Issuu on Google+

SCREEN » p13

June 20, 2013

"TO THE WONDER" COMES TO BARKING LEGS

Vol. 10 • No. 25

Chattanooga’s Weekly Alternative

k n u P k c o R

a g o o n a t t a Ch

a nd e v i l is a tanooga k n u P at h C a n d s on b n i f l l o e s w load descend st '13 n a v s a fans for Punk Fe d n a wn o t n w do

MUSIC behold the brave tech innovation Theatre jekyll & Hyde

2 • The Pulse • june 20-26, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

THIS WEEK JUNE 20-26 IN THE PULSE EDITORIAL

Editor Mike McJunkin Contributing Editors Janis Hashe • Gary Poole Contributors Rich Bailey • Rob Brezsny • Zachary Cooper Chuck Crowder • John DeVore • Janis Hashe Matt Jones • Mike McJunkin • Ernie Paik Gary Poole • Alex Teach • Rob Brezsny Photographers Josh Lang Cartoonists & Illustrators Max Cannon • David Helton • E.J. Pettinger Richard Rice • Jen Sorensen • Tom Tomorrow Interns Keeli Monroe • Carson O'Shoney Founded 2003 by Zachary Cooper & Michael Kull

ADVERTISING

Director of Sales Mike Baskin Account Executives Amy Allara • Chee Chee Brown • Rick Leavell Jessica Gray • Jerry Ware Peri Hulett • Donna McAlister

CONTACT

Offices 1305 Carter St.Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Website chattanoogapulse.com Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Calendar calendar@chattanoogapulse.com THE FINE PRINT: The Pulse is published weekly by Brewer Media and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse covers a broad range of topics concentrating on music, the arts, entertainment, culture and local news. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publisher may take more than one copy per weekly issue. We’re watching. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors. © 2013 Brewer Media. All rights reserved.

BREWER MEDIA GROUP Publisher & President Jim Brewer II

RAW PARTY, REDEFINED.

nature vs nurture a cop's duality P22

LIVE MUSIC & DJs EVERY WEEKEND FRI & SAT• JUNE 21/22 BEN DEIGNAN $1 beer 10-11pm SUN • JUNE 23 PEE WEE MOORE & FRIENDS 10pm LIVE MUSIC STARTS @ 10:30pm FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS DJ REGGIE REG 2nd Floor 9:30pm-3am FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS

TWO FLOORS • ONE BIG PARTY • LIVE MUSIC • DANCING • 409 MARKET ST • 423.756.1919 open 7 days a week » full menu until 2am » 21+ » smoking allowed chattanoogapulse.com • june 20-26, 2013 • The Pulse • 3

BOWL

THE

brush up on your safety

Southeast Wilderness Medical Conference It’s no secret that Chattanooga, with all of its natural beauty, is a magnet for lovers of the great outdoors. Citizens and tourists alike enjoy our mountains, trails, rivers, and lakes. However, it’s easy to forget the potential hazards and “what-ifs” when you’re in the midst of the Scenic City’s beautiful scenes. Luckily, the fine folks at the annual Southeast Wilderness Medical Conference are looking out for you. All you need is $20 and some free time on Friday, June 21 between 4:30 and 7 p.m. to attend a seminar called “Wilderness Safety for the Outdoor Enthusiast.” In addition to brushing up on the standard lions and tigers and

chattanooga’s weekly alternative NEWS • COMMENTARY • BULLETINS & PUSH NOTIFICATIONS AT DIAL-UP SPEED facebook/chattanoogapulsE • TWITTER @CHATTAPULSE EMAIL LOVE LETTERS, ADVICE & TRASH TALK TO INFO@CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

bears (oh my!) avoidance tactics, you’ll also have an opportunity to learn about snakebites, insect stings, inclement weather, and a multitude of other injuries, ailments and potentially hazardous situations. So whether your outdoor sport includes paddles, wheels, ropes or your bare feet, make your way to The Church on Main at 1601 Rossville Ave., to ensure you’re prepared for the unexpected. Visit outdoorschattanooga.com for more info. — Keeli Monroe

Cooking on the Rooftop

Make It Yourself—And Make It Healthy Let’s face it: Now that Riverbend, Bonnaroo, and the Weird Bass Music Festival

are over, your body could probably use a nice, healthy, home-cooked meal. Burn better than you bake? No problem! Cooking on the Rooftop, which takes place at the Creative Discovery Museum, is a fun, educational event that’s great for the entire family, no matter what cooking skills you do or don’t possess. Chef Nick Goeller from 212 Market will be using local ingredients, including some from the museum’s rooftop garden, to show you how easy (and fast) it is to whip up something healthy at home. Cooking on the Rooftop, now in its third year, is an annual summertime event sponsored by Arts Build of Greater Chattanooga and the Tennessee Arts Commission. You have four opportunities during the summer to catch this hands-on workshop: Saturday, June 22; Saturday, June 27, Sunday, July 28, and Saturday, August 10. All sessions are from noon - 1 p.m. Workshop is included in price of admission. Creative Discovery Museum, 321 Chestnut St. (423) 648-6043, cdmfun.org —K.M.

united planet contest 2013

Win A Chance to Make a Difference

ON SALE FRIDAY!

August 13 - The Tivoli Theatre TICKETS ON SALE THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 21 AT 10AM • www.ChattanoogaOnStage.com :

A

B E A V E R

P R O D U C T I O N

:

4 • The Pulse • june 20-26, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

From protecting sea turtles in Costa Rica, to caring for AIDS patients in Tanzania, to counseling women in Nepal, “volunteer vacations” are growing in popularity each year—and here’s a chance to win a free two-week volunteer trip abroad. Nonprofit United Planet, which organizes volunteer abroad trips to more than 40 countries, is again sponsoring its United Planet Day Photo & Video Contest. Submit photos and/or videos that “illustrate the ideas of cross-cultural understanding,

friendship, and supporting one another in your own community or abroad” and you’ll be in the running to win a volunteer trip to one of ten selected countries. It’s not necessary to have already done volunteer work abroad. Email entries to contest@unitedplanet. org with the subject line “UP Day Contest [Your Name]. Deadline for submissions is Wednesday, August 21, 11:59 pm EST. Voting will be opened to the public by the following week. Winners will be announced on or around September 22. More information and contest guidelines are at unitedplanet.org/united-planet-day-contest. —Staff

j. Campbell RoundTable

The Ways of Tai Ji

One of the more eclectic regular meetings going on in town is the monthly Joseph Campbell RoundTable, which, despite its name, does not focus solely on the works of the pioneering dream-and-myths writer. As described: “A Mythological RoundTable Group (MRT) is a gathering of people drawn together by a deep and abiding interest in all things mythological. Much like the Round Table of yore, it is a place where individual and community come together—a place to play, plan, create, partake in ritual, and share tales of our own quests with companions well met.” You never know who might be featured, which is part of the fun. This month, Dr. Zibin Guo, currently a professor of medical anthropology at the UTC and the founder and driving force behind the Chattanooga Tai Ji community, will be the guest, speaking on “Ways of Knowing: Secret Knowledge.” 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 26, Grace Episcopal Church, Room 120, 20 Belvoir Ave. — Staff

POLITICS

by gary poole

Democrat, Republican or “Other” The growing dissatisfaction with the Big Two

G

rowing up, I always assumed my parents' political beliefs were “normal” and pretty much middle-of-the-road common sense. After all, these were my parents, and they would never mislead me. That their friends, who came over for dinner parties, pool parties, or just to hang out on the back deck (we had a big back deck), all seemed to be mostly in agreement, made it seem even more normal.

It wasn't until I got older and started to travel and talk to people outside of the parental bubble of like-minded friends that I realized maybe, just perhaps, the political view my parents had of the country and the government was a wee bit outside the mainstream. I also was to learn, post-divorce, that my parents actually disagreed quite a bit with each other, but had kept their disagreements out of sight and sound of the children. Turns out my mother was a Kennedy-esque progressive Democrat while my father was a E i s en hower moderate Republican. Which always struck me as odd, since my mother moved the family to the Deep South while my father stayed in the California Bay Area after they split. Finding a Republican in San Francisco is quite an accomplishment, but I know there is at least one there. Same thing with my mother, who settled into the Northern suburbs of Atlanta, where Democrats usually feared to tread. Even so, they stayed true to their party beliefs, generally voting for the nominated candidates and espousing the core beliefs of the respective parties among their, as always, like-minded friends. The bubbles remained intact, except that now I was being exposed to two separate bubbles, de-

pending on which parent I was visiting at the time. When I started developing my own political beliefs, I came to the conclusion that it was easy to describe my political status by my view instead of by a party. As someone who has friends from all political be-

lief systems, I figured out that both of the main political parties in this country were further apart than ever in what they publicly espoused (take a moment to actually read their platforms, as stated at last year's presidential conventions)—and closer together than ever in their iron-fisted goal of never allowing another party to upset the two-party system. Which may be, slowly, ever-so-slowly, starting to change. According to the Pew Research Center, as of last year only 56 percent of Americans identified themselves with one of the two parties (32 percent Democrat, 24 percent Republican). That leaves 38 percent of us on our own politically, the highest percentage ever recorded.

And those most disaffected seem to be former Republicans, as just a decade ago, 30 percent of the country identified with the GOP. The advent of the Tea Party movement and the slow-but-steady growth of the Libertarian Party has been a major force in moving conservatives away from the Republican Party, while the Green Party has been siphoning off liberals increasingly uncomfortable with the direction of the Democratic Party under President Obama. Not to mention a growing number of smaller parties who are likewise drawing away identification and support from the Big Two. Which is not to say the DNC and RNC have anything to fear anytime soon. The Tea Party movement is the strongest political movemement in decades, yet it is not a political party and can't even agree on what their main message should be (there are almost as many different Tea Party groups as there are types of tea) aside from a unified hatred of taxes. Yet while the Big Two are comfortable, incredibly well-funded, and have a locktight-grip on state and federal government, they do have to acknowledge that more than a third of voters don't seem to like either one of them. And that number continues to grow.

Home Games Thu, June 20 • 7:15 PM vs. Tennessee Smokies Health & Wellness Night

Fri, June 21 • 7:15 PM vs. Tennessee Smokies Fireworks!

Sat, June 22 • 7:15 PM vs. Tennessee Smokies Baseball Card Giveaway

Sun, June 23 • 2:15 PM vs. Tennessee Smokies SunTust Sunday

Mon, June 24 • 7:15 PM vs. Montgomery Biscuits Kids Eat Free

chattanoogapulse.com • june 20-26, 2013 • The Pulse • 5

Solving a Big Problem in a Unique Way Innovator Ross Mason talks the future of healthcare

I

think I just experienced the Gig Tank in miniature. Over the course of an hour-long, three-way conversation, I watched two Gig Tank teams make their pitches and get interrogated by a friendly expert who was excited to share both advice and high-level industry contacts with them.

WeCounsel and FwdHealth— "We are three weeks out from the two Gig Tank teams in having a minimum viable prodhealthcare—presented their uct," said Tyner, "at which point product concepts in a teleconferwe'd like to pilot with several orence to Ross Mason, a healthganizations we've been talking care technology entrepreneur with, including a few nationwide who's coming to Chattanooga providers of telepsychiatry and a next week, both to advise all few hospital networks." the start-up companies in the FwdHealth seeks to aggreGig Tank—and perhaps to plant gate the data that is already besome related seeds ing generated by a among established variety of health prohealthcare companies motion services that in Chattanooga. engage individuals to According to Mike encourage healthier Bradshaw, the Gig behavior. The probTank's entrepreneurlem—and opportuniRICH in-residence, Mason ty—inherent in these bailey is the former board services, according to chair of the Georgia Department President and Cofounder Shayne of Community Health, with a Woods, is that they are entirely $13.2 billion annual budget, and disconnected from the user's has worked for Volkswagen's doctor and health insurers. His Healthcare Venture Accelerator company is creating a software Fund in Germany. Since 2007, solution to convert that raw data he's been paralyzed below the into an actionable framework collarbone, following a bicycle that allows insurers and healthaccident that broke his neck. He care providers to proactively is now a consultant; venture phimanage medical risk by reachlanthropist and founder of the ing out to individuals, rather Healthcare Institute for Neurothan attempting to manage large Recovery and Innovation. groups. WeCounsel Solutions cofoundIn a high-volume, rapid-fire er Harrison Tyner described his delivery, Mason responded with company's product to Mason as a series of probing questions: a "cloud-based technology that What is your revenue model? enables mental health providWho are your competitors? Who ers to communicate and interact developed your software? Do with clients in an online setting you know about this company... to supplement in-person treatthey're either a competitor or ments." The centerpiece is a cusa potential partner. Have you tomized videoconferencing tool approached the military for a that allows a therapist to treat pilot? Is this just about risk asclients remotely, as well as view sessment, or are you changing documents, take notes, view behavior? the patient's history and handle The flip side of this grilling scheduling and billing. was the naming of people these

Tech

6 • The Pulse • june 20-26, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

You've got to be willing to throw out things that don't work, to listen and innovate and iterate your solution over and over and over based on the feedback that you're getting. young entrepreneurs should probably talk to, like the guy who designed benefit plans for Walmart and Burger King, or the guy in pharmacogenetics who might be interested in a strategic partnership, or the one who's developing a national umbrella organization for neurological disorders. Mason also offered some broader advice about how to succeed as a start-up company. First thing: Don't fall in love with your own ideas and try to sell them. "That's not how you build a great business when you're an early-stage company," he said. "You've got to listen to your customers and refine your business model so you're really addressing things that are critically important to them as businesses." These two companies are both creating business-to-business products. "You've got to be solving a big problem in a unique way, lever-

Ross Mason

aging your technology, and being really sensitive to what your customer needs," he said. "And your revenue model has to be working, so you're getting cash to sustain the business. You've got to be willing to throw out things that don't work, to listen and innovate and iterate your solution over and over and over based on the feedback that you're getting," Mason also had some advice for Chattanooga. "You've got the technology infrastructure, you're trying to build an environment that's friendly to early-stage companies and entrepreneurs, you made the investment in your community to create a lifestyle people are going to enjoy," he said. "But you gotta have capital." He said Georgia has spent a half billion dollars supporting scientific research, but because 92 cents of every venture capital dollar comes from out of state,

start-up companies are leaving. "So for you guys, capital is going to be key," he said. "You've got to figure out: How do we create a financial ecosystem and infrastructure so we can keep the jobs and innovators here?" "Ross is an extraordinarily experienced entrepreneur who is also the single most inspiring man I've ever met," said Bradshaw. "And he loves Chattanooga. He appreciates the competitive advantage that our innovative spirit gives to this city and the infrastructure that we built as a result of that spirit. He's coming here to share some of his experience with us." Ross Mason will speak June 25 on "Innovation, healthcare and Chattanooga" at 5 p.m. on the 13th floor of the First Tennessee Bank Building, 701 Market Street. The event is sponsored by CO.LAB and First Tennessee. Admission is free.

LIST

THE

pulse » PICKS

• A curated weekly selection of picks from the Chattanooga Live and Arts & Entertainment calendars by Pulse staffers.

THU06.20 MUSIC All American Summer Presents: Moonlight Bride •Enjoy great music, a glass of wine, a snack from Good Dog and the best view in town with the haunted pop sounds of Moonlight Bride. 6 p.m. • Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 2670968, huntermuseum.org

FRI06.21 ART & POLITICS “Shanequa Gay: The Fair Game Project” • An artistic conversation on what the Atlanta-based artist sees happening to black men in America. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. • Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658, bessiesmithcc.org

CD RELEASE Hudson K CD Release Extravaganza with Ashley & the X’s and Woodford Sessions • “Ouroborous and the Black Dove” is the national debut of the Knoxville-based powerhouse Hudson K. 8 p.m. • Barking Legs Theater, 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347, barkinglegs.org

SAT06.22 MUSIC W.B. Givens • Raised in the hill country of northern Mississippi, W.B. Givens grew up a stone's throw away from the legendary land where the Delta Blues began. 9 p.m. • The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192, thehonestpint.com

OUTDOORS

FOOD

Tennessee River Gorge: Sunset Kayak Trip

Gourmet Guys Food Tasting Gala

• Explore the most spectacular part of the Tennessee River Blueway on this leisurely downriver float by kayak. 7 p.m. • TVA Raccoon Mountain Boat Launch. (423) 643-6888, outdoorchattanooga.com

• A food-tasting gala pitting 60-90 chefs against each other in an amateur event. Proceeds support initiatives for needy children locally and internationally. 4 p.m. - 7 p.m. • First Tennessee Pavilion, 1829 Carter St. rotarygourmetguys.com

» pulse PICK of the litter

A Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On • International performer and instructor Aziza Nawal tops the bill for Chattanooga RAQS, an evening of Middle Eastern dance that will include Bollywood, Persian, Egyptian, Uzbek and other regional dance style. Get out the veils and

harem pants. You too, ladies. Chattanooga RAQS! $12 advance/$15 door. 8 p.m. Saturday, June 22, Barking Legs Theater, 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347, barkinglegs.org

chattanoogapulse.com • june 20-26, 2013 • The Pulse • 7

k n Pu k c o R a g o o n a t t a Ch

ns n Tee Froze

and e v ali k n u but is p , y a l g on noo a t Not t a ds ha o C l n in g va l n i l g e w brin wn. s i o t t n s fe dow s n punk a nd f a s addox M nd n a a y R b os by of e  phot

onro M i l e e K y b

@ Slu ggo's North

8 • The Pulse • june 20-26, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

Sheena may have been a punk punk, a punk rocker in 1977, but now it's her kids' and grandkids' turn. Hell, maybe old Sheena’s still rockin’ too. In days of old, when Joe Strummer was still known to some as John Mellor, punk bands were just another unspeakable aspect of Chattanooga’s nightlife. Now, we beg them to come in their leather-studded, blue-jeans-clad masses, thanks in part to venues like JJ’s and Sluggo’s. But there’s another entity to thank for our city’s musical gentrification: a Gollum-like creature lurking deep in Chattanooga’s Underground, in the forgotten tunnels buried beneath our downtown streets. OK, not really—but that would be kind of cool. The “creature” in question is Do Ya Hear We? records. DYHW got its start seven years ago when a group of friends from a small-but-strong corner of Chattanooga’s underground music community came together to release the music of a mutual friend who had passed away. Seven records later, this vinyl-only label continues to expand (why do albums always sound better on vinyl, anyways?). And, as if being a vinyl-only record label in 2013 isn’t interesting enough, there’s moooore! Do Ya Hear We? actually got their official start as a music festival. Yes, my friends, you read that correctly: Chattanooga, Tennessee, affectionately referred to by as some the Buckle of the Bible Belt, has its own punk rock festival and has for years. And by “festival,” I don’t mean a bunch of musicians coming together to jam and drink Southpaw Light in someone’s basement (which is also an admirable past time, so there might be some of that, too). This is a real festival, with planning, organization, and a schedule. Do Ya Hear We? Punk Fest 2013, like every other year in the festival’s seven-year history, will include nearly 40 bands, about half of which are from Chattanooga. The visiting lineup features bands from North Carolina (Kreamy ‘Lectric Santa and Ancient Whales), Minnesota (Serenghetto and Hard Feelings), New York (Shellshag and Magnets), Missouri (Nature Boys and Rat’sRest), Massachusetts (Peeple Watching), Indiana (Shut Up), Georgia (Wade Boggs), Alabama (Thunder Krotch), Florida (Scum of the Earth, Rivernecks, and The Scavuzzo’s) and Louisiana (Violent Sects). So, how does the daunting task of assembling the lineup of visiting bands each year get accomplished? Tucker McGuinness, one of the festival’s organizers, says, “These bands are all extensions of our scene here and are doing similar things in their hometowns.” Local bands on the schedule include the Future Virgins, the Bohannons,

Possible Side Effects, Big Kitty and Beard Wolf. Marty Bohannon, guitarist and vocalist for The Bohannons, says they’re “stoked” to be playing DYHW. “It’s our favorite local music festival. We got turned on to so many great bands through Do Ya Hear We? like Dead Dog, Witches, Shellshag, and Landlord.” In its first year, Do Ya Hear We? Punk Fest was nothing more than a handful of friends asking musicians and acquaintances they knew from around the country to travel to C hat t a nooga to hang out and listen to music for a couple of days. Though it has grown in size since then, the idea behind it remains the same. “We want to get together our friends from around the country and have a good time in Chattanooga,” McGuinness said. “We want to show everyone what our small city has to offer: our bands, our venues, record labels, restaurants.” According to him, many have described the event as being more like a family reunion or gathering than a festival. There are no tickets, no VIP passes. For $6 a show, you get six-to-ten hours of music from ten-to-12 different bands. That kind of talent for that kind of price is more intense than Sid’s love for Nancy. In addition to just generally being awesome, Do Ya Hear We? Punk Fest 2013 will also mark the release of the record label’s eighth record: a full-length, 15-song LP called “Walk the Floors” by local band Dark Rides. Not a big punk fan? No problem. Some of the scheduled bands have been known to dabble in rock and alternative, so go anyway.

W ine f o s y a D Th e ins P y t e f a S & Chattanooga may be shaping up to quite the underground music hub these days, but there are those who remem-

ber differently. Eric Scealf, front man for Chattanooga punk/glam rock band The Unsatisfied, has witnessed the growing pains and pleasures of the local punk scene since The Unsatisfied got their start by playing a house party one Halloween night in 1986. Eric remembers a very different Chattanooga than the one we have today. “Chattanooga was the strangest place to be in the 1980s. Very dangerous situations all over this town back then. Dark and depressing—you did not go down town,” he said. Since the genesis of the punk rock genre around 1974, punk bands in the States as well as across the Pond had a hard time finding places to play shows. Even at an early stage, politically charged punk rock was deemed “dangerous”

because it bucked t h e mainstream and rejected c o m me r c i a l ized mass-produced music, opting instead for free thinkers and raw, unpolished, devoted talent. Venues weren’t quick to open their doors to punk acts.

This was especially true in the South where country music (please apply appropriate drawl and emphasis to the first syllable in “country”) is the preferred delicacy next to road kill and cracklin’. “I had a lot of luck out of town,” Scealf said. “For me it seemed the farther I got out of the South the better it was for what I was trying to do.” Though Chattanooga’s punk-rock scene in the ’80s lagged behind the rest of the country by about a decade, it has held its own since. Black Flag, the Descendants and the Red Hot Chili Peppers all played a gritty punk/alternative club called the Nucleus located at 405 Market Street (about where The Mix is now) before they hit it big. Whatever the reason for our late start, we appear to be making up for it now. Chattanooga is cooler than Johnny Rotten’s spiky orange hair (…not really, but we can dream). But ultimately, It doesn’t matter whether you’re a seasoned old-timer who remembers seeing HANK, Feast of Pigs or The Kreed play around Chattanooga back in the day, or a newcomer who tosses back $2 PBR tall boys and swaps sweat with strangers at JJ’s or Sluggo’s, Do Ya Hear We? Punk Fest 2013 will not disappoint. Get warmed up with a free pre-fest party at JJ’s, 231 E. MLK Blvd. on Thursday, June 20. The festival shenanigans officially begin Friday June 21 at 7 p.m. at Sluggo’s North, 501 Cherokee Blvd. and continue there Saturday at 5 p.m. On Sunday, everything wraps up with a final show at 5 p.m. at JJ’s Bohemia. Shows at Sluggo’s are all ages, but shows at JJ’s are 21 and up, which means, if she doesn’t know who Glen Danzig is, she’s probably too young for you, bro. Form a straight line, go through a tight wind, and lose your minds at Chattanooga’s annual punk fest. Nooga Calling! Oh, yeah, we hear ya.

chattanoogapulse.com • june 20-26, 2013 • The Pulse • 9

Brave Souls, Brave Sound Behold the Brave talk about their new album, songwriting and starting a cult.

Photo - Brandon Funk

By Zachary Cooper

The first time I listened to music from Behold The Brave was in early 2012, on a track sent to me by one of the members asking about The Pulse booking an anniversary showcase at Track 29. “Oh To Sleep” was the track title from their first EP. Once I listened to it, there wasn’t any question—I wanted them in the showcase line-up. The balance of pure rockn-roll, the echoes of a Southern heritage and an obvious talent for writing both melodically and lyrically, converge into something immediately enjoyable. The band’s latest release is a full-length album titled “Great American Experience” and it’s an apt title for their brand of music. You could drop them in any club in the

10 • The Pulse • june 20-26, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

world, and anyone who pays even marginal attention would be able to identify their musical origin: This is American Rock-N-Roll. You could make the case for an even more specific origin of the BTB style: Neo-Classic Rock of Southern Heritage with tinges of Pop sensibilities? Perhaps. But like so many convenient identifiers, it fails in accuracy and in offering you anything other than vagaries of style. Sure, all of those elements are present in BTB’s music. But often it’s not what influences a band’s music that produces solid material; it’s how that band channels all the elements and achieves originality. BTB is doing this rather well. I spoke with bassist Joel Parks about their music and what drives their creativity.

We all have our separate beliefs, though we respect each other and the people that listen to our music. The lyrics mean something different to every person that listens, and that's how they should be.

Zach Cooper: Every band and performing musician has, or is striving to create, their own sound or a style that is recognized as their own. I think you have that going for BTB, but do you think about creating a certain sound, or do you just work together and see what comes out? Joel Parks: I think every performer, no matter the art, has some kind of preconceived check list in their head with the types of influences that want to pull from. The cool thing about working with a group of guys is that we individually have those influences that we like to bring to the table. So you get some interesting combinations. You also butt heads a lot, so we never collectively say, "We want this song to sound like…” We all bring a lot of different ideas to the table. ZC: “Great American Challenge” is your latest full-length release. Matt Goldman produced that with you guys on the Regenerate Music label. Was this the first experience collaborating with a producer and label? How was this experience for you? JP: Regenerate has been our first label experience. We're fortunate enough to have some support that trusts our judgment when it comes to the music we create. Goldman was a champ to work with. He is by far the most experienced producer we've worked with to date and we loved having his input and ideas in the on the record. He's a tone genius. It was actually his idea, during the first day of pre-production, to track the majority of the record live. That turned out to be a huge reason this record feels as great as it does. ZC: There’s plenty of powerful rock-n-roll in the BTB discography so far. But there are just as many subtle harmonies and gentle touches. How does the band approach the writing process? Is it completely collaborative or are there leads writing the majority of the material? JP: The musical structure is a group effort, no doubt. We let Clayton do his thing for the lyrics and the majority of the melodies. We are always trying to expand our musical palettes, which helps with the diversity in a lot of our tunes. You can't be prejudiced to certain styles and expect to still bring something fresh to the table. I might even be a little embarrassed by all of the Spotify shows that I listen to. ZC: You guys are from the Chattanooga area. Also, you met and formed while attending the Christian college Lee University. How does being “Southern” influence your music, or does it? Is there something about having the experience in a conserva-

tive Christian college that influences you lyrically or otherwise? JP: Clayton and Zack have been life-long friends, and I met the two of them at Lee University in 2008. Jeremiah joined the group a couple of years later, after having known them through other bands. When you live in a place like Chattanooga for so long, I think it's impossible to not be influenced by it. The scenery, the people, and the music scene have such a unique pull about them. It's next to impossible to not be influenced by all of that. You can take the boys out of the South, but you can't take the South out of the boys. We all have our separate beliefs, though we respect each other and the people that listen to our music. The lyrics mean something different to every person that listens, and that's how they should be.

Photo - Isabel Slick

ZC: What’s next for Beyond the Brave? Recording, touring? Heavy on both? Starting a cult? JP: Hopefully, we’ll be able to throw some new things out in the near future. We always try to continue writing. Progressively getting rowdier. Absolutely touring. We have a little route at the end of this month, starting in Chattanooga at JJ's Bohemia on June 25 with our long time friends Abandon Kansas. Who wouldn't like having their own cult? Behold The Brave Clayton Davis (guitar, keys, vocals), Zack Randolph (guitar), Joel Parks (bass), Jeremiah Thompson (drums) facebook.com/beholdthebrave twitter.com/beholdthebrave youtube.com/beholdthebrave reverbnation.com/beholdthebrave Behold the Brave, 10 p.m. Tuesday, June 25, JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jjsbohemia.com chattanoogapulse.com • june 20-26, 2013 • The Pulse • 11

901 Carter St (Inside Days Inn) 423-634-9191

Thursday, June 20: 9pm Open Mic with Hap Henninger Friday, June 21: 9pm Hap Henninger Saturday, June 22: 10pm Ryan Oyer Tuesday, June 25: 7pm

Server/Hotel Appreciation Night $5 Pitchers $2 Wells $1.50 Domestics ●

All shows are free with dinner or 2 drinks! Stop by & check out our daily specials! Happy Hour: Mon-Fri: 4-7pm $1 10oz drafts, $3 32oz drafts, $2 Wells, $1.50 Domestics, Free Appetizers

Facebook.com/theoffice.chatt

BACKYLAERD GRIL

ROCKIN’ IN FRONT, SMOKIN’ OUT BACK

NO SMOKING • ID REQUIRED • $5 COVER BAND NIGHTS LIVE MUSIC 7:30-11 P.M. • DRINK SPECIALS • BIKES WELCOME! Thu. June 20 9:00pm - Midnight

Fri. June 21 8:00pm - Midnight

Sat. June 22 4:00pm - Midnight

The Darkside Party It’s party time at Backyard Grille

Sweet N Lowdown Come hear an angel sing

Arson

Smokin’ hot rock-n-roll

E 23RD SUNDAY JUENN MIC KIDS OP M 2PM-8P 4021 HIXSON PIKE “WE SMOKE IN OUR BACKYARD”

BETWEEN ACCESS ROAD & ASHLAND TERRACE

423.486.1369 • BACKYARDGRILLECHATTANOOGA.COM

Chattanooga Live

MUSIC CALENDAR

Thu 06.20 All American Summer Presents: Moonlight Bride 6 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org The Loop 7 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956, sugarsribs.com Open Mic 7 p.m. The Camp House, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081, thecamphouse.com Erick Baker, Jillian Edwards, Happenstance 9 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. rhythm-brews.com The American Gonzos, Telemonster, Lines in the Sky 9 p.m. The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192, thehonestpint.com The Darkside Party 9 p.m. Backyard Grille, 4021 Hixson Pike. (423) 486-1369, Open Mic with Hap Henninger 9 p.m. The Office, 901 Carter St. (inside Days Inn). (423) 634-9191 Josh Lewis 9 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar, 5751 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9878, budssportsbar.com Do Ya Hear We Acoustic Punk Night 10 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jjsbohemia.com Common Enemy, S.N.A.F.U, Crosscheck 10 p.m. Sluggo’s, 501 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224

Fri 06.21 Old Time Travelers 11 a.m. Rock City, 1400 Patten Rd., Lookout Mtn, Ga. seerockcity.com

12 • The Pulse • june 20-26, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

Nim Nims with Smooth Dialects

• Once dubbed (in these very pages) "The Best Band You've Never Heard", the Nim Nims have been playing constantly and touring throughout the entire Southeast, bringing the sound to an ever-growing legion of fans. One of the hardest bands to describe musically, their influences range from alternative to folk to funk to church choir Southern rock to electronica to a judcious use of cowbell, 'Cause you can never have enough cowbell. Never. 10 p.m. Saturday, JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jjsbohemia.com

Do Ya Hear We? presents: Chattanooga Punk Fest 7 p.m. Sluggo’s, 501 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224 Dana Rogers 7 p.m. Nightfall Music Series, River City Stage at Miller Plaza, 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com. Gabriel Newell with Oak Creek Band 7:30 p.m. The Camp House, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081, thecamphouse.com Amber Fults & the Ambivalent Lovers 8 p.m. Nightfall Music Series, River City Stage at Miller Plaza, 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com. Sweet N Lowdown 8 p.m. Backyard Grille, 4021 Hixson Pike. (423) 486-1369, Hudson K CD Release Extravaganza with Ashley & the X’s and Woodford Sessions 8 p.m. Barking Legs Theater, 1307 Dodds Ave.

(423) 624-5347, barkinglegs.org Johnston Brown 8 p.m. Acoustic Café, 61 RBC Dr,, Ringgold, Ga. (706) 965-2065, ringgoldacoustic.com Hap Henninger 9 p.m. The Office, 901 Carter St. (inside Days Inn). (423) 634-9191 21 Under 9 p.m. Ziggy’s Underground Music, 607 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 265-8711 348 9 p.m. SkyZoo, 5709 Lee Hwy. (423) 468-4533, skyzoochattanooga.com Husky Burnette 9 p.m. Southern Brew and Cue, 5017 Rossville Blvd. (423) 468-4222 Soul Survivor 9:30 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956, sugarsribs.com Breakfast Club 9:30 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St.

rhythm-brews.com Ben Deignan 10 p.m. Raw, 409 Market St. (423) 756-1919 Dax Riggs with Bohannons 10 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jjsbohemia.com Robby Hopkins 10 p.m. T-Bones, 1419 Chestnut St. (423) 266-4240, tboneschattanooga.com

Sat 06.22 Ogya 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Chattanooga Incline Railway, 3917 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 821-4224, ridetheincline.com. Old Time Travelers 11 a.m. Rock City, 1400 Patten Rd., Lookout Mtn, Ga. seerockcity.com Arson 4 p.m. Backyard Grille, 4021 Hixson Pike. (423) 486-1369, Do Ya Hear We? presents:

Chattanooga Live Chattanooga Punk Fest 5 p.m. Sluggo’s, 501 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224 Hope for the Dying, The Burial, Everybody Loves the Hero and Naming Nations 7 p.m. Warehouse Cleveland, 260 2nd Street NE, Cleveland. warehousevenue.com 2¢ Stamps with Dewveall 7:30 p.m. The Camp House, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081, thecamphouse.com Shades of Gray 8 p.m. Acoustic Café, 61 RBC Dr., Ringgold, Ga. (706) 965-2065, ringgoldacoustic.com Flyin’ A’s 8 p.m. Charles and Myrtle’s Coffeehouse, 105 McBrien Rd. (423) 892-4960, christunity.org The Local Group 8 p.m. Crust Pizza, 3211 Broad St. (423) 756-4040 Spand-XXX 9 p.m. SkyZoo, 5709 Lee Hwy. (423) 468-4533, skyzoochattanooga.com Never Surrender 9 p.m. Ziggy’s Underground Music, 607 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 265-8711 Ryan Oyer 9 p.m. The Office, 901 Carter St. (inside Days Inn). (423) 634-9191 W.B. Givens 9 p.m. The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192, thehonestpint.com Soul Survivor 9:30 p.m. Sugar’s

CHATTANOOGA MUSIC CALENDAR Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956, sugarsribs.com Back N Black: A Killer Tribute to AC/DC 10 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. rhythm-brews.com Nim Nims with Smooth Dialects 10 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 2661400, jjsbohemia.com Queen Lightning 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar, 5751 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9878, budssportsbar.com Ben Deignan 10 p.m. Raw, 409 Market St. (423) 756-1919

Sun 06.23

(423) 266-1400, jjsbohemia.com Chattanooga Traditional Irish Music Session 5 p.m. Moccasin Bend Brewing Company, 4015 Tennessee Ave. (423) 821-6392 American Legion 9 p.m. Ziggy’s Underground Music, 607 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 265-8711 Blackcat Moon 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar, 5751 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9878, budssportsbar.com Peewee Moore & The Awful Dreadful Snakes 10 p.m. Raw, 409 Market St. (423) 756-1919

Mon 06.24

Old Time Travelers 11 a.m. Rock City, 1400 Patten Rd., Lookout Mtn, Ga. seerockcity.com Kerry Kean 12:30 p.m. Chattanooga Market, First Tennessee Pavilion, 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com. Kate Morrissey 2 p.m. Chattanooga Market, First Tennessee Pavilion, 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com. Kids Open Mic 2 p.m. Backyard Grille, 4021 Hixson Pike. (423) 486-1369. Do Ya Hear We? presents: Chattanooga Punk Fest 5 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd.

Unspoken Triumph with Sirens, Ovid’s Withering and Every Word a Prophecy 10 p.m. Sluggo’s, 501 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224.

Tue 06.25 Tim Starnes & Friends 7 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956, sugarsribs.com Cat Country Presents: Texaco Country Showdown 8 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. rhythmbrews.com Behold the Brave with Abandon Kansas 10 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia,

231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jjsbohemia.com

Wed 06.26 Dan Sheffield 7 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956, sugarsribs.com Reveal Renew with The Good Ole Boys, The Lateral View, The Bear Comes Home and Sleep Patterns 7 p.m. Warehouse Cleveland, 260 2nd Street NE, Cleveland. warehousevenue.com Courtney Daly, Ivan Wilson 8 p.m. Acoustic Café, 61 RBC Dr., Ringgold, Ga. (706) 965-2065, ringgoldacoustic.com Son Volt, Colonel Ford 9 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. rhythm-brews.com Nosecone Prophets, Pack of Wolves, Muletide Perkins 9 p.m. The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192, thehonestpint.com Opposite Box Pirate Party with Montezuma Fire Revenge and the River Rats 10 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jjsbohemia.com

Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@ chattanoogapulse.com.

DINE IN

LIVE MUSIC

JUNE

20 BREAKFAST CLUB FRI 9:30p 21 SAT BACK IN BLACK 10p 22 COUNTRY SHOWDOWN TUE 8p 25 WED SON VOLT 9p 26 ERICK BAKER

THU with JILLIAN EDWARDS & HAPPENSTANCE 9P

YOUR FAVORITE 80'S BAND IS BACK

A TRIBUTE TO AC/DC

Presented by TEXACO & CAT COUNTRY 95.3

with COLONEL FORD

6.27 SPACE WRANGLER: THE MUSIC OF PANIC 6.28 ST. PAUL and THE BROKEN BONES ALL SHOWS 21+ UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED • NON-SMOKING VENUE

221 MARKET STREET

HOT MUSIC • FINE BEER • GREAT FOOD BUY TICKETS ONLINE • RHYTHM-BREWS.COM

daily lunch & drink specials!

The only place in Town where you can sing karaoke anyTime.

Book your Birthday, anniversary or holiday parties now!

410 market • (423) 757-wing

singitorwingit-chattanooga.com

TAKE OUT

SERVING LUNCH & DINNER CATERING AVAILABLE

1634 ROSSVILLE AVE | (423) 509-3430 MON-FRI: 11-8, SAT: 11-7 SEE US AT THE MARKET ON SUNDAYS chattanoogapulse.com • june 20-26, 2013 • The Pulse • 13

WHERE CAN YOU GET A

ARTS

60-COURSE MEAL

FOR ONLY $15?

SAT. • JUNE 22

FIRST TENNESSEE PAVILION

4-7PM TICKETS: $15 rotarygourmetguys.com

Sponsored by the three Chattanooga Rotary Clubs, come taste gourmet soups, appetizers, sides, entrees and desserts from more than 50 professional and “wannabe” chefs in a fun competition. Proceeds fund “Rotary Kidz” projects benefitting children locally and internationally. A Gracious Thanks to Our Sponsors:

Brewer Media • EPB Fiber Optics Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee Tennessee American Water • FSG Bank Grant Konvalinka & Harrison, P.C. Chattanooga Business Machines Modern Woodmen Fraternal Financial First Tennessee Bank • Mashburn Outdoor Steak ‘n Shake • Clear Channel Media

The Monster Within Again By Janis Hashe  Photos by Clayton Powers

It’s been a good spring/early summer for monsters in Chattanooga. Theater for the New South just closed their production of Neal Bell’s “Monster.” The Chattanooga Theatre Centre’s production of “Bloody, Bloody Andrew Jackson” continues through July 14—and a strong case can be made for the monsterhood of our seventh president. Then there’s “Jekyll & Hyde,” onstage for one more weekend at Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga. Like Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein,” on which “Monster” is based, Robert Louis Stevenson’s “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” was written as a novella.

14 • The Pulse • june 20-26, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

Walking into ETC’s black box theatre,

each audience member is bathed in acid green light, momentarily transforming them into ‘monsters.’

WEDNESDAYS

MONSTER ONLY $1

DRUMMIES $3 craft Draft Beer The “Jekyll & Hyde” ETC presents is a 1997 musical by Frank Wildhorn, Leslie Bricusse and Steve Cuden. Theatre buffs will know that Wildhorn is a love-it-orleave-it discussion in the musical theatre world. The original production ran for more than three years on Broadway and spawned a cult of “Jekkies” who returned again and again to see the show. However, it also inspired some of the most vitriolic reviews since the days of George Jean Nathan. Walking into ETC’s black box theatre, each audience member is bathed in acid green light, momentarily transforming them into “monsters.” A clever idea—and in fact, all the design elements of this production live up to the new standards ETC has set for itself in this, its first season in the company’s new space. Sue Christiansen’s versatile, theatre-in-the-round set, Brenda Schwab’s detailed period costumes, Sanford Knox Jr.’s careful lighting and Amber Brown’s prop choices are all outstanding aids to this show. Director Garry Lee Posey moves his actors through the set and scenes expertly, using the space to its maximum potential.

The 18-member cast has dance numbers that have to work in a relatively small space, and do. (A standout show moment is the second act opening number, “Murder, Murder.”) The leads, John Thomas Cecil as Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde, Marianna Allen as Emma Carew and Jennifer Arbogast as Lucy Harris, are well cast and obviously deeply committed to the material. Allen and Arbogast have another show highlight in their duet “In His Eyes.” Cecil has to carry the show, and as an actor, does an admirable job with difficult material. His voice, however, does not have the range that would allow the score’s repetitive material to achieve the melodramatic climaxes intended by the composer. But we do get a real sense of the battle to the literal death of the two beings inhabiting one body, and Cecil throws himself physically into this battle rivetingly. Allen’s strong voice serves her well as ever-loving Emma, Dr. Jekyll’s “good” fiancée, and she has a lovely moment with her father (Thomas Rodgers) in the first act’s “Letting Go.” It isn’t Allen’s fault that this is a true one-note role, but her per-

formance does little to add complexity or depth. Arbogast has better luck with the hooker-with-a-heart-of-gold Lucy, and her polished stage presence is shown off in “A New Life.” Among the ensemble, Michael Westmoreland (Simon Stride), Brenda Schwab (Lady Beaconsfield/Mistress Spider) and Thomas Alford (The Bishop of Basingstroke) all add nice detail and sensibility. Now we come to this viewer’s difficulty: Clearly, I am not a “Jekkie.” What I will say about this production (which received a standing ovation from the audience at the performance I attended) is that if you are a fan of “Phantom of the Opera” and Andrew Lloyd Webber musicals in general, the odds are very good you will very much enjoy this show. Stephen Sondheim fans likely need not apply. “Jekyll & Hyde,” 7:30 p.m. June 20, 21,22, 2:30 p.m. June 23, Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (inside Eastgate Town Center). $20/$15 students with ID. (423) 987-5141, ensembletheatreofchattanooga.com

DAILY DRINK SPECIALS

mith’s Black s D owntown

809 Market street (423) 702-5461 Find us on the web

blacksmithsgastropub.com chattanoogapulse.com • june 20-26, 2013 • The Pulse • 15

atop Lookout Mountain

Arts & Entertainment

EVENTS CALENDAR

Thu 06.20

The perfect place to take in the 7 states view at Rock City Gardens while feasting on delicious modern Southern cuisine. Café 7 is also the best place to enjoy the traditional mountain music of the Old Time Travelers during Summer Music Weekends. Café 7 and Summer Music Weekends are just two of a host of reasons to get a Rock City Annual Pass. Seating available Thur.–Sun. 11am-4pm

Local, Fresh, Seasonal for more info call 706.820.2531

See RockCity.com

June Jubilee 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Chattanooga Zoo, 301 N. Holtzclaw Ave. (423) 697-1322, chattzoo.org “Inside & Out” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave., 423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org “Shanequa Gay: The Fair Game Project” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658. “Works by Tony Russo” 11 a.m – 5:30 p.m. Graffiti, 629 Spears Ave. (423) 400-9797, hillcityart.com “Michael Murphy: Damage” 11 a.m.-5 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282, avarts.org Rock City Raptors 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Rock City, 1400 Patten Road, Lookout Mtn, Ga. seerockcity.com “Water Lovers” 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. In-Town Gallery, 26A Frazier Ave. (423) 267-9214, intowngallery.com Ooltewah Farmer’s Market 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. Ooltewah Nursery & Landscape Co. Inc., 5829 Main St. (423) 238-9775 Tennessee River Gorge: Sunset Kayak Trip 7 p.m. TVA Raccoon Mountain Boat Launch. (423) 643-6888, outdoorchattanooga.com All-American Summer Concert Series 6 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org “Mystery at the Redneck Italian Wedding” 7 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839,

16 • The Pulse • june 20-26, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

Better not bring your kids

• His first show sold out, but as of press time, there are still tickets available for Dave Chappelle’s 10 p.m. show at the Tivoli. The comedian//activist/actor (let’s not forget he was in “Robin Hood: Men in Tights”) is a real “get’ for the Chattanooga comedy scene. Warning sticker: Do not go to this show if you think Cee Lo Green should be banned from Riverbend. You’ll have a coronary. $53. 10 p.m. Wednesday, June 26. Tivoli Theatre, 709 Broad St. (423) 642TIXS, chattanoogaonstage.com

funnydinner.com “Love Birds” Date Night Painting Workshop 7-10 p.m. Artsy-U, 5084 S. Terrace. (423) 321-2317, artsychattanooga.com UTC Master Chorale 7:30 p.m. Second Presbyterian Church, 700 Pine St. (423) 425-4612. “Jekyll & Hyde” 7:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 987-5141, Craft Night! 8 p.m. Sluggo’s, 501 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224

Fri 06.21 June Jubilee 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Chattanooga Zoo, 301 N. Holtzclaw Ave. (423) 697-1322, chattzoo.org “Inside & Out” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave.

(423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org “Shanequa Gay: The Fair Game Project” 10 a.m. -5 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658. “Works by Tony Russo” 11 a.m – 5:30 p.m. Graffiti, 629 Spears Ave. (423) 400-9797, hillcityart.com “Michael Murphy: Damage” 11 a.m.-5 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282, avarts.org Fresh On Fridays 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Center Park, 728 Market St. (423) 265-3700, facebook. com/centerparkchattanooga Rock City Raptors 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Rock City, 1400 Patten Road, Lookout Mtn, Ga. seerockcity.com “Water Lovers” 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. In-Town Gallery, 26A Frazier Ave. (423) 267-9214, intowngallery.com “3 Daisies” Painting Workshop 7-10 p.m. Artsy-U, 5084 S. Terrace. (423) 321-2317, artsychattanooga.com

“Mystery at the Nightmare Office Party” 7 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com “Jekyll & Hyde” 7:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga. 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 987-5141, James Gregory 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233, thecomedycatch.com “Bloody, Bloody Andrew Jackson” 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre, 400 River St. (423) 267-8538, theatrecentre.com SU: Chris Barnes 9:30 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com

Sat 06.22 Family Fun Festival 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. College Hill Courts Community Center, 1300 Grove St. Ct. (423) 752-4870 June Jubilee 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Chattanooga Zoo, 301 N. Holtzclaw Ave. (423) 697-1322, chattzoo.org Chattanooga River Market 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza, 1 Broad St. (423) 402-9960, chattanoogamarket.com “Inside & Out” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org “Works by Tony Russo” 10 a.m – 4 p.m. Graffiti, 629 Spears Ave. (423) 400-9797, hillcityart.com Open Gallery 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Shuptrine’s

Arts & Entertainment Gold Leaf Designs, 2646 Broad St. (423) 266-4453, shuptrines.com Rock City Raptors 11 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Rock City, 1400 Patten Road, Lookout Mtn, Ga. seerockcity.com “Michael Murphy: Damage” 11 a.m.-5 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282, avarts.org “Water Lovers” 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. In-Town Gallery, 26A Frazier Ave. (423) 267-9214, intowngallery.com “Shanequa Gay: The Fair Game Project” Noon -4 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658 Saturday Cinema: “Up” 2:30 p.m. Chattanooga Public Library, 1001 Broad St. (423) 757-5310, lib.chattanooga.gov Gourmet Guys Food Tasting Gala 4 p.m. - 7 p.m. First Tennessee Pavilion, 1829 Carter St. rotarygourmetguys.com. “Mystery of Flight 138” 5:30 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com “Dragon Flowers” Painting Workshop 7-10 p.m. Artsy-U, 5084 S. Terrace. (423) 321-2317, artsychattanooga.com “Jekyll & Hyde” 7:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 987-5141, Chattanooga RAQS Middle Eastern Dance Show 8 p.m. Barking Legs Theater, 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347, barkinglegs.org Dancing with the Stars Chattanooga 8 p.m. Tivoli Theatre, 709 Broad St. (423) 642-TIXS, chattanoogaonstage.com “Mystery of the Facebook Fugitive” 8 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St.

EVENTS CALENDAR

(423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com “Bloody, Bloody Andrew Jackson” 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre, 400 River St. (423) 267-8538, theatrecentre.com James Gregory 9:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233, thecomedycatch.com SU: Chris Barnes 10:30 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com

Sun 06.23 June Jubilee 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Chattanooga Zoo, 301 N. Holtzclaw Ave. (423) 697-1322, chattzoo.org Magic Tree House traveling exhibit 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Creative Discovery Museum, 321 Chestnut St. (423) 756-2738, cdmfun.org Rock City Raptors 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Rock City, 1400 Patten Road, Lookout Mtn, Ga. seerockcity.com Blueberry Festival 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Chattanooga Market, First Tennessee Pavilion, 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com “Water Lovers” 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. In-Town Gallery, 26A Frazier Ave. (423) 267-9214, intowngallery.com “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” Noon - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org “Inside & Out” 1 p.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com “Jekyll & Hyde” 2:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 987-5141, “Stream Landscape”

Painting Workshop 7 p.m. - 10 p.m. Artsy-U, 5084 S. Terrace. (423) 321-2317, artsychattanooga.com

Mon 06.24 June Jubilee 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Chattanooga Zoo, 301 N. Holtzclaw Ave. (423) 697-1322, chattzoo.org “Shanequa Gay: The Fair Game Project” 10 a.m. -5 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658. “Inside & Out” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org “Water Lovers” 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. In-Town Gallery, 26A Frazier Ave. (423) 267-9214, intowngallery.com Family Night - “Beach Ball” Painting Workshop 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Artsy-U, 5084 S. Terrace. (423) 321-2317, artsychattanooga.com

Tue 06.25 PLEIN AIR: The Art of Outdoor Painting 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Shuptrine’s Gold Leaf Designs, 2646 Broad St. (423) 266-4453, shuptrines.com June Jubilee 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Chattanooga Zoo, 301 N. Holtzclaw Ave. (423) 697-1322, chattzoo.org “Shanequa Gay: The Fair Game Project” 10 a.m. -5 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658. “Inside & Out” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com

“Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave., (423) 267-0968, “Michael Murphy: Damage” 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282, avarts.org “Works by Tony Russo” 11 a.m – 5:30 p.m. Graffiti, 629 Spears Ave. (423) 400-9797, “Water Lovers” 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. In-Town Gallery, 26A Frazier Ave. (423) 267-9214, intowngallery.com “Swirly Flowers” Painting Workshop 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Artsy-U, 5084 S. Terrace. (423) 321-2317, artsychattanooga.com

Named “One of the Ten Most Incredible Cave Waterfalls on Earth” World Reviewer

Wed 06.26 June Jubilee 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Chattanooga Zoo, 301 N. Holtzclaw Ave. (423) 697-1322, chattzoo.org “Shanequa Gay: The Fair Game Project” 10 a.m. -5 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658. “Inside & Out” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org “Michael Murphy: Damage” 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282, avarts.org Dave Chappelle 7:30, 10 p.m. Tivoli Theatre, 709 Broad St. (423) 642-TIXS, chattanoogaonstage.com

Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@ chattanoogapulse.com.

423.821.2544 RubyFalls.com

Aerial Adventure.

OPEN DAILY!

NEW FOR 2013: Climbing Tower & ZIP Ride!

423.821.2544 RubyFallsZip.com

chattanoogapulse.com • june 20-26, 2013 • The Pulse • 17

Screen

Malik’s Latest Is Worth the Wander “To The Wonder” should be experienced, not judged

By John DeVore

T

here are some films for which a review is meaningless. Evaluating strengths and weakness means nothing when a film is exact in its craft—when all choices are deliberate, and not the byproducts of deadlines or focus groups, weaknesses are difficult to find. These are films meant to arouse emotion. They exist because the artist needed them to. If a film achieves what it set out to do, it can’t be viewed as anything other than a success. There might be arguments as to whether the message is one worth communicating, whether a film resonates

emotionally with your own experience, but with certain films it’s not useful to criticize the artist’s techniques or intentions, because there isn’t any fault to be found. Terrance Malik is one filmmaker that always makes the film he intends, and by that measure his films are good. But Malik’s films are unlikely to exist in any other way. He is too careful an artist. “To The Wonder,” his most recent romance, is a visual symphony that is meant to be experienced rather than judged. It is film as essential art rather than explicit storytelling, a collection of images with its own rhythm and structure.

The film shows Neil (Ben Affleck) and Marina (Olga Kurlyenko) as a young couple in love. Who they are is less important than what they represent, namely the silent American Male and the Impassioned European Female. Their lives appear dreamlike, with long shots of playful touching, small bursts of unheard whispers, accompanied by orchestral swells paired with long silence. The film seems more memory than action—most dialogue is spoken in breathy, low tones or quiet internal voiceover. We aren’t seeing the world as it is, only as it is remembered. It is a story of deep emotion and anxi-

ety, of both the spoken and unspoken truths that haunt every relationship. This isn’t a story that is inaccessible. Almost everyone has experienced the turmoil of love growing stale. Emotional distance and intimacy is approximated by the relative position of the actors on screen, by the empty dining rooms and flowing curtains, the vast skies and running water. Malik invokes emotional responses through dynamic visuals, his gift being one of associating strong feelings with the beautiful, natural Earth. The scenes of happiness and wonder always appear to be looking up, as if from the perspective of a child, looking to the optimism of heaven. Those of despair and loneliness are close, with closed blinds and quick cuts. Another character, Father Quintana, mirrors the love story of Neil and Marina through his own struggle with faith. There is a strong connection in the film between secular and spiritual love. Neil loves Marina at a distance, not responding to the powerful devotion of Marina in a way that she can understand. Father Quintana is himself loved by a distant Father who doesn’t return affection in a measurable way. Their faith is shaken in different ways, different types of

infidelity, but both seek forgiveness, hoping to be part of a “love that loves.” These strongly Christian themes are evident but not explicit, shown through Malik’s careful eye and direction. At times, the film is as distant from the audience as Marina is from Neil, and at two hours, long shots of standing in the kitchen can be tiresome, especially for viewers not familiar with the director’s work. But given how much there is to see, how rich each scene is with visual splendor, it’s hard to be bored. “To The Wonder” has been criticized for being overly somber. While it’s melancholy to be sure, memory is almost always bittersweet. There is simply too much beauty in the film for it to be as bleak as some say. The scenes in Oklahoma, especially, hint at how vast the world is and how small our place is in it. The ability to appreciate our smallness, even in the midst of internal sadness, is a credit to our place in the world. Mise En Scenesters Presents: “To the Wonder” $5. 8:30 p.m., June 29, Barking Legs Theater, 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347, barkinglegs.org

MORE MONEY FOR YOUR GOLD CHATTANOOGA’S #1 GOLD BUYER wants to give you MONEY for your jewelry! Get paid TOP-DOLLAR just like Rick’s thousands of satisfied customers!

WWW.RICKDAVISGOLDANDDIAMONDS.COM

RICK DAVIS GOLD & DIAMONDS 5301 Brainerd Rd at McBrien Rd • 423.499.9162 18 • The Pulse • june 20-26, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

Between the Sleeves

record reviews • ernie paik

Miles Davis Quintet Live in Europe 1969: The Bootleg Series Vol. 2 (Columbia/Legacy)

B

y a wide margin, the artist most represented in this writer’s personal music collection is trumpeter Miles Davis, with the irony that this fan, despite his immersion after falling in love with Kind of Blue and Dark Magus—two strikingly different albums—15 years ago, still only feels like a novice. The reason is that Davis’s catalog is so impossibly vast yet so rich and rewarding, and every turn he made in his career and each choice of sidemen could be studied and analyzed—a book could

honest music

likely be written about every single month of his career. In the second volume of Columbia’s Bootleg Series, Live in Europe 1969, listeners have the opportunity to zoom in on a particular fascinating transitional period, in a career seemingly in constant evolution, documented on four separate sets on three CDs and one DVD. Spotlighting the year in which the groundbreaking Bitches Brew was recorded, it captures Davis’s “lost quintet” after his Second Great Quintet in the mid-

to-late-’60s and before his full-on “Electric Miles” jazz fusion mode. Joining saxophonist Wayne Shorter from the Second Great Quintet is the rhythm section of double-bassist Dave Holland and drummer Jack DeJohnette plus keyboardist Chick Corea; the group hasn’t let go of the standards of the past, with renditions of “’Round Midnight” and “I Fall in Love Too Easily,” but a restlessness is apparent with the new material, like “Miles Runs the Voodoo Down.” By the mid-’70s, song structures seemed to dissolve with Davis’s live sets; here, they’re still present, yet with an aggressively free attitude. DeJohnette drives “Directions” with a brutal urgency, eschewing the common jazz-ride-cymbal-tap for insistent, frequent crashes. Davis and Shorter, well-acquainted at this point, pierce the airwaves with their tandem melody, and on electric piano, Corea scampers with an astoundingly agile fluency, providing several breathtaking solos. Insightful and generous, the collection is a welcome dive into one of Davis’s underrepresented periods, where he begins to fiercely shed elements of his past.

Arrington de Dionyso’s Malaikat dan Singa Open the Crown (K)

O

ne question this writer doesn’t hear enough is, “Can you recommend any good Indonesian post-punk garagerock with demonic throatsinging and free-improv bass clarinet?” For the record, he has never heard anyone actually ask this question, but the answer is Arrington de Dionyso’s Malaikat dan Singa. Also known for his other primary band, Old Time Relijun, de Dionyso’s new album Open the Crown with his outfit Malaikat dan Singa (translated as “angels and lions”) continues the trajec-

tory set by 2009’s Malaikat dan Singa and 2011’s Suara Naga, with wild, menacing and somewhat demented rock, transmitted through an Indonesian filter. One new development is that de Dionyso actually sings in English on several of the tracks on Open the Crown— previous albums were sung in Indonesian—making it slightly less exotic and impenetrable on one level, yet paradoxically weirder on another level, since the listener can actually understand them somewhat. On the title track, with a purposefully infuriating musi-

cal minimalism, he spouts, “Skull shaking thunder, the blood and the milk flowing through me,” suggesting some mystical outdoor ritual. De Dionyso sets himself apart with his astounding voice, which sounds genuinely unhinged and can drop into an evil-sounding, guttural drone, using his throat-singing skills. While true originality is indeed rare these days, that doesn’t mean that musicians shouldn’t stop trying new combinations, which is what de Dionyso’s doing here. The drumbeats sometimes evoke John “Drumbo” French of Captain Beefheart’s Magic Band with their own irregular manner, and the sonic style uses ample distortion and delay effects, with a few cheesy keyboard flourishes and bass clarinet wailing. It’s a complicated mix, bringing to mind some deranged stew with little bits of Bo Diddley, Alan Vega, Serge Gainsbourg, Sun City Girls and Lee Perry. That said, for about half of the album, de Dionyso uses his familiar methods but pushes them, revisiting some earlier tracks with longer, snarling renditions. Newcomers may be surprised by Open the Crown—fans will probably not—but still, it’s an intense and disorienting album.

local and regional shows

The American Gonzos with Telemonster [$5] Nosecone Prophets with Muletide Perkins Trio [$5] Tony Holiday and the Velvetones with Lower Valley Authority and Upper River Ramblers [$5]

Thu, June 20 9pm Wed, June 26 9pm Thu, June 27 9pm

Sundays: Live Trivia 4-6pm followed by Live Music June 23: WB Givens [Free] June 30: Molly maguires [Free]

Full food menu serving lunch and dinner. 11am-2am, 7 days a week. 35 Patten Parkway * 423.468.4192 thehonestpint.com * Facebook.com/thehonestpint

chattanoogapulse.com • june 20-26, 2013 • The Pulse • 19

Free Will Astrology GEMINI (May 21-June 20):Pablo Casals was one of the greatest cello players who ever lived. Among his early inspirations was the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. Casals discovered Bach's six cello suites when he was 13 years old, and played them every day for the next 13 years. Have you ever done something similar, Gemini? Devoted yourself to a pleasurable discipline on a regular basis for a long time? I invite you to try it. The coming months will be an excellent time to seek mastery through a diligent attention to the details.. CANCER (June 21-July 22): "I know that I am not a category," said philosopher Buckminster Fuller. "I am not a thing—a noun. I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process." Philosopher Norman O. Brown had a similar experience. "The human body is not a thing or substance, but a continuous creation," he mused. "It is an energy system which is never a complete structure; never static; is in perpetual inner self-construction and self-destruction." Now is an excellent time to imagine yourself in these terms, Cancerian. You're not a finished product, and never will be! Celebrate your fluidity, your

rob brezsny changeableness, your instinctual urge to reinvent yourself.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Renowned 20th-

century theologian Karl Barth worked on his book Church Dogmatics for 36 years. It was more than 9,000 pages long and contained over six million words. And yet it was incomplete. He had more to say, and wanted to keep going. What's your biggest undone project, Leo? The coming months will be a good time to concentrate on bringing it to a climax. Ideally, you will do so with a flourish, embracing the challenge of creating an artful ending with the same liveliness you had at the beginning of the process. But even if you have to culminate your work in a plodding, prosaic way, do it! Your next big project will be revealed within weeks after you've tied up the last loose end.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Susannah Cibber was a popular 18th-century English contralto whose singing was expressive and moving. On one occasion, she performed Handel's Messiah with such verve that an influential priest responded by making an extravagant guarantee. He told her that as

a result of her glorious singing, any sins she had committed or would commit were forever forgiven. I'd like to see you perpetrate an equivalent amazement, Virgo: a good or beautiful or soulful deed that wins you a flood of enduring slack. The cosmic omens suggest that such an achievement is quite possible.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Johnny Appleseed was a 19th-century folk hero renowned for planting apple trees in vast areas of rural America. During the 70 years this famous Libra was alive, he never got married. He believed that if he remained unwed during his time on earth, he would be blessed with two spirit-wives in the after-life. Have you ever done something like that yourself, Libra? Is there an adventure you've denied yourself in the here and now because you think that's the only way you can get some bigger, better adventure at a later date? If so, now would be an excellent time to adjust your attitude. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): "It is kind of fun to do the impossible," said Walt Disney, a pioneer animator whose cartoon innovations were remarkable. Judging from your current astrological omens, I think you Scorpios have every right to adopt his battle cry as your mantra. You've got an appointment with the frontier. You're primed to perform experiments at the edge of your understanding. Great mysteries will be tempting you to come closer and lost secrets will be teasing you with juicy clues. As you explore and tinker with the unknown, you might also want to meditate on the graffiti I saw scrawled on a mirror in a public restroom: "Only those who attempt the absurd can achieve the impossible." SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Astronauts on lunar expeditions have orbited the moon and seen its entire surface. But the rest of us have never seen more than 59 percent of it. As the moon

20 • The Pulse • june 20-26, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

revolves around the Earth, it always keeps one side turned away from our view. Isn't that amazing and eerie? The second most important heavenly body, which is such a constant and intimate factor in our lives, is half-hidden. I'd like to propose that there is an analogous phenomenon in your inner world, Sagittarius: a part of you that forever conceals some of its true nature. But I'm pretty sure you will soon be offered an unprecedented chance to explore that mysterious realm.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): An-

glo-Irish novelist Laurence Sterne married his wife Elizabeth in 1741. Twenty-five years later he fell in love with another woman, Eliza. In composing love letters to his new infatuation, he lifted some of the same romantic passages he had originally written to Elizabeth when he was courting her. Try hard not to do anything remotely resembling that, Capricorn. Give your intimate allies your freshest stuff. Treat them as the unique creatures they are. Resist the temptation to use shticks that worked to create closeness in the past.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It's important that you not punish yourself or allow yourself to be punished for the sins that other people have committed. It's also crucial that you not think nasty thoughts about yourself or put yourself in the presence of anyone who's prone to thinking nasty thoughts about you. Self-doubt and self-criticism may be healthy for you to entertain about ten days from now, and at that time you will probably benefit from receiving compassionate critique from others, too. But for the moment, please put the emphasis on self-protection and selfnurturing.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): For over

three decades, a man in Assam, India has worked to build a forest. When Jadav "Molai" Payeng started planting and tending

seeds at the age of 16, the sandbars bordering the Brahmaputra River were barren. Today, almost entirely thanks to him, they're covered with a 1,360-acre forest that harbors deer, birds, tigers, rhinos, and elephants. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you could launch a comparable project in the next 12 months, Pisces—a labor of love that will require your persistent creativity and provide you with sanctuary for a long time.

ARIES

(March 21-April 19): Maybe you've seen that meme circulating on the Internet: "My desire to be well-informed is at odds with my desire to remain sane." If you feel that way now—and I suspect you might soon if you don't already—you have cosmic permission, at least for a while, to emphasize sanity over being well-informed. Lose track of what Kim Jong-un and Kim Kardashian are up to, ignore the statements of every jerk on the planet, and maybe even go AWOL from the flood of data that relentlessly pours toward you. Instead, pay attention to every little thing your body has to tell you. Remember and marvel at your nightly dreams. Go slow. Lay low. Be soft. Have fun with unspectacular influences that make you feel at home in the world.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I expect you will be called on to move fluidly between opposing camps or competing interests or different realities. Maybe you'll volunteer to serve as an arbiter between the crabby good guys and the righteous bad guys. Perhaps you'll try to decode one friend's quirky behavior so that another friend can understand it. You might have to interpret my horoscopes for people who think astrology is bunk. You may even have to be a mediator between your own heart and head, or explain the motivations of your past self to your future self. You can't be perfect, of course. There will be details lost in translation. But if you're as patient as a saint and as tricky as a crow, you'll succeed.

Jonesin’ Crossword

matt jones

“Product Placement” -- we’ll just slip this in there. Across

1. ___ fate 6. “Rated ___ ‘General Audience’” 10. Dutch tourist attraction 14. Poker variant named for a city 15. “First lady of song” Fitzgerald 16. High point 17. “___ Tag!” 18. Ship of agreeing fools? 20. Duck or elephant silhouette on the wall? 22. ___-Coburg and Gotha (royal house of Europe) 23. “Affirmative” 24. Rum cake 27. Texting sign-off 30. Field animal’s harness 34. Astronomy muse 36. Assistant 39. Mitochondrial material 40. Person who can’t

enjoy great evenings out? 43. Chou En-___ 44. 900-line psychic Miss ___ 45. Like grunt work 46. “To be,” to Brutus 48. Cobra Kai, for one 50. “Bill & ___ Excellent Adventure” 51. Tease 54. “For ___ in My Life” (Stevie Wonder) 56. “And so this foul vixen kept me broadcasting for years” response? 63. Guy who walks through water? 64. Company with a famous joystick 65. Hot spot? 66. Egg, in Latin 67. Kind of criminal 68. Vera of gowns 69. Idee ___ 70. October option

Down

1. “Animal House” chant 2. Big birds

3. Adding and such 4. Long-tailed game bird 5. Blue material in movies and musicals, for short 6. Jump in the pool 7. ___ powder (traveling substance for Harry Potter) 8. “Lemony Snicket” evil count 9. Australian actress Mitchell 10. Coleman of “Nine to Five” 11. Apple MP3 player 12. New Zealand parrots 13. Abbr. after a phone no. 19. Kermit-flailinghis-arms noise 21. Jamaican stew ingredient 24. Crooner Michael 25. Fields 26. Cornerstone 28. Tumblr purchaser of May 2013 29. Brightened up 31. “Live Free ___” (New

Hampshire motto) 32. Deal with dough 33. British noblemen 35. Firm ending? 37. Focus of an exorcise plan? 38. Part of NYE 41. Dropout’s alternative 42. Termite targeter 47. Blowing it 49. Quest leader’s plea 52. Quality ___ 53. “___ Bones” (Stephen King novel) 55. Artfulness 56. “___ Nagila” 57. Fall garden? 58. It was only VII years ago 59. Evian waters 60. Flamboyant surrealist 61. ___-Z (‘80s muscle car) 62. “Old MacDonald” noise 63. “That’s so cool!”

Copyright © 2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+ to call. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle No. 628. chattanoogapulse.com • june 20-26, 2013 • The Pulse • 21

On the Beat

alex teach

Nature vs. Nurture: A Cop Duality “ I

dreamed of being in a huge room, a warehouse, with a ceiling made of thousands and thousands of doors stretching beyond my sight in all directions, and I was left to stare up at them. It was clear I was being dared to choose a handle and turn it. I was the subconscious author of this scene, so in the dream I knew exactly what this represented: It was about the random choices we make in a life of random choices, with no way to know where each portal would lead. Sure, they looked different. Some doors flat, some six panel, others with paint peeling to the extent I couldn’t determine their design…but as I would move forward (upward) and reach for a random door handle, I knew it made no difference which one I picked. There was work to be done on the other side of that door no matter which I chose, and I was here to do it. The dream itself didn’t make me think about the differences between what I consider the two primary kinds of cops, but the disinterest in choices did. By two kinds, let me clarify because there are clearly dozens of different types. It’s a strength of the profession because it allows specialization in different areas of the law. Narcs, traffic cops, robbery squads—totally different personalities unified only by a common patch, a common badge. No, I’m referring to the staple of the profession: Uniformed street cops. Not the transient ones driven by ego, or the ones I consider “tourists” who always wanted to be cops but never thought they could until a recruiter actually returned a call…or the ones that simply couldn’t find a better job with benefits. I mean the ones committed to doing the

22 • The Pulse • june 20-26, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

job but for two different reasons (whether they know it or not). This difference is subtle in terms of actual performance and success, but the difference is very real when put under a microscope. Put simply, there are those that feel they can “make a difference,” if only for one person or one small group. They are aware this is unsustainable, but they continue anyway. They are driven by empathy, and the other parts of their lives reflect this, i.e. their hobbies, their attachments. Then there are those that simply feel it’s their duty to serve the greater good, rather than the individual. Not out of empathy though, but because it’s their identity. Instead of empathy, they are driven by anger at attempts to break down our system, and unlike the first group who are driven by self-satisfaction, this one is driven by contempt…not for their customers, mind you, but because they are unable to stop serving, because it’s their nature to do so. Their mission. The contempt is for those that go against

order, and sure, occasionally against themselves for being unable to resist this. And as such, they don’t have many hobbies and even fewer attachments. While the former may sound superior, think on it a bit. There is a difference, and while I can assure you both are noble people, I have found that whether driven by empathy to make a difference or duty, fueled by anger or disgust, disgust tends to get problems solved rather than delayed. It’s pure energy, a directness that I can appreciate. Solving two problems in the time it takes someone else to solve one because of the delay of needing to make someone feel better about themselves in the process—well, color me overly pragmatic, but beat cops are charged with solving problems, not engendering self-esteem. I consider these differences, and also have to wonder: Which would outlast the other? Empathy or rage? Concern or anger? Decades of raw feelings, or gritty duty? And the answer is always obvious. I think I started out on empathy, on concern, but I’ve found that it’s duty that carries me forward, and sadly, borderline contempt that gives me energy when all else fails, as opposed to “boundless optimism.” That train has long since left the station, kiddies, pushed forward by people that don’t like to watch “scary movies” yet expect cops to live a real-life one for 30 years and keep a polite smile the whole time. …I think back to the dream, and approach a door as I have done so many times before during my waking hours, and I begin to knock, then reach for the handle. Another problem waiting to be solved.

Color me overly pragmatic, but beat cops are charged with solving problems, not engendering self-esteem.

• Alex Teach is a police officer of nearly 20 years experience. The opinions expressed are his own. Follow him on Facebook at facebook.com/alex.teach.

chattanoogapulse.com • june 20-26, 2013 • The Pulse • 23

FIRST ROUND OF COMPETITION

June 19 th @ rhythm & Brews 221 market street get your entry forms at catcountry953.com info: kris@catcountry953.com

the texaco Country showdown is designed to find the most promising country music talent in america and give aspiring artists a chance to launch their professional careers. doors open at 7:30 pm

Brought to you By

and

ERIC HEATHERLY ConCERT AfTER THE CompETITIon


The Pulse 10.25 » June 20, 2013