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February Events Feb. 10: Seattle Bike Swap; Feb. 12: Willie Weir, Burma And Beyond; Feb. 16: Hpc Open House; Feb. 22: Nelson Vails; Feb. 24: Chilly Hilly

FEBRUARY 2013 / Vol. 43, No. 2

Bicycle and walking continue to grow in communities across the state

Celebrating 10 years of partnership with Group Health

by Tessa Greegor, Principal Planner

by Anne-Marije Rook, Staff Writer

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t’s been five years since the inaugural year of the Washington State Bicycle and Pedestrian Documentation Project, aka the “State Counts,” and we’re excited to announce that the count trends indicate that bicycling and walking is increasing in communities around the state. Before diving into the results, I want to thank all of the enthusiastic volunteers and city staff across the state for taking part in this effort over the past five years, dedicating countless (and count-filled) hours helping to recruit volunteers, and standing at intersections and on trail corridors tallying people as they pass by. In 2012, nearly 400 people, including many of you, volunteered to collect data about bicycling and walking in almost 40 cities around Washington. Thank you and we look forward to working with you again this coming fall! The 2012 State Counts represented yet another successful year with increasing

numbers of people walking and biking at count locations throughout the state. In total, more than 61,000 people were counted bicycling or walking during more than 400 two-hour count shifts in late-September. Compared to 2011 count data, the 2012 numbers showed an increase of 10.1 percent in bicycle volumes (at consistent locations) and 5.8 percent in pedestrian volumes statewide. Compared to the 2009 counts, the data from select locations where counts have been conducted consistently each year demonstrated significant growth in bicycling and walking; specifically, bicycle counts were up 43 percent and pedestrian counts were up 20 percent. Meanwhile, a comparison between 2008 and 2012 count data at consistent locations shows that total non-motorized travel was up by 10 percent. The key takeaway: continued on page 4

Bike programs are coming to south Snohomish County!

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ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

7400 Sand Point Way NE, Suite 101S Seattle, WA 98115 www.cascade.org

PRSRT STD US Postage Paid Seattle, WA PERMIT No. 2172 TIME DATED MATERIAL

Group Health is always out in support of Bike to Work Day. Group Health came aboard in 2003 as the title sponsor of Cascade’s Seattle to Portland Classic. Soon, Group Health funding also helped organize events like Flying Wheels, RSVP and the Commute Challenge. In addition to our events, Group Health has been a big supporter of the Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation, providing sponsorship dollars for the “Give Three Feet” campaign, summer camps, Basics of Bicycling continued on page 11

Major Taylor Project Spinathon expands to new locations Come out to spin on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013

by Erica Meurk, Grant Writer t Cascade, we know that it’s not enough to give a kid a bike. That kid needs safe places to ride–to school, to the park and around the neighborhood–or that bike will collect dust in the garage.

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ascade Bicycle Club would like to extend a BIG thank you to Group Health for supporting our events and programs as we celebrate the 10th anniversary of our partnership in 2013. The Group Health Cooperative, commonly known as Group Health, is a Seattlebased nonprofit health care organization that provides coverage and care for 700,000 people in Washington and Idaho. With a mission to improve the health and well-being of the members and the communities it serves, Group Health is an active sponsor of many health and fitness events and created the Group Health Fitness Network to encourage its members, employees and the community to get active and stay active as part of their personal health journey. As part of its long-standing commitment to the well-being of the community, Group Health supports cycling through event sponsorship and promotion of bicycle safety.

In fall of 2010, at the request of a committed group of volunteers called the Edmonds Bicycle Advocacy Group, Cascade began offering its Basics of Bicycling program in the Edmonds School District. Since then, we’ve provided this innovative three-week bike-safety training to more than 4,900 elementary-school students in Edmonds, Brier, Woodway, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and portions of unincorporated Snohomish County. Last year, at the urging of the school district and parents–and with funding from Verdant Health Commission and the Hazel Miller Foundation–we added an Advanced Basics of Bicycling program for middleschool kids in the Edmonds district. Our hope is that by providing these kids with a continuum of bike-skills training from third through seventh grades, they’ll be more likely to ride bikes after the last bell rings at the end of the school day–and to continue riding throughout their lives. After all, it’s one thing to ride a bike in the school gym, and quite another to ride on the on the busy city streets surrounding the school grounds. But where will all those kids ride? In south Snohomish County, as in many communities across the United States, we have developed our neighborhoods for cars continued on page 4

Is your membership expiring?

RENEW AT

www.cascade.org/renew

by Ed Ewing, Major Taylor Project Manager

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he third annual Major Taylor Project Spinathon benefit has expanded to new locations! Live Love Flow (LLF), Seattle’s first indoor cycling yoga fusion studio, has agreed to co-host this year’s Spinathon. Tentative plans include adding a third location in the University District. “Live Love Flow is super excited to be a part of it!” said Jamie Scates Schmitz, the studio owner. Our 2013 Spinathon goal is $35,000 with 100 percent of the evening’s proceeds going toward reaching more students at our existing south and southeast Seattle Major Taylor Project sites, and to support the newly created Major Taylor Project youth leadership retreat. The Major Taylor Project transforms and empowers underserved youth through bicycling, by promoting leadership, personal responsibility and positive physical and social development. Named after Marshall “Major” Taylor, the turn of the century African-American U.S. and world bicycle sprint champion, the Major Taylor Project is

In This Issue 41St annual Chilly Hilly.........................................2 February classes......................................................2 Bike swap................................................................2 Burma and Beyond.................................................2 We got Nelson!.......................................................3 McGinn eager to complete missing link..............3 Bizcycle certifies its first business........................3 Bike maintenance parties a success.....................4

a year-round youth development program focused on creating access and opportunities for youth in diverse and underserved communities. The project shares the importance of bicycling, leadership, community activism, bicycle maintenance, safety and the importance of working toward individual goals. Come support the Major Taylor Project Spinathon at one of the following locations: • Allstar Fitness, 2629 W Andover St, West Seattle • Live Love Flow, 1223 E. Cherry St (by Seattle University) And possibly at a third location in the University District. Check the website for updates. You can reserve your bike for one, two or three hours. The donation to reserve your bike is $30 per hour. Online registration is available at www.cascade.org and liveloveflowyoga.com. You can also show your continued on page 7

February rides.....................................................5-7 Summer tours lotteies open Feb. 26....................7 Bike-themed brewery..............................................8 Pedaling in maine...................................................8 A ride for Africa and a ride to your soul.........9 Cyclist of the month............................................10 Long-distance bicycling with family....................10 Cascade contacts...................................................11 Welcome new members.......................................12

February 2013

Get ready for the 41st annual Chilly Hilly Sunday, Feb. 24 on Bainbridge Island

Shop for treasures at the Seattle Bike Swap

Register online at http://shop.cascade.org

he Seattle Bike Swap is coming up on Sunday, Feb. 10! If you’re in the market for used or new bikes, equipment or accessories at bargain prices, you won’t want to miss the Swap. Now in its 18th year, the Seattle Bike Swap is a bike bargain hunter’s paradise with up to 100 vendors under the same roof. Buyers can look for great deals on new and used bike-related goods, from complete bikes to small parts. You never know exactly what vendors will bring to sell and what treasures you will find.

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e can’t be sure if February will bring sun, rain or snow, but one thing is certain: Chilly Hilly is approaching! No matter what the weather, those Bainbridge Island hills help take the nip out of the air. Chilly Hilly has been kicking off the cycling season in the Northwest for four decades. The 2010 event brought a new record with more than 6,000 riders! The 33-mile route around Bainbridge Island starts with an early morning ferry ride across Puget Sound from Seattle or you can join the crowd directly on Bainbridge Island. The course is open from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Chilly Hilly is a fundraiser for the Cascade Bicycle Club, and all members receive a $5 discount off registration. Event riders can pull over for a respite at the halfway point and enjoy free hot apple cider and cookies. Local Bainbridge Island organizations also set up tables with home baked goods and drinks for sale. In addition, check out the chili feed at the finish line that benefits Bainbridge’s own Squeaky Wheels Bicycle Club. Join us Sunday, Feb. 24 on the ride Bicycling Magazine's Jan. / Feb. 2013 issue named one of the best “Five rides that will chill your fingers but warm your soul.” It's guaranteed to be hilly, chilly and a heck of a lot of fun. Special thanks to the Bainbridge Island community and residents for welcoming bicyclists to their home.

ONLINE REGISTRATION – BEST DEAL UNTIL FEB. 20

Seattle start: $28, includes round-trip ferry fare. Winslow start: $23, no ferry fare included.

BAINBRIDGE ISLAND SPECIAL

Feb. 20 - 23 from noon to 6 p.m. only. For those riders starting on the B.I. side you can register at the lower online price in person at the B.I. Cycle Shop (162 Bjune Dr. SE, Winslow – (206) 842-6413)

Sunday, Feb. 10, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Seattle Center Exhibition Hall

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ADMISSION

General adult admission is on a sliding scale depending upon arrival time: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. - $5 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. - FREE Kids under age 15 are FREE all day!

CASH IS KING Look for our new Chilly Hilly jersey this year.

MAIL-IN REGISTRATION: FEB. 5 - 13 The registration form can be downloaded from www.cascade.org. Seattle start: $33, includes round-trip ferry fare. Winslow start: $28, no ferry fare included.

ADVANCED PACKET MAILING

If your registration is received by Feb. 13, your rider packet will be mailed to you FREE! If you register after Feb. 13, your packet will only be available for pickup on the day of the event at the start line you indicated on your registration form (Seattle or Winslow.)

DAY-OF-RIDE REGISTRATION AND PACKET PICKUP

Seattle: Day-of-ride packet pickup and day-of-ride registration is on Alaskan Way opposite the Colman Ferry Terminal. Open 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Bainbridge Island: Day-of-ride packet pickup and day-of-ride registration is at the B.I. Cycle Shop, 124 Bjune Dr SE, Winslow. Open 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Cash machines are located near the Exhibition Hall. Be sure to bring cash or checks with you, as most vendors won’t take credit cards. As always, the best thing to “swap” for goods is cash. If you ride your bike to the event, be sure to bring a lock. There will be racks available, but they will be unattended. Best to arrive early because the really good stuff goes fast!

PRE-OWNED, GENTLY USED BIKE GEAR WANTED! Do you have a bike seat post thingamajig? One clipless pedal, but not the other? Did you receive a new bike saddle gift, and are unsure what to do with your old one? Perfect! Those bike odds and ends are the treasures people are looking for at the upcoming Seattle Bike Swap. It’s never too early for spring cleaning! Bring your Bike Swap donations to the Cascade Bicycle Club, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Your bike-related item

donations are then modestly priced and sold. The proceeds directly benefit the Cascade Bicycle Club’s Education Foundation’s youth programs. Questions? Contact Lindsey Parker at ypa@cascadebicycleclub.org.

CONSIGN YOUR GEAR AT BIKE SWAP

If you have a complete bike you want to sell on consignment, we will try and sell it for you for a fee ($10 plus 10 percent of the selling price). If you’re looking for top dollar on your bike this is NOT the place for you, as bikes will be priced to move. To sell your bike on consignment, you will need to bring it to the swap between 8 and 8:30 a.m. Come to the front entrance to complete a form and pay $10 (includes entry into the swap at 9 a.m.) Return by 2 p.m. that day, and we will either give you money for your bike or return your bike to you. If you would like to donate a bicycle, please contact Ed Ewing, ed.ewing@cascadebicycleclub.org, (206)778-4671. Important consignment details: • Bikes to be sold on consignment will be accepted the day of Bike Swap between 8 and 8:30 a.m. • 10 percent of consignment proceeds go to the Major Taylor Project. • Donated bikes can be dropped off at Cascade one week prior to Bike Swap. • 100 percent of donated bike proceeds go to the Major Taylor Project. • $10 to register bikes to be sold on consignment ($10 includes event admission). • Any bikes not sold must be collected by seller at 2 p.m. (end of Swap) or bike becomes property of the Major Taylor Project. • Consignment bikes must have ‘’Asking’’ and ‘’Minimum’’ price.

February classes

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his winter is a great time to brush up on your bike maintenance skills. Learn how to do your own maintenance so your bike will be in tiptop shape and you’ll be ready to roll when the sun shines. We have a new “Maintenance for Everyday Riders” class for those who want basic knowledge to keep their ride rolling. Or, take one of our riding classes. Urban Cycling Techniques will teach you what you need to know about riding in the urban environment. It’s more fun to ride with friends or participate in group rides. This class will get you started.

March 9+10, 2013

Here is the February line-up:

SMITH COVE pier 91

Fix a Flat – Feb. 4, 2013 Chains and Derailleurs – Feb. 12, 2013 Maintenance for Everyday Riders – Feb. 19, 2013 Urban Cycling Techniques – Feb. 21, 23, 2013 Disc Brakes, Wheels and Tires – Feb. 27, 2013

M.J. Kelly, Editor Diane English, Editorial Assistant; Susan Hiles, Photography; February contributors: Ryann Child, Jeff Davis, Ed Ewing, Tessa Greegor, Anne Kurt, Erica Meurk, Lindsey Parker, Joe Platzner, Scott Straight, Anne-Marije Rook, Eric Ruthford, Peter Verbrugge The contents of this newspaper do not necessarily represent the views of the Club or any of its members. The views expressed are those of the individual contributors. Submissions guidelines: Article ideas should be discussed with the Editor in advance as the publication calendar is planned two months prior to publication. Final materials are due the first Tuesday of the month, though earlier is appreciated.  Articles submitted after that will be considered on a space-available basis. Queries can be emailed to. m.j.kelly@cascadebicycleclub.org. If you send text attachments, please format files as native MS Word files or .RTF. For line art please use an .eps format and for photos please use .jpg or .tiff format. The Courier is printed at 300 dpi, so a small 72 dpi photo will not reproduce. If you attach your name and phone number, I will do my best (conditions permitting) to discuss any major changes with you. All submissions are subject to editing for comprehension, grammar or space requirements. Please be concise!

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Inserts:  We have room for 6 single sheet qualifying inserts in each issue.  Please contact Leah Pistorius, (913) 579-7629 leah.pistorius@ cascadebicycleclub.org, for a copy of our insert policy and request form. The request and fee are due by the first of the month prior to the desired month. Advertising: Advertising: Display ads can be placed in the Courier. To check availability and reserve space, contact Leah Pistorius, (913) 579-7629 leah.pistorius@cascadebicycleclub.org Reprints:  Articles may be reprinted or abstracted in publications of nonprofit groups provided that the author and Club are credited.  Please send us a copy of the reprinted material. Membership Information:  Club records and finances are available to members upon request from the club office at 206-522-3222.

www.cascade.org/expo presented by

www.cascade.org

Vol. 43, No. 2

“We got Nelson!” 

McGinn eager to complete Missing Link, city to break “legal log jam” with full EIS

by Joe Platzner, Board of Directors

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was casually reading the January Cascade Courier the other day, thinking about rides for the upcoming year as well as important education and advocacy issues, when I literally jumped up.   “Nelson Vails is coming to REI!” I excitedly told my family.   Now, I doubt Nelson will remember me, but he was one of my heroes growing up. In high school, I spent all my spare time around bikes, and one of the most exciting activities was racing at the velodrome in Trexlertown, Pa. As intermediates and juniors we would make the weekly trip to the track, race two or three races, and rub shoulders with world-class athletes.   Nobody had more talent, charisma, and just plain old class than Nelson Vails. Nelson was a consummate showman. You never knew what he would do for fun, but you could count on it. I remember Nelson warming up with little “killer bee” antenna buzzing around his helmet. One time, holding onto the wall of the track before a race started, Nelson reached down near his front hub and mimed the pulling motion to start up his engine; after a few pulls his imaginary motor started up, and the race was off. It wasn’t all goofing around; Nelson could switch to “business time” with the best of them and race his heart out. But one experience with Nelson stands out beyond all others; I remember it as if it were yesterday. Track racing can be pretty intense. You are at your limit banging around, touching wheels, and occasionally watching sparks fly under the lights as people occasionally go down. That smooth looking concrete can be brutal. In the intermediate and junior races, you also have the invulnerability of youth in the mix. Trexlertown had a great tradition that really mixed up experience. Everyone got two or three races a night in their particular category, so everyone from kids to masters to pros could battle it out at their level. The final, however, was reserved every night for everyone who had a top two or three finish in their earlier races; this is where Nelson comes in.   I was a middle of the pack kid most of the time. Then one night, I ran a pretty good miss-and-out, and I found myself lining up in the final with the icons of the sport. Holy smokes! I was probably 110 pounds soaking wet, and I’m lining up with Olympians. I mean these were guys who were not posing when they wore the stars and stripes jerseys. To say I was a little nervous was an understatement. You do not want to do something stupid and take out a pack of

these guys going to the Olympics.   As I slowly rode from the infield to the track, Nelson silently rode up next to me, gently bumped into me, flashed that huge smile, and said, “Hey, just sit behind me, kid.” No kidding, he tucked me under his wing for a good 40 laps and kept me out of trouble. What a guy.   When he is here talking about his experiences and the Major Taylor Project, a kid could do worse than listening to Nelson and just getting behind him.   (Joe Platzner just recently joined the Cascade board. He rides with the Seattle Randonneurs, and he is interested in bicycle advocacy and education.) 

Celebrate Black History Month with Nelson Vails Friday, Feb. 22, 7 p.m. Seattle REI Store, 222 Yale Ave N Advance tickets $10 for Cascade members, $12 for non-members, now on sale at www.brownpapertickets.com. Nelson Vails story is a triumph over almost insurmountable odds. The youngest of 10 children growing up in the Harlem projects, became the first African American to win an Olympic medal in bicycling in the 1984 Track Sprint. Nelson started winning races in Central Park at a young age and worked as a New York City bicycle messenger to support his family. Nicknamed “The Cheetah,” Nelson rode furiously while working, trained in Central Park after work, and raced locally on weekends. In 1981 he earned a spot on the U.S. Olympic Cycling Team and raced to a gold medal in 1983 in the Pan American games in Venezuela. He represented the USA at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles where he won the silver medal in the individual 1000-meter Match Sprints, behind countryman Mark Gorski. Vails was the 1984 National Sprint Champion and National Tandem Sprint Champion in 1984, 1985 and 1986. In 1985 he earned a silver medal in the Tandem Sprint at the World Championships. In the 1980s and early 1990s he competed professionally in 6-Day circuits in Europe and in Japanese Keirin events from 1990 to 1995. Please join us for an evening of inspiration benefitting the Major Taylor Project on Friday, Feb. 22, at Seattle REI!

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n case you missed it over the holidays, Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn, Councilmember Tom Rasmussen and Seattle Department of Transportation officials held a news conference to announce a series of road safety improvements to streets and intersections in Ballard, including the Missing Link. “We are eager to complete the Missing Link, and conducting a full EIS is the best way to break the legal log jam on this project,” said McGinn. “We are also moving ahead on safety improvements on the street that can be implemented quickly to help everyone share the road.” “For over a decade the city has been working to complete the Burke-Gilman Trail. I am confident that with careful planning both bicyclists and freight and industrial traffic will be able to coexist successfully in Ballard,” added Rasmussen, chair of the City Council’s Transportation Committee. The first segment of the Burke-Gilman Trail opened from Gas Works Park in Seattle to Kenmore in 1978. Since then, the city of Seattle has worked to extend the trail westward to Ballard and Golden Gardens. Currently, the trail is not constructed between 11th Ave. NW and the Hiram M. Chittenden Locks, creating a gap between segments of the trail. City records show there were 45 bicycle crashes that were responded to on NW 45th St. between 11th Ave. and Shilshole Ave. NW in a four year period (2008-2011). That location, part of the “Missing Link,” is the highest bicycle collision location in the city. In 2003 the city council adopted a plan to close this “Missing Link” along the Shilshole alignment. Since then, opponents of the project have gone to court to impede its construction. Earlier this year the city’s hearing examiner reversed, in part, her previous affirmation of the SEPA Determination of NonSignificance for the Missing Link Project, and remanded it to the Seattle Department of Transportation to prepare an EIS, limited in scope to traffic hazards in the segment of the project along Shilshole Ave. NW, between 17th Ave. NW and Vernon. SDOT has decided to undertake the preparation of a full EIS for the entire project, which the city believes is the most expeditious path to take in the interest of the project. This process will begin in 2013, but will take several more years to reach its conclusion due to the likelihood of further legal appeals over adequacy of any new EIS. A comprehensive EIS is therefore the best approach to expedite the process, by doing the most extensive environmental review, which will be more difficult to challenge legally.

In the meantime there are a number of

Mayor Mike McGinn spoke before cameras to announce that the City will conduct a full Environmental Impact Statement study for the project to complete the “Missing Link” of the Burke-Gilman Trail in Ballard. [Pictured: Mayor Mike McGinn, SDOT Director Peter Hahn and Transportation Committee Chair Tom Rasmussen.

improvements that need to be made to address safety concerns for bicyclists and pedestrians, as well as vehicular traffic, in the general area where this trail project is proposed. SDOT has prepared specific recommended improvements that will be constructed in 2013 or 2014. These improvements include: • Advisory bicycle lanes on NW 45th St. and other safety improvements on that section of roadway • Installation of striping and signage to create a traffic island and a 4-way stop at Ballard Ave NW and 17th Ave NW. • Striping and signage at NW 48th St. and Ballard Ave NW to improve vehicular line of sight and slow speeds. • Shoulder maintenance and replacement along degraded sections of the shoulder along Shilshole Ave NW. • Installation of a curb ramp to allow bicycles access to the sidewalk to queue for the existing bike lane headed north on 24th Ave NW at the intersection of Shilshole Ave. NW/24th Ave. NW and NW Market St. Current conditions provide very limited queuing space for bicycles. These improvements are independent from the proposed trail project, and are intended to either enhance public safety or provide routine roadway maintenance. The city will coordinate with, and take input from, bicycle and freight stakeholders in the implementation of these and any additional safety projects. “The Burke-Gilman Trail is a busy, multiuse trail that provides an important connection to residents and businesses in Ballard. I’m glad to see that the city is moving ahead with its plans to close the Missing Link and with these other safety improvements,” said Davidya Kasperzyk, founding board member of Friends of the Burke-Gilman Trail.

BizCycle certifies its first business: Washington Bike Law, Silver Level by Ryann Child, AmeriCorps, Commute Programs Assistant We are thrilled to announce that Washington Bike Law has been certified as a silver level bicycle-friendly business. Attorney Bob Anderton was first in the door to apply his business for BizCycle certification, and he has set the bar high. This three-person law firm has shown that not only is it easy to be bike-friendly even for small businesses, it’s easy to become BizCycle certified. But don’t take our word for it; here’s what Anderton had to say about the process. Q: Why did you decide to seek Cascade’s BizCycle certification? A: We are not just lawyers who represent bicyclists; we are lawyers who love riding bikes. We were the first law office in the country to be designated a Bike Friendly Business by the

League of American Bicyclists, so we wanted to keep up the firsts when this program was launched. Q: What was the process like? Did you learn anything about your workplace that you didn’t realize before in regards to support for bicyclists? A: I didn’t think I’d learn anything, but actually I did. I thought that our 1911 building did not have shower facilities, but after working through the process with Stephanie [Cascade’s manager of commute programs] I enquired and learned that there are actually two shower facilities in the building. Thankfully, none of us are especially sweaty people so our lack of knowledge has not prevented us from riding. But, without this program, I never would have had this information.

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

Q: Now that you know your certification level (Silver), does your workplace plan to make any changes to improve bicycle facilities or programs? A: Naturally, we want to go for the gold. And therein lies virtue of BizCycle. BizCycle not only recognizes businesses for the actions they are currently taking to be bike-friendly, it informs and inspires further improvements to increase bicycling. Washington Bike Law now has a powerful stamp of approval as a bike-friendly employer based on the credits they earned. And the credits they have not yet earned represent a simple list of potential actions they can review, prioritize and implement. Just like bicycling, BizCycle is a simple way to get to where you want to go. And in

the case of Washington Bike Law, they are headed for gold. Whether your company is already bikefriendly or looking to become more bikefriendly–or both–BizCycle certification is simple and effective. We will be recognizing our first cohort of certified businesses at this year’s Bike to Work Breakfast. Applications are due March 15, so contact bizcycle@ cascadebicycleclub.org to learn more. Visit http://bizcycle.cascade.org.

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February 2013

bike maintenance parties were a success

bicycle and walking continues to grow continue from page 1 the number of people bicycling and walking around the state has grown over the years! In 2012, volunteers collected data about gender and helmet use in addition to mode and direction of travel. Across the state, approximately 84.7 percent of cyclists observed were wearing helmets. In Seattle, 93.5 percent of cyclists wore helmets. By comparing a summary of the helmet data from jurisdictions with helmet laws to jurisdictions without helmet laws, the results indicated approximately 90 percent of all bicyclists wore helmets in jurisdictions with helmet laws compared to 63 percent in jurisdictions without helmet laws. The gender data collected through the 2012 State Counts showed that males comprised 75.8 percent of all bicyclists counted across the state and females comprised 23.7 percent. In contrast, 50.2 percent of all pedestrians counted were female.

by Lindsey Parker, AmeriCorps, Youth Programs Assistant

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ive maintenance parties, 40 volunteers and 400 BMX bikes later, the education team finished another successful round of bike maintenance nights! There was an overwhelmingly great response from volunteers to help with the 26-inch wheel BMX bikes used in the Basics of Bicycling elementary school program. Many volunteers had no previous maintenance experience, but all were able to learn basic mechanic skills on the simple, single speed, coaster brake bikes. With pizza to fuel them, and a positive attitude to learn, 60 bikes were finished each night. Tubes were patched, chains were lubed and each bike was updated in the inventory. These biannual maintenance parties would not be possible without help from our enthusiastic volunteers. Thank you volunteers for all of your hard work each week!

added dates and a price drop on our international tours by Peter Verbrugge, Event Producer

Top: Volunteers gather around a set of bikes they worked hard to maintain. Middle: A volunteer adjusts the seat post height of a bike for the elementary school students. Below: Lindsey, the Youth Programs intern, guides a volunteer on adjusting the bottom bracket

Riders can save $200 on the Best of Hokkaido Japan cycle tour for all bookings received by Feb. 28. Due to currency movements we can offer this saving for a limited time only. Recently we hosted intrepid around-theworld Canadian cyclist Janick Lemieux` at REI for a talk on her multi-country “Ring of Fire” riding experience all over Asia. When asked about her favorite place to cycle in Asia, Janick Lemieux stated that “Hokkaido was clearly the best all-around venue. Fantastic, lightly traveled roads, stunning natural beauty and awesome natural hot spring Spa’s to enjoy at the end of every ride”

south snohomish County continue from page 1 rather than for people on bikes or on foot. As a result, people–including the kids who learn to ride bikes through our programs–don’t have safe places to bike and walk. They’re less likely to integrate physical activity into their daily lives, and more likely to suffer a range of health problems as a result. Snohomish County is no exception. Less than 1 percent of Snohomish County residents ride bikes to work, and the obesity rate hovers above the statewide average, at 27 percent. With Link light rail development planned for Snohomish County during the next decade, it’s essential that we seize upcoming opportunities to integrate safe bicycling routes into this community’s transportation network. With these factors in mind, Cascade approached Verdant Health Commission for funding for policy work directly targeting communities in south Snohomish County. With the Commission’s support over the

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While we’re not surprised by the positive trends reflected in the 2012 State Counts for bicycling and walking in communities across Washington, we’re excited to have data to support what we know about bicycling and walking to help strengthen the case for investing in these modes. And as communities across the state continue to build safer infrastructure to support people bicycling and walking, we anticipate these positive trends to continue. If you’d like to see the final report for the 2012 Washington State Bicycle and Pedestrian Documentation Project (complete with data for each count jurisdiction), please visit: http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/bike/count. Thank you again for volunteering for this project and we hope to work with all of you this coming September for the 2013 State Counts!

next two years, we’ll be working with city planners, elected leaders, businesses and community volunteers to do everything we can to harness community support for bicycling and give those kids–and their parents–safer places to ride. We’ll be offering trainings on bike-friendly transportation planning and policy for elected leaders and city planners, encouraging businesses to apply for BizCycle certification, and offering a free two-day version of our Advocacy Leadership Institute for volunteers who want to help with the effort. We’re looking forward to a healthier, more livable south Snohomish County connected by safe, convenient bicycling routes for anyone who wants to ride. If you’re a south Snohomish county resident and would like to participate in our Snohomish-based Advocacy Leadership Institute or be involved in any way, please contact Max Hepp-Buchanan at MaxHB@cascadebicycleclub.org.

Japan is certainly one of the top five cycle destinations in the world; so please join us in cycling this hidden gem. The Lake and Volcano District of ChileArgentina tour sold out, so we opened up a second tour on Nov. 17 to 28, 2013. This tour is both tandem and moderate rider friendly. Find out why we have send six happy tours to Chile over the past few years. The Rajasthan- India tour has also sold out. We will not be adding a second tour, but there is a wait list if interested. Finally, our Czech-Austria Tour is filling up fast! Only eight spaces were open at time of this article. If we have enough interest, an earlier date second tour will be added.

burma and beyond: an evening with Willie Weir tuesday, Feb. 12, 7 p.m. reI seattle, 222 yale ave. n tickets available in advance through brown Paper tickets Cascade members: $8 / General public: $10

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yanmar (Burma) is all over the news. It is listed in several publications as one of the top travel destinations. Barack Obama recently became the first sitting U.S. president to visit. Makes you want to go, doesn’t it? What about cycling in Myanmar? How open is the country now? Where can you travel? Is it worth the expense? Well, Willie Weir and his wife Kat Marriner just finished a bike trip in Burma. They were tossed out of a monastery, and hosted by the police. They were greeted by a bazillion friendly people, and never once chased by a dog. They passed hundreds of ox carts and witnessed President Obama’s motorcade zip by on the streets of Yangon. Come see the images (Laos and Cambodia too) and hear the stories from a man who is pedaling slower, but steadier.

www.cascade.org

Vol. 43, No. 2

FEBRUARY RIDES More daily rides are listed online at www.cascade.org/dailyrides

Cascade Bicycle Club Ride Classification In order to pick the rides that suit your skills and energy level, use the following guidelines: • PACE: The speed on level ground without breaks: Easy: Under 10 mph Leisurely: 10-12 mph Steady: 12-14 mph Moderate: 14-16 mph Brisk: 16-18 mph Strenuous: 18-21 mph Super Strenuous: 22+ mph • TERRAIN: These descriptions should be considered in the context of the pace and length of the ride: Mostly Flat: Trails and/or mostly flat roads with a possible gentle upgrade Rolling: Climbs are short and easy, not too numerous. Some Hills: A few short steep hills, some moderate upgrades and/or longer gentle climbs. Hilly: Many true hills, but none outrageous.

Extremely Hilly: Steep & long climbs with grades >9% and/ or mountain passes Unlimited: “Out of category”; only for those very sure of their ability to climb any grade, any length at the advertised pace. Off Road: Significant unpaved sections. • MAP: Whether a map or cue sheet is provided. • REGROUP: None and Occasional regroup categories expect experienced riders who can fix their own mechanical problems and follow a map/cue sheet if they are separated. • RAIN: Weather conditions that cancel the ride. Helmets are required on all rides. When using a cell phone you must pull off the road/trail and STOP. Put away all earbuds/headphones/music devices before the ride starts.

Friday, Feb. 1

Sunday, Feb. 3

FRUMPS: Does the Jordan Bridge 43 mi • Moderate • Rolling • Map • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • Centennial Trail Pilchuck Trailhead, 2 Miles north of Snohomish • Steady rain cancels • Sue Matthews, 206-687-9338 A relatively flat ride (1600’-43 mi) toward Granite Falls and Arlington via the Jordan Bridge. Only one significant hill. Lunch in Arlington. No sweep. Directions to Pilchuck Trailhead: Continue on Maple from the trail’s beginning in Snohomish. As you leave the city limits, Maple becomes Machias Pilchuck Trailhead is on the right in approximately 2 miles.

FRIDAY RIDERS: Go to Queen Anne/ Magnolia via the Canal Trail & Thomas St. Bridge 25-30 mi • Leisurely • Hilly • No Map • Frequent regroup • 10 a.m. • Gas Works Park, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Bill Lemke, 206-284-2843 Explore some Queen Anne and Magnolia neighborhoods on and off the boulevards and using the Ship Canal Trail and Thomas Street Bridge. There will be a restaurant lunch/snack stop. Senior, new and slower paced riders are welcome. We will ride very slowly uphill and wait for walkers. Icy conditions also cancel.

Saturday, Feb. 2 SPOKESPEOPLE rides! Theo’s Chocolate & Zoo Rose Garden 7 mi • Easy • Rolling • Map • Stay together • 2 p.m. • N 42nd & Densmore Ave. N, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Cathy Tuttle, 206-547-9569, 206-713-6269, cathy.tuttle@ gmail.com Michael Herschensohn, 206-412-0702, mh982501@gmail.com Get ready for a sweet taste of Valentine’s Day. Visit the Woodland Park Zoo Rose Garden and Theo Chocolate with Spokespeople. We’re pretty sure the roses won’t be in bloom but this garden is still beautiful! After a brief rest at the Rose Garden, we’ll head south to Fremont and partake of sweet samples at Theo’s Chocolate. We’ll be back to our starting point by 4 p.m. and you’ll have some ideas for great places to visit on Valentine’s Day. We’ll travel on Greenways or proposed Greenways for most of this ride. New riders welcome! Please come by 1:45 if you are new to riding in groups or if you need help with adjusting your helmet or bike. All ages and skill levels welcome! All rides are on the road with traffic and include expert commuters who accompany us to offer encouragement and model good road riding techniques for new, returning and reluctant cyclists. Please join us! All are welcome! **FAMILIES WELCOME**

All riders are required to sign a waiver form. Rides are cancelled or are no longer considered Cascade rides in the event that the ride leader does not show up or does not

CHEW Week Four: Bellevue/Cougar/ Mercer Island/Bellevue 39 mi (3400’) • Moderate • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • South Bellevue Park & Ride (2700 Bellevue Way SE, Bellevue) • Steady rain cancels • Wilfried Mack, wilfried.mack@gmail.com • Matthew Wong, 425-443-8151 cell, matthew.wong@ comcast.net Ice or snow will also cancel the ride. The fourth ride of the CHEW Series (see below for series description) will be held on Feb. 3, starting at 9:30 from South Bellevue Park-n-Ride (http:// goo.gl/maps/YlP4X). This ride route is 39 miles and has circa 3400 feet of elevation. We’ll leave South Bellevue Park-n-Ride on a warm-up ride segment heading toward SE Bellevue and ascend Cougar Mountain from the north, exiting through Newcastle, veloambulating around Mercer Island, followed by an adventurous route through West Bellevue. This is the posting for the Moderate-paced ride (14-16 mph) on the flats). Please note that the restroom facilities by the Park-n-Ride are not open this time of year. Updates for the ride will be posted on the Cascade Free Daily Ride group on the Meetup. com site at http://www.meetup.com/cascaderides

Climbing Hills–Eastside Wintertime The CHEW Series will be held Sundays at 9:30 a.m. on Feb. 3, 10, 17, March 3, 10, 17 and 24 at various starting points on the Eastside. These will be climbing routes on local hills which will progress from circa 30 miles and 2500 feet of elevation, to 50+ miles and 4500 feet of elevation. There will be three paces offered for riders: Brisk (16-18 mph on flats); Moderate (14-16 mph on flats); and Steady (12-14 mph on flats) all will use a common course for that week. Riders should be able to sustain the appropriate pace for their selected group, read a cue sheet, change a flat (and have the requisite equipment), and have a positive attitude! Faster riders and better climbers are welcome to join but for them the ride becomes self-paced and self-guided. Riders can ride on their own, in small groups or with the appropriate pace ride leader. Cue sheets will be available at the start and riders can email the Ride Leader by the preceding Friday noon for the final route cue sheet pdf and map url. Rest Stops will be planned as noted on the Route Cue Sheet.

CHEW Week Four: Bellevue/Cougar/ Mercer Island/Bellevue 39 mi (‘3400) • Brisk • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • South Bellevue Park-n-Ride, Bellevue • Steady rain cancels • Valiant Seu, 425-830-0787, ephemeralcycle@gmail.com Kimberly Smith, 206-612-3480, iamkimbo@ hotmail.com The fourth ride of the CHEW Series (see below for series description) will be held on Feb. 3, starting at 9:30 from South Bellevue Park-nRide (http://goo.gl/maps/YlP4X). This ride route is 39 miles long and has circa 3400 feet of

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

provide a waiver form for signatures of riders. Riders are expected to be ready to ride at the time listed (i.e. that’s not the time to drive into the parking lot with a full bladder and empty tires) and to ride in a safe, courteous, legal manner. Riders are expected to cooperate with the leader(s) and ride within the advertised pace. If unsure of your ability to keep up, try a slower level ride to get an idea of ride paces. For “Hilly” rides, consider choosing a pace down from your usual level. Unless indicated, it is not necessary to RSVP the ride leader to participate in a ride. Youth riders may also join regular club rides. Permission must be obtained from the ride leader at least 24 hours in advance for youth to join a regular club ride. Children 15 and under must be accompanied by parent or legal guardian OR must have parent/legal guardian sign a consent form designating a guardian for them on the ride; youth ages 16-17 may ride without a parent or guardian with advance permission of the ride leader AND a signed parental consent

form (available at www.cascade.org) which must be given to the ride leader at the start of the ride. Cascade does not sponsor or endorse any non-bicycling activities that people may participate in while on these rides. Each cyclist is responsible for his/her conduct and decisions while on a Cascade ride. Cascade membership and activities are open to anyone able and willing to participate in a safe, courteous and cooperative manner and in support of the purposes of the club. Ride information is also available at: www.cascade.org. Only Cascade certified ride leaders may post and lead Cascade Daily Rides. See Ride Leader Information on our website or email the Rides Chair at cbcrides@cascadebicycleclub.org. On Twitter? Tag your tweets and twitpics with #dailyrides.

elevation. We’ll leave South Bellevue Park-n-Ride on a warm-up ride segment heading toward SE Bellevue and ascend Cougar Mountain from the north, exiting through Newcastle, veloambulating around Mercer Island, followed by an adventurous route through West Bellevue. This is the posting for the Brisk-paced ride (16-18 mph on the flats). Please note that the restroom facilities by the Park-n-Ride are not open this time of year. Updates for the ride will be posted on the Cascade Free Daily Ride on the Meetup. com site at http://www.meetup.com/cascaderides/ events/97393212/

com • Julie Pearl, 206-226-1311, jpearlsea@ gmail.com In honor of Bob Marley’s birthday, come join us for 42 (give or take) miles of flat, relaxing riding. Bring your flower power and be ready to begin jamming at the start time. Tie-dye, dreadlocks, hemp necklaces and showering beforehand are optional. We’ll begin at the Cascade Bicycle Club HQ and follow the road or trail to Alki. We’ll stop for coffee, tea or salad in Alki at the Tully’s coffee house joint and then head back using the same trails that got us there. It will probably be too early in the year to see any buds or herbs, but still should be a good time.

See CHEW Climbing Hills–Eastside Wintertime above in the moderate pace description. CHEW Week Four: Bellevue/Cougar/ Mercer Island/Bellevue 39 mi (3400 ft) • Steady • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • South Bellevue Park and Ride, 2700 Bellevue Wy SE, Bellevue • Steady rain cancels • Alan Miller, 425-488-4567, 206-697-4603 cell, amiller7x7@comcast.net Ice or snow will also cancel the ride. The fourth ride of the CHEW Series (see below for series description) will be held on Feb. 3, starting at 9:30 from South Bellevue Park-n-Ride (http:// goo.gl/maps/YlP4X). This ride route is 39 miles long and has circa 3400 feet of elevation. We’ll leave South Bellevue Park-n-Ride on a warm-up ride segment heading toward SE Bellevue and ascend Cougar Mountain from the north, exiting through Newcastle, veloambulating around Mercer Island, followed by an adventurous route through West Bellevue. This is the posting for the Steady-paced ride (12-14 mph on the flats). Please note that the restroom facilities by the Park-n-Ride are not open this time of year. Updates for the ride will be posted on the Cascade Free Daily Ride group on the Meetup. com site at http://www.meetup.com/cascaderides/

See CHEW Climbing Hills – Eastside Wintertime description above in the moderate pace description. Sunday Crepes Ride 25 mi • Leisurely • Some hills • No Map • Stay together • 10 a.m. • Gas Works Park, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • David Bordewick, 425-822-8546, theborde@aol.com Join us for a Swedish pancake breakfast at the Swedish Club on Dexter Ave., Seattle. afterward we will engage in bicycle activity to burn off the calories. Crepes breakfast is $9.00, cash or check, credit cards not accepted. Pouring rain and/or freezing weather & snow will cancel event. Or check with the Ride Leader.

Bob Marley Birthday Ride/Magnuson to Alki 42 mi • Moderate • Mostly flat • Map: Online • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • Cascade Bicycle Club HQ, 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle • Showers cancel • Jenny Anderson, 702-882-3040, jandrsn@gmail.

Monday, Feb. 4 MUMPS: Do The Lake 40-60 mi • Moderate • Hilly • No Map • Frequent regroup • 10 a.m. • Tracy Owen Station/Log Boom Park, Kenmore • Steady rain cancels • Craig Mohn, 425-890-5234 cell, cmohn_cycling@comcast.net (texts preferred to VM) Ice or snow will also cancel the ride. The basic route is a counterclockwise loop of north Lake Washington with a food stop en route. Start at Log Boom or meet us at the Leschi Starbucks at about 11:15-contact the ride leader if you have questions about this. Distance and route may vary to suit weather conditions and group. A brisk pace group may be added only if a certified ride leader volunteers to lead it. Check with leader if weather appears questionable.

Tuesday, Feb. 5 TREATS: Gas Works to Edmonds 30-35 mi • Steady • Hilly • Map • Stay together • 10 a.m. • Gas Works Park, Seattle • Ice/snow cancels • Peter Hallson, 425-6734816 Let’s go for lunch in Edmonds. Ride through U of W campus, visit Hamlin Park, return from Edmonds via Interurban Trail.

Cycle Tuesdays 25-35 mi • Super strenuous • Some hills • No Map • Occasional regroup 5:45 p.m. • Gene Coulon Park, next to Kidd Valley, Renton • Ice/snow cancels Russell Moul, 206-200-7314, 253-657-9568 • Pete Grey, 425-558-0451, pgrey@hotmail. com Year-round training rides for one day STP riders. Rides stress safety, cooperation and group riding skills. Fast pacelines with regroups from Renton to surrounding areas. Large turnout splits into multiple groups. No parking in Coulon parking lot. Lights required.

Eastside Tours Evening ride 20-30 mi • Brisk • Hilly • No Map • Frequent regroup • 6:30 p.m. • Overlake Transit Center, 15590 NE 36th , Redmond • Showers cancel Eric Gunnerson, 425-753-6032, eric_ gunnerson@hotmail.com

5

February 2013

FEBRUARY RIDES www.cascade.org/dailyrides Join us for our 15th year of evening rides as we explore the Eastside. The route varies from week to week. Our pace on the flats is high-moderate low-brisk. This is a hilly ride; we will climb around 1500 feet on an average ride. Hills are climbed at your own pace and we regroup at the top of all hills. Please see website for more details before attending. Lights required! Note winter start location; meet just north of buildings.

Wednesday, Feb. 6 WRUMPS: Does North Bend 38 mi • Moderate • Some hills • Map • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • Tolt McDonald Park, Carnation • Steady rain cancels • Sue Matthews, 206-687-9338 We’ll take a relaxing ride to North Bend for lunch with just a few hills about 1400’, for 38 miles. Tolt McDonald Park is on SR-203 at the south end of Carnation just north of the Tolt River Bridge.

Wednesday’s Bends Queen Anne Route 25 mi • Strenuous • Extremely hilly • Map:Online • Occasional regroup 5:30 p.m. • Sakuma Viewpoint by Agua Verde Cafe, Seattle • Showers cancel Dan Fealk, 360-305-2369, fealkd@gmail.com Note earlier 5:30 start time. Lights required. Sakuma Viewpoint is beside Agua Verde Cafe at 1303 NE Boat St, along the water to the west of UW Medical Center. If you’re riding, turn off the Burke-Gilman Trail at Brooklyn Ave and go south two blocks to Boat St. We typically go for about 2 hours, ride together on the flats, have 5-8 hills on each route, and make no food stops.

Thursday, Feb. 7 More Cycle Tuesdays 25-35 mi • Super strenuous • Some hills • No Map • Occasional regroup 5:45 p.m. • Gene Coulon Park/Next to Kidd Valley, Renton • Ice/snow cancels Tom Baker, 425-221-0631, tommbaker@ hotmail.com • Brian Ohlemeier, 425-9856980 cell Year-round training rides for one day STP riders. Rides stress safety, cooperation and group riding skills. Fast pacelines with regroups from Renton to surrounding areas. Large turnout splits into multiple groups. ** No parking in Coulon parking lot. Lights required!

Eastside Tours Evening ride 20-30 mi • Brisk • Hilly • No Map • Frequent regroup • 6:30 p.m. • Overlake Transit Center, 15590 NE 36th , Redmond • Showers cancel Eric Gunnerson, 425-753-6032, eric_ gunnerson@hotmail.com Join us for our 15th year of evening rides as we explore the Eastside. The route varies from week to week. Our pace on the flats is high-moderate low-brisk. This is a hilly ride; we will climb around 1500 feet on an average ride. Hills are climbed at your own pace and we regroup at the top of all hills. Please see website for more details before attending. Lights required! Note winter start location; meet just north of buildings.

Friday, Feb. 8 FRIDAY RIDERS: Go North from Green Lake 20-28 mi • Leisurely • Some hills • No Map • Frequent regroup • 10 a.m. • S. W. Corner of Green Lake next to Rest rooms, Seattle • Showers cancel Jan Johnson, 425-672-0617 A recreational ride mainly on city streets, going north to Shoreline. Meet at the rest rooms at the southwest corner of Green Lake by the rowing center. Park across the street in the dirt parking lot. Be sure to pump up your tires and check your brakes the night before. Any icy conditions also cancels.

6

FRUMPS: Kenmore Ramble 30-40 mi • Moderate • Some hills • No Map • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • Tracy Owen Station (Log Boom Park), Kenmore • Showers cancel Dan Garretson, 425-985-8570 We will ride from Log Boom Park to an unknown destination. The location and distance will be determined by the weather. Ice, snow or temperatures below 37 degrees cancels the ride.

Saturday, Feb. 9 Learn and Ride-Ride with GPS and Garmin/Juanita Hill 14 mi • Moderate • Hilly • Map:Online • Occasional regroup 10:15 a.m. • Kenmore Library, 6531 NE 181st , Kenmore • Showers cancel Jenny Anderson, 702-882-3040, jandrsn@ gmail.com Ever wonder how ride leaders get routes into ridewithgps.com? Did you get a new Garmin and only know how to turn it on? This is a learn and ride series that will begin in the Kenmore Library meeting room where we will walk you through the steps to route our ride on RideWithGPS. Since the library has free Wi-Fi, bring your laptop and follow along. We’ll also walk through the basics of transferring the route to a Garmin device. Finally, we‘ll get on the road and ride the route. Please RSVP on meet up link listed above so we can ensure you have a seat. We’ll be wheels rolling at 11:30 a.m., so if you’d just like to join us for the ride, meet us at the library for the start. Even if rain cancels the ride we’ll still do the indoors learning part.

Sunday, Feb. 10 CHEW Week Five: 7-ish Hills East 41 mi (3500’) • Brisk • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Wilmot Gateway Park (17301 131st Ave NE, Woodinville) • Steady rain cancels Wilfried Mack, wilfried.mack@gmail.com Alexa Volwiler, alexa.volwiler@gmail.com The fifth ride of the CHEW Series (see below for series description) will be held on Feb. 10, starting at 9:30 from Wilmot Gateway Park in Woodinville (http://goo.gl/maps/IJr23). This ride is 41 miles long and has circa 3500 feet of elevation. We will leave Wilmot Gateway Park and after a short warm-up begin the endeavor: Winery Hill, Norway Hill, Brickyard Hill, Rose Hill, Education Hill, Trilogy Hill (most), and ending with Hollywood Hill. This is the posting for the Brisk paced ride (16-18 mph on the flats. Updates for the ride will be posted on the Cascade Free Daily Ride on the Meetup.com site at http://www.meetup.com/cascaderides/ events/97394162/

See CHEW Climbing Hills-Eastside Wintertime 2/3. CHEW Week Five: 7-ish Hills East 41 mi (3500 ft) • Steady • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Wilmot Gateway Park in Woodinville, WA • Steady rain cancels • Alan Miller, 425-488-4567, 206-697-4603 cell, miller7x7@comcast.net The fifth ride of the CHEW Series (see below for series description) will be held on Feb. 10 starting at 9:30 from Wilmot Gateway Park in Woodinville (http://goo.gl/maps/IJr23). This ride is 41 miles long and has circa 3500 feet of elevation. We’ll leave Wilmot Gateway Park and after a short warm-up begin the endeavor: Winery Hill, Norway Hill, Brickyard Hill, Rose Hill, Education Hill, Trilogy Hill (most), and ending with Hollywood Hill. This is the posting for the Steady paced ride (12-14 mph on the flats). Updates for the ride will be posted on the Cascade Free Daily Ride on the Meetup.com site at http://www.meetup.com/cascaderides/ events/97394162/

See CHEW Climbing Hills-Eastside Wintertime 2/3. CHEW Week Five: 7-ish Hills East 41 (3500’) • Moderate • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Wilmot Gateway Park in Woodinville Steady rain cancels • Kimberly Smith, 206612-3480, iamkimbo@hotmail.com The fifth ride of the CHEW Series (see below for series description) will be held on Feb. 10, 2013 starting at 0930 from Wilmot Gateway Park in Woodinville (http://goo.gl/maps/ IJr23). This ride is about 41 miles long and has circa 3500 feet of elevation. We’ll leave Wilmot Gateway Park and after a short warmup begin the endeavor: Winery Hill, Norway Hill, Brickyard Hill, Rose Hill, Education Hill, Trilogy Hill (most), and ending with Hollywood Hill. This is the posting for the Moderate-paced ride (14-16 mph on the flats). Updates for the ride will be posted on the Cascade Free Daily Ride on the Meetup.com site at http://www. meetup.com/cascaderides/events/97394162/

See CHEW Wintertime 2/3.

Monday, Feb. 11 MUMPS: Do The Lake See MUMPS, 2/4.

Tuesday, Feb. 12 TREATS: Lunch with Lenin ~40 mi • Steady • Some hills • No Map • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • Burien Burger King, 14893 Av SW, Burien • Ice/ snow cancels • Pete Jack, 206-498-9363, petejack45@gmail.com Burien to Fremont. Out by some lesser known streets plus what you’d expect from the West Seattle Bridge to Fremont, back via Alki and Marine View Drive. The address is the Burien Burger King near Burien P & R. DO NOT park in the P & R lot or you may get a ticket and/or towed. There should be plenty of space west of BK toward Staples.

Cycle Tuesdays See Cycle Tuesdays, 2/5.

Eastside Tours Evening ride See Eastside Tours, 2/5.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13 For a complete list of this month’s rides, see www.cascade.org.

Thursday, Feb. 14 THUMPS: Home for Lunch 20-35 mi • Moderate • Some hills • No Map • Stay together • 9:30 a.m. • Leschi Starbucks, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Mike Nelson, 206-325-9068 Be home in time for lunch after some urban exploration. Fixies and single speed bikes welcome. Ride leader will be riding a single speed.

More Cycle Tuesdays See More Cycle Tuesdays, 2/7.

Eastside Tours Evening ride See Eastside Tours, 2/7.

Friday, Feb. 15 FRUMPS: Marymoor to Maltby 40 mi (2400’) • Moderate • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • Marymoor Park, East Lot • Steady rain cancels • Chris Nelson, 206-349-4846, chris.nelson166@ gmail.com A moderate ride to lunch in Maltby via the Snoqualmie Valley and Fales Road Climb hills at your own pace and we’ll regroup at the top as needed. Please arrive early enough to prepare for a 10 a.m. departure. Ice or snow will cancel. Showers may shorten the route. If the Marymoor East lot is closed, park in the Marymoor Velodrome lot (bring $1 cash for parking).

FRIDAY RIDERS: Architecture in The International District 25 mi • Leisurely • Mostly flat • No Map • Frequent regroup • 10 a.m. • Gas Works Park, Seattle • Ice/snow cancels • Norm Tjaden, 206-525-2366 A part ride and part walking tour to explore some of the historic and significant buildings in an area still home to many of Asian ancestry. We’ll stop to look at the architectural details of the buildings from the early 20th century. Bring or buy lunch, a bike lock and shoes suitable for some walking. An urban ride with some traffic. Rain also cancels.

Saturday, Feb. 16 High Performance Cycling Team 2013 Kick-off Meeting 4 p.m. • Cycle University, West Seattle No rain cancellation • David Longdon, 541514-1502, cascade.cyclist@gmail.com • Tom Meloy, tmeloy@ureach.com This social gathering at Cycle U in West Seattle is for anyone who would like to learn more about Cascade’s High Performance Cycling program. This is an opportunity to meet team members and find out about our plans for 2013. Besides socializing, discussion topics will include: • Team benefits from our relationship with CBC and Cycle U • 2013 Team goals and initiatives • Cycle U coaching clinics. Potential clinic topics include pacelines, climbing, group ride safety, cornering and descending, etc. • The team discount program including discounts on Felt bikes and Specialized bikes and products • Fitness performance testing program for members • 2013 Ride schedule Cascade’s High Performance Cycling (HPC) was developed to match the interests and needs of cyclists who like to ride fast, hard, far and climb hills, but without a racing focus. The HPC program is committed to helping strong cyclists challenge themselves to improve their skills and fitness. HPC riders should: • Be committed to improving their fitness and cycling skills • Be able to, or desire to ride at the CBC Strenuous effort level. • Possess the endurance to ride over 50 miles. • Be comfortable with, or desire to master paceline and group riding techniques.

Sunday, Feb. 17 CHEW Series Week Six: And another set of 7-ish Hills 45 mi • Steady • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Wimot Gateway Park 17301 131st Ave. NE Woodinville • Steady rain cancels • Debbie Muir, 425-770-4516, smartluckylena@msn.com This is the sixth ride in the CHEW Series. This route is approximately 45 miles with an elevation gain of 3872 feet. Ice or snow will also cancel the ride. The sixth ride of the CHEW Series (see below for series description), starts from Wilmot Gateway Park located at 17301 131st Ave. NE Woodinville. The route is 45 miles long with about 3872 feet of elevation gain. This is the Steady-pace ride (12-14 mph on the flats). Updates will be posted on the Cascade Free Daily Ride Meetup.com site, at http://www.meetup. com/cascaderides/events/97395772/

See CHEW Climbing Hills-Eastside Wintertime 2/3. CHEW Week Six: And another set of 7-ish Hills 46 (3850’) • Moderate • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Wilmot Gateway Park (17301 131st Ave NE,

www.cascade.org

vol. 43, no. 2

FEBRUARY RIDES www.cascade.org/dailyrides Woodinville) • Steady rain cancels • Matthew Wong, 425-443-8151 cell, matthew.wong@ comcast.net Alexa Volwiler, alexa.volwiler@gmail.com The sixth ride of the CHEW Series (see below for series description) will be held on Feb. 17 starting at 9:30 from Wilmot Gateway Park in Woodinville (http://goo.gl/maps/IJr23). This route is about 46 miles and has circa 3850 feet of elevation. We’ll leave Wilmot Gateway Park and after a short warm-up begin the endeavor: first up is Hollywood Hill, then a route up the side of Trilogy Hill, Education Hill, InglewoodFinn Hill, Norway Hill, Brickyard Hill and Winery Hill – Woot!! This is the posting for the Moderate-paced ride (14-16 mph on the flats). Updates for the ride will be posted on the Cascade Free Daily Ride on the Meetup.com site at http://www.meetup.com/cascaderides/ events/97395772/

see CHeW Climbing Hills-eastside Wintertime 2/3. CHeW Week six: and another set of 7-ish Hills 46 mi (3850’) • Brisk • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Wilmot Gateway Park (17301 131st Ave NE, Woodinville) • Steady rain cancels • Wilfried Mack, wilfried.mack@gmail.com • Kimberly Smith, 206-612-3480, iamkimbo@hotmail. com The sixth ride of the CHEW Series (see below for series description) will be held on Feb. 17 starting at 9:30 from Wilmot Gateway Park in Woodinville (http://goo.gl/maps/IJr23). This ride is about 46 miles and has circa 3850 feet of elevation. We’ll leave Wilmot Gateway Park and after a short warm-up begin the endeavor: first up is Hollywood Hill, then a route up the side of Trilogy Hill, Education Hill, Inglewood-Finn Hill, Norway Hill, Brickyard Hill and Winery Hill – Woot!! This is the posting for the Briskpaced ride (16-18 mph on the flats). Updates for the ride will be posted on the Cascade Free Daily Ride on the Meetup.com site at http://www. meetup.com/cascaderides/events/97395772/

see CHeW Climbing Hills-eastside Wintertime 2/3. s.P.O.K.e.s.: Leisurely Chill on the Hills 2013 23 mi • Leisurely • Hilly • Map • Frequent regroup • Noon • Farrel McWhirter Park, 19545 Redmond Road, Redmond • Ice/snow cancels • Michelle Burton, 425-890-4936 cell SPOKES will do a loop from Farrel McWhirther Park in east Redmond and look for a few hills to warm us up for the Chilly Hilly on Feb. 24. We’ll stop for lunch at the QFC Shopping Center at Redmond Ridge. At the end of SR-520 onto Avondale Road, go approximately 1.25 miles. Turn right onto NE Novelty Hill Road. Go 1/4 mile. Turn left on NE Redmond Road. Go 1/2 mile. Park is on left and well-marked. To access arena parking: From the end of SR–520 onto

Avondale Road, go north approximately 1.5 miles, go right on NE 116th then right on NE 196th , entrance is at end of road on the right.

Monday, Feb. 18 MuMPs: Do the Lake

miles in Echo Falls Golf Club restaurant. No rest room at start, plan ahead.

Saturday, Feb. 23 For a complete list of this month’s rides, see www. cascade.org.

See MUMPS, 2/4.

tueSday, Feb. 19 treats: Lake ballinger to everett 26-28 mi • Steady • Some hills • No Map • Frequent regroup • 10 a.m. • Ball fields by Ballinger Lake Golf Course, 23000 Lakeview Dr, Mountlake Terrace • Showers cancel Jan Johnson, 425-672-0617 We’ll have a chance to explore the Interurban Trail north to lunch at the food court at the Everett Mall. The city of Lynnwood has a federal grant to improve the trail and the leader will point out the planned improvements which will be worked on this summer. This trail sometimes does go on and off the road. There are some short hills and road crossings. This is not a flat trail like the Burke-Gilman. From I-5 take Exit 177 (“Hwy 104/Ballinger Way”); go west (as if to Edmonds); turn north/right on 76th at the light and then east/right on 228th which curves to the parking lot on the right. (Note: there are many ways to get here; choose yours from the Internet if you wish.) Park in the parking lot at the ball fields adjoining the Ballinger Lake Golf Course, 23000 Lakeview Drive, Mountlake Terrace or along the street if there is a game going on.

Cycle tuesdays

Sunday, Feb. 24 CHILLy HILLy (Cascade bicycle Club event) 33 mi • Various Paces • Hilly • Map • None 7 a.m. • Colman Ferry Terminal, Seattle and BI Cycle, Winslow • No rain cancellation Join us on Sunday, Feb. 24, for the ride Bicycling Magazine named “One of Four Classic Rides” in the nation! Guaranteed to be hilly, chilly and a heck of a lot of fun. With Chilly February weather and 2,675 feet of Hilly climbing, the name says it all! Chilly Hilly has been kicking off the cycling season in the Northwest for the past 39 years. The 33-mile route around Bainbridge Island starts with an early morning ferry ride across Puget Sound from Seattle, or you can join the crowd directly on Bainbridge Island. Course is open from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. If you are taking the ferry from Seattle, the ride starts when you get off the boat. If starting on Bainbridge, begin at the top of the ferry off ramp on Winslow Way. For complete description see www.cascade.org. There is Day of Ride registration for this event.

Monday, Feb. 25 MuMPs: Do the Lake See MUMPS, 2/4.

See Cycle Tuesdays, 2/5.

tueSday, Feb. 26

eastside tours evening ride See Eastside Tours, 2/5.

WedneSday, Feb. 20

treats: ride to sultan bakery 36 mi • Steady • Some hills • Map • Frequent regroup • 10 a.m. • W Snoqualmie Valley

Rd & Woodinville-Duvall Rd, gravel parking lot, near Duvall • Ice/snow cancels • Clarice Sackett, 425-478-8306 Start near Duvall, ride Tualco Valley, Ben Howard Road, lunch at Sultan Bakery and then back. Note: No facilities at start. Start is on West Snoqualmie Valley Road, just south of Woodinville Duvall Rd and light at intersection. Dirt parking lot on west side at “Verizon Station.”

Cycle tuesdays See Cycle Tuesdays, 2/5.

eastside tours evening ride See Eastside Tours, 2/5.

WedneSday, Feb. 27 WruMPs: In and Out of Kirkland 30+/- mi • Steady • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • Juanita Beach Park, Kirkland • Showers cancel • Don Volta, 425-828-0138, 425-503-7186, don.volta@ cascadebicycleclub. • Jane Volta, 425-828-0138 A HILLY ride in and out of Kirkland with a lunch stop. Ride distance and route are weather dependent. Snow, ice and fog also cancel.

thurSday, Feb. 28 tHuMPs: Home for Lunch 20-35 mi • Moderate • Some hills • No Map • Stay together • 9:30 a.m. • Leschi Starbucks, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Mike Nelson, 206-325-9068 Be home in time for lunch after some urban exploration. Fixies and single speed bikes welcome. Ride leader will be riding a single speed.

More Cycle tuesdays See More Cycle Tuesdays, 2/7.

eastside tours evening ride See Eastside Tours, 2/7.

WruMPs: Home for Lunch 20-35 • Moderate • Some hills • No Map • Stay together • 9:30 a.m. • Leschi Starbucks, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Mike Nelson, 206-325-9068 Be home in time for lunch after some urban exploration. Fixies and single speed bikes welcome. Ride leader will be riding a single speed.

thurSday, Feb. 21 More Cycle tuesdays See More Cycle Tuesdays, 2/7.

eastside tours evening ride See Eastside Tours, 2/7.

Friday, Feb. 22 FruMPs: bothell-echo Falls 33 mi • Steady • Hilly • Map:Online • Occasional regroup • 10 a.m. • Dirt parking lot off 102nd Ave., Bothell • Showers cancel • Loretta Goetsch, 206-525-4714, lagoetsch@ aol.com • Ice/snow cancel. Food break at 22

Major taylor continue from page 1 support in the following ways:

Personal Pledge Challenge • Collect donations from your supporters and increase your chance to win great prizes! • Raise $250 and receive two additional premium drawing tickets • Raise $500 and receive a Major Taylor Project jersey and five additional premium drawing tickets • Raise $1000 and receive a Major Taylor Project jersey, and 10 premium drawing tickets • Sponsor a Major Taylor Student Spinner • Support a student on the bike for one, two or three hours.

Match a spinner Work for an organization that will match your support? Pledge your support and have your organization match your efforts. You may also visit the Major Taylor Project page, majortaylorproject.org and submit your donation online. When you sign up for the evening’s events, you will automatically enter a drawing for some amazing gifts and prizes. If you are not available to attend, you can still help the Major Taylor Project by sending a donation. Questions? Contact Liz Johnson, Major Taylor Project Outreach Program Assistant, at mtpa@cascadebicycleclub.org, (206) 957-6960. Get ready for a fun, exciting and energy filled evening!

summer tours lotteries open Feb. 26, 10 a.m.

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till not sure how to spend that hardearned vacation time? Have a few days to spare? We have some great ideas for you–take a cycling vacation! See the sights at a slower pace. We have three tours that will take you to beautiful locations with fantastic cycling. The lotteries for all of them open Feb. 26 at 10 a.m. and close on March 5 at noon.

bend and Central Oregon 4-Day tour, steady/Moderate Hub and spoke

Meet June 20 Ride June 21-24 Mountain views, river canyons, quiet roads through rural farmland, and sunny weather highlight this tour in a premier cycling area.  

Long beach Cruise 4-Day tour, steady Hub and spoke Meet Sept. 12 Ride Sept. 13-16 Relaxed cycling past lighthouses, wildlife preserves, cranberry bogs, oyster farms historic landmarks while following the Lewis and Clark Trail 

Oregon Wallowas and Hells Canyon 6-Day tour, Moderate

Meet Sept. 22 Ride Sept. 23-28 Cowboy country, miles and miles of wilderness roads, breathtaking landscapes and exciting activities fill your days on this remarkable tour.

For full details about Cascade’s bicycle tours, visit www.cascade.org . “Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

7

February 2013

Bikeconomics

Bike-themed brewery to open in Ballard Business: Peddler Brewing Company Owner: Dave Keller and Haley Woods Industry: Food & Drink

by Jeff Davis, Club member

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Pedaling "Down East," up the coast of Maine Tuesday, Mar 5, 7 p.m. Seattle REI, 222 Yale Ave N Free!

by Anne-Marije Rook, Staff Writer

eattle is about to welcome a new brewing company that will bring craft beer and bikes even closer. At the end of February, Dave Keller and Haley Woods will open Peddler Brewing Company, a gathering place for beer lovers and bicyclists alike. The bike-themed brewery is the combination of Haley’s dream of running her own customer-oriented business, and Dave’s dream of brewing and talking about beer every day, and their shared love of riding bikes. “Initially we thought we’d open a place similar to the Beveridge Place Pub in West Seattle [that serves a large array of regional and international draft beers], but then I just decided that it would be way more fun to make the beer myself,” said Keller, who’s been a home brewer for 10 years. “I think every home brewer has the dream of opening his own place.” And bikes were part of the idea from the get-go. “Every time you’re around cyclists, craft beer is not far behind,” joked Keller, who raced bikes in college. “Beer and bikes are two passions of mine. It just made sense to combine them.” Woods added that in looking for a location, the couple wanted to be as close to the Burke-Gilman Trail as possible. “We wanted it to be an easy destination for bikes,” she said. “So we purposely looked for a place near a bike path.” They found a home for their brewery in the old Maritime Pacific Brewing place on 1541 NW Leary, just two blocks off the Burke-Gilman. “And Ballard’s industrial setting is a natural fit,” Keller said. “We’ll have bike parking and a public workstand for minor repairs inside the tasting room,” Keller said. “Where else can you take your bike inside the bar?” Since acquiring the space in July, Keller and Woods have been spending most of their free time renovating it. Woods, a high school math teacher, and Dave, an engineer, continue to work full time at their day jobs. “The brewery is our free time activity – just nights and weekends,” said Woods. Aside from some KickStarter funding, the whole operation has been out-of-pocket and DIY. “We downsized our living, moved to Ballard from Capitol Hill, and are doing everything ourselves,” said Woods. Taking down walls, drilling, painting, hammering, wiring, sawing, sanding, pouring concrete, installing equipment – you name it. They’re doing it all themselves. “All I had ever done before was maybe paint some walls and hammer a nail in the wall,” said Woods. “It is exciting

Cascade Presentation Series

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ast spring, Cascade members Jeff and Louise Davis explained how to plan a perfect pedal tour to a packed house at REI. And now they’re back. This time they’ll share the bike adventure they were planning at that time and completed this summer: a month and a half trip up the coast of Maine. They say it’s one of the best they’ve ever done. Jeff lived in a small town in Maine 30 years ago, but rarely got to the coast. Louise grew up outside Boston, but only visited the Maine coast once as a child. It was clearly time to explore it. Jeff and Louise will take you Down East as they make their way from Boston to Bar Harbor and Acadia National Park, with three weeklong stays at very different places along the way. They’ll share back roads and beaches, hikes into the famous Maine Woods, and paddle trips along the rugged, rock-bound coast as they keep trying and trying until they found the perfect lobster dinner. Besides their usual awesome photos, they’ll also provide tips on how to do your own DIY credit card bike tour, in Maine or elsewhere. Despite very different economies and history, Maine and Washington share many physical attributes—upper corners of the country, offshore islands, endless shoreline and evergreens—and values like concern for the environment and friendliness toward cyclists. Come join Jeff and Louise and see if Maine is where you want to point your bike someday. to look around and see what all we did.” Woods even turned her childhood penny collection into a beautiful bike-themed mosaic, hanging just above the bike rack. “We truly are putting our heart and soul into making this brewery a reality,” the couple said. So what will Keller be brewing? Peddler Brewing Company has a seven-barrel brewing system, eight taps in the tap room with a few regular taps and a couple rotating seasonal taps. “We’ll have a large variety - Belgians, IPAs, Kolsch, Caramel ESB, tangerine wheat,” said Keller. Woods and Keller are planning to be open on Wednesdays through Saturdays. Keep up with their progress on Facebook or on their website at www.peddlerbrewing.com. Bikenomics is a feature series to spotlight the greater Seattle area’s growing bike businesses. Know a business that should be featured? Send me an email at amrook@cascadebicycleclub. org.

www.cascade.org

Vol. 43, No. 2

A ride for Africa and a ride to your soul by Scott Straight & Anne Kurt, Club members

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oin us this June for our second annual Red-Bell 100 event. This beautiful ride is a unique fundraiser benefiting Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation youth programs and World Bicycle Relief. While our youth programs reach around 25,000 local kids per year, World Bicycle Relief is reaching youth and adults on the other side of the world. Last year, Cascade members Scott Straight and Anne Kurt took part in one of Cascade Bicycle Club’s International tours in Africa where they got to experience firsthand how World Bicycle Relief provides access to independence and livelihood through The Power of Bicycles. Here’s what they experienced: Months have passed since our mid-October arrival back in Seattle after our vacation in Lusaka, Zambia. But even now, in every still moment, we can’t stop reflecting upon the memory of our experiences in Zambia, of its people, its land, the flora and fauna, the goodwill we received and the country’s difficult challenges. So this is how it feels to have a life-changing vacation, a phrase we have heard in terms of a cliché, but now we truly understand. Anne and I were looking for an adventure vacation. After scouring our local sports and activity travel ads, we came upon an ad through the Cascade Bicycle Club website from the World Bicycle Relief (WBR) for an opportunity to cycle in Zambia. WBR’s work touched us, and we wholeheartedly agreed with their mission of transforming individuals and their communities through The Power of Bicycles. We learned that WBR provides low-cost, well-engineered bikes, able to withstand the unforgiving African terrain, to provide transportation for social and medical services, the BEEP school education program and work opportunities for the citizens of a country that has many difficult financial and infrastructure challenges. As riders ourselves, we knew the many benefits of bicycling, but from our experiences in Zambia, we could see firsthand the huge impact that a simple bicycle can have on promoting a higher quality of life regarding community health, education and general transportation. During our eight-day excursion, we met many people of the WBR staff, including WBR’s Zambian country director and director of Africa. WBR staff provided us with information about the history and current business goals of the WBR organization, and gave us a personalized tour through the assembly line for the famous “Buffalo Bike,” a robust bicycle engineered specifically for rural African terrain and load requirements. With help, we even assembled our own Buffalo Bikes to use while we were in Zambia. On our first bike excursion, we met with local volunteer health care workers who support a community that is spread out across miles of African terrain, connected only by dirt roads and small dirt paths. The Buffalo Bicycle allows health care workers to see many more patients and provide them with the services needed while also transporting medical supplies. This allowed us a glimpse of how a much harder life was made a little easier by this bicycle, and this was perhaps the most emotional day for us.

On another excursion, we rode to a school where WBR donated 100 bikes to an incredible educational program called BEEP (Bicycles for Educational Empowerment Program) that provides bicycles to female students who struggle to continue their education due to the time it takes to go to school and back to the village to support the daily family chores. It was a day of celebration on a magical scale beyond expectations, and I nearly had a heart attack playing a pickup game of futbol with the local ninth grade team in over 100-degree sun. We also visited a dairy collection center for farmer co-ops who have milking cows and use the Buffalo Bike to transport their milk to the community vat. The bikes were also made available to other members of the working community by means of setting up a micro financing operation to purchase one of the bikes through the World Vision nonprofit organization. On our final excursion, we took our bikes to a marketplace where they were sold to a local WBR dealer who already had buyers waiting to purchase our used Buffalo Bikes. At the end of our trip, we were left with the deep-seated impact of Zambia and how the bicycle culture brings us together as one. As a fair-weather recreational cyclist, I now have a deeper appreciation of the bike, our country’s richness in resources, and will forever be impacted by the experiences with the World Bicycle Relief Organization’s “Africa Rides” bike tour.

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

9

February 2013

The guide to long-distance bicycling with family

“What keeps me riding? Not stopping. If you find something you enjoy, no matter how busy you get, don’t stop what you like doing.”

by Eric Ruthford, Club member and frequent Ride Around Washington rider

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Cyclist of the Month

KRIS RHODES

by Anne-Marije Rook, Staff Writer, amrook@cascadebicycleclub.org Age: 29 Wheels: Surly Ogre, Surly Steamroller, Raleigh Prestige Occupation: SDET at Microsoft

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hile Kris Rhodes identifies himself as “just a guy who rides bikes,” he logs more miles in one week as most people do in months. An avid bike commuter, Rhodes commutes from Seattle’s Belltown to Microsoft in Redmond – a 62-mile roundtrip the long way, 32-mile if he takes the shortcut across I-90 and through Bellevue – logging an average of 250 to 300 miles a week. Originally from Perth, West Australia, Rhodes said he started riding to school when he was 8 years old and continued to do so all through high school. “I rode a bike until I got it stolen. Then I got a car and discovered I like motorcycles,” Rhodes said. “I ending up driving in Uni because I was essentially doing 14-hour-days, and I was strapped for time.” A job at Windows Phone brought him to Seattle, Wash., in 2008. “At the time, I was overweight at 220 pounds. I had gotten into a sedentary lifestyle and my job was stressful,” he said. Driving a rental car, Rhodes found that he spent too much money on gas and parking. “I hated driving that car,” he said. So he decided to get back into biking. To meet fellow bicyclists, Rhodes started attending the free Cascade Daily Rides. “When you move to a new place, you want to meet people so you look at your hobbies. For me that was biking and rock climbing. But I got doored in 2008 and broke the cartilage between my sternum and second rib so climbing is out,” he said. “I met a wonderful ride leader, Scott Kralik, and mainly did the Thursday night rides in the summer. They are slow, easy-paced rides and were a great place for me to start. That was really the start of me riding in Seattle.” Six months after starting to commute, Rhodes had dropped down to a healthy weight. “My family has a history of heart attacks, and I needed to do something,” said Rhodes. “I tried the gym but didn’t like it and found that I really enjoy biking. Better health and fitness are just benefits that come with biking.” To keep track of the wear and tear on his bicycles, Rhodes logs his mileage daily. Between January 2009 and the time of our interview, Rhodes logged 3,368 hours in the saddle for a total of 50,870 miles! “That’s why I go through so many bike parts!,” said Rhodes, who has completed the many Cascade rides –including STP, Flying Wheels, Chilly Hilly–on a fixedgear bicycle. Nowadays, Rhodes can most frequently be found riding his Surly Ogre, a 37-pound all-rounder he lovingly calls “tank.” “This bike is bullet proof. It can go the distance. It can do anything but go fast,” said Rhodes.

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Since 2009, Rhodes has been combining his passion for bicycling with raising awareness and fundraising for charity. Last month, he rode the Stinky Spoke in a “Crush Kids’ Cancer” jersey, he logs his miles on EveryMove.org for the Major Taylor Project, and he even once completed a hilly century ride in a full chicken costume. “That was the 2010 Livestrong event,” Rhodes said. “I was going around raising funds but no one wanted to donate because me riding a bike is nothing special. So I said that if I’d raise $1000, I would wear a chicken suit and do the ride on my fixed-gear.” The century was a miserably affair with cold temperatures and lots of rain. “People were getting hypothermia and I quickly became a water logged chicken,” recalled Rhodes. “But the cool thing was that the chicken suit worked as a safety mechanism–everyone saw me. I don’t think cars have ever been that aware of me.” Rhodes raised $1300 for his efforts, and has a souvenir Livestrong backpack to prove it. The chicken suit was later donated to another charity. “As someone who was a really poor student and who had to give up a lot, I believe that if you can help someone, you really should,” said Rhodes. “I can do it while riding bikes and Microsoft [with their matching program] makes it easy to do.” While bicycling has rewarded him in many ways, Rhodes said the biggest rewards have to do with people. “One of the most surprising things that me biking has done is that in 2008, I was the only person at Windows Phone to ride a bike. When I left in 2012, there were lots of bikes in the hallway. I think it’s in part because there was this constant reminder of this guy–this wacko–riding his bike rain or snow,” said Rhodes. “Biking has also opened a few doors. I’ve met some interesting people while riding in to work and got get to pick their brains while riding.” Rhodes also inspired his father to start biking. “My dad was overweight and had a second heart attack. He saw his son (me) biking all the time and bought a recumbent. He now bikes a lot, has lost weight and is doing much better,” said Rhodes. When asked what keeps him riding day in day out, Rhodes’ answer was simple; “Not stopping.” “It is much harder to stop and start again,” said Rhodes. “If you find something you enjoy, no matter how busy you get, don’t stop what you like doing.” Know a cyclist who deserves some special recognition? Nominate them for cyclist of the month! Send your ideas to Anne-Marije Rook at amrook@cascadebicycleclub.org.

n one of our first long bike rides together, I suggested my wife, Miri, draft off my rear wheel to take advantage of the reduced air resistance by riding close. She tried for a little while, but said it was too hard to keep her bike in position. Forty miles later, when she was really tired, I talked her into it and she noticed that it was, indeed, easier. Then, she said, “Can we put a DVD player on your butt?” We didn’t do that, but I did start reciting lines from The Princess Bride or classic Looney Tunes, and this became a way of helping the miles go by and preserving marital sanity–she’d ask, “What’s on the DVD player?” and a brief musical or comedy would begin. I did my first long-distance ride 10 years ago, when I was 22. Since then, I’ve told people how great it was, and now I’ve got all these family members who come with me – my dad, Charles Ruthford (he’s now on the Cascade board), my two brothers, Jeffrey and Patrick, my mother, Jane, and, after I got married, my wife, Miri. Most of our rides together have been on the Ride Around Washington (RAW), a 350 to 400-mile ride organized by the Cascade Bicycle Club that changes routes each year, lasts six days and has 200 to 250 riders. I’ve done this nine times, and the rides have a nice family feel as you see many of the same people each year. Having done these rides so many times, I can now share some tips and suggestions for making long rides work with family: Watch your promises about the route. If you tell your tired-out partners that the rest of your route is “mostly downhill” in an effort to make them keep going, you’re going to be eating those words next time you get to a big uphill. I once tried explaining, “This isn’t a hill. It’s just an extra-gravity zone.” It didn’t work. Look after their nutrition and hydration needs. Twenty miles after lunch one day, my wife was complaining of a headache and an upset stomach. I suggested we stop for food at a rest stop. “I feel awful, I don’t want to eat, I just want to get to camp,” Miri said. “I know, but the headache and nausea is caused by a lack of salt. You need to eat.” “We just had lunch.” “It doesn’t matter.” Being a good leader in this situation is finding the most benevolent way possible of saying “Eat the $#@% cookie!” Humor is good, but in a limited way. On the 2008 Ride Around Washington, my mother was complaining about her toes hurting in her cycling shoes. I asked, “Do you think you can keep riding, or should we call a toe truck?” Thank God she was clipped in to her pedals, otherwise I’d have been hurting, too. Keep drafting in the family. On STP this year, my dad, brother and I were on Highway 507 going through Joint Base Lewis-

McChord. Patrick was leading our paceline when a cyclist in front of him Author Eric, accompanied by stopped wife Miri and brother Patrick without on the 2010 Ride Around warning. Patrick went Washington. swerving; Dad and I went flying. Dad landed in the gravel on his face; I landed in the weeds on my side. After a brief look-over from paramedics, Dad was determined to be all right, but he got a tetanus shot later on. We resolved to stay farther back from people we didn’t know, and Dad told people his beat-up face was the result of doing stunt work for Harrison Ford. Invest in a good tent. On the 2009 Ride Around Washington, my wife and I took a reliable old tent purchased in the 1980s. It was “our tent” for the first four nights, however, on the fifth night, we had a hail storm with violent winds. The tent did OK, but by the end of the 90-minute storm, I was mopping up water with towels. Also, the walls were bending inward. “YOUR tent is trying to kill me!” she declared. Now we have a new tent. Offer compliments. In 2010, I finished the 110-mile High Pass Challenge fifth from last. You have to finish by a certain time if you want your free cup or other souvenir. I was running late. Patrick, who finished earlier, saved me a hot dog, got me a cup with a logo, and congratulated me on improving my time by 30 minutes from the previous year. I felt great. Offer treats. On STP three years ago, my seat post split open lengthwise, making a sound like a very, very loud almond can being opened. That was in Vader, but I couldn’t find a mechanic with an extra seat post until Castle Rock. I stood on my pedals as I rode and stopped often. Also, there was a thunderstorm going on. We finally got to Castle Rock High School, and I had to run up to a gas station to get money from the ATM to pay the mechanic. My wife had been waiting a very long time and had started saying things like “Whose idea was this? Oh that's YOURS,” so I also bought a pack of M&M’s and brought them to her. She gasped, “Oh, I love you!” and seized the chocolate. But, it’s all worth it. Despite the challenges of keeping your family team together on the ride, you’ll find this to be a memorable shared experience that you will talk about for the rest of the year. And, hopefully they won’t spend it all talking about the time you leaned too close to your chain while adjusting the rear derailleur, getting the lapel of your jacket sucked into the rear cluster and your face smudged with grease. This happened to me. Once. In 2005. And they always remind me about it.

Member of Cascade Bicycle Club and Bicycle Alliance of Washington. Sponsor of Fischer Plumbing, Bikesale.com, Recycled Cycles Racing, Garage Racing, Cucina Fresca, Blue Rooster Racing, SCCA/Starbucks and Lakemont Cycling Teams.

www.cascade.org

Vol. 43, No. 2

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS

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e’re actively recruiting volunteers to help with the Seattle Bike Swap, Chilly Hilly and Seattle Bicycle Expo. Below are listed a variety of volunteer opportunities, each with different time commitments, experience requirements and logistics. There are two additional requirements for ALL volunteers, regardless of the job or duration: be reliable and be friendly. Look over the list to see if anything strikes a chord, then if you’d like to volunteer, you may apply online by going to www.cascadebicycleclub.org under the “Join Cascade!” banner and click on “volunteer,” or contact Diana Larson at 206-852-6827 for more information.

February Bike Swap Date and Time: Sunday, February 10, 6 – 9am (8 - volunteers). Task or Event: Site Crew Set up/Security. Where: Seattle Center Exhibition Hall, 225 Mercer St, How Long: 2.5 hours. Doing What: Help with the setup and the security of the entrances. Date and Time: Sunday, February 10th, 8am – 12pm (3 – volunteers). Task or Event: Greeters. Where: Seattle Center Exhibition Hall, 225 Mercer St, Seattle, WA. How Long: 4 hours. Doing What: Will be outside directing attendees to the ticket sales booth, cash machines, etc. You are the first friendly face the attendees will see. Date and Time: Sunday, February 10th, 2 – 4pm (4 volunteers). Task or Event: Site Crew Take Down. Where: Seattle Center Exhibition Hall, How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Help with the breakdown and clean up of the facility. Chilly Hilly Date and Time: Sunday, February 24th, 6:30 - 11am (6 volunteers). Task or Event: Chilly Hilly Registration. Where: Alaskan Way opposite the Pier 52 Ferry Terminal, How Long: 5 hours. Doing What: Cashier - Accepts payments and provides information on Cascade Club events, rides, and membership. Previous experience working with cash, credit cards, and checks is desired. Knowledge of event and membership services is recommended, but training is available. Date and Time: Sunday, February 24th, 6:30 - 11am (3 volunteers). Task or Event: Chilly Hilly Packet Pickup. Where: Alaskan Way opposite the Pier 52 Ferry Terminal, How Long: 5 hours. Doing What: Hand out packets to pre-registered riders whose packet had not been mailed. Date and Time: Sunday, February 24th, 6:30 - 11am (4 volunteers). Task or Event: Chilly Hilly Greeter. Where: Alaskan Way opposite the Pier 52 Ferry Terminal, S How Long: 5 hours. Doing What: Hand out information and provide riding tips to riders.

Date and Time: Sunday, February 24th, 6:30 - 11am (2 - volunteers). Task or Event: Chilly Hilly Volunteers at Large. Where: Alaskan Way opposite the Pier 52 Ferry Terminal, How Long: 5 hours. Doing What: Help as needed. Date and Time: Sunday, February 24th, 6:30 - 11am (2 - volunteers). Task or Event: Chilly Hilly Ferry Rider Counters. Where: Alaskan Way opposite the Pier 52 Ferry Terminal How Long: 5 hours. Doing What: Bike Control and counting of riders. Date and Time: Sunday, February 24th, 6:30 - 11am (4 - volunteers). Task or Event: Chilly Hilly Crossing Guards. Where: Alaskan Way opposite the Pier 52 Ferry Terminal, How Long: 5 hours. Doing What: Assist cyclists in safely crossing the street at assigned cross walks. Date and Time: Sunday, February 24th, 7 - 11am (3volunteers). Task or Event: Chilly Hilly Registration. Where: B.I. Cycle Shop, 162 Bjune Dr SE. Winslow, Bainbridge Island. How Long: 4 hours. Doing What: Cashier - Accepts payments and provides information on Cascade Club events, rides, and membership. Previous experience working with cash, credit cards, and checks is desired. Knowledge of event and membership services is required. Date and Time: Sunday, February 24th, 7 - 11am (1 volunteer). Task or Event: Packet Pickup. Where: B.I. Cycle Shop, 162 Bjune Dr SE. Winslow, Bainbridge Island. How Long: 4 hours. Doing What: Hand out packets to pre-registered riders whose packet had not been mailed. Date and Time: Sunday, February 24th, 1st shift: 8 11:30am; 2nd shift: 11am - 2:30pm (2 volunteers per shift). Task or Event: Chilly Hilly Rest Stop. Where: Battle Point Park. Frey Road, Bainbridge Island. How Long: 3.5 hours per shift. Doing What: Handling food supplied for riders Date and Time: Sunday, February 24th, 1st shift: 8 11:30am; 2nd shift: 11am - 2:30pm (2 volunteers per shift). Task or Event: Chilly Hilly Cider Stop. Where: American Legion Hall, Bainbridge Island. How Long: 3.5 hours per shift. Doing What: Handling food supplied for riders.

Celebrating 10 years with Group Health and the Major Taylor program. “Our interest in Cascade and bicycling as a whole was threefold. We wanted to support something that speaks to our health and wellness mission, have a stake in the ground to really make a difference in the community through a long-range commitment, and support something that is accessible to our members, staff and their families,” said Damien King, community relations manager at Group Health. In addition to bike commuting and recreational bicycling, Group Health is also a recognizable supporter of the local bike racing scene, previously sponsoring the state’s only velodrome. The coop continues to be the primary sponsor of the largest women’s racing team in the Pacific Northwest, Team Group Health. “We have diversified our Fitness Network in the last few years to include swimming, walking, running and triathlon but cycling has been a constant focus,” said King. When King started working for Group Health, he wasn’t a cyclist, and it was through the sponsorship work that he became interested. “I did not cycle until only recently. I had so much pressure from people to start riding since we were sponsoring all these cycling events, so I “Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

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bought a road bike and rode the STP in 2009, 2010 and 2011,” said King, adding that he’s also completed the Chilly Hilly, Flying Wheels and RSVP. “Our CEO has a similar story. He was not a cyclist, and we talked him onto riding STP to support our mission and our sponsorship. He has since ridden events with his wife and many executives,” said King. “An article a few years ago in The New York Times said that cycling is the new golf for meeting with executives and that is true at Group Health.” We are grateful to continue the partnership we have with Group Health. Over the past nine years, Group Health has been a generous sponsor, and by proudly adding their name to our events, we help Group Health reach their goals to raise public awareness of the health benefits of an active lifestyle. We’d like to thank Group Health for their sponsorship and for sharing our vision to build better communities through bicycling. And if you’re a Group Health member, you can get a discount on popular Cascade events like the STP, Chilly Hilly and Flying Wheels. For more information, visit www.grouphealthfitnessnetwork.com

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February 2013

Welcome new members

L

ook at all those membership cards going out of the door! We’re so happy to have you all on board. In addition to being able to register early, your membership is an investment in creating a better community through bicycling. Your membership dollars help shape pro-bike policies; hold elected officials accountable to their word and to our mission; connect you with people who appreciate and support bicycling; encourage safer, healthier choices for everyone who wants to bike; and make cycling a safer, more convenient transportation choice for everyone. Welcome to the bike movement! Thanks for riding along.

Kent Abendroth Rebecca Adamson Bernadette Alexander Dawn Allen Les Alluisi Russ Almond Deanna Almond Cody Almond Zeke Almond Jason Almond Dan Anderson Abby Arildson Kathleen Arthur Lynn Asbeck Kevin Ascher Thomas Baker Paul Banken Julie Barton-Smith Jonathon Bashford Lisa Baumann Chalise Baysa Erin Becker Jon Becker Colin Becker Cosme Beltran Max Benson Susan Berry Regan Bervar Nathan Bialke David Bilides Penny Black Wicklein Bob Kristie Bombaro-McCollum Sue Bouma Mary Bouma Patrick Bouma Rich Boyesen Matthew Bradburn Dana Brown Craig Bruney Brian Burg Mary Burns Christopher Byler Jonathan Calvert Scott Cameron Tarya Cameron Paul Cameron Jon Carlson Matt Carpenter George Carter Brett Carter Lisa Casady Matt Chadsey Richard Chase John Chevillet Michelle Church James Clarke Elizabeth Clarkson Lydia Claxton Raymond Clemens Elyse Clemens Marti Clemens Mary Clement Diane Clementi Dwain Clifford

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Gregg Colbo Larry Cole Jennifer Cole Randy Coles Grace Collins Cathy Crichton Tam Crocker Shawn Crosby Mary Curran Jed Curtis Kathy Dapcic Troy Davis Wesley Davis Lisa Dawn Jonathan Dean Rachael DelVillar Matthew Diamond Joseph DiChiaro Melvin Dick Shawn Diem Brian Doherty Chuck Dolan Tom Donlea Leo Donlea Siri Donlea Annemarie Dooley Simon Douwes Naeem Dowidar Chuck Droukas Wesley Ducey Joshua Duffield Lisa Dukes James Dunbar Cory Dyer Mark Eamer Keith Eckstein Denise Ehlert James Ehlert Connie Ellis Alex Emerman Bob Eng Jim Eng Tim Ensley Julie Espinoza Peter Ettel Kiva Fallgatter Wendy Fee Ric Fegurgur Collette Fidecaro Austin Field Wayne Fitzwater Tracy Fitzwater Radu Florea Josef Forsberg Kyla Forsberg Jim Franklin Ryan Franklin Peter Freerickson Anne Frizell Kristin Garrett Elizabeth Gaston Todd Gehman Teresa George Marge Germain Heather Gervais

David Gill Kyle Ginney Chris Glennon Janet Gonzale Raquel Gonzalez Frank Gorshe Mark Gorski Mary Sue Gorski Adam Gorski Bradley Gorski Galen Gorski Jonathan Gorstein Dmitry Gourkine Ilsa Govan Ed Grandbois Chris Gribble Alice Groat Parrish Hammer Kendra Hammer Ronda Hardcastle Nick Harlson Jess Harper Shae Healey Daniel Heath Anthony Hecht Eric Heinitz Adam Henley Julie Henry Toni Higgs Neil Hodges Carol Holmes Patrick Hoy Amy Hsieh Ben Hugenholtz Nancy Hughart Allison Hughes Suzanne Ivey Sarah Jackson Debbie Jacobs Jorge Jimenez Tim Johnson Amanda Johnson Victoria Johnstone Garry Josephson Lorelei Juge Donovan Juge Dorian Juge Erin Juge Joanne Kahn Anthony Kay Sarah Kay Kristen Kerns Harry Kleiner Chris Kleinke Robert Klute Linda Klute Ruppert Koch Arabind Komatireddy Rohit Kumar Lee Lambert Maureen Larson Dan Larson Kathy Leitch Robin Lemonds David Leonard

Arthur Lew Amanda Lezcano Eva Lieber Jose Lieber Joanne List Stephen List Natalia Litoldo-Capistrano Christopher R. Lorkowski Nadia Lubeznik Jim Luebke Kelly Lund Katie Lund Josh Lund Mary Lund Richard Lytle Sarah Mackay John Macrina Austin Magleby Jason Maitland Walter Major III Arnaldo Maldonado Maddy Malecha Werlindo Mangrobang Heather Marney Anthony Marra Anthony Marsh Charles Marzette Jr Kyle Matsumura Evelyn Matsumura Barbara Mattison Roger Mattison Darrell May Cesar Mayor Julia Maywald Gregg McAninch Chase McAninch Carrie McAninch Janeen Mcaninch Christina McCallum Rory McClellan Paul McCollum Jo McDonald Matt McDonald Cynthia McGivern Jennifer Mcindoe Chris McKinney Rachael McKinney Kevin McWatters Rosalyn McWatters Andy Mehl Aime Mello Lee-Lee Miao Shannon Middleton Ben Miller Kyle Miller Chris Mills Mark Minaga Michelle Monderer Matt Monkress Samantha Moore Earl Moore Graham Morgan Lucky Mullarkey Deborah Munkberg Tim Myers

Ritesh Narayan Maria Nardella Steven Nelson Daniel Nelson Doug Nelson Ed Nelson David Nelson Joan Nelson Marc Nepomuceno Antonio Neri Peter Neupert Michael Newbury Lasse Nord Garth Novack John Novicki Gisel Nunez Christopher Nutter James Olsen Justin Osmer Sarah Osmer Henry Osmer Claire Osmer Helen Owens Yu-Ling Melody Pan Lisa Parlin Josh Parrish Ross Pearson Michelle Pearson Jon Pedeferri Darla Petersen Robert Pezanowski Michael Phillips Paul Piacitelli Glen Pickus Darrell Pittman Richard Poling Rusanna Poling Mary Kay Poppe Adriana Potter Lauren Potter Ethan Potter

Joel Potter Betsy Pridmore Ted Quanstrom Juli Rasmussen Annika Rasmussen Dahlia Rasmussen Robert Rasmussen Adam Reece Patrick Rice Bruce Richards Leanne Ridgeway Dennis Rivet Ron Robb Walter Robelo Jon Rodin Bryant Sabandal Steve Sauve Jeremy Schanck Allison Schellberg Charles Scherer Joseph Scherting Dustin Schneider Paul Scott Gerald Seidler Sharon Senner Miguel Serricchio Danielle Sexton Winter Shaufler Melinda Shaw Robert Shaw David Shaw Nicole Shaw Romy Shepherd Sheri Sherrell Derek Shigaki Walt Shostak Michael Silverstein Petra Silverstein Brett Simpson Mark Sinnott John Slattery

Anthony Slinn Craig Smith Sharyl Smith Todd Smith Eric Smith Dustin Snyder Paul Sobczak Julian Soh Jasmine Soh Makayla Soh Priscilla Soh Leah Soltar Roland Sonia Jim St Pierre Joshua Stewart Carol Stick Jake Stick Jed Stremel David Suckow Kathy Sutherland Jeff Sutherland Tina Tarver Mandee Tatum Jonathan Taylor Ronald Taylor Matthew Thomas Adrienne Thompson Troy Thompson Dave Thorbeck Bob Thordarson John Tibma Tom Todaro Jeff Tuttle Karen Ulbrickson Kristine Uravich Todd Vandermoon Tyler Vandivort Sergio Vega Montes Leah Verre EJ Vincent Linda Wachter

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Matthew Wagner Emily Wagner James Wagner Diana Wagner Marcia Wagoner Jonathan Wall Megan Wallace John Wetmore Chris Whiddon Roger White Mary Wiegand Matt Wiegand Paul Wilcox Blaine Wilkie Kurtis Willden Peter Willis James Wills Dan Wilson Matthew Wiltse Teresa Wirkkala Chuck Wolber Stan Wolf Gina Wolf Peter Wolochow Dan Wooton Leslie Wooton Michael Wooton Mary Wooton Pete Wootton Sid Wray Jay Yancey Patsy Yap James Yealy Will York Danielle York Robert Young Judy Zawacki Kyle Zeller

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February 2013 Cascade Courier