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BRIANNA . cara . mckenzie design philosophy

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underwater antiquities museum

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Fall 2012

rainbow network headquarters

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Spring 2012

drawing & painting

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study abroad

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Fall 2011

design philosophy Forward Thinking Architects and designers have a responsibility - not just to design buildings that don’t fall down or hurt people. We have a responsibility to continue to advance our industry. Today, this means building in a sustainable manner. This should not be considered an obligation, but rather it should be ingrained in our nature as designers to be socially responsible, economically responsible and environmentally responsible. Sustainability is not a lifestyle choice, nor is it a fad. It is a forward-thinking model for businesses, industries and consumers to aspire. Looking Back The past is significantly more important than we often choose to accept. With these stories of what once was, we can learn more about who we are, where we came from, and how we ended up where we are today. In many languages, the words “history” and “story” are the same. Some might suggest that a story can be made up, it can change with time and morph from mouth to mouth, be open to interpretation and understood in a variety of different ways. The notion that history can be biased is certainly not a new one, but one that many people tend to forget. The history that we consciously choose to reflect on, typically illustrates our values, interests and cultural understanding of the world. Embracing the Present As they say, there’s no day like today, the present. Looking forward and looking back provides designers today with a multitude of incredible opportunities. For many forward thinkers, the idea of keeping many of the “plain” older buildings that are scattered in the American landscape is just plain silly. How can we ever excel or grow if we are stuck in the same strand of history forever? This is certainly a valid point, although what they may not have considered is that many people felt similarly towards ancient ruins in Greece not too long ago. People did not remember a culture of Greek Gods and monumental temples at this time. The temples were a material depository where builders could go and collect whenever desired. They saw no value in preserving something that no one could remember anything about. The past is worth preserving for many reasons such as cultural value, social value, memories, lessons learned, knowledge and more. Preserving buildings that are already built is sustainable. “‘The greenest building is the one that is already built.”

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Piraeus Cultural Coast: Underwater Antiquities Museum Design Competition Athens, Greece

Competition tasks entrants with historic preservation of the Historic Piraeus Grain Silo through an adaptive reuse project for the first Greek Underwater Antiquities Museum.

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flow

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carving

G r a n d s t a i r c a s e v i e w f r o m t h e f i r s t f l o o r.

ARP

overlapping spaces

of

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Interior Concept Wall Study (poly film, masonite and mini lights).

weaving space

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1. Sea, Environment, Man a. water cistern

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2. Time capsules in the seabed...Moments in time c. light column

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2b

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4c

3. Underwater Archaeology: Research and Excavations in an Aquatic Environment a. staged underwater ruins b. interactive dig exhibit

4c

3b

4. Migrating on Land or Staying in the Seabed: the protection, management and promotion of underwater cultural heritage c. artifact storage stacks

3a 1a

4c

3a

5. Private Conservation Labs

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6. Garden Roof Terrace and Restaurant 7. Entry Gallery

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8. Shops 9. Lobby

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West Section Cut Through Silos (Thematic Axes Verticality)

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Piraeus Cultural Coast: Athens, Greece

east facade ground level

This international competition is just one piece of a larger community revitalization project for the port city of Piraeus transforming the coast of the industrial section of the city. Other planned elements for the Piraeus Cultural Coast include an archaeology museum, aquarium and shopping centers. Thus, a large portion of the competition was site planning and design.

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looking south in east loading bay

The main concepts included the celebration of the old with the new gently woven into it, the properties of water applied to space and interactive technology.

looking north

north facade ground level

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Ground Floor Plan (Loading Bays) 1 water feature 2 reception & lobby 3 shops 4 admin. offices 5 admin. lobby 6 wood plank walk

6th Floor Plan

5th Floor Plan (transforming the grain silos...)

1a 1b

2d

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1. Sea, Environment, Man a. water cistern b. interactive simulations of environmental issues today 2. Time capsules in the seabed...Moments in time a. artifact aquarium b. time capsule c. light column d. in floor exhibit 3. Underwater Archaeology: Research and Excavations in an Aquatic Environment a. staged underwater ruins b. in-floor excavation tanks c. light wells

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3c 3a

3b

4. Migrating on Land or Staying in the Seabed: the protection, management and promotion of underwater cultural heritage a. interactive conservation labs b. view into conservation labs c. artifact storage stacks

Interactive simulations of environmental issues today 1

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3a Staged exhibit - scenes from underwater antiquity

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5. Private Conservation Labs 6. The Piraeus SILO: Landmark of a City, Symbol of an Era a. grain elevator

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3c

7. Grand Stair Case

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Silo periscopes - views of Piraeus

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4c 6a

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4 Interactive underwater antiquities world map with view of artifact stacks.

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FOOD

Rainbow Network Headquarters Managua, Nicaragua This group competition tasked designers with creating a headquarters for the non-profit organization the Rainbow Network.

WATER

This project followed three main concepts and goals: 1. Using the vernacular of the house and interpretation of local culture. HEALTH

2. Using the versitility of bamboo and structured geometry to connect visitors to the site. 3. Creating the desired image of the rainbow network by blending into the local context.

SCHOOLS

ECONOMICS Site Plan.

section A3 HOUSING

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1. Campus Entry 2. Administrative Offices 3. Health Clinic 4. Healing Garden 5. Horticulture Pavilion 6. Education Pavilion 7. Site Parking 8. Water Purification Center 9. Classrooms 10. Dormitories 11. Moringa Pavilion 12. Warehouse

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Bamboo learning Pavilion.

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Health clinic waiting room.

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M a i n o ff i c e E nt r y. Campus Plan.

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Dormitory and Classroom front entry elevation

View looking towards dormitiries outside classrooms.

Plan detail of dorm wall and column.

B a m b o o p a v i l i o n b e t w e e n 12 the dormitories and classroom space.

Dormitory and Classroom floor plan.

Dormitory and Classroom back pavilion elevation

Wall Section of dorm wall and column.

Dormitories & Classroom exploded axon

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Painting & Drawing Through painting and drawing, I have gained a better understanding of form and space. Most recently, I have been exploring a simplified range of values and colors limiting the color palette to only what is needed.

Pa i nt i n g S t u d y, a c r y l i c - Eg y p t i a n s Raising the Nile by John Singer Sargent

Currently, my greatest influence is Wayne Thiebaud who strived to paint the essence of objects through local colors and exploratinos of white.

Still life, acrylic

Painting sketch, pencil & acrylic on paper - hand study

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Study Abroad Studying abroad brought me closer to my passion for history and architecture wandering through cities such as Rome and Athens that are living, breathing museums of ancient cultures up to present day.

photograph, The Colosseum Rome, Italy

The Pantheon Rome, Italy

Sketch of Fountain, pen - Rome, Italy

Sketch of Roman Baths - Thessaloniki, Greece

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