoshida@cascadebicycleclub.org

MEMBERSHIP FORM Please detach form and return to: Cascade Bicycle Club •7400 Sand Point Way NE, Suite 101S • Seattle, WA 98115 o New member o Renewal FIRST NAME

MI LAST NAME

M/F DATE OF BIRTH

EMAIL

STATE

ZIP

ADDRESS CITY HOME PH

WORK PH

CELL PH

To help promote cycling, we occasionally share names with other organizations. We never share telephone numbers or email addresses, only postal addresses. May we share your name? ◊ Yes ◊ No TYPE OF MEMBERSHIP 1 YEAR 2 YEARS GIFT SOCK SIZE OFFICE NOTES

Individual Household/Family* Supporter* Advocate* Champion* Student/limited income (e-news only)

o $ 35 o $ 60

o $ 65 o $ 115

o $ 100 o $ 250

o $ 195 o $ 495

o $ 500 o $ 15

o $ 995 o $ 25

Cycling socks

S M L XL

Cycling socks

S M L XL

Cycling socks

S M L XL

Tax-deductible donation to the CBC Education Foundation** TOTAL ENCLOSED o

A check payable to the Cascade Bicycle Club is enclosed. ($20 fee for returned checks.)

o

Please charge my VISA/MASTERCARD: — — — Cardholder’s name (Please print):

Exp. date /

Cardholder’s signature: *Contributing members may include household and family members on their membership. **The Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation (CBCEF) is an IRS 501(c)(3) charity. Donations to the CBCEF are tax-deductible. Membership contributions or gifts to the Cascade Bicycle Club 501(c)(4) are not deductible as charitable contributions for federal income tax purposes.

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

11

September 2013

Welcome New Members Brad Agoos Corina Allender Dylan Anderson Evyn Anderson Jeremy Anderson Susan Anderson Fatima Aviquivil Timothy Backoff Karen Behm Al Benaroya Randy Benham Christophe Berthoud Heidi Berthoud Barbara Bodine Tom Borek Susie Bottjer Peter Breining Stephane Brochet Jesse Brodt Jeanne Burbidge John E Burke Beth Butcher Izabell Butcher James Butcher Jaxson Butcher Madelyn Butcher Max Butcher Reilee Butcher Francisco Calpito Cheryl Chikalla Kieran Chin Cheong Kristin Covey Kelsey Croall Bruce DaCosta Kenneth Davidson

Linda Davidson Adam de Turberville Jacqueline DeGideo Denise Diskin Madeline Edwards Bret Eickhoff Ken Erickson Jean Escoz Rebecca Farrell Andrew Fearneyhough Rob Fetty Ricardo Fleury Leonard Gaines Vickie Galluzzo Bryce Gifford Carl Gifford Nancy Gifford Richard Haines Maxine Hansen Jeff Harder David Hauer Mary Hauer Kathy Herigstad Rodney Hines Greg Hoglund Elisa Hogue Tralisa Hogue Trevor Hogue Tristan Hogue Ryan Hopper Henry Howes Kyle Jaynes Pat Kaehuaea Susan Keene Bruce Klouzal

Yoshito Kosai Jennifer Lail Mike Lanning Al Lehman Joyce Leslie Noah Letwin Rebecca Letwin Brett Lindeke Anne Lindsley Larisa Lumba Coni Lumsden Sally Luz Ann Mack Dari Magyar Harry Mar Sandra Mazziotta F C McDonald-Crowther Alisa McKenzie Chris McKenzie Tim McLeod Margo Milandin Richard Mitchell David Mosbach Annette W.E. Nelson Jacob Nichols Kaleb Nichols Erik Oien Heather Park-Albertson Lauri Paulsen Jason Poon Tamara Prevost Anton Quist Isaiah Rendorio Bernardo Romo Callista Salazar

Lewis Schrawyer Jonathan Shadel Sean Shanahan M. Shimizu Erin Siebert Anna Slater Richard Slaughter Seth Slaughter Tom Slining Mark Slonecker Sandra Smith Christina Snyder Tami Sperry Bethany Stockton Jasmine Stotts Megan Streeter Eric Sullivan Loni Syltebo Thomas Taylor Yen Thai Jim Toomey Selina Urena Carlos Venero Rich Vogel Sherri Wade Karen Wang Nita Wester Jeff Wilkson Travis Williams Tristan Wilson Lori Woehler Rick Woehler Anthony Wright

A Tonik Jersey is built for real women with real bodies. The search is over for a jersey that fits and flatters because the women of Tonik know that powerful comes in all shapes and sizes.

Discover the new buzz in cycling apparel.

TonikCycling.com

Bicycle Accident?

Avoid The Mistakes That Can Leave You Holding The Bag. Don’t make one of the 7 Biggest Mistakes That Can Wreck Your Washington Bicycle Accident Case. Ever had a car turn left directly in front of you without even looking? If you are hit by a car do you know what to do? Do you know who to talk to and who you shouldn’t? Do you know what mistakes some people make in the days or weeks following the accident that wreck an injury case? Find the answers in this free book. When the insurance company calls wanting a recorded statement and asking you to sign a few forms, what should you do? Politely hang up and get the MOST important information about Washington Bicycle Accident claims before talking to the insurance company, hiring a lawyer, or signing anything. Order this NO COST Book at:

www.WashingtonBicycleBook.com or call 425.242.5595

Don’t lose your MOMENTUM! Keep riding this Fall. Opening Spring 2013 Located in the new downtown

ch

ar

d

St

.

Si

an

xt

h

Av

N en

.

en

ue

ViaBikeSeattle.com / VeloBikeShop.com

12

2151 Sixth Avenue at 206.325.3292

Av

St

h

ra

ft

Seattle Via6 apartments. Sixth & Blanchard.

no

Fi

ue

Le

Joining Velo Bike Shop in its new location at Sixth and Blanchard is ViaBike. You’ll find bike storage, locker rooms, showers, towel service, and a bike wash. ViaBike is all about making bike commuting easy.

Bl

ViaBike. Seattle’s new bicycle club for downtown commuters.

The Cascade Courier is printed on recycled paper. We support recycling. Please recycle this paper when you are finished with it.

/velobikeshopseattle

VeloBikeShop.com free customer parking

www.cascade.org


September 2013 Cascade Courier