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December-2009

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December-2009

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Revamping the Education System The Indian Educational System seems to be turning over a new leaf. The Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) has encouraged and incorporated some fresh thinking with the hopes of improving the intellectual and emotional health of school students. Setting up the building blocks of a brand new evaluation system, the Board on one hand has decided to bring in some innovative changes in the examination grading methodology, and plans to do away with the 10th grade Board exams on the other. As with any new concept, this too is receiving mixed responses.

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T

he new grading system introduced by the CBSE shows promise in ways of offering a range of measures. These measures include introduction of formative and summative assessments instead of a single-window terminal examination, assessment of co-scholastic activities, including aptitude and attitude, assessment of basic skills

The role of any educational organisation is not just limited to conducting examinations and handing out certificates, but also includes meaningful responses to the changes taking place on a global scale, be it technological, scientific, cultural, social or political. The emphasis should not be placed on the role of examinations, but should be on shifting

related to thinking, emotions and social competencies, introduction of grades rather than marks, choice of optional CBSE examination and facility for on-line examinations.

the focus to nurturing the real talents of the learners in classrooms.

As far as schools affiliated to the CBSE are concerned, the concept is not new. The Board had introduced the concept years ago for the primary level and a few years later for the middle level. Now the concept has graduated to the secondary level, creating a debate because now there’s a public examination at the secondary stage that is becoming a hurdle for some. Amidst speculation, the enthusiasm with which the CBSE has taken up the process of implementation of change appears quite impressive. The case for a change, necessary inputs for enabling it and building an environment conducive for the change among the schools, all show that the CBSE is leaving no stones unturned to implement the change effectively and with a purpose. CBSE chairman Vineet Joshi said: “Apart from de-stressing students, the new system would ensure that standards don’t fall. It would also encourage students to showcase their creative skills.” The fear instilled in students and parents alike towards examinations by agencies all around has done more damage than the examinations themselves. Unscrupulous and unhealthy competition for pursuing some listed courses in colleges has been the dominant damaging factor on the mental health of the learners. This paradigm of misconception has shifted the focus from effective learning to effective choice of specific questions to be answered in the examinations. This kind of learning just in order to pass examinations actually stifles creative thinking.

Highlighting the non-uniform quality of education across the nation’s schools, education activist Gourishyam Panda said the HRD Ministry proposal will not be conducive for India as there is no level playing field. “How can a grading system yield without the schools being at par with each other?” he questioned, adding that this will certainly widen the gap in the higher education structure. In 1986, the National Education Policy came out with a recommendation on de-stressing the examinations and moving towards continuous and comprehensive evaluation that would focus on the assessment of a spectrum of skills and competencies of the learners. The whole objective of the reform exercise is to refocus educational enterprise in the classroom. It is to make classrooms more interactive, more participative, more constructive and more empowering of the process of learning. The objective is to make the learners think creatively and critically, understand and solve problems and develop a healthy emotional profile through various intelligent approaches. The approach should aim at helping children acquire inter-personal and intra-personal skills that will make them work as a coherent group, respond effectively to social networking and develop a responsible social consciousness. Prof. TK Chandrasekhar - Director, NISER Bhubaneswar, said for students and parents it can certainly help in reducing ‘stress levels’ of the percentages awarded in mark-sheets. “But for the ‘extra talented ones’ it would not be encouraging as there would be no difference between 91 and 100 per cent as all will be bracketed in one grade,” he said.

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The introduction of thinking skills, emotional skills and social

summative assessment of the student to be done over two

skills is certainly a move in the positive direction. However, the schools need to be told that these skills are not to be seen in isolation as an exercise standing apart from the curriculum, but are integral to various disciplines being taught. The success of implementation appears to lie in the empowerment of teachers and the need to train them at

terms – first and second – during the year-long academic calendar.

different levels – awareness, competency and leadership. Empowered teachers can bring about a revolution in the approach to learning and this has to be mentored by the administrators at all levels. Prof Swadhin Patnaik - Director of the Institute of Mathematics and Applications, felt, ‘For a board like CBSE the formula might mean something, but in the long run if the states are tempted to replicate it just to cut their education budget as the current practice goes, then it could result in a catastrophe.’ He stated, “The grading system will not free the students from entrance tests when they go for higher education. There would be more ‘businesses on entrances’ as currently students take coaching for IIT, JEE and medical courses.” Reiterating this issue, the Council of Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) has openly condemned the new CBSE grading system, claiming it to be ‘baseless’. CISCE

Summative Assessment – based on the term-end examination: There will be two evaluations each in the first and second terms.Each evaluation will carry 10 marks apiece. Formative Assessment – based on classwork, homework, assignment etc.: There will be one term-end exam for each term.The first term-end exam will carry 20 marks.The second term-end exam will carry 40 marks.

Evaluation Students of class IX and X will be evaluated on a 9-point grading system. Each grade, given on the basis of both formative and summative assessments, will correspond to a range of marks as indicated below: A1-91-100 (Grade 10), A2-81 to 90 (Grade 9), B1-71 to 80 (Grade 8), B2-61to 70 (Grade 7), C1-51-60 (Grade 6), C2-41 to 50 (Grade 5), D-33 to 40 (Grade 4), E1-21 to 32, E2-20 and below.

chairperson, Neil O’ Brien says that, “Awarding grades instead of marks is absolutely not taken by us. Would the colleges and universities admit students on the basis of their grades in the school?” His take on the issue stands on a valid point as he adds on, “Unless the universities start admitting students only on the basis of grade system and all the other school education boards also follow the path, there’s no point in introducing it.”

The New System With Board exams being made optional from the academic year 2010-11, a new system of evaluation – Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation (CCE) – based on grades has been implemented. It comprises formative and 6

December-2009

Points to Remember

Important Factors

•Assessment of theory/practical papers in external subjects •In case of a tie, all the students getting the same score will shall be in numerical scores. In addition to numerical scores, the Board shall indicate grades in the marks sheets issued to the candidates in case of subjects of external examinations. In case of internal assessment subjects, only grades shall be shown.

•Subjects of internal examination in Class X - the

assessment shall be made on a five point scale i.e. A, B, C, D & E.

•The grades shall be derived from scores in case of

subjects of external examination. In case of subjects of internal assessment, they shall be awarded by the schools.

The qualifying marks in each subject of external examination shall be 33%. However at Senior School Certificate Examination, in a subject involving practical work, a candidate must obtain 33% marks in the theory and 33% marks in the practical separately in addition to 33% marks in aggregate, in order to qualify in that subject.

get the same grade. If the number of students at a score point needs to be divided into two segments, the smaller segment will go with the larger.

• Method of grading will be used in subjects where the number of candidates who have passed is more than 500.

• In respect of subjects where total number of candidates passing in a subject is less than 500, the grading would be adopted on the pattern of grading and distribution in other similar subjects.

• CBSE will use the pattern of aptitude exams for all schools which will judge the level of understanding in each subject.

• Evaluations will be made on the basis of all over performance through out the year instead of a single public exam at the end of the year.

•For awarding the grades, the Board shall put all the passed • If unwell, students will also have the option of taking an students in a rank order and will award grades as follows:

A1: Top 1/8th of the passed candidates A2: Next 1/8th of the passed candidates B1: Next 1/8th of the passed candidates

exam later.

• Students will have to pass in at least four out of five subjects.

• The grades will be A1, A2 and the lowest E, which will be regarded as failure.

B2: Next 1/8th of the passed candidates C1: Next 1/8th of the passed candidates C2: Next 1/8th of the passed candidates D1: Next 1/8th of the passed candidates

• Students with E2-grade can appear in a compartment exam.

• Emphasise on continuous and comprehensive evaluations through the year.

D2: Next 1/8th of the passed candidates

English Teaching Medium in Andhra Schools

E: Failed candidates

English will replace Telugu as the medium of teaching and the state syllabus will be replaced with the Central Board of

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School Education (CBSE) syllabus in 6,500 government-run

instruction. The Andhra Pradesh United Teachers Federation

high schools in Andhra Pradesh from the new academic year. The government said the move was aimed at shoring up standards in school education and to prepare students to strengthen their base in English medium and face competition. With IT and other knowledge-based industries throwing up many jobs in the state, the introduction of English

(UTF) and the Andhra Pradesh Teachers Federation (APTF) have opposed the move to introduce CBSE syllabus and want the government to continue with the state syllabus. They also fear that the merger of schools would also result in closure of many schools in rural areas. The Joint Action Committee of Teachers Organisations has even launched protests against

with CBSE syllabus followed by computer studies could better prepare students, especially from rural areas, for future opportunities.

merger of schools.

Education department officials said this was to ensure that students from rural schools would be at par with their counterparts studying in private English medium schools. The department issued an order introducing English as the medium of instruction with CBSE syllabus from class VI in 6,500 select schools, covering over 250,000 students. Under

and the resultant closure of schools, since it is not a small issue and needs a lot of planning; the closure of schools could also lead to an increase in the number of dropouts.

the order, students of classes VI and VII of upper primary schools which are within two kilometres radius of high schools where English would be

Eminent legislative council member Chukka Ramaiah has also cautioned against changing the syllabus in such a hurry

Ramaiah also stated that the State Government has not taken appropriate measures to familiarise the teaching staff to English language teaching; five-day training classes were conducted for namesake without any seriousness. He also pointed out that the move would make the learning process more difficult for the students. Ramaiah criticised

introduced as medium of teaching would be shifted to the nearby high schools along with teachers and other administrative staff. The authorities have also made arrangements to train the teachers who are currently teaching Telugu medium syllabus. They would undergo training in English at reputed universities and institutes in the country.

Implementation not as easy as Conception The state of affairs in Government-run schools is causing confusion to everyone. With the new academic year fast approaching, many teachers and parents are worried about the introduction of CBSE syllabus and English as medium of

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the Government’s decision to cut short the number of schools to 6,500 from the existing 10,500 schools. The government has still gone ahead with its proposed scheme of things. The education system commenced English as the teaching medium from class VI with Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) syllabus in 6,500 high schools in rural areas as a new experiment amid criticism against launching the scheme without proper trained teaching staff.

December-2009

Governing the Schools Manikya Varaprasad Reddy is man who is candid. He is sincere in his vision about school education in Andhra Pradesh and even has the courage to state that the challenge to reach the entire length and breadth of Andhra Pradesh in terms of proper and well-planned school education is indeed immense. While stating that the state’s education scenario is much better than many other states of the country, he clearly indicates that the expansion of infrastructure development has not been addressed in the right manner.

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“We have to clearly focus on infrastructure development for

educational administration, achievement levels in schools,

overall improvement. Our current focus thus is to look at varied intricate aspects of infrastructure and in terms of education, higher education schools,” he said.

financial issues, decentralisation and community ownership, review of State Education Act, rationalization of teacher deployment and recruitment of teachers, monitoring and evaluation, status of education of girls, SC/ST and disadvantaged groups, policy regarding private schools and ECCE. Many States have already carried out several changes

Noting that the situation of primary schools is alarming and enrolment is coming down primarily due to the sudden growth of private schools, he indicates that the parent’s focus is going towards English medium and they also think that government level primary school teachers are not up to the required level of their expectation. “It is a perception that the government teachers are not up to the mark. We have several good teachers across the state and the other perception of them not being paid at par with private schools is also wrong. Going by the recent pay commission, government school teachers are paid much higher salaries than private teachers,” he stated. Commenting on the few recent disruptions in proper running of schools in the twin cities due to the fee structure, he states that a committee has been appointed to look into the same and G.O has also been issued in regards to not exploit fees as there is some celing to it. “But private schools collect other fees like Building structure fees, infrastructure fess, etc. But then there are Supreme Court guidelines too and the controlling of fees is a little tough there,” he said. Pointing towards the rural-urban imbalance, Varaprasad Reddy notes that the vast difference has resulted in a huge misplacement of education. “We are trying to take necessary steps to reduce the imbalance and the government from its side is also trying to get new schemes to reach the rural areas to reduce the divide. We are also recruiting quality teachers in government schools and the situation is a bit improved than before,” he said.

Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan As part of the SSA, the central and the State governments will undertake reforms in order to improve efficiency of the delivery system. The states will have to make an objective assessment of their prevalent education system including

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to improve the delivery system for elementary education. The Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan is based on the premise that financing of elementary education interventions has to be sustainable. This calls for a long -term perspective on financial partnership between the Central and the State governments. The programme calls for community ownership of school-based interventions through effective decentralisation. This will be augmented by involvement of women's groups, VEC members and members of Panchayati Raj institutions. The Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan assigns greatest importance to the preparatory activities as these have been conceived as a necessary condition for quality implementation of the programme. Systematic mobilization of the community and creation of an effective system of decentralised decision making are part of the preparatory activities. A number of steps have already been taken in many states and it is expected that the State/ UTs which have not yet decentralised powers to Village Education Committees/ Panchayats/ Urban local bodies, would do so as a part of the preparation for implementing Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan. Through a participatory process a core planning team will be constituted in each village at the habitation level including selected VEC members, selected community leaders, NGO representatives, Head Master, selected teachers and some selected parents, ensuring participation of women as well as persons from the deprived communities. Parents of children with special needs may be included in the team. The selection of this team is very critical for effective planning.

December-2009

We present few schools in Hyderabad which fall in the top league following our survey. The quest was to find schools which have experience as well as the willingness to change according to the need of current times. Schools featured here are among those which best suited all criterion governed by set parameters. Schools which did not fill the data sheets provided to them in total were not short-listed.

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The Rating Methodology This year’s survey of Best schools in the Twin cities of Hyderabad and Secunderabad witnessed about 150 schools participating and like every year, this year too saw a renewed enthusiasm among the schools in filling the survey sheets. The methodology is primarily to float a survey sheet asking the schools to fill in all the relevant details which provide a complete picture of the school from the past five years till the present. Each detail is required to be backed by substantial proof.

The Criterion The Best schools have been identified through the parameters of Education, Faculty, Pass Percentage and Infrastructure. The selection of exceptional schools was done strictly on the basis of these parameters while abiding by the responses given by the schools. Based on these parameters along with supporting details, the schools were given an overall rating.

Rating The overall rating of a school was determined by the total points earned by respective schools, considering all the factors and then given a star rating from 1 to 5. The 5-star rating was given to a school which earned the maximum

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December-2009

points and thus awarded ‘Outstanding’, while a 4- star rating

evaluating this parameter included the faculty strength,

denoted the school to be ‘Excellent’, a 3-star rating meant that the school was awarded under the ‘Very Good’ category, a 2star meant that the school earned to be in the ‘Good’ bracket and a 1-star rating meant that the school got a ‘Fair’ rating. Under this parameter, education quality depended upon the methodology of teaching, curriculum, hours of study, number

student to teacher ratio, experience of teachers, etc. Points were distributed according to the strength of each component. For example, if a school had 50 percent teachers who are Post Graduate with B.Ed, 2 points were awarded, but if a school has 50 percent teachers with Post Graduate but lesser number of them with B Ed, 1 point was awarded.

of students, and total number of years of existence of the School. Each component was thoroughly examined to meet the respective criterion, if not; they were given grace points, in case they were just below the expected limit of qualification.

Faculty The size of faculty is directly relative to the progress of every child in a school. The components considered while

OVERALL RATING : ★

Outstanding ○

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Fair

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Good ○

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Very Good ○

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Excellent ○

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: ★

Pass Percentage The effect of Educational practices and faculty is reflected on the output. The factors considered to evaluate this parameter included the average pass percentage for the last five years, number of students passing with first class, ranks bagged by the school, etc.

Infrastructure A sound infrastructure is the need of today’s education where it is not just study material and practices, but also the facilities provided, which is of significance. This parameter considered if the school has separate playgrounds or just a general playground, the strength of the library, if there was a swimming pool in the schools, if stress was given for extracurricular activities, computer strength, etc. The Indian Express Limited has ensured that the survey sheet reached respective schools in the twin cities. Only those schools, which responded to the survey, were evaluated. Participation in the survey is the decisive factor to join the ‘Best Schools of Hyderabad 2009". Those who have nor participated in the survey have not been considered in the rating.

December-2009

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Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan’s Public School

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December-2009

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haratiya Vidya Bhavan’s Public School, a private (non-profit) institution is a 30-year old co-educational

school following CBSE curriculum. Offering education upto XII class, the school has more than 2000 students. The school has separate playgrounds for sports along with a gymnasium, tennis court and yoga classes. The library is well stocked and the computer laboratory has more than 90 computers.

Methodology of Teaching “The school is frequently updating its teaching methodology to develop creative thinking and enhance analytical faculties. Children are motivated to think in different ways and develop a spirit of enquiry, which stands them in good stead. The school adopts a variety of methods to suit the needs of the students and the methodology is altered to suit concepts being taught. Interactive sessions, discussions, role-play, dramatization, quiz, seminar, communicative approach, are some of the methods adopted for effective learning,” said C Rama Devi, Senior Principal of the school.

Admission Policy The school’s major intake is at the age of 3+ by draw of lots. Depending on the vacancies students will be taken on the basis of entrance test from classes 1 to X.

December-2009

BHARATIYA VIDYA BHAVAN’S PUBLIC SCHOOL Senior Principal: C Rama Devi Road No. 71, Jubilee Hills, Hyderabad – 33. Tel: 040-23600200, 23544934 Fax: 040-23545648 Website: www.bvbpsjh.com

RATINGS : ★

Education ○

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Overall ❘

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Outstanding ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Very Good ★ ★ ★

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: ★

Infrastructure ○

: ★

Pass Percentage ○

: ★

Faculty ○

★ ○

Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★

Good ★ ★

Fair ★

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FEES AND ADMISSION POLICY

Annual Tuition Fees LKG & UKG – Rs 12,000/I-VI – Rs 12,000/V-VII – Rs 13,800/VIII-X – Rs 15,600/XI-XII – Rs 19,200/-

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Abhyasa Residential Public School

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December-2009

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bhyasa Residential Public school is more than 10 years old and a private (non-profit) institution. A co-

educational and residential school, the school follows ICSE & ISC – Council for the Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE – New Delhi) curriculum. The school also offers IGCSE – Cambridge International Examinations (CIE-United Kingdom), which was started recently.

Admission Policy

ABHYASA RESIDENTIAL PUBLIC SCHOOL Principal: Vinaayak Kalleetla Toopran – 502334, Medak District Tel: 08454-235718/19, 235966/77 Website: www.abhyasaschool.com www.abhyasaschool.org E-mail: abhyasaschool@yahoo.com

RATINGS : ★

Education ○

Purely on order of merit:

Faculty

♦ Entrance test and viva for all the applicant students

Pass Percentage

♦ Individual interview for all the parents (Appreciation of Abhyasa systems)

♦ Performance at previous schools also considered (Minimum 60%)

Methodology of Teaching “Abhyasa children are motivated to critically question existing beliefs, identify new problems that need creative solutions and develop intuitive insights into unfathomable phenomena. Children are constantly encouraged towards innovating for beneficial application to life and are taught to effectively communicate all that they think and feel. All the activities are supported by Smart Classes enabled by Educomp Solutions Limited. Abhyasa is infact the first school in the twin-cities to introduce Smart classes in the year 2007,” said Vinaayak Kalleetla, principal of the school.

December-2009

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Overall

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Infrastructure ○

Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★

Good ★ ★

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Annual Tuition Fees Admission fee at the time of joining: Nil Annual Curriculum (tuition) fees: Rs 50,000/Annual boarding & mess fees: Rs 40,000/Books & Stationery: Rs 3,500 Student Pocket Money: Rs 1,500 (No Donation & Capitation fee)

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Jubilee Hills Public School

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December-2009

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ubilee Hills Public School is more than 20 years old and offers education upto 10th class. The school has

applied for CBSE affiliation of 11th and 12th standard. Certified with ISO 9001:2008, the school has its own bench marks to meet self-accreditation standards. The school has about 106 teachers with 36 holding Post Graduate degree with B.Ed. The student:teacher ratio currently is 33:1. The average pass percentage in the past years has been 100%.

JUBILEE HILLS PUBLIC SCHOOL I/C Principal: M Varalakshmi Block No. 3, Road No. 71, Jubilee Hills, Hyderabad – 500033 Tel: 040-23548584, 23607797 Website: www.jhpublicschool.com E-mail: info@jhpublicschool.com

RATINGS ○

Methodology of Teaching “Focus is on child-centric methodology of teaching. Teachers help students by doing method by involving students to do various lab activities, presentations, projects, debates, seminars, quiz, etc. Focus is also on all-round development of a student as he/she is exposed to various ECA and club activities like expressions club, theatre, social awareness, life skills, mathemagic, art, dance, music, sports, technology, nature club etc,” said I/C principal, M Varalakshmi.

Admission Policy Subject to availability of Vacancies, an admission test is conducted in the month of March/April and meritorious candidates are admitted.

December-2009

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Overall ❘

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Outstanding ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Very Good ★ ★ ★

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The infrastructure is excellent.

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Education

Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★

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Fair ★

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Fees Total fees for the year including one capitation, tuition, boarding, lodging expenses, in case of hostel facility. Annual Tuition Fees: (For Cl 9 to Cl 10) Rs 15,900/- payable in 3 terms (For Cl 6 to Cl 8)

Rs 14,250/- payable in 3 terms

(For Cl 1 to Cl 5)

Rs 13,200/- payable in 3 terms

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Chinmaya Vidyalaya

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December-2009

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ollowing CBSE curriculum, Chinmaya Vidyalaya is more than 10 years old and offers education upto XIIth

standard. A private (non-profit) institution, Chinmaya Vidyalaya has 1624 students in its co-educational facility.

Methodology of Teaching “Teaching is done through various methods depending on the type of the lesson. For primary classes, it is activity based collection of information, observation, seminar method demonstration by the subject teachers. Sometimes classwise quiz are conducted so that children interact and learn the concepts by play-way techniques. Children also learn by dramatisation, conducting survey and working in a group and pair-work and individual work. Children are taught by different subject software available with the subject teachers. In this context (NIIT) has provided us with all necessary software,” said Rajani Gowri Sankar, Principal of the school

Admission Policy Admissions are done through meeting sessions with parents and children for filling L.K.G seats. In higher classes (1 to 8), admissions are opened only subject to vacancy and they are filled through entrance exams, tests in English, Maths and languages. For IX to XII, admissions are done only on merit and aptitude test.

CHINMAYA VIDYALAYA Principal: Rajani Gowri Sankar Kundanbagh, Begumpet, Hyderabad – 500016 Tel: 040-23418012, 65355011

RATINGS : ★

Education ○

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Outstanding ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Very Good ★ ★ ★

Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★

Good ★ ★

Fair ★

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Annual Tuition Fees Classes I to II – Rs 10, 650/Classes III to V – Rs 11,250/Classes VI to VIII – Rs 12, 600/Classes IX to X – Rs 14,100/Classes XI to XII – Rs 16,500/-

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St Paul’s High School

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December-2009

M

ore than 20 years old, St Paul’s High School is a private (non-profit) institution offering education

upto Xth class. Following SSC curriculum, the school has more than 2000 students.

Methodology of Teaching “In order to develop a scientific outlook the methodology advocated is through reasoning observation, experimentation, probing lecture, method discussion, demonstration, analytical approach, induction or deduction method, or through a project work. Computers, maps, sketches, photographs, diagrams, OHP, CDs, visit to sites, debates; seminars, working models and graphs serve as visual teaching aides to facilitate the study of a subject. A check list is introduced at the end of each unit. It is a list of skills and abilities that are attempted to be developed by each student. It is hoped that this selfassessment will give the student a rough measure of the progress he is making,” said Rev. Bro. Show Reddy, principal of the school.

Admission policy UKG to Xth based on entrance test and subject to vacancy. LKG – Interview method. 20% of the seats are reserved for economically backward irrespective of caste, creed or religion.

December-2009

ST PAUL’S HIGH SCHOOL Principal: Rev. Bro. Show Reddy 3-6-166, Hyderguda, Hyderabad – 500029 Tel: 04023222092, 23222888 Website: www.stpaulshshyd.com www.stpaulshyd.edu.in

RATINGS : ★

Education ○

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Overall ❘

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Outstanding ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Very Good ★ ★ ★

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Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★

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Fair ★

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Annual Tuition Fees Rs 2,12, 30,655/- (From Ist to Xth) Admission fee at the time of joining: Rs 20,000/-

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Meridian School for Boys & Girls

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December-2009

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ore than 10 years old, this co-educational school follows CBSE curriculum and offers education upto the senior secondary level.

Methodology of Teaching “The teaching methodology is largely child-centric, following the latest educational practices. The methodology is planned taking into account the different learning styles depending on strengths and weaknesses of students. The flexible teaching method is appropriate to the situation and is applicable both to the individual and the whole class. Various activities like projects, field trips, discussions, role plays and other interactive activities cater to the development of multiple intelligence. Meridian is dedicated to providing opportunity to each individual so that each one can achieve their potential and become productive member of the community,” said D Usha Reddy, principal of the school.

Admission policy

MERIDIAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS & GIRLS Principal: D Usha Reddy Tel: 040-23430561 Website: www.meridianschool.in E-mail: ushameridian@rediffmail.com meridian_society@rediffmail.com

RATINGS : ★

Education ○

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: ★

Overall ❘

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Infrastructure ○

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Faculty ○

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Outstanding ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Very Good ★ ★ ★

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Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★

Good ★ ★

Fair ★

❘ ❘

Annual Tuition Fees Rs 51,000/- to Rs 70,000/-

Registration & submission of enclosures required Age Criteria: 2 ½ for nursery, 3 ½ for PPI, 4 ½ for PPII and 5

Annual mess fees: Rs 14,250/-

st

½ for standard I and so on as on 1 June of the academic session. Selection procedure: Only interviews for nursery and PPI classes. Entrance test from PPII onwards.

December-2009

27

Niraj Public School

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n ISO 9001-200 & ISOP 1400-2000 certified school, Niraj is more than 20 years old offering education

upto Xth class. A co-educational school following ICSE curriculum, the school has more than 1000 students.

NIRAJ PUBLIC SCHOOL Director of Niraj Educational Society: B Jivitesh Reddy 6-3-864, Sadat Manzil, Ameerpet, Hyderabad 16 Tel: 040-23413543 Website: www.nirajpublicschool.com

Methodology of Teaching “Niraj speaks in the voice of tomorrow in school education. Our school matches with any stream or pattern of education in the world. Niraj is catering to the study needs of students from all over the world. Teaching is completely activity based. Teachers and students work together and develop power point presentations, projects, skits etc. Teachers practice micro – teaching methods and give more opportunities for the students to explore. All the language lessons are taught through skits. Science subjects are taught through practical demonstrations and experiments. All classrooms in Middle and High school are provided with computers,” said B Jivitesh Reddy, Director at Niraj Educational Society.

Admission Policy

RATINGS : ★

Education ○

★ ○

: ★

Overall ❘

★ ○

★ ○

★ ○

★ ○

: ★

Infrastructure ○

: ★

Pass Percentage ○

: ★

Faculty ○

★ ○

★ ○

★ ❘

Outstanding ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Very Good ★ ★ ★

Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★

Good ★ ★

Fair ★

❘ ❘

Annual Tuition Fees Rs 37,000/- per annum including lunch

Nursery & LKG – Direct admission after interview UKG to X – Pre-interview will be conducted for registration after which an entrance exam is held. Final interview of qualified students & their parent is also conducted.

December-2009

29

Little Flower High School

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ore than 20 years old, Little Flower High School offers education upto Xth class. A co-educational

school, it has a total strength of more than 2000 students. Following SSC curriculum, the school’s source of institutional control is private (non-profit).

LITTLE FLOWER HIGH SCHOOL Principal: Rev. Bro. Jaico Gervasis Chirag Ali Lane, Abids, Hyderabad – 500001 Tel: 040-23202675 Website: www.lfhshyd.com

Methodology of Teaching “At Little Flower, the right ambience is created with warm, well lit, well-furnished classrooms, bulletin boards, colourful charts, cupboards and classroom computers. The teaching methodology is child-centered focussing on character formation and equipping children to meet the needs of the society. It is experiential backed by the use of audio-visual aides. PowerPoint illustrations of the lessons are used in various subjects,” said Rev. Bro. Jaico Gervasis, principal of the school.

RATINGS : ★

Education ○

★ ○

: ★

Overall ❘

★ ○

★ ○

★ ○

★ ○

: ★

Infrastructure ○

: ★

Pass Percentage ○

: ★

Faculty ○

★ ○

★ ○

★ ❘

Outstanding ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Very Good ★ ★ ★

Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★

Good ★ ★

Fair ★

❘ ❘

Admission Policy Most admissions take place in L.K.G. There is a cut-off date to ensure that the child is of proper age and to ensure certain amount of homogeneity with regard to age. Selection is done by the selection committee after meeting the parents and the child. Being a minority school, preference is given to Catholics.

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Annual Tuition Fees I to V – Rs 9000/ p.a VI to IX – Rs 9360/- p.a X – Rs 9720/- p.a

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St.Peter’s High School

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Co-educational school having successfully educated students for more than 10 years, St. Peter’s offers

education upto the Xth standard. With student strength of more than a 1000, the co-educational school is quality certified by ISO 9001:2000 and follows the SSC curriculum.

ST.PETER’S HIGH SCHOOL Principal: T Alphonse Reddy Sy. No. 2, Sitarampur, Bowenpally, Secunderabad Tel: 040-27953770 Website: www.stpeterseducation.com

Methodology of Teaching “For students, school life is about finding and embracing their own unique identity. In the classroom, therefore, our aim is to reflect not only the varied needs and abilities of all our students, but also the different stages in their intellectual, emotional and social development - all within a stimulating environment that encourages our students to become independent learners. We see the primary years as a crucial stage in building foundations for life-long and independent learning in our students. It is an exciting process and as educators, we are privileged to observe their development and discoveries on a daily basis. Our teachers adopt a highly collaborative approach to learning, which supports diverse interests and enables rich learning experiences. We focus on developing the individual talents of our students, so each may gain the skills, confidence and experience necessary to become life-long learners. They learn to embrace the modern world and make their place within it as responsible,

RATINGS : ★

Education ○

★ ○

: ★

Overall ❘

★ ○

★ ○

★ ○

★ ○

: ★

Infrastructure ○

: ★

Pass Percentage ○

: ★

Faculty ○

★ ○

★ ○

★ ❘

Outstanding ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Very Good ★ ★ ★

Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★

Good ★ ★

Fair ★

❘ ❘

Annual Tuition Fees Rs 10, 000 to 13,000/-

contributing citizens of the 21st century,” said T Alphonse Reddy, principal of the school.

December-2009

33

Kendriya Vidyalaya No. 1 Uppal

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overned by Kendriya Vidyalaya Sangathan (KVS), an autonomous body under the ministry for Human

Resource Development, KV. No. 1, Uppal is more than 20 years old institution. Offering education upto XIIth following the CBSE (NCERT) curriculum, the school currently has 1800 students.

KENDRIYA VIDYALAYA NO. 1 UPPAL Principal: G Rama Rao Tel: 040-27200314 Website: http://kv1uppal.ap.nic.in E-mail: kv1uppal_hyd@yahoo.com

RATINGS

Methodology of Teaching “Our Teaching methodology ensures the child’s exposure to a holistic education experience in an active and dynamic learning environment giving them every opportunity to identify and realise their potential and achieve excellence. Instructional strategies at primary levels are; Child centred, activity based and heuristic. Where the child is encouraged ‘to find’ and ‘do’ by himself and experience the joy and thrill of achievement. At secondary and higher secondary level, a variety of teaching learning strategies are applied which help in developing the 21st century skills,” said G Rama Rao, principal of the school.

Admission Policy Admission policies, mode of selection and procedures are transparent and are followed as per the guidelines dictated by the KVS, following the norms given viz., categories, reservations, etc. The admission schedule is displayed in the school website www.kv1uppal.ap.nic.in

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: ★

Education ○

★ ○

: ★

Overall ❘

★ ○

★ ○

★ ○

: ★

Infrastructure ○

: ★

Pass Percentage ○

: ★

Faculty ○

★ ○

★ ○

★ ❘

Outstanding ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Very Good ★ ★ ★

Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★

Good ★ ★

Fair ★

❘ ❘

Annual Tuition Fees Collected in the form of admission fee @ Rs 25/- (Tuition fee is changed for new students). Boys from classes IX to XII pay the tuition fee. However, SC/ST/KVS wards are exempted from this fee.

35

The Suitable Mantra of Coaching “Start by doing what is required, then do what is possible and you will realise that you have done the impossible” - St. Francis What used to be a religion practiced once the student finished their 10+2, has become a cult with fanatics starting entrance exam coaching from as early as their 8th and 9th grades – a time when a student is just beginning to learn Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics in their individual avatars. One year, two, or maybe even four, just how many years does it require to prepare for and make it through the IIT JEE, AIEEE and AIPMT?

36

December-2009

T

he Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) are the

premier engineering schools of the country, which almost every student and more so their parents aspires gaining admission into. Potential candidates, hopeful of securing a rank and a seat in these prestigious establishments of higher education, put themselves through the grind of tuitions and coaching for the IIT Joint Entrance Exam – a trend being followed for decades now, and a trend that is becoming more of a business venture and less of an educational aide. Candidates and their parents, who see a doctor in their future, opt for the All India Pre Medical Entrance Exam (AIPMT), and go through the rigorous coaching that precedes it. With 15 campuses as of now, the IITs have an annual intake of about 8,000 students selected through a nation-wide Joint Entrance Exam (JEE), for which nearly 400,000 students appear every year – a dismal rate of just 2% getting admission out of all the candidates. Such extreme competition is taking its toll on both the students and also their families. Students and parents alike are running to IIT Coaching Centres in the hopes that those establishments can work some wonders that could lead to an admission into an IIT. Students are putting in loads of study hours and parents are dishing out loads of coaching fees, while neither has any guarantee that all this effort will realise into their IIT dreams. The madness is not limited to the IIT JEE only, as students also sit for the All India Engineering Entrance Exam (AIEEE), hoping they will be able to secure a seat in one of the NITs or IIITs, if the IITs are not within reach. Hundreds of thousands enrol into coaching classes that prepare the student for taking these entrance exams; this massive enrolment has developed the coaching business into an industry of sorts with phenomenal amounts of money being spent by parents for their child’s bright future. It should not come as too big a surprise to know for a fact that some of the instructors at well established and renowned coaching centres are earning multitudes more than actual professors that are part of IIT faculty; in most cases, these instructors are ex-IITians or ex-faculty of IITs, making good money from

December-2009

this business of entrance exam coaching. The Entrance Exams The Joint Entrance Examination (JEE) conducted by the Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) to admit students into engineering and science courses, is one of the toughest examinations conducted at the 10+2 level. The current pattern consists of two objective type papers each containing mathematics, physics and chemistry sections. The syllabus of the examination is predominantly based on topics covered by the CBSE Board Examination (AISSCE) and the ISC Board Examination. The pattern of questions in JEE is deliberately variable so as to minimize the chance of students getting selected by cramming up the probable questions. As it is objective type questions, optical mark recognition answer sheets have been adopted since 2006. In previous years, there were separate mathematics, physics and chemistry papers, each of two hours’ duration that contained both subjective and objective questions. The current pattern is adopted so as to reduce the students’ stress. Given the importance attached to the JEE by students all over India, the IITs follow a rigorous procedure when conducting it every year. The exam is set by the JEE Committee (consisting of a group of faculty members drawn from the admitting colleges) under the tightest security. Multiple sets of question papers are framed and the set that is to actually be used on the day of the exam is known to only about five individuals. In the past, the JEE has been noted for originality in its questions. The All India Pre Medical Test (AIPMT) is a yearly college entrance examination conducted by the CBSE for admission to MBBS and BDS courses in several medical colleges around the country. Presently, 15% of the total seats in all medical and dental colleges, except in the states of Andhra Pradesh and Jammu and Kashmir, are reserved for candidates who qualify this examination. Recently reservations for SC, ST and OBC have been undertaken in AIPMT. It consists of exams conducted in two phases; first preliminaries in April, then

37

main examinations in the month of May. AIPMT is equivalent

conceptual understanding approach. Good coaching centres

to All India Engineering Entrance Examination (AIEEE), which is also conducted by CBSE for entrance to engineering colleges in India. The pattern of AIPMT is being changed with effect from 2010. Due to complaints about the unreliability of the subjective exams, the tests are to be made completely objective like the prelims. More difficult and application-level

start to instil the basic understanding approach back into the students, thus providing what the high schools and junior colleges have been unable to. Thanks to some of these good coaching centres, the number of students appearing for and qualifying through JEE and AIPMT, from Hyderabad, has been regularly increasing.

questions can be expected. Assertion-reason questions may be included as in AIIMS. About 1900 MBBS and 250 odd dental seats are available through AIPMT, but ranks up to 2500 can reasonably hope for selection due to overlap with other entrances.

But with these good coaching centres, come the ones that have brought a bad name to the education industry. Taking advantage of the helpless situation of students and parents,

The Right Approach To be successful in these entrance examinations, a student should first master the fundamentals of intermediate (10+2) syllabus, followed by attempts to get into the depth of the subject by solving relevant short but twisted problems from various text books. Potentially, attending a good coaching centre could boost an individual’s rank or help get a rank in the first place. Parents and students have to realise, though, that a coaching centre can never be a substitute for intelligence and hard work. In objective type examinations, it is enough for the student to know which answer, among the four choices, is correct. To get through the national entrance exams, the student should know why the remaining three choices are incorrect. The comprehension type questions of JEE and AIPMT demand a much thorough understanding of the subject and a student needs to develop basic aptitude towards mathematics, physics and chemistry. This aptitude is best developed among students at the High School level; unfortunately most schools prefer encouraging students to cram the studies into their heads instead of adopting the 38

these unworthy institutes operate by instilling fear of the entrance exams into parents and students. The result of this misguidance leads the students to believe that they need to learn a lot more subject matter and spend a lot more time than they actually have to. The obvious side effects of this have been the decrease in student efficiency (brain drain) and a drastic decrease in the amount of time and effort spent on necessary, intermediate (10+2) education. This trend, off late, has lead to unhealthy, cut-throat competition among students, and the overall development of the child is regressed due to lack of sports and other extra curricular activities. The lure of this better higher education has resulted in parents believing that these coaching centres are the only means of getting into a prestigious college; permitting them this authority on the child’s welfare has allowed additional leeway for some of the coaching centres to abuse this power. By depicting intermediate education to be of secondary importance and not as the essential foundation needed for higher education, such coaching centres have stood to benefit from hapless students and parents, in turn creating December-2009

below par graduation results. The worst effected of this bad trend are the students who are moderately

intelligent and stand a chance to succeed in this competitive environment only when they get the maximum benefit from their basic academics taught at school. A vast majority of students are from this moderate category and are spending their time and money on the incorrect priorities, sometimes leading to failure, while the coaching centres benefit from the success of the few extremely bright students who would succeed anyway. Perfection in the intermediate syllabus, followed by practicing complicated problems based on the simple basics is the correct modus operandi for achieving success in the entrance exams.

to coaching being imparted from as early as 8th standard, under the term ‘foundation course’, which is quite ironical since the real foundation is meant to start from the 10th standard and gets completed through intermediate education. Some coaching academies feel that parents have a wrong thinking that children should take up the preparatory coaching only during their intermediate days. According to them, if one really aspires to join any of the IITs, then the preparation process should start from as early as the 8th standard onwards. Their belief is that preparation for IIT-JEE or AIEEE is all about honing one’s analytical skills and has nothing to do with mugging up a few lessons. The minds have to be stimulated to apply logic over a problem; so they have started the ‘foundation course’ for students from 8th to 10th standards. The coaching methodology is totally different, such coaching institutes claim, and apart from making the students think, the coaching makes them go deep into the subject. Their opinion is that any IIT aspirant should study six to eight hours on their own at home, apart from the daily grind in an institute or at their school.

Academicians and IIT instructors feel that solving a problem is important and more important is doing it within the set time limit. This comes only by practice, not by reading alone. Depending on the grasping power of an individual, he/she can achieve this either by sitting at home or by attending effective coaching classes. Neglecting intermediate syllabus and attending coaching centres which dump inappropriate high standard educational material on students will continue to be a hostile combination. The Right Time Many years ago, the preferred way adopted by students was to complete intermediate and then prepare for JEE or PMT through coaching centres for a year. Times changed and students, at the behest of their parents, started enrolling in coaching classes from their 11th and 12th standards, in an attempt to be better prepared. The trend nowadays has shifted December-2009

How all this can be possible is anyone’s guess, if a student has to attend school, coaching classes and also study at home; this is a sure-shot recipe for complete disaster and will play havoc on the child’s social and physical development. A child needs to experience school the way it’s meant to be, to ensure their overall development, and to ensure they come out with flying colours with their intermediate results. The Intermediate years are the most crucial in a student’s academic life, and the IITs are not the ‘be all and end all’ of engineering institutes. Many students opt to take admissions into regional engineering colleges also, which give them the advantage of being a big fish in a small pond, greatly enhancing their recruitment potential.

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International Schools International school concept has spread fast in the twin cities. There are many schools now which claim to be in the league. We give you few of those established schools in the arena who have an entire bouquet to offer in terms of international education. This section is not a rating, but a random selection of schools which have stood apart for its education policy, facilties, infrastructure, among others.

Jain Heritage Cambridge School

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December-2009

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he Jain Heritage School follows the simple motto of Learn: Explore: Imagine. “Teaching your child to lead

is one thing. Inspiring them to become a leader, quite another,” is the philosophy that Jain Heritage has created for itself. With a built up area of 50,000 sq. ft on its campus, the school has about 400-500 students that are in a 10:1 ration with their teachers, with maximum class sizes of 25 students. Provisions include yoga for the students, well stocked library, an auditorium, laboratories, computers and dancing/singing activities. Affiliated with International Pre-School Alliances, the CBSE, New Delhi and the IGCSE Cambridge University UK, the school has incorporated a range of curricula in its teaching. The Pre-Primary, Nursery & KG Classes are conducted with Toddlers International Play School Curriculum; for grades 1-6, the curricula taught is both CBSE and IGCSE; and for grades 7 through 9 the curriculum is Cambridge IGCSE.

with progress charts, so that every receiving teacher is aware of attainment levels, experience, progress rate and special needs. They indicate areas of work done together with notes relating to strengths, special needs, talents, interests, communication skills, social skills, punctuality, attendance and other relevant information.

Jain Heritage a Cambridge School Principal – K. Lakshmi Rao Survey No.187, Besides Deccan Chronicles Holdings Ltd, Kondapur, Hyderabad – 84, Ph. 040-32525252 www.jainheritage.in

Fees and Admission Policy At the pre-primary level, students are interviewed for admissions; from 1st grade onwards, the admissions are granted on basis of intelligence tests. Annual tuition fees is Rs. 45,000 and Mess fees is Rs. 12,000 for a year.

Students are carefully monitored and assessed throughout the year. Each student goes through the various levels in school

December-2009

43

Niraj International School

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N

iraj International School had just begun its journey on July 2009 with a dream of spreading International

standard education right from the roots. Sourced as a private institution the school is floated with a non-profit intention of imparting education with the highest standards in the world. Presently the school is at the nascent stage of primary level but has plans to grow eventually up to class-XII. The Curriculum followed by the school is IB PYP which is a child friendly curriculum with emphasis on individual attention. The school is seeking affiliation with International Baccalaureate Organization at Geneva. Initially the school has started with Nursery, Senior KG and standards from Grade I to VI. The study hours for Nursery-Sr.KG and Grades I-VI are 24 hours and 36 hours respectively. The school conducts six weekly tests to assess the Child’s learning ability. The school has employed well experienced and highly qualified teachers. Presently the school has a total of 18 teachers. Besides subject and class teachers these include Dance teacher, Music Teacher, Art and Craft, Physical education and Information Technology teacher.

December-2009

For the academic year 2008-09, the school had a proposed student to teacher ratio of 10:1, but at present the students are enjoying 1:1 luxury. With 100 percent retention, the school had enrolled 17 fresh students for the academic year 2009-10. The school has spacious cricket, football, and basketball playgrounds along with an indoor Badminton courts. In addition to these facilities it also has a swimming pool and a Tennis court. The school also has a well furnished Physics, Chemistry, Biology labs along with an auditorium to accommodate 500-1000 students. Admission is through a combination of oral/written tests where students are assessed based on languages comprehension and communication skills.

Annual tuition fee ; Rs. 75,000/NIRAJ INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Principal: H.G. Pant 132, 133, Kandlakoya, Medchal (MD), R.R.District Phone: 08418-260476, 9618553366 Website: www.nirajinternationalschool.com

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Oakridge International School

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December-2009

O

The teacher continuously assesses the student in the class

Oakridge international School follows International Baccalaureate primary years programme for students aged 3 to 12 which focuses on the development of the whole child as an inquirer, both in the classroom and in the world outside.

The number of study hours for 9 and 10 standard students is 170 hours over two year while for XI and XII standards it is 120 hours for HL courses and 90 hours for SL courses.

akridge International School believes in holistic approach toward education. Though the school

adheres to the syllabus set by the CBSE, the approach and methodology is of a student centric approach, where in the teacher acts as a facilitator and the students find the answers to their queries through research.

The school has incorporated a range of curricula in its teaching. For grades 1-6, the curricula taught is both CBSE and IGCSE; and for grades 7 through 9 the curriculum is

not only for academic competency but also the social behavior and emotional attributes. Other than academics children are exposed to different activities like Yoga, dance, drama, music etc for the all-round development of the children.

The total annual fees for each student ranges from 75, 000 to 2.5 lakhs.

Admission policy

Cambridge IGCSE.

Admission is based on merit and selection process involves observation or an aptitude analysis followed by an interaction.

The curriculum is concept based and tries to develop

OAKRIDGE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

International mindedness in students. Total number of teachers in the school is 232 of which 190 are PGTs and 42 are Graduate teachers.

Principal: Capt. Rohit Sen Bajaj Khajaguda, Golconda Post, Cyberabad, Hyderabad-50008

The student to teacher ratio is 12:1. The average number of students in each class is 25. New students enrolled for the academic year 2009-10 is 427.

December-2009

Phone: 404-20042460/61 Web: www.oakridge.in

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Sreenidhi International

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December-2009

S

reenidhi International School currently offers both ICSE (Delhi, India) and IGCSE (CIE, U.K) streams,

under the guidance of well qualified teachers. Sreenidhi International School is a candidate school for the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme for students who will be qualified to pursue Grades XI and XII; this school is pursuing authorisation as an IB World School also. They have two campuses - one at Jubilee hills offering grades from Nursery to 5th and another at Aziznagar, built on a sprawling 60 acres eco - friendly environment.

With facilities for cricket, football and basket ball already setup, the school is readying its indoor badminton courts. These apart, sporting activities are also ably supported by a swimming pool, tennis courts and yoga. The library consists of more than 3000 books and the computer lab offers more then 30 terminals, ensuring a system for each student.

SREENIDHI INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Principal: V. Srinivasan, H.No.8-2-293/82/A, Plot No.727, Road No.37, Jubilee Hills, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh. Pincode: 500 033, TeleFax: 91 40 23 55 23 62 / 23 55 54

The curriculum at Sreenidhi is structured in a manner that keeps the child engaged with the ever-changing world trends, right from the early years to the senior level. They continuously reinvent and appraise the teaching-learning strategy to create the most appropriate educational opportunities that the child deserves. Instructional strategies are student-centred and include active learning, inquiry,

23; Mobile: 91 9912345042 / 9948813000 www.sreenidhiinternational.com

experience-based learning, cooperative and participative learning activities. Sreenidhi is an International school with Indian ethos that lay emphasis on Logical Thinking and Effective Communication, may it be written or oral, and also activities that reach beyond academics.

Admission Policy

December-2009

Fees and Admission Policy Annual Tuition Fees: Ranges from Rs. 90,000 to Rs. 1,90,000 for ICSE; Rs. 2,60,000 for the IGCSE curriculum; all inclusive of tuition, food, uniforms, transport, stationery etc.

Admissions are done through entrance exam and personal interviews

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ADVERTORIAL

Panel Discussion The education system of the nation is undergoing some extensive renovation. CBSE’s new grading procedure to have a knowledge centric evaluation system; the Andhra government’s GO 91, asking private schools to regulate the collection of fees; the Reservation Act specifying 25% seats in private schools for poor children; and the 6th Pay Commission introduced to hike teachers’ salaries in government schools – all are some of the burning issues of the present day scenario, with many pros and cons associated with each. Views and opinions of professional educationalists were sought on these issues, and are presented in the following pages.

Not Exam centric but Knowledge centric Union Human Resources Development minister Kapil Sibal has taken a revolutionary step to ease the pressure of examination on the students and made the system not examination centric but knowledge centric. What impact does the introduction of a new grading system have on the overall schooling system? Is it a boon or bane for the students and the education system?

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December-2009

REV. BRO. JAICO GERVASIS, PRINCIPAL, LITTLE FLOWER HIGH SCHOOL

D

ecimation of knowledge and exams to assess the level of reception and application are inseparable. The questions asked, their objectives and pattern are more important and effective than grading. Marks would be more precise, while Grades would be less precise and if given without assigning marks the grading could be subjective. There can be unhealthy competition and comparison even for one mark, but with grades competition and comparison could still be there but lesser. Competitive edge would be more and accordingly the level of performance higher with marks; with grades overall level of performance might decline. Grades can be assigned in different ways. Marks can be assigned first and then grades later based on the percentages or percentile score. Getting lower grades than expected can sometimes lead to greater disappointments than getting a few marks less. It may be good initially to give marks alongside grades and make a study of the impact it makes before only grades are given. December-2009

C. RAMA DEVI, PRINCIPAL, BHARATIYA VIDYA BHAVAN’S PUBLIC SCHOOL

U

nion HRD Minister Kapil Sibal has taken a revolutionary step to make the education system knowledge centric and not exam centric. This undoubtedly eases the pressure on students. The impact on the overall schooling system will be fine if the grading system is completely absorbed by the teachers and the students. The new process of evaluation reflects all components of personality of an individual. As for the teachers, their role has widened. They’ll not only be evaluating the students in curriculum but also in co-scholastic areas. The Evaluation of CBSE aims at addressing this in a holistic manner; it may take a year or two to assimilate the system. Encouraging the child to be communicative, creative, analytical and questioning will take them a long way. In the end it is not just the marks that matter, but also how the child deals with life.

D. USHA REDDY, PRINCIPAL, MERIDIAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS AND GIRLS

T

he present examination system is an unfair judgment of a student’s performance on a given day and how he is able to spill out from memory. It fails to assess the child’s talents in many other aspects such as sports, life skills, aesthetic abilities and other achievements. The shift to grading system will ease the pressure on students to a large extent and bring down the cut throat competition for a single mark, as the grading system will have a wider range i.e., 91% to 100 % will be an A1 grade and so on. The new continuous and comprehensive evaluation will not only reflect on all aspects of learning and achievement of the student but will be school based as well. However, students need to remain focused and not take the new system too lightly. It is definitely a boon for the students who are unable to perform well as they get multiple chances to improve their scores without the embarrassment of failing in the external exams.

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potential. In order to do this every educational institution should design their curriculum where there will be complete involvement of all the students enrolled with them. School curriculum should attempt at making the child a good citizen, who can eventually contribute to social, cultural and economical betterment of the society. K LAKSHMI RAO, PRINCIPAL, JAIN HERITAGE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL “Education is what remains after one has forgotten everything he learned in school” - Albert Einstein. This quote is appropriate to express my view that school education can’t be exam centric but it should be knowledge centric.

T

he Present scenario is quite alarming as the true sense of education is getting extinct and most of the educational institutions are working like factories to produce results and top rankers rather than scholars who acquire knowledge. As academicians we know that purpose of education is the all round personality of child .But present day education is neither imparting the true knowledge of life to be an independent self to face the world boldly nor improving the talents of a child by which one achieves laurels in the field of interest. I would like to focus on the two major points incorporated in X Five year Plan 2002-2007-

♦ Full flowering of potentials of each

child through a humanizing/ sensitizing education: This stresses on the optimum utilization of child’s 56

♦ Developing cognitive and critical

skills in each child : Every educational institute must structure it’s curriculum to focus primarily on providing essential skills that may be of social and economical use even if they discontinue their schooling for various reasons. The child at any point of time must be in a position to be independent. Harmonious development of child’s personality in an atmosphere of happiness and love should be the motto of education. If all the educational institutions and the school managements do understand and follow them by word and spirit, this lamentable situation of running the rat race to produce the results wouldn’t have arised. We need to appreciate the bold initiative of Hon’ble HRD Minister Sri.Kapil Sibal in trying to minimize the pressure on the adolescents by making Grade X Board examination optional .Certainly it’s an eye opener to all the conventional academicians and aspirant parents who believed that examination results are the yard sticks to assess the potential of child as well as the schools. Though there was a

huge uproar when he announced this ,as a “natural resistance to change by any human being”, educationists started looking into this issue with different perspective and I am sure that true academicians would appreciate his strong stand of destressing the whole educational process. The C.B.S.E initiative in introducing Formative assessment is highly appreciable. We need to know the repercussions in being judgmental about the child based on summative test performance ,as the child may be/may not be physically /mentally fit on the given day to take the test which automatically reflects on child’s performance .Hence, under no circumstances exam should be the yard stick to assess the child. Education is incomplete without training the child to be an independent being who will be able to think critically and solve problems with his logical thinking and reasoning ability. All these 21 st century skills will be developed among the students only when the curriculum focuses on all round development rather than the academic Excellency. Education should focus on the three domains of child. Cognitive, Affective and psycho motor. Cognitive domain involves knowledge and the development of individual skills. Affective domain involves attitude and psycho motor skills involve physical or manual skills. The recent trends say that E.Q /Emotional Quotient is more important than Intelligent Quotient. Even if the I.Q level of the child is quite high December-2009

and if he lacks Emotional Quotient and positive attitude that child will be a failure absolutely in his life. The philosophy & planning of government in creating opportunities to all is highly commendable, yet when it comes to implementation part, it is unable to take strong strands in sanctioning permission to run the schools. The schools are mushrooming up with no strong vision, mission and goal. The main purpose of such mushrooming schools is to make money at the earliest. They are not bothered about the development of the child. Their major concern is to pocket profits. As long as the government is sanctioning permission to such institutions and as long as parents are thrusting their aspirations and dreams on their children, forgetting that each child an entity on it’s own, and each child has his/her likes and dislike this rat race goes on. Yet another major issue in this regard is the quality of teachers. Today’s teachers are not teachers of choice; they are teachers of compulsion which in turn reflects on their performance in the school. Most of them follow the “Bill & the Bell” policy. They are not considering teaching Profession as a Noble one. One major point they forget is that they are dealing with human beings and not machines. An Engineer can fault, software personnel may fault but if a teacher faults the consequence will be fatal.

December-2009

I

n essence, grading is an exercise in professional judgment on the part of teachers. It actually involves the collection and evaluation of evidence on students’ achievement or performance over a specified period of time.

REV. BRO. SHOW REDDY, PRINCIPAL, ST. PAUL’S HIGH SCHOOL, HYDERABAD

The impact of introducing a new grading system on the overall schooling system is really Boon for the students and the education system as well. Prior to introduction of new grading system wide variation was observed in grading practices that led to a gradual move away from percentage scores to scales that had fewer and larger categories such as Excellent, Good, Average and poor while the other scale had letters indicating the grades as A, B, C, D and F. To ensure fairer distribution of grades, the idea of grading was based on the normal probability where students were ranked according to their proficiency. A top percentage was assigned grade A the next percentage grade B and so on. Although teachers generally try to develop grading policies that are honest and fair their practices vary widely, even among those who teach at the same grade level within the same school. Grading method of evaluation serves the purpose of communicating the

achievement status of students to their parents and other interested parties providing information to students for self evaluation, identifying the students for certain educational paths, documenting the students’ performance to evaluate the effectiveness of instructional programmes. Using letter grades requires the abstraction of great deal of information into a single symbol. In addition, the cut-offs between grades are always arbitrary and difficult to justify. Letter grades also lack the richness of other more detailed reporting methods such as percentage scores. Parents often are left wondering if their child’s achievement is comparable with that of other children or in line with the teacher’s expectations. The issue of introduction of grading system of evaluation continues to challenge educators. However, to develop a grading practice that provides quality information about student learning requires clear thinking and careful planning.

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The Fee Quandary The Andhra Pradesh State Government has issued the Government order 91 which stipulates that the fee prescribed for the last academic year is collected instead of the enhanced ones. There is an uncomfortable rift between the schools and the parent body on this issue. Certain private educational institutions are exploiting the parents by hiking fee indiscriminately and some of them also luring them with attractive names such as IIT Olympiad / Concept / e-Techno / eshastra etc and collecting exorbitant fees. In this situation, it is felt by the Government that there is every need to regulate the collection of fee by Private unaided Schools. What is the whole dilemma about and what are the effects if GO 91 is followed by schools and how will it benefit the students and parents?

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international education bodies such as IB and Cambridge International. The money invested ahs to be recovered to be further invested into the growth of the institution. A part wishing to take his children to

H.G. PANT, PRINCIPAL, NIRAJ INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

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private schools instead of the so-called free schools run by the government must be willing to pay for quality education. Schools must be free to decide what fee they charge commensurate with the facilities and

e live in a free democratic country practicing open economy. Socialism is a very high sounding idealistic, utopian concept which failed miserably in the former Soviet Union and in many other

quality they offer. Let there be fair and fierce competition and parents should decide which school they wish to take their children to depending on what they can afford to pay. Such fierce competition based on the quality and

countries around the world.

facilities offered will result into only the best of the lot surviving and thriving successfully while pretender will sink into oblivion.

The very word regulation and control go against the grain of free economy. If regulations and control and the talk of socialism could take us to the Promised Land, we all would be there already. It is ironical that on one hand we hear all talk of encouraging independent private, enterprise and then regulation control on the other. Private schools do not receive a single rupee grant/ aid from the government and invest astronomical sums in setting up institutions which have truly world class infrastructure, in recruiting and training a qualified faculty, and providing quality education to the interested students, besides paying hefty recurring affiliation fees to the December-2009

We have seen it happening into areas of telecom and other service industries and the customers are the direct beneficiary of such a competition. I would sincerely advise the government to concentrate on providing quality education in government-run schools and affordable fees or no fees, and let the private schools wake up to the competition. No one dictates to Harvard and Stanford universities what fees they should charge, and yet the aspiring students queue up to gain entry to these institutions.

C. Rama Devi, Principal, Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan The fee structure of any school is decided on the infrastructure and facilities available and also the studentteacher ratio. Hence most schools collect fees as per their standards. Parents too get a wide choice to select a school for their wards depending on their affordability. AC classrooms, AC buses, computers for the students, call for an increase in the fee structure. Regulating the fees may hamper the growth of the school as it may put restrictions on the development.

Capt. (IN) Alokesh Sen, Principal, Hyderabad Public School, Begumpet Education is a service that schools are selling to the parents within the ethics and morals of their uniqueness. For quality service, schools require quality infrastructure and quality teachers. The quality of education should always form the bottom line of the fixation of the fees.

Vinaayak Kalleetla, Principal, Abhyasa Residential Public School It is a fundamental right for any educational institution to impart education of the standards it deems fit, and it is up to the parents to accept or reject it. In a similar way, why is the government not regulating the fees structure of private hospitals?

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The Reservation Act The government has introduced 25% reservation seats for weaker sections in the country for obtaining proper education. The bill makes education a fundamental right of every child between the ages of 6 to 14 and specifies the minimum norms in government schools. It also specifies reservation of 25% seats in private schools for children from poor families, prohibits the practice of unrecognized schools, and makes provisions for no donation or capitation and no interview of the child or parent for the admission. What would be the implications of the same towards students, schools as well as the education scenario on the whole?

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December-2009

T

he Andhra Pradesh Government issues a Government Order(GO) which regulates the fees

PRATIMA SINHA, PRINCIPAL, HILLSIDE ACADEMY

T

he whole scenario of basic education is grounded in the principles of “Sarvodaya”; it was envisaged as all inclusiveness and not just oriented to the elite but to the needs of the weakest & poorest section of the society. Universal & Compulsory education is the birthright of every child whether rich or poor, the rural and the urban. A child coming from the weaker section can also be highly intellectual. The problem is schools like to put the excess baggage of their work on the parent and thus prefer parent who is educated. If nothing else scholarship should be offered to the deserving students. Integrating children from the weaker sections of society is important as the world is full of people at the top who have not had any formal education but due to their inner strength, determination and intellect have reached their desired goals. We as the responsible citizens of the country should not be just an onlooker but an active participant in its growth and every body should be given an equal opportunity.

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private school can charge, and the central Government, makes it mandatory for every private school to reserve 25 percent

H.G. PANT, PRINCIPAL, NIRAJ INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

seats to children from weaker section of the society. While it sounds so good, it is a double whammy for the private schools and will seriously affect their operating revenue. It will also have to take into account the programme a school offers and whether children joining under this quota will really benefit from it. For instance, a school such as our runs an International programme and the medium of instruction is English throughout. It is also debatable whether parents of these children will be able to provide the required enabling environment at home. Further, there are two categories of private schools—those which have received land from the government on hugely subsidized rate, and the 100 percent private schools, which depend on their resources solely. In my opinion, this clause of a mandatory 25 percent reservation should not only be applied but enforced on the schools which obtained Government land on the promise of helping the children from the weaker section of the society.

The principle of fairness demands that those institutions which have taken no benefit from the government be exempted from this ruling. If the government forces its ruling is on schools, who will compensate the school for the loss of revenue? Will a school charging Rs.150,000/- per year for a day-scholar be compensated by the government on a proportionate basis? Who will pay for the school uniform, co-curricular activities programme, etc.? Unless there issues are addressed very honestly, the revenue base of the truly private institutions will be seriously compromised with a telling effect on the quality of education they provide, and it will be a huge disincentive for private player who may then rethink on their continuing or otherwise in the education sector. I would strongly suggest that the governments which spend so much of tax-payer’s money on well-equipped, well-staffed but poorly managed Government schools set their own house in order and ensure that these schools’ standards improve.

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Paying the Tutor While teaching has been considered one of the most respectable jobs among all, it is a bitter truth that it is the least rewarding in terms of salaries, especially in the government run schools. The 6th Pay Commission has outlined the need for raising the salary brackets. Will it bring some respite to them or will it be another eye wash? What should be done for a more enhanced salary package?

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C. Rama Devi, Principal, Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan The 6th Pay Commission has been introduced by the government based on various criteria and hence schools too

REV. BRO. SHOW REDDY, PRINCIPAL, ST. PAUL’S HIGH SCHOOL

T

he 6th Pay commission has outlined the need of raising the salary brackets of teachers with government schools to bring in more streamlined salary package. The need for raising the salary brackets of teachers on par with the government teachers has brought in great respite in spite of certain anomalies in pay fixation which was rectified later by the government in various notifications. Some reputed private un-aided schools of the state are following the pay package brackets of the government in toto contrary to some of the private schools which do not follow the salary structure laid by the government. To meet the demand of the uniform salary package as recommended by the commission, the private managements need to introduce a balance fee structure which is the only source of income to pay the salaries to the teachers. Kapil Sibal recommended a uniform syllabus for the state and central schools in the entire country, similarly a uniform salary package could be recommended. December-2009

should make provisions in their budget to implement the revisions for their staff. The need for raising the salary brackets of teachers has been clearly defined by the 6th Pay Commission and teachers who are considered as Nation Builders certainly deserve a better pay package. To streamline the salary package the schools can have a criteria for the performance level of a teacher which will definitely motivate a teacher to do better and also consider the living index. The raising of the salary bracket for teachers will attract more people towards the teaching profession rather it being the last resort for some. The 6th Pay Commission is not an eye-wash and has come at just the right time.

Capt. (IN) Alokesh Sen, Principal, Hyderabad Public School, Begumpet The schools may follow any pay commission for allotting salaries to their teachers, but the bottom line will always be that unless the school pays well, the good teaching talents will neither be attracted nor retained.

builders of the nation and the society. It is said that, “If you pay peanuts, you get monkeys.” So why complain of the poor quality of education and teaching if you do not want to pay for it?

M. Varalakshmi, Principal, Jubilee Hills Public School The 6th Pay Commission has outlined the need for raising the salary bracket of teachers as they are the least paid professionals. With costs of living going higher every day, it is difficult for a teacher to survive in this profession and deal with the stress leading to ‘brain drain’. Therefore, implementation of better pay for teachers is the need of the hour.

G. Rama Rao, Principal, Kendriya Vidyalaya No.1, Uppal There is undoubtedly a quantum jump in salaries of teaching faculty particularly in KV’s but with the spiraling prices and cost of living in emerging economy that the nation has embarked upon, the payment requires a substantial hike. It should be graciously noted that the western countries have been paying handsome salaries to the teachers for the primary and secondary level keeping in mind the Herculean

Vinaayak Kalleetla, Principal, Abhyasa Residential Public School

task of moulding and shaping the pedagogy and tapping their talents like a pot maker. They aptly deserve any better package so that they are economically well off to render better services to the society. Therefore the

Teachers deserve a better deal; they

hike in payment will go a long way.

are the least paid among the hierarchy of professions. But they are also the 63

Tapping into the Multiple Intelligences of our Children! structure needed for assessments that take stock of and highlight the many facets of the student’s whole intellect. Multiple intelligences (MI) theory describes the human mind as possessing at least eight distinct forms of intelligence. These intelligences include linguistic, logical-mathematical (both traditional IQ – related abilities), visual-spatial, kinesthetic, musical, naturalist, intrapersonal, and interpersonal. What exactly does the MI profile look into? Our schools and culture focus most of their attention on linguistic and mathematical intelligence. However, the Multiple Intelligence theory says that we should also place equal attention on individuals who show gifts in the other intelligences: the artists, architects, musicians, naturalists, dancers, entrepreneurs and others who enrich the world in which we live. Thus the multiple intelligence approach proposes a major transformation in the way our schools are run, says Chandrashekar D P, COO - Jain Group of Institutions Before we move any further let us first understand what is this Multiple Intelligence Theory all about? The Multiple Intelligence is a powerful

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proven theory that teaches that the intellectual potential of each student’s mind is best described multidimensionally, and that it would be superficial misrepresentation to look only at typical tests of academic performance when judging student potential. What is its practical value in a student’s life? Institution that makes the development of self-understanding, an explicit part of their instruction and curriculum give students powerful tools for current and lifelong learning. Howard Gardner’s multiple intelligence (MI) theory articulates exactly the kind of global

The profile consists of eight main scales tied to the multiple intelligences, along with 26 subscales that describe specific skill domains within each. For example, the musical main scale includes four subscales: vocal, musical appreciation, instrumental, and composing. The subscales provide a rich source of information from the student’s point of view that is rarely available in a normal graphic chart. There are also intellectual style scales that describe the strength of three general preferences: Leadership, General Logic, and Innovation.

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A careful review of the subscales can play an important role in understanding a student’s MI profile because they can reveal strengths and nuances that are otherwise hidden. For example, Saachi may be an accomplished vocalist, but may have only a moderate score on the musical main scale because of her very low instrumental ability. Her very high innovative scale would suggest that she tends more toward the creative than the technical aspects of music and singing. How does this detailed understanding of a student then translate into better career and life choice?

Traditional View

Multiple Intelligence View

People are born with a fixed amount of intelligence.

Human beings have all of the intelligences, but each person has a unique combination, or profile.

Intelligence levels do not change over a lifetime.

We can all improve each of the intelligences, though some people will improve more readily in one intelligence area than in others.

Intelligence consists of ability in logic

There are many more types of

and language.

intelligence which reflect different ways of interacting with the world.

Teachers teach the same material to

Teachers teach and assess differently

everyone.

– based on individual intellectual strengths and weaknesses.

Teachers teach a “topic” or “subject”

Teachers structure learning activities around an issue or question and connect subjects. Teachers develop strategies that allow for students to demonstrate multiple ways of understanding and value their

119 questions that inquire about the developed skill, level of participation, and expressed enthusiasm for a wide variety of activities naturally encountered in the daily lives of students and adults, ranging from practical activities such as map reading and technical writing to creative endeavours in the arts to solving social-emotional problems like conflict negotiation and stress management. The Midas process has three goals: first, to educate students (and other stakeholders) about the eight multiple intelligences: second, to obtain a realistic description of the student’s strengths and limitations through an MI assessment: and third, to connect MI strengths to learning activities and

December-2009

uniqueness. career paths that will maximise success. These interpretative activities are detailed in several of Howard Gardner’s books for students, teachers, counsellors, psychologists, and

We must regard intellectual ability more broadly. Things like drawing a picture, composing, listening to music, or watching a performance can be vital avenues of learning, and as important

parents.

as writing and mathematics.

Now let us understand how different this

We must provide opportunities for

concept of ‘Multiple Intelligence’ in education is in comparison to the traditional view of intelligence. See box.

authentic learning based on the students’ needs, interests, and talents. The multiple intelligence classroom acts like the “real” world. Students become more active and involved learners.

To conclude lets retain values but rewrite rules:

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ADVERTORIAL

International Education Myths vs Facts demarcation between aspects of Formation and Information, is what makes a school preferred over the rest. Let us picture ourselves in the year 2025, sixteen years from today. The little children of today, will have completed their education and will be about to venture out to face the big, wide world outside. The world

The suffix “International” is a widely misused word in today’s educational scenario. Many institutions use this phrase liberally and give an erroneous impression to the general public but on closer enquiry it is revealed that they neither follow an international curriculum, nor have an international faculty or students. Most schools use the term to enhance their image and equate “International” with perhaps air-conditioned class-rooms, swimming pool, and many more such fittings and fixtures. Truth cannot be farther than this. H.G. Pant – Principal, Niraj International School gives an insight into the myths and facts about international education.

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e live in exciting times where knowledge is increasing day by day at an exponential rate. We call it the knowledge explosion. The pace of events is fast indeed. So fast, that today’s latest becomes obsolete tomorrow. In an effort to cope with knowledge explosion, at times education is sadly relegated to mere gathering of facts and information and in the process, children’s creativity is compromised. We strongly believe that true education is much more than just collecting facts. True education is and should be more Formation than Information. This clear

population will have grown to an estimated 8 billion from today’s approximately 7 billion. Although, a lot of exciting new technology would be available, in general the level of competition and with it the level of stress will also have increased in the same proportion. The child of today will need to develop into a strong, determined and confident personality to take all this in his/her stride – a person who is a thinker and inquirer, who is articulate and confident to be on the world stage and compete with the best in the world. In the crowded classrooms in most schools of our country today, rotememorization is the order of the day where students continue to be judged almost solely by exam-results. This stress on higher academic percentage alone leaves no time for creative, innovative thinking and participating in

December-2009

co-curriculum activities, the two

increased at a slower pace and even in

Now ask yourselves this vital question

components which are so important for development of a well-balanced human being.

our mythology “shruti and smriti” were accepted modes of transfer of knowledge from one generation to the other. Memory worked in those days and that is why there was so much emphasis on rote memory in the

“What would I like my child to be? An original or a copy conformist?” and you would, I am sure, settle for the obvious.

The children have no time for participating in co-curricular activities in the school, and shuttle from home to school to coaching centers. It is shocking to learn that the multi-billion rupees coaching industry is now even

education system of a bygone era. But memory will not work today, and there is no need as we have high performing memory chips.

targeting children from grades 6 & 7. As one does not become a scholar of English by just memorizing the whole dictionary – one needs to have one’s own thoughts, and a flair for writing – in the same way real education does not only mean learning the facts in Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Geography, but it should aim at preparing the youth for life by learning to think creatively. Values and ethics are vital elements of any education. Take the Formation and value part out of it, and any education, if at all any is really left, becomes meaningless. Minus values, all we have is informed insensitive brutes

Rote learning and memorisation is easy; creative thinking is challenging. People find it easy to conform than to change the rules and be branded a nonconformist. It is an acknowledged fact that all progress of mankind is because of nonconformist people who chose to think differently. Today anyone can travel from one part of the world to another distant point, but it took a Christopher Columbus to discover America 500 years ago.

The two leading educational bodies in the field of international education are the IB (International Baccalaureate) and CIE (Cambridge International Examinations). These bodies run programmes in thousands of schools in around 150 countries of the world. Although, International education in India is a relatively recent phenomenon, this movement is gaining momentum, and more schools are following these curricula. As is common with any new movement, there are many myths and fallacies associated with the concept of international education. A few are discussed here below: International Schooling is expensive Since international education is a resource hungry programme, and there

incapable of any feeling. Let us now return to our main course – the truly international education. International education represents a major shift in classroom teaching where the emphasis is more on understanding a concept rather than simply memorisation of facts, rules and formulae. In the days of yore, knowledge December-2009

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is a lot of emphasis on Professional

teaching-learning outcomes. The

approach takes a lot of academic time

Development and training of the staff, it is out of sheer necessity that such schools charge a little higher fee, but then the facilities offered have to justify these fees.

curriculum is so rich and diversified with lots of activities that there is no question of a child having lots of free time.

and it is mostly play for the students

International schooling is all about pampering the students and they turn out to be snobs In reality while sometimes children can

This is a fallacy. While IB curriculum in itself is rich in content, both in breadth

be carried away by the facilities, international education emphasizes on caring and sharing, open mindedness and on community service. Students go for hikes and treks, and involve

and also the depth, it does not dictate a rigid syllabus. All schools have the flexibility of enriching their curriculum and adapt it to suit the nation-specific conditions.

themselves in many useful community service projects which gives them a taste of ground realities.

A comparison will show that international curriculum not only

There is no stress on the children and they can do whatever they like

incorporates the content for example in maths and science as practised in most education boards in India, but in fact is richer than most.

Yes, the schools provide a stress-free environment which results into better 70

The subject content especially in mathematics is comparatively lesser than in other schools

It is a proven fact that these progressive approaches are the best practices applicable in the teachinglearning situations and lead to much better learning outcomes compared to simply rote-learning to secure desirable percentages in the examinations.

Team work teaches the students the importance of planning and cooperation with other members of the team, debating and discussing the problem, accommodating others’ views and then write the findings in a coherent manner.

Project-oriented, and learning-by-doing

All this, and a presentation on the topic learned in the class is a valuable exercise in honing their communication skills and adds to their confidence. IGCSE and IB Diploma programmes are not recognized in India December-2009

A fallacy again IGCSE and IB Diploma

and take pride in our rich and varied

country to prepare our young people for

programmes are fully recognized in India by Association of Indian universities, and students with these qualifications are eligible to sit for all competitive entrance examinations, as well as gain admission to colleges and

heritage and be deeply aware of timetested human and moral values.

a role on the global stage and compete with the best in the world.

In fact knowing and learning about others makes us more appreciative of our own culture and values.

International education is all about good education and it will be a happy day indeed when every child in our country will have access to good education, call it by any name or tag.

universities in India. These qualifications are regarded highly in universities all over the world and thus give an edge to the students in the international educational scenario. IB Diploma programme (equivalent to class XII) is a very demanding Preuniversity course of study. Designed for highly motivated students aged 16 to 19, it opens the doors of many universities across the globe. It is a comprehensive two year international curriculum and has some unique features to its credit such as Theory of knowledge, a research-based extended essay, and CAS (Creativity, Action, Service) apart from the

Celebrating all important national and international festivals and an active international exchange programme impress upon young people that we are living in a shrinking global village and are interdependent on one another. Educating young people and making them wise and judicious, is an exciting, challenging, enriching and adventurous journey. Living in the global village, we all must be open to learn and assimilate all good practices available anywhere in the world and blend them with best timetested values and culture of our own

Instead of taking pride in well-endowed international schools, we hope one day all schools will be of comparable standards because in times to come, knowledge alone will be the greatest deciding factor. To quote Bill Gates: “The concept of ‘Have’ and ‘Have nots’ which is presently based on the economic parameters will shift-from economic to educational achievements, and the creation of wealth will depend directly on the level of education a society will have.”

academic subjects. Many colleges abroad give extra credits to IB Diploma students. More information on these programmes is available on the websites – www.ibo.org and www.cie.org.uk. Students studying in international schools come under heavy western influence and shy away from Indian tradition and culture Being international-minded does not mean not being an Indian. Schools train the students to be patriotic Indians first December-2009

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Curriculum We present few schools according to their Curriculum which created a niche for themselves in terms of varied aspects, right from education, pass percentage, infrastructure, overall development and the perfect balance of education and enlightenment. Most of them are featured in our selection of the top 10 best schools of Hyderabad; here you get better glimpse on what they have to offer.

Best CBSE Schools Name

Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan’s Public School

Jubilee Hills Public School

Principal Address Phone E-mail Website Education Faculty Pass Percentage Infrastructure Overall

C Rama Devi Road No. 71, Jubilee Hills, Hyderabad – 33 Tel: 040-23600200, 23544934, Fax: 040-23545648 www.bvbpsjh.com ★★★★★ ★★★★★ ★★★★ ★★★★★ ★★★★★

M Varalakshmi (I/C Principal) Road No. 71, Block III, Jubilee Hills, Hyderabad Tel: 040-23548584, 23607787 info@jhpublicschool.com www.jhpublicschool.com ★★★★ ★★★★ ★★★★ ★★★★★ ★★★★

30 years Private (Non-profit) Co-educational XII th More than 2000 No Quarterly 126 20:1 More than 20 years More than 40 students

More than 20 years Private (Non-profit) Co-educational Upto Xth (Applied for more) More than 2000 ISO 9001:2008 Monthly, Quarterly... 106 35:1 More than 5 years More than 25 students

341 100% 90.3% -

196 100% 81% 133 100% 94.8% -

                  

                  

General Information Existing since Type of institutional control School classification Classes Upto Total School Strength Is the School Quality Certified Frequency of Internal Examination Total number of teachers Student-Teacher ratio Average Experience of Teachers Average no. of students in each class Institutional Enrolment (2008-09) Enrolment VII Class Pass Percentage First Class Enrolment X Class Pass Percentage First Class Enrolment XII Class Pass Percentage First Class Facilities Offered Playground Library Auditorium Basketball Court Laboratories Badminton Court Computers Personality Development Tennis Court Vocational Courses Yoga Swimming Pool Student Journal Drama Dance Singing Gymnasium Yearbook NCC

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December-2009

Best CBSE Schools Chinmaya Vidyalaya

Meridian School for Boys & Girls

Kendriya Viyalaya, No.1, Uppal

Rajani Gowri Sankar Sandeepany Kailas, Kundanbagh, Hyderabad – 16 Tel: 040-23418012, 65355011

D Usha Reddy 8-2-541, Road No.7, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad – 34 Tel: 23355087, 23420561, 23420562

G. Rama Rao Tel: 27200314 kv1uppal_hyd@yahoo.com http://kv1uppal.ap.nic.in ★★★ ★★★ ★★★★ ★★

★★★★ ★★★ ★★★★ ★★★★★ ★★★★

www.meridianschool.in ★★★ ★★★★ ★★★ ★★★★ ★★★★

More than 10 years Private (Non-profit) Co-educational XII th 1624 No Monthly 85 20:1 More than 5 years More than 25 students

More than 10 years Co-educational X th and above More than 1000 No Monthly, Quarterly... 112 13:1 More than 5 years Less than 30 students

More than 20 years Governed by Kendriya Vidyalaya Sangathan Co-educational XII th 1800 No Quarterly 28 30:1 More than 10 years Between 40 and 50 students

89 98.80% 91% 61 95.08% 86.2%

95 100% 97.8% -

161 99% 75% 55 99% 76%

                  

                  

                  

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Best ICSE Schools Name

Abhyasa Residential School

Niraj Public School

Hyderabad Public School

Principal Address Phone E-mail Website Education Faculty Pass Percentage Infrastructure Overall

Vinaayak Kalleetla Toopran - 502334, Medak Tel: 08454-235718/19, 235966/77 abhyasaschool@yahoo.com www.abhyasaschool.com/.org ★★★★ ★★★★ ★★★★★ ★★★★★ ★★★★

B Jivitesh Reddy 6-3-864, Sadat Manzil, Ameerpet, Hyd-16 Tel: 040-23413543 www.nirajpublicschool.com ★★★ ★★★ ★★★★ ★★★★ ★★★★

Captain (IN) Alokesh Sen (Retd.) 1-87 & 88, S P Road, Begumpet Tel: 040-27764698, 27761546

★★★ ★★★★★ ★★★ ★★★★★ ★★★★

More than 10 years Private (Non-profit) Co-educational & Residential XII th Less than 500 students Implemented TQM with CII Quarterly 50 9.5:1 More than 10 years 25 students

More than 20 years Private (Non-profit) Co-educational Upto Xth More than 1000 ISO 9001:2000, ISO 1400:2000 Quarterly 81 16:1 More than 5 years More than 25 students

More than 20 years Private (Non-profit) Co-educational XII th More than 2000 Quarterly 134 18:1 More than 10 years More than 25 students

61 100% 100% 23 100% 100%

107 100% 99% 71 100% 100% -

204 94.61% 69.6% 47 95.7% 68.1%

                  

                  

                  

General Information Existing since Type of institutional control School classification Classes Upto Total School Strength Is the School Quality Certified Frequency of Internal Examination Total number of teachers Student-Teacher ratio Average Experience of Teachers Average no. of students in each class Institutional Enrolment (2008-09) Enrolment VII Class Pass Percentage First Class Enrolment X Class Pass Percentage First Class Enrolment XII Class Pass Percentage First Class Facilities Offered Playground Library Auditorium Basketball Court Laboratories Badminton Court Computers Personality Development Tennis Court Vocational Courses Yoga Swimming Pool Student Journal Drama Dance Singing Gymnasium Yearbook NCC

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Best SSC Schools Name

St. Paul’s High School

Little Flower High School

Principal Address Phone E-mail Website Education Faculty Pass Percentage Infrastructure Overall

Rev. Bro. Show Reddy 3-6-166, Hyderguda, Hyderabad - 500029 Tel: 040-23222092, 23222888 www.stpaulshshyd.com ★★★★ ★★★★ ★★★★ ★★★★ ★★★★

Rev. Bro. Jaico Gervasis Chirag Ali Lane, Abids, Hyderabad - 500001 Tel: 040-23202675 www.lfhshyd.com ★★★ ★★★ ★★★★ ★★★★ ★★★★

More than 20 years Private (Non-profit) Co-educational X th More than 2000 Yes Monthly, Quarterly... 86 30:1 More than 10 years Between 40 and 50 students

More than 20 years Private (Non-profit) Co-educational Xth More than 2000 Monthly 83 33:1 More than 5 years Between 40 and 50 students

237 100% 97% 214 100% 94% -

211 100% 87% 188 100% 99% -

                  

                  

General Information Existing since Type of institutional control School classification Classes Upto Total School Strength Is the School Quality Certified Frequency of Internal Examination Total number of teachers Student-Teacher ratio Average Experience of Teachers Average no. of students in each class Institutional Enrolment (2008-09) Enrolment VII Class Pass Percentage First Class Enrolment X Class Pass Percentage First Class Enrolment XII Class Pass Percentage First Class Facilities Offered Playground Library Auditorium Basketball Court Laboratories Badminton Court Computers Personality Development Tennis Court Vocational Courses Yoga Swimming Pool Student Journal Drama Dance Singing Gymnasium Yearbook NCC

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Best SSC Schools St. Peter’s High School

All Saints High School

Parsi School

T Alphonse Reddy Sy. No. 2, Sitarampur, Bowenpally, Secunderabad Tel: 040-27953770 www.stpeterseducation.com ★★★ ★★★ ★★★ ★★★★ ★★★

Rev. Bro. Sleeva Reddy 5-9-304, Gunfoundry, Hyderabad-4 Tel: 040-23235153/23232992 ashs_cd@yahoo.com ★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★★★★ ★★★

D.M.L Vyjayanthi 119, Parklane, Secunderabad - 500003 Tel: 27843733 ★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★★★

More than 10 years Private (Non-profit) Co-educational X th More than 1000 ISO 9001:2000 Monthly 77 20:1 More than 5 years More than 25 students

155 years Private (Non-profit) Co-educational X th More than 2000 Yes Monthly, Quarterly... 91 40:1 More than 10 years Between 40 and 50 students

90 years Private (non-profit) - Trust Co-educational X th More than 1000 Quarterly 21:1 More than 10 years Between 40 and 50 students

109 100% 93.5% 47 100% 94% -

190 100% -

104 89% 76% -

                  

                  

                  

December-2009

★★

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Corporal Punishment – Spare the Rod, Save the Child “Children are sick of being called ‘the future’. They want to enjoy their childhoods, free of violence, now” - Paulo Pinheiro, UN General Assembly Even though the HRD Ministry had issued instructions to all States and Union Territories in December 2007 to prohibit corporal punishment in all schools under their jurisdiction, and when Section 17 of the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act 2009 prohibits physical punishment and mental harassment to children in school, the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR) registered 27, 50 and 31 cases of corporal punishment in schools during 2007, 2008 and 2009 respectively. The time has come, to ‘spare the road and save the child’.

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C

orporal or Physical Punishment can be described as

In 1999 the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural

- “any punishment in which physical force is used and intended to cause some degree of pain or discomfort, however light. Most involves hitting (smacking, slapping, spanking) children, with the hand or with an implement. In addition, there are other non-physical forms of punishment that are also cruel and degrading; for example,

Rights adopted a General Comment on “The Right to Education” which stated that corporal punishment is inconsistent with the fundamental guiding principle of international human rights law enshrined in the Preambles to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and both Covenants.

punishment which belittles, humiliates, denigrates, scapegoats, threatens, scares or ridicules the child.”

Human Rights in India

An estimate 60-70% of school going children in India are physically abused says the national report on child abuse by the Ministry of Women and Child Development. The crime is rampant in every single district of the country. Boys are marginally more likely to face physical abuse (73 per cent) than girls (65 percent). Corporal punishment in both government as well as private schools is deeply ingrained as a tool to discipline children and as a normal action. But most children do not report or confide about the matter to anyone and suffer silently. “Corporal punishment in all settings wherever the child is should be banned through legislation, in line with the recommendations in the UN Study on Violence against Children. Any form of violence against children is never justifiable or acceptable. It teaches the child that violence is acceptable and so perpetuates the cycle of violence. Eliminating corporal punishment in all settings is also a key strategy for reducing and preventing all forms of violence in society,” says Karin Hulshof- UNICEF India Representative.

International Human Rights The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child includes the Right to Protection of the Child against abuse, which is categorized as an Immediate Right. Article 19 of the CRC requires States to protect children from “all forms of physical or mental violence”. During the first decade of the Convention, the Committee on the Rights of the Child recommended to over 120 States to abolish all corporal punishment and develop public education campaigns to promote positive, non-violent discipline in the family, schools and other institutions. December-2009

Article 21 of the Constitution protecting the ‘right to life’, is the first point of reference. The Child Rights Charter 2003 of India specifically states “All children have a right to be protected against neglect, maltreatment, injury, trafficking, sexual and physical abuse of all kinds, corporal punishment, torture, exploitation, violence and degrading treatment.” Prohibition and elimination of corporal punishment in schools is identified as a priority in the 2005 National Plan of Action for Children and the report on child protection in the National Plan for 2007-2012. The National Policy on Education (1986, modified 1992) states that “corporal punishment will be firmly excluded from the educational systems.” The Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, 2009 (No 35 of 2009) (26 August, 2009) prohibits physical punishment and mental harassment to the child and states: (1) No child shall be subjected to physical punishment or mental harassment. (2) Whoever contravenes the provisions of sub-section (1) shall be liable to disciplinary action under the service rules applicable to such persons. In August 2007, the NCPCR also wrote to all chief secretaries with detailed guidelines recommending practical steps for the elimination of corporal punishment. In December of the same year, the Human Resource Development Ministry also wrote to all Chief Secretaries recommending that corporal punishment be prohibited in all schools in the jurisdiction of the state government as it “severely affects the human dignity of the child, thereby reducing his/her self esteem and self confidence”. 83

“Existing provisions covering different types of violence against children are rarely used to prosecute acts of corporal punishment. Also, corporal punishment is not specifically defined and/or criminalised under the Indian Penal Code (IPC),” says Deepa Dixit, member of the National Commission for the Protection of Child Rights, explaining why teachers are rarely punished for causing serious injury to their students.

Global Prohibition Corporal Punishment in schools is prohibited in nearly half of the world’s countries. In the past 20 years, eighteen countries have enacted laws prohibiting corporal punishment in all settings, namely in the home, in schools, alternative care and in the judicial system. It is of interest to note that since the turn of the century, ten countries have officially prohibited all forms of corporal punishment. The pace of reform is gathering momentum in light of the UN Study on Violence against children which recommended in its final report prohibition in law of all corporal punishment of children by 2009.

Indian Attitudes Legal protection against corporal punishment is important to safeguard the rights of a child. However, in practice, legal options are usually resorted to only in case of extreme corporal punishment. They are nevertheless important measures of deterrence. It is very important that teachers should know that by assaulting children they risk not only dismissal but also prosecution by criminal law, which doesn’t exist in India at present. Simultaneously, public education is crucial to accompany law reform. The process of law reform and enactment of the Right to Education Bill with provisions on corporal punishment itself has the potential to be educational if properly disseminated. Teacher training and sensitisation, public interest programmes, community mobilisation, educating children on their rights etc can additionally play an important role to

Physical and Psychological Scars Children due to fear are often silent and submit to violence without questioning. They sometimes show signs of deep hurt in their behaviour but this often goes unnoticed, perpetuating further violence on them. More often than not, when a teacher uses violence on children it is an outburst of their own personal frustration. Mental health experts are of the opinion that corporal punishment not only affects the emotional behaviour and academic performance of a child, but also leads to reduction in self esteem and dignity of child. There is a large body of international research detailing the negative outcomes of corporal punishment. Some of the conclusions are presented below: Escalation - Mild punishments in infancy are so ineffective that they tend to escalate as the child grows older. The little smack thus becomes a spanking and then a beating. Encouraging violence - Even a little slap carries the message that violence is the appropriate response to conflict or unwanted behaviour. Aggression breeds aggression. Children subjected to physical punishment have been shown to be more likely than others to be aggressive to siblings; to bully other children at school; to take part in aggressively antisocial behaviour in adolescence; to be violent to their spouses and their own children and to commit violent crimes. Physical punishment teaches children that we communicate important things through hitting; the parents who they depend on to protect them, will hurt them and so they should fear their parents, rather than trusting them; their home is an unsafe place for learning and exploration. If we want to teach children to be non-violent, we must show them how to be non-violent. If we want to teach them how to stay safe, we need to explain to them and show them how to do this. Hitting children harms our relationships with them. It doesn’t give them the information they need to make decisions, and it doesn’t increase their respect for us.

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Psychological damage - Corporal punishment can be

It empowers children to make life decisions, based on their

emotionally harmful to children. Research especially indicts messages confusing love with pain, and anger with submission as the most psychologically harmful.

own experiences, and to utilise an internal system of reinforcement to weigh the values of the decisions that they have made.

Sometimes parents try to correct their children by telling them that they are bad, rude, clumsy, immature, or incompetent. When children hear such criticism, they feel rejected and they feel like failures. They depend on us to build their knowledge and their skills. They need encouragement and support. Children with high self-esteem are more

Positive Discipline is a discipline system that focuses on the positive points of behaviour. Some practitioners believe that educators should act with a philosophy that there are no bad children, just good and bad behaviours. Teachers and parents can teach and reinforce the good behaviours while wean out the bad behaviours without hurting the child verbally or

successful because they are willing to try. They are happier because they feel good about their abilities to cope with failure. They have better relationships with their parents because they know their parents believe in them.

physically. Positive discipline includes a number of different techniques that, used in combination, can lead to a more effective way to manage groups of students. There are 5 criteria for effective positive discipline:

Parents and teachers can do a lot to build the children’s selfesteem, by recognising the children’s efforts, even if they’re not perfect; by appreciating the children’s desire and supporting the children when they fail and encourage them to keep trying.

Teachers’ Role

• Helps children feel a sense of connection (belonging and significance)

• Is mutually respectful and encouraging (kind but firm at the same time)

The work conditions of school teachers in most government schools are undoubtedly adverse. There are over crowded classes, not enough text books, first-generation learners etc. But children are not responsible for all these problems that teachers face in performing their duties. It is so easy to victimise the weak. Besides, this is not to say that there is no violence or corporal punishment on children in well-to do private schools. Teachers need to play their role responsibly and should try to instil positive discipline in the children. Positive Discipline The positive discipline parenting and classroom management model is based on the work of Alfred Adler and Rudolf Dreikurs that originated in the 1920s. It consists of a specific set of techniques for rewarding good behaviour and curtailing negative behaviours. It is a program designed to teach children to become responsible, respectful and resourceful and inculcates a spirit of self-discipline. December-2009

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Is effective long – term (considers what the child is thinking, feeling, learning, and deciding what to do in the future to thrive)

• Teaches important social and life skills (respect, concern for others, problem solving and cooperation, as well as contributing to the community)

• Invites children to discover how capable they are (encourages the constructive use of personal power and autonomy) Positive Behaviour Support (PBS) is a form of child discipline that is a proactive and positive approach used by staff, parents and community agencies to promote successful behaviour and learning at home and at school for all students. PBS supports the acquisition of replacement behaviours, a reduction of crisis intervention, the appreciation of individual differences, strategies for self control, and durable improvement in the quality of life for all.

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Andhra Stepping Up The All India Teachers Federation for Child Rights and the MV Foundation launched a campaign against corporal punishment in schools, earlier this year. A workshop was conducted for 100 teachers from 20 mandals of Andhra Pradesh, which was addressed by the convener of MV Foundation, J. Bhaskar. He said the major component in teacher training should be against corporal punishment. According to him, corporal punishment increased the dropout rate besides hampering the learning capabilities and distorting the personality of the child. The students adjudged those who avoided corporal punishment as the best teachers. He expressed dismay at the instances where the parents themselves encouraged the teachers to award corporal punishment to their wards. He believes that it should be the responsibility of the teachers to launch a counter campaign against corporal punishment.

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Health and Hygiene A highly important aspect of education in schools is that of health and hygiene education. School health and hygiene education can be best described as a combination of infrastructural and implementation components that are necessary to produce a healthy school environment and to develop and support safe hygiene behaviours. The infrastructure component includes drinking water, hand washing and sanitary facilities in and around the school compound, while the implementation components are activities that promote better conditions at school and practices of school staff that help to prevent water and sanitation-related diseases.

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R

ecent analyses have shown that school facilities

The states and unions that have started the programme are

may need improving; many cases were found with no or insufficient water supply, sanitation and hand washing facilities. Some facilities were not adapted to the needs of the children, were broken, dirty or unsafe. Even though hygiene education was being practised, in some instances it was ineffective and did not relate to the school’s

Assam, Chhattisgarh, Daman and Diu, Dadar and Nagar Haveli, Delhi, Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, Haryana, Jammu and Kashmir, Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Manipur, Meghalaya, Orissa, Rajasthan, Sikkim, Tamil Nadu, Tripura, Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, and West Bengal,.

environment; soap was found absent in a majority of schools.

Under the programme, children are being taught about good nutrition practices and health education, regular health checkups, provision for corrective action and provision of secondary and tertiary care help, if required.

With such poor and neglected conditions, schools become unsafe places for children, with diseases being transmitted and creating negative impacts for the children, their families and their overall development. Good health practices at school are essential for now and become an investment for the future; lack of good health practices has been the leading cause for low school enrolment, high absenteeism, and poor classroom performance. The provision of clean, safe water and sanitation facilities is a first step towards a healthy learning environment. However, just the provision of facilities does not make them sustainable nor does it ensure the required results. It is the correct utilisation of the facilities that makes the real difference. Combining facilities, correct behavioural practices and education can make a positive impact on the health and hygiene of the community as a whole.

Government Steps Up A majority of states in the country have started the School Health Programme initiated by the government to improve the health of children and prevent recurrence of diseases; the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare identified the common diseases that occur among schoolchildren as measles, diarrhoea, acute respiratory infections, tuberculosis, chickenpox, worm infestations and sepsis. The steps taken by the government to prevent diseases among schoolchildren were to provide support for the School Health Programmes in each and every district of the country. Currently 21 states have initiated the programme and they have taken key steps, which will help improve the health of schoolchildren and prevent recurrence of such diseases. December-2009

The Power of Yoga The Union Health Minister, Anbumani Ramadoss, wants children to learn yoga and is keen to make it compulsory in schools. Known for his strong views against tobacco use and alcohol, Ramadoss suggested making ‘good health’ a subject in schools so that children are make aware of health conditions like diabetes and hypertension. Ramadoss is also keen to introduce a National School Health Programme under which children will be screened for sight and hearing defects, dental problems, anaemia, malnutrition and cardiovascular health. It has been scientifically validated that yoga helps reduce hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, arthritis, stress and mental disorders. The health ministry had earmarked Rs.8 billion for alternative medicines under the Five Year Plan, and asked for allocation of Rs.50 billion under the 11th Five Year Plan (2007-12).

School Health Clubs In a major initiative aimed at promoting healthy habits among the young, the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) asked all its affiliated institutions to start health clubs as part of a newly framed comprehensive school health programme. This initiative is aimed at inculcating healthy and positive ways of living among students. A circular issued to heads of all affiliated schools said that schools can be dynamic settings for promoting health during childhood and adolescence.

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hile ‘school health’ has largely remained confined

to medical check-ups of children or some hours of health instruction in the curriculum, the new initiative will see schools strategically placed to inculcate positive attitudes towards health, self-esteem, life skills and behaviour. It will help in developing health skills and physique through practical engagements with play, exercises, sports and practices of personal and community hygiene. The clubs would also focus on the overall emotional, social and mental wellbeing of children.

The Board revealed that this is not a different module added to the already existing syllabus, but will be a part of each subject where every teacher will mould the health and hygiene issues in regular classes. The manuals given to each school will be divided in three levels, for standards I - V, standards VI-VIII and standards IX- XII, and will focus on six themes including knowing the human body, food and nutrition, personal and environmental hygiene, physical fitness, being responsible, and safety, behaviour and life skills.

CBSE introduced this comprehensive health programme since the board felt that children these days are so bogged down by pressure from their peers and families, primarily in academics, that their health remains a largely neglected area. The health club, with the school principal as convenor and a counsellor/psychologist as the secretary, will organise health-relevant activities, besides acting as a resource centre for the overall well-being of students.

Plan into Action From the next academic year, students studying under Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) will be forming their own health clubs to maintain the health and hygiene of the students. The School Health Programme was initiated in all CBSE schools after a Global School Health Survey conducted by the World Health Organisation showed lack of hygiene awareness among students and also that school health is restricted to annual health check-ups. The programme has been started to incorporate better understanding over general health and hygiene issues through daily learning. While the master trainers for each region recently underwent training to initiate the Comprehensive School Health Programme, the schools are making plans to form the club. With an attempt to infuse activity-based learning in the routine studies, the teachers will involve the students in group discussions and debates.

Master trainers of this programme say that instead of theoretical knowledge, it will be practical demonstration of the basic health and hygiene issues like ingredients of various fast foods like cold drinks and noodles and their effects on the importance of noting the manufacturing date of food articles and medicine. The students will be groomed into a play module making it interesting and will be divided as per the classes. While all the teachers of other CBSE schools will be trained for the programme by the end of this academic year, the programme will start from the next school session. With such activities in each class, the Health Club Committee will have teachers and student participants from each level. The club will basically monitor the whole programme and also keep a check on the areas in the school (canteen and toilets) where hygiene is to be maintained.

Infection Prevention The spread of Swine Influenza (swine flu), a respiratory disease caused by type A influenza viruses, took a heavy toll on the Indian population, especially in the states of Maharashtra and Gujarat. Many cases of infection were reported from schools with the contagious disease spreading from student to student, though the transmission is limited and not sustained beyond three people. However, as they always say, ‘prevention is better than cure’ and so we have

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provided some basic information on how to safeguard against swine flu and other infections while maintaining a good level of hygiene in the school. Infections and Contagious Diseases spread through: ♦ Contagious person to person ♦ Coughing

Sneezing ♦ Contacting an infected surface ♦

Some of the major symptoms are: Fever ♦ Cough ♦ Sore throat ♦ Runny nose ♦ Body aches ♦ Headaches ♦ Chills and fatigue ♦ Nausea ♦ Diarrhoea and vomiting ♦

Warning Signs in Children Fast breathing or trouble breathing Bluish skin colour ♦ Not drinking enough fluids ♦ Not waking up or not interacting ♦ Being irritable ♦ Flu-like symptoms improve but return with fever and worse cough ♦ Fever with a rash ♦ ♦

Warning Signs in Adults

Avoiding close contact with people who are sick ♦ Avoiding touching one’s eyes, nose, and mouth ♦

Other methods of controlling the spread of flu like diseases Covering the nose and mouth when coughing or sneezing ♦ Staying home from school or work to avoid infecting others ♦ Most Importantly, washing of hands ♦

Wash hands before ♦ Touching your hand to your mouth including

Eating ♦ Drinking ♦ Brushing your teeth ♦ Helping a sick person ♦

Wash Hands After ♦ Going to the bathroom

Changing diapers ♦ Touching surfaces, such as: • Doorknobs • Railings • Tables (cafeteria) • School desks • Commonly used or shared school supplies • Helping a sick person • Blowing your nose ♦

When soap is not available, alcohol-based disposable hand wipes or gel sanitizers may be used, which can be found at any supermarket or medical store. If using the gel sanitizer, hands should be rubbed until the gel is dry; there is no need to use any water and the alcohol kills the germs on the hands.

Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen ♦ Sudden dizziness ♦ Confusion ♦ Severe or persistent vomiting ♦ ♦

Infectious Flu can be prevented by: Staying in good general health Getting plenty of sleep ♦ Being physically active ♦ Managing your stress ♦ Drinking plenty of fluids ♦ Eating nutritious food ♦ ♦

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Listing The listing in the following pages of ‘Hyderabad’s Best Schools-2009’ has a comprehensive collection of various schools in Hyderabad and Secunderabad along with their contact numbers and addresses. All schools have been designated and distinguished based on curriculum and their status (International/Residential).

CBSE PHOENIX GREENS SCHOOL OF LEARNING PLOT 43, PINE VALLEY, BESIDES CYBERABAD POLICE COMMISSIONERATE, GACHIBOWLI, HYDERABAD, 500 081. PHONE: +91-40-64637100 /01 /02 EMAIL: INFO@PHOENIXGREENS.COM WWW.PHOENIXGREENS.COM BHARATIYA VIDYA BHAVAN ROAD NUMBER 71,JUBLIEHILLS HYDERABAD – 500033 PH: 040-23544934 E-MAIL: BVBPSJH@REDIFMAIL.COM WEBSITE: WWW.BBPSJH.COM DELHI PUBLIC SCHOOL HYDERABAD, INDIA PH:040-23000622/23006044 WEBSITE:HTTP://WWW.DPSHYDERABAD.COM/ E-MAIL: INFO@DPSHYDERABAD.COM JUBILEE HILLS PUBLIC SCHOOL BLOCK NO.3, ROAD NO.71, JUBILEEHILLS HYDERABAD-500033 PH:040-23548584 E-MAIL: JUBILEEHPS@YAHOO.COM WEBSITE: WWW.JHPUBLICSCHOOL.COM ‘P’ OBUL REDDY PUBLIC SCHOOL ANDHRA MAHILASABHA , JUBILEE HILLS, HYDERABAD – 500033 PH: 040- 23548912 E-MAIL: AMSPORPS@GMAIL.COM WEBSITE: WWW.AMSPORPS.COM

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THE HYDERABAD PUBLIC SCHOOL RAMANTHAPUR, AMBERPET HYDERABAD-500013 PH: 040-27038378, 27038391 E-MAIL: PRINCIPAL@HPSRAMANTHAPUR.ORG BHARATIYA VIDYABHAVAN VIDYASHRAM NIRD CAMPUS, LAMPUR RAJENDRA NAGAR HYDERABAD-500030 PH: 040-24016404, 24008566 E-MAIL: BVBV_130106@YAHOO.COM ATOMIC ENERGY CENTRAL SCHOOL D.A.E COLONY, KAPRA HYDERABAD-500062 PH: 040- 27121334 HILLSIDE ACADEMY #46, JUBILEE HILLS OPPOSITE B.R AMBEDKAR OPEN UNIVERSITY, BOWINPALLY, HYDERABAD- 500011, PH:040-23546113 E-MAIL: ROOTS_SCHOOL2000@YAHOO.COM WEB: WWW.HILLSIDE-ACADEMY.COM LOTUS NATIONAL SCHOOL NAGARAM, E.C.I.L HYDERABAD- 500762 PH: 040- 65292489, 23350770 VIGNAN VIDYALAYAM HIGH SCHOOL PHASE-II, MIYAPUR, NEAR PEARL REGENCY HOTEL, GACHIBOWLI HYDERABAD-500032 PH: 040- 23045005

AMRITHA VIDYALAYAM #844/1, SHANTI NIKETHAN COLONY EASTMAREDPALLY, NEHRUNAGAR, HYDERABAD500026 PH:040- 27733174, 27739898 E-MAIL: AVSEC@GMAIL.COM

BHARATIYA VIDYA BHAVAN PUBLIC SCHOOL BHEL TOWNSHIP, RAMCHANDRAPURAM GACHIBOWLI, HYDERABAD-500032 PH: 040- 23024910 E-MAIL: BVBPSSCHOOLBHEL@SIFY.COM

RISHI PUBLIC SCHOOL HYDERGUDA, NEAR TOYATA SHOWROOM, NEHRUNAGAR HYDERABAD- 500026 PH:040- 23262744

HARVAHAL PUBLIC SCHOOL #3-6-568, HIMAYATNAGAR EAST HYDERABAD-500029 PH: 040- 27630610 WEB: WWW.HARVAHALPUBLICSCHOOL.ORG

ROCK WOODS PUBLIC SCHOOL ARVIND NAGAR COLONY, DOMALGUDA, GAGAN MAHAL, HIMAYATNAGAR, HYDERABAD-500029 PH: 040-27638926 E-MAIL: ROCKWOODS@GMAIL.COM DAFFODILS PUBLIC SCHOOL HIGH 60, HOUSING BOARD, KUKATPALLY HYDERABAD: 500872 PH: 040-23055547 LADDERS SCHOOL #22-230/B , ARUN CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY NEAR BHAGYANAGAR Y JUNCTION, KUKATPALLY HYDERABAD-500072 PH: 040-23162627, 9490233555 WEB: WWW.LADDERSSCHOOL.COM MOTHER TERESA SCHOOL #1-8-247, CHIKKADPALLY OPPOSITE AMBEDKAR COLLEGE LANE, MUSHEERABAD, HYDERABAD-500020 PH: 040-27610909 BOLTON SCHOOL BOLTON ROAD, OPPOSITE TIVOLI GARDEN SECUNDERABAD H.O, HYDERABAD-500003 PH: 040-27891229, 9951944844 E-MAIL: JANAKI_PALLAVI@REDIFMAIL.COM WEB: WWW.BOLTON.IN MOUNT BANJARA HIGH SCHOOL ROAD NO-14, BANJARA HILLS, HYDERABAD PH: 040-23545930, 23607765 WEB: WWW.MOUNTBANJARASCHOOL.ORG E- MAIL: MBANJARA@YAHOO.COM GLENDALE ACADEMY BESIDE SUN CITY, NEAR ARTILLERY CENTRE GATE, HYDERABAD PH: 040-6522-3980 E-MAIL: INFO@GLENDALEACADEMY.NET WEB: HTTP:/GLENDALEACADEMY.NET

December-2009

HYDERABAD PUBLIC SCHOOL RAMANTHAPUR, HYDERABAD – 500013 PH: 040-27031546/27038391/27038486 E-MAIL:HPSRAMANTHPR2002@YAHOO.COM KENDRIYA VIDYALAYA UPPAL NO 1 UPPAL X ROAD, UPPAL, HYDERABAD – 500039 PH:040-27207304/27200314 E-MAIL: KV1UPPAL@HOTMAIL.COM WEB:WWW.KV1UPPAL.AP.NIC.IN VIKAS THE CONCEPT SCHOOL OPP COCO COLA FACTORY, MIYAPUR X ROAD, MIYAPUR, HYDERABAD – 500138 PH:040-23046464/23042966/9989706526, E-MAIL:INFO@VIKASCONCEPT.COM WEB:WWW.VIKASCONCEPT.COM

LEARNIUM SCHOOL A 84, MLA COLONY, ROAD NO 12, BANJARA HILLS, HYDERABAD - 500034 PH: 040-65345625/65345626 WEB: WWW.LEARNIUMSCHOOL.COM ST MICHEALS SCHOOL ENTRENCHMENT ROAD, STREET NO 5, WEST MARREDPALLY, HYDERABAD – 500026 PH: 040-27717682/66497682 E-MAIL:MAIL@STMICHAELSHS.COM WEB:WWW.STMICHAELSHS.COM AZRA PUBLIC SCHOOL 10-2-510/1, ASIF NAGAR, MAIN ROAD, MEHDIPATNAM, HYDERABAD-500028 PH: 040-23530262/23530453/23532405 AZRASCHOOL@YAHOO.CO.IN

SPRINGDALE ACCAMEDY DE INTERNATIONL 34, TIRUMALA HILLS, DILSUKHNAGAR, HYDERABAD – 500036 PH:64555722/64555866 9393038844/9866739888 E-MAIL:ADMISSIONS@SAIAPEC.COM WEB:WWW.SAIAPEC.COM A P M KINDERGARTEN SCHOOL 6-3-597/A BELLA MOUNT, NEAR VYSYA BANK, VENKATRAMANA COLONY, KHAIRATABAD, HYDERABAD – 500004 PH:040-65527885/23375821/23373960 E-MAIL:PASHAIMT@REDIFFMAIL.COM BHAVANS SRI RAMKRISHNA VIDYALAYA SECUNDERABAD, SAINIKPURI, HYDERABAD – 500094 PH:040-27112561 E-MAIL:BVBAPBS06@REDIFFMAIL.COM WEB: WWW.BHAVANS.INFO

OASIS SCHOOL OF EXCELLENCE SHAH MANZIL, RAYA DURGA MARG, TOLI CHOWKI, HYDERABAD – 500008 PH: 040-23562712/9849474347/23563349 GREEN MEADOWS PARK SCHOOL NEAR ZOOLOGICAL PARK, BESIDE JALWA HOTEL, WAVES THE SCHOOL KISHAN BAGH, HYDERABAD – 500264 SWAMI NARAYAN GURUKUL INTL. SCHOOL AYAPPA SOCIETY, MADHAPUR, PH:040-64558750/64551126/9885208887 YENKAPALLY MOINABAD NEAR GANDIPET, HYDERABAD – 50003 E-MAIL:GREENMPS123@YAHOO.COM HYDERABAD – 500001 PH: 040-64602325/64602326 HYDERABAD CENTRAL SCHOOL PH: 040-32932481/9440754520 E-MAIL:INFO@WAVESTHESCHOOL.COM WEB:WWW.WAVESTHESCHOOL.COM CENTRAL UNIVERSITY CAMPUS, SECUNDERABAD PUBLIC SCHOOL GACHIBOWLI, HYDERABAD – 500031 2-12-70, OPP PADMASHALI KALYANA MANDAPAM, NARAYANA E TECHNO SCHOOLS DILSUKNAGAR PH: 040-23130000/23010145 DILSUKHNAGAR, HYDERABAD – 500036 WEST MARREDPALLY, HYDERABAD – 500026 WEB: WWW.UOHYD.ERNET.IN PH: 040-27800004/27806216 PH:9912343446/9912343445 WEB:WWW.THESECUNDERABADPUBLICSCHOOL.COM SILVER OAKS SCHOOL WEB:WWW.NARAYANAGROUP.COM MEDCHAL HIGHWAY BACHUPALLY VILLAGE, HINDU PUBLIC SCHOOL VIGNAN CBSE SCHOOL GHATKESAR MIYAPUR, HYDERABAD – 500138 7-2-1087/A, SRI HANUMAN DEVASTHANAM, R.R. DIST, NEAR GHATKESER, PH:040-23047777/23047788/23047777 SANAT NAGAR, HYDERABAD – 500018 HYDERABAD – 500001 E-MAIL: INFO@SILVEROAKSSCHOOL.COM PH: 040-23704355/65505981 PH:8415260320/8415329981 WEB:WWW.SILVEROAKSSCHOOL.COM E-MAIL:HINDUPUBLICSCHOOL@REDIFFMAIL.COM 9440422557 PRRTAXILA@HOTMAIL.COM VISAKHA CENTRAL SCOOL MARICA HIGH SCHOOL SUR-8/B1, BACHUPALLY, MIYAPUR, SARATHI SCHOOL 9-4-77/3/29-34, NIZAM COLONY, HYDERABAD – 500138 HABSIGUDA X ROADS, HABSIGUDA, OPP MOGAH RESIDENCY, PH:40-23048888 HYDERABAD – 500007 TOLI CHOWKI, HYDERABAD – 500008 DAV PUBLIC SCHOOL PH: 040-27151385/27151610 PH:040-23568310 SANTOSHIMA NAGAR, SAFILGUDA, RAMAKRISHNA E-MAIL: SARATHISCHOOL@YAHOO.CO.IN E-MAIL:MARICAHS@HOTMAIL.COM PURAM, HYDERABAD-500556 PH: 040-27223721/27223392 MAHARISHI VIDYA MANDIR KONDAPUR GIRISH PARK, NEAR HITECH CITY, MADHAPUR, HYDERABAD – 500034 PH:040-23113196/23111629/23111629 E-MAIL:MVMHYD@SIFY.COM

December-2009

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ICSE HALLMARK SCHOOL #1-10-119, MAYURI MARG, BEGUMPET, HYDERABAD -500016 PH-040-66338744 E-MAIL- CONTACT@HALLMARKSCHOOL.COM WEB- WWW.HALLMARKSCHOOL.COM NIRAJ PUBLIC SCHOOL #6-3-864, SAADAT MANZIL, AMEERPET, NEAR AMEERPET X ROAD, BEGUMPET HYDERABAD - 500016 PH: 040 – 23413543, 66661486 E-MAIL: NIRAJ_NET@REDIFMAIL.COM WEB: WWW.NIRAJPUBLICSCHOOL.COM NALANDA PUBLIC SCHOOL #12-2-712, NANAL NAGAR, HUMAYUN NAGAR HYDERABAD - 500028 PH: 040 – 23513913 E-MAIL: NALANDAPS@YAHOO.IN ST. JOSEPHS PUBLIC SCHOOL #3-5-781/A, KING KOTI ROAD, HYDERABAD G.P.O. HYDERABAD - 500001 PH: 040 – 23235665 E-MAIL: SJPSKK@GMAIL.COM SHERWOOD PUBLIC SCHOOL PET BASHEERABAD, JEEDIMETLA HYDERABAD - 500055 PH: 040 – 23096090 E-MAIL: INFO@SHERWOODEDUCATION.COM WEB: WWW.SHERWOODEDUCATION.COM SLOKA - THE HYDERABAD WALDORF SCHOOL PLOT NO 573 K, ROAD NO 82, JUBILEE HILLS, HYDERABAD - 500033 PH: 040 – 23545206 E-MAIL: SLOKA_97@YAHOO.CO.IN WEB: WWW.SLOKAWALDORF.COM VIDYARANYA HIGH SCHOOL GREEN GATES, SAIFABAD, KHAIRATABAD H.O. HYDERABAD - 500004 PH: 040 – 23235146

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SAMARITAN SCHOOL #37-93-56, MADHURA NAGAR, NEAR K.R. NEO HEALTH CLUB RAMAKRISHNAPURAM, HYDERABAD-500556 PH: 040 – 27112512/27112978 RAMADEVI PUBLIC SCHOOL RAMOJI FILM CITY, OFF NH 9 RAMOJI FILM CITY HYDERABAD - 501512 PH: 040 – 32946671 E-MAIL: PELLURI@GMAIL.COM VIGNAN SCHOOL MANI COMPLEX, KARMANGHAT CROSS ROAD SANTHOSH NAGAR, HYDERABAD - 500059 PH: 040 – 65406644, E-MAIL: RAJASHEKAR@BEEB.NET SUN FLOWER SCHOOL DIAMOND POINT, SECUNDERABAD - 500003 PH: 040 – 27891994 E-MAIL: SUNFLOWERSCHOOL@YAHOO.COM WEB: WWW.SUNFLOWER.ORG ST. ANNS GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL S P ROAD, HYDERABAD – 500003 PH: 040-27804108 CHAITANYA VIDHYALAYA 1-2-594, OPP INDRA PARK, DOMALGUDA, HYDERABAD - 500029 PH: 040-27631105/65502579 E-MAIL:CHAITANYAVIDHYALAYA@ETH.NET CHIREC PUBLIC SCHOOL 1-22, NEAR HITECH CITY, BOTANICAL GARDEN ROAD, KONDAPUR, HYDERABAD – 500084 PH: 040-20040103/4/, 9866461201/ 9866242258, E-MAIL: CHIRECPS@HD1.VSNL.NET.IN WEB: WWW.CHIRECPS.AC.IN WWW.CHIREC.COM

KALPA SCHOOL 8-2-589 19 AVENUE 5, ROAD NO 8 (OLD), BANJARA HILLS, HYDERABAD – 500034 PH: 040-23350164/23350020 E-MAIL:KALPASCHOOL@HOTMAIL.COM WEB: WWW.KALPASCHOOL.COM JOHNSON GRAMMAR SCHOOL HABSIGUDA FLAT NO 103, RAGAVENDRA NAGAR, NACHARAM, RANGAREDDY – 501507 PH: 040-27150122/65444347 9848258012/9866945222 JGS-ICSE@HOTMAIL.COM WWW.JGSCHOOL.COM INDUS WORLD SCHOOL YAPRAL, HYDERABAD – 500087 NEAR TULSI GARDEN PH: 040-27110800/27111801 E-MAIL: INFO.SAINIKPURI@CLEF.IN WEB: WWW.INDUSWORLDSCHOOL.COM , ST MARTINS HIGH SCHOOL MALKAJGIRI MADHUSUDAN NAGAR, MALKAJIGIRI, HYDERABAD - 500047 PH: 040-27064091/27064032 WEB: WWW.STMARTINSMALKAJIGIRI.IN SRI SAI PUBLIC SCHOOL 8/25, STREET NO 8, HABSIGUDA, HYDERABAD – 500007 PH: 040-27172691/27152348 E-MAIL:SRISAI@GMAIL.COM KENDRIYA VIDYALAYA UPPAL NO 2 SURVEY OF INDIA, UPPAL POST OFFICE, UPPAL, HYDERABAD – 500039 PH: 040-27202031, 25502706 / 20052706 KV2UPPAL80@REDIFFMAIL.COM WWW.KV2UPPAL.AP.NIC.IN VIGNAN VIDYALAYAM HIGH SCHOOL HIG PHASE 2, MADINAGUDA, BHEL, HYDERABAD – 500032 PH: 040-23045005/23041856/23041550 E-MAIL: VIGNAN.HYD@GMAIL.COM

December-2009

VIGNAN SCHOOLS OPP SURVEY OF INDIA, PRASHANTH NAGAR, UPPAL, HYDERABAD – 500039 PH: 040-65293092/65293093 VISWAM GLOBAL SCHOOL KUKATPALLY, HYDERABAD – 500072 PH:040-32951573/32951574 VISWA BHARATHI SCHOOL 1-2-51 PLT NO 117, NIZAMPET ROAD BRINDAVAN COLONY, KUKATPALLY, HYDERABAD – 500072 PH: 040-23155531/23892724/23714692 PRANAVA SCHOOL GANDIPET ROAD NEAR TARAMATI BARADAI MANCHIREVULA, GANDIPET ROAD HYDERABAD – 500001 PH: 040-32434929/232356/232357 E-MAIL: INFO@PRANAVA.EDU.IN WEB: WWW.PRANAVAEDU.IN RAVINDRA BHARATHI IIT OLYMPIAD AC ACADEMY, SHIVBAGH, NEAR BHASKARA HOSPITAL, S R NAGAR, HYDERABAD – 500038 PH: 040-23743238/9912347131, E-MAIL:RBSSR.NAGAR1@GMAIL.COM WEB: WWW.RBSCHOOLS.IN SLATE THE SCHOOL PLOT NO 160/D, PATNY NAGAR, S P ROAD, HYDERABAD - 500003 PH: 040-64628520/66258420 OXFORD GRAMMAR SCHOOL 3-6-712 CHANDRAM 490, ST NO 11, HIMAYAT NAGAR, HYDERABAD – 500029 PH: 040-27635669/27636214/27635644 E-MAIL: OGSL@REDIFFMAIL.COM WEB: WWW.OXFORDGRAMMARSCHOOL.COM MATRUSRI SCHOOL 2-1-290/5/1, STREET OPP VIJAYA BANK, NALLAKUNTA, HYDERABAD - 500044 PH: 040-27619469/27669606 E-MAIL: INFO@MATRUSRI.COM

December-2009

MOUNT CARMEL GLOBAL SCHOOL SURVEY NO 138, BADANGPET R R DISTRICT, KANCHAN BAGH, HYDERABAD – 500258 PH: 040-32523253/9959311233, E-MAIL:INFO@MOUNTCARMELHYD.COM WEB: WWW.MOUNTCARMELHYD.COM HERITAGE VALLEY THE INDIAN SCHOOL PAPIREDDYGUDA VILLAGE, SHAD NAGAR, KESHAMPET ROAD, HYDERABAD – 500001 PH: 9246270423/9246357216 ST. GEORGE GRAMMAR HIGH SCHOOL 5-9-263, GUN FOUNDARY, ABIDS NEAR GUN FOUNDARY MAIN ROAD LINE HYDERABAD-500001 PH: 040-23232447 NASR SCHOOL FOR GIRLS ROAD NO-12, BANJARA HILLS HYDERABAD-500034 PH: 040-23302615 EMAILNASARPRIMARYGIRLS@REDIFFMAIL.COM PRINCESS ESIN GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL 22-3-600, PURANA HAVELI HYDERABAD-500002 PH: 040-24574861/65943552 TRINITY PUBLIC SCHOOL SNEHA SIRI SAMAPADA APARTMENT BEHIND ELLMA TEMPLE, S.R NAGAR HYDERABAD-500038 PRANAVA SCHOOL NEAR TARAMATI BARADI MANCHIREVULA GANDIPET ROAD, HYDERABAD-500001 PH: 04032434929/9490491750 E-MAIL: INFO@PRANAVA.EDU.IN WEB: WWW.PRANAVA.EDU.IN ST. THERESA SCHOOL ARUN COLONY E.C.I.L HYDERABAD-500762 PH: 040-27124329

GUJARATHI SCHOOL NEAR BIBLE, HOUSE R. P. ROAD, SECUNDERABAD - 500003 PH: 040-27536130/27539088 ST. MARIN’S SCHOOL NEAR SEVEN TEMPLES, OLD AIR PORT ROAD BOWENPALLY, HYDERABAD-500011 PH: 040-23778018/ 23774208 E-MAIL: STMARINSSCHOOL@GMAIL.COM WEB: WWW.STMARINSHIGHSCHOOL.COM FUTURE KIDS SCHOOL #79/B JOURNALIST COLONY, OPP APOLLO HOSPITAL, BANJARA HILLS , HYDERABAD-500034 PH:040- 23545045/23545629 E-MAIL: FUTUREK_SCHOOL@YAHOO.COM WEB: WWW.FKSHYDERABAD.COM KENNEDY HIGH- THE GLOBAL SCHOOL BACHUPALLY, NEAR MEDCHAL HIGHWAY MIYAPUR, KUKATPALLY HYDERABAD-500072 PH: 040-65288187, 65586827 VIGNAN VIDYALAYAM HIGH SCHOOL PHASE-2 , GACHIBOWLI HYDERABAD-500032 PH: 040-23045005/ 23041856 HERITAGE VALLEY NEAR KAMATHANAM VILLAGE PAPI REDDY GUDA , HYDERABAD- 500001 PH: 040-64512584/ 9246366216 E-MAIL: INFO@HERITAGEVALLEY.CO.IN WEB: WWW.HERITAGEVALLEY.CO.IN VOX POP INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL PLOT NO-622, MATRUSRI NAGAR MIYAUR, HYDERABAD-500138 PH: 040 - 64596364 MOB: 9701511567/ 9849042881 WEB: WWW.VOXPOPIS.IN

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SSC BRAHMAM TALENT HIGH SCHOOL OPP. B-102, MADHURANAGAR, NEAR S.R. NAGAR X ROADS HYDERABAD. – 040-23818443 , 04023814066 EMAIL: BRAHMAMSCHOOL@GMAIL.COM WEBSITE WWW.BRAHMAMTALENTSCHOOL.COM

HARVARD TALENT SCHOOL #2-3-734/B/6/1/A, CROSS ROAD, AMBERPET HYDERABAD-500013 PH: 040-27426648, 27634156 ROSE BUDS HIGH SCHOOL BAGH AMBERPET, AMBERPET HYDERABAD-500013 PH: 040-27401927

BRILLIANT GRAMMAR HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPAPET CROSS ROAD, SAROORNAGAR, NEAR MAHARASHTRA BANK, HYDERABAD-500035 ST. JOHNS HIGH SCHOOL PH: 040-23437781, 23437776, 23437775 BHARAT NAGAR, RAMANTHAPUR, AMBERPET HYDERABAD-500013 WEB: WWW.BRILLIANTINSTITUTIONS.COM PH: 040-27037582 ALL SAINTS HIGH SCHOOL SRI BALAJI HIGH SCHOOL GUNFOUNDARY, ABIDS HYDERABAD- 500001 VENKAT RAM NAGAR, TOWN SHIP BALANAGAR, HYDERABAD-500037 PH:040-23235133, 23232992 PH: 040-23098474 MAHATAMA GANDHI MEMORIAL SCHOOL UNIQUE HIGH SCHOOL MARUTHI NAGAR YOUSUFGUDA, SURYA NAGAR, QUTBULLAPUR, TOWNSHIP HYDERABAD-500045 BESIDE IDPL COLONY, BALANAGAR PH:040-23743350 HYDERABAD-500037, PH: 040-23082313 WEB: WWW.MGMKJHIGHSCHOOL.COM BASHYAM PUBLIC SCHOOL PANAMA GODOWNS, VANASTHALIHILLS, VANASTHALIPURAM

HYDERABAD-500661 PH: 040-24123569, 9848536973 SIDDHARTHA GRAMMAR SCHOOL #610,611, VAIDEHINAGAR, VANASTHALIPURAM HYDERABAD- 500074 PH: 040-24244442 MILLENIUM HIGH SCHOOL #45, RAJAPPA NAGAR, NEAR SUBATHRA NAGAR BUS STOP, VANASTHALIPURAM , HYDERABAD-500074, PH: 040-24123655 CARDINAL GRACIOUS HIGH SCHOOL #B-1-8A/1, RAM SHANKAR NAGAR, ENDOWMENT CITY RAMANTHAPUR, NEAR B.S. SOFTECH COMPUTERS, AMBERPET, HYDERABAD-500013 PH: 040-27037714 98

INDRIA MEMORIAL SCHOOL ASHOK NAGAR NACHRAM E.C.I.L, HYDERABAD-500762 PH:040-27120375 E-MAIL: INDIRAMEMORIAL.SCHOOL@GMAIL.COM BLUE BELLS HIGH SCHOOL SRI NAGAR COLONY, KHAIRATABAD, H.O. HYDERABAD-500004 PH: 040-23748604 DON BOSCO HIGH SCHOOL #8-4-378/1, NEW SASTRY NAGAR, ERRAGADDA NEAR INDIAN CHEMAICAL COUNCIL, SANATH NAGAR, HYDERABAD-500018 PH: 040-23833993 NATIONAL OPEN SCHOOL #6-5-/100 , PHOLOMEN SCHOOL , NEW BHIOGUDDA, YELLAMMAGUTTA SECUNDERABADH.O, HYDERABAD-500003 PH: 040-27532516 CARE MODEL SCHOOL #2-2-1105/71C, TILAK NAGAR NALLAKUNTA HYDEARBAD-500044 PH: 040-27562423

SPRING FIELDS SCHOOL BANJARA HILLS , ROAD NO-11 LITTLE FLOWER HIGH SCHOOL HYDERABAD-500034 CHIRAG ALI LANE, ABIDS PH: 040-23396640 E-MAIL: ASMASUBHANA@SPRINGFIELDSCHOOL.COM HYDERABAD-500001 PH:040-23202675 BHARAT RATNA HIGH SCHOOL WEB: WWW.LFHSHYD.COM #7-1-77/2, DHARAM KARAN ROAD, AMEERPET NEAR MCH GROUND, BEGUMPET SAFDARIA GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL HYDERABAD-500016 #10-3-72, HUMAYUN NAGAR NEAR POLICE STATION, MEHDIPATNAM, HYDERABADPH: 040-66363316 500028 BRIGHT HIGH SCHOOL PH: 040-23533274 NEAR AMEERPET, MAINROAD VIDYA DAYINI MODEL HIGH SCHOOL BEGUMPET, HYDERABAD-500016 YADGIRI NAGAR , NEAR SANTOSH NAGAR PH: 040-23742688 BOLARUM, HYDERABAD-500010 BHASHYAM PUBLIC SCHOOL PH:040-24530353/24071483 RAMAKRISHNAPURAM, NEAR ASHTALAXMI TEMPLE, DILSUKHNAGAR, HYDERABAD-500060 PH: 040-24032008 E-MAIL: BHASHYAM_RKPURAM@YAHOO.COM December-2009

ADAMS HIGH SCHOOL 16-8-235, KALADERA NALGONDA X ROADS, NEAR BHARAT PETROL BUNK MALAKPET, HYDERABAD-500024 PH: 040-24411604 E-MAIL: ADAMHS@REDIFFMAIL.COM GEETANJALI TALENT SCHOOL SWAMI VIVIEKANAND COLONY KUKATPALLY, HYDERABAD PH: 040-65997705 ST. PETER’S HIGH SCHOOL SCBD, ST JOHN ROAD SECUNDERABAD PH: 040-27953770/9849280448 SISTER NIVEDITHA SCHOOL 17349, AMEERPET BEGUMPET HYDERABAD-500016 PH: 040-23731535 CMR HIGH SCHOOL 173, BESIDE MALLAREDDY GARDENS SEETHARAMAPURAM ROAD BOWENPALLY , HYDERABAD-500011 PH: 040-27758892/27953999 ST.ALPHOIN’S SCHOOL KPHB COLONY, NEAR SRI SAI TRADERS HYDERABAD PH: 040-65545900

SURYAM MODEL SCHOOL KUKATPALLY, HYDERABAD-500872 PH: 040-20046333 NIRMALA HIGH SCHOOL OPP HINDI PRACHAR SABHA HILL COLONY KHAIRATABAD HYDERABAD-500004 PH: 040-65572082/9849075004 DILSUKH NGAR PUBLIC SCHOOL NEAR MAIN ROAD LINE DILSUKHNAGAR, HYDERABAD-500060 PH: 040-24045678 RAGHUNATH MODEL HIGH SCHOOL #20576, CHAITANYAPURI COLONY MALAKPET, HYDERABAD-500036 PH: 040-24040103 MS TALENT SCHOOL MASAB TANK, NEAR ABN AMRO BANK HYDERABAD PH: 040-23341234 E-MAIL: MSEDUCATION@GMAIL.COM WEB: WWW.MSEDUCATION.COM LITTLE TULIP SCHOOL MEHABOOB GARDEN TOMBS ROAD TOLICHOWKI, HYDERABAD PH: 040-23562911/23562111

SRI POOJITHA SCHOOL MIG-8, NEAR JNTU, DHARAMA REDDY COLONY KUKATPALLY, HYDERABAD-500072 PH: 040-23055692

BHARAT RATNA HIGH SCHOOL #7-1-77/2 DHARAM KARAN ROAD NEAR MCH GROUND AMEERPET , HYDERABAD-500016 PH: 040-66363316/23735805

MNR SCHOOL OF EXELLENCE BAGHYA NAGAR, SRIVANI NAGAR KUKATPALLY, HYDERABAD-500072 PH: 040-23065795 E-MAIL: INFO@MNRINDIA.ORG WEB: WWW.MNRINDIA.ORG

FROEBEL’S GARDEN HIGH SCHOOL STEET NO-5, RED HILLS, BEHIND NILOU HYDERABAD PH: 040-23391589 E-MAIL: INFO@FROEBELSKG.ORG WEB:WWW.FROEBELS.ORG

RAVINDRA BHARATI SCHOOL ROAD NO-4, KPHB COLONY HYDERABAD-500072 PH: 040-2351248/9912347215 WEB: WWW.RBSCHOOLS.IN

ST. ANN’S CONVENT NEAR ST.MARY’S CHRUCH YELLAMMAGUTTA, SECUNDERABAD HYDERABAD-500003 PH: 040-27802806/27801854

December-2009

ST JOHNS CHURCH HIGH SCHOOL 24-D, BESIDE ,ST JOHNS CHURCH ROAD SECUNDERABAD-500003 PH: 040-27730528/27732007 ST. MARK’S SCHOOL SARVASUKHI COLONY WEST MAREDPALLY NEHRU NAGAR, HYDERABAD-500026 PH: 040-27802858/9849701911 ST. MARY’S HIGH SCHOOL P-92, VIJAYA NAGAR COLONY SD ROAD , HYDERABAD-500059 PH: 040-24531485 GAWTHAM MODEL SCHOOL NEAR MINERWA COFFEE SHOP HIMAYATHNAGAR, HYDERABAD PH: 040-65154707/66562144 SUJATHA HIGH SCHOOL 5-9-170, CHAPEL ROAD ABIDS , HYDERABAD-500001 PH: 040-23203755/23387601 E-MAIL: INFO@SUJATHAHIGHSCHOOL.COM WEB: WWW.SUJATHAHIGHSCHOOL.COM ST JOHN GRAMMAR SCHOOL 5-9-273, ABIDS, HYDERABAD. PH: 040-27090130/23242603 E-MAIL: JOHNSHIGHSCHOOL_2006@YAHOO.CO.IN NARAYANA CONCEPT SCHOOL 7-1-71, DHARAM KARAM ROAD AMEERPET, HYDERABAD-500016 PH: 040-23428944/23428945 E-MAIL: NARAYANASCHOOL_AO@YAHOO.COM

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International Schools INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF HYDERABAD 6-3-346, ROAD NO.1, BANJARA HILLS-500034 HYDERABAD PH: 040-23351110/23319706/08417302100 FAX : +(91)4023395065 E-MAIL: ISH@ISHYD.ORG WEB: WWW.ISHHYD.COM INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL #8-1-300/1, SHAIKPET, GOLCONDA HYDERABAD-500008 PH: 040-23561085 E-MAIL: IS_SHAIKPET@REDIFMAIL.COM WEB: WWW.INTERNATIONALSCHOOL.ORG SIVANI THE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL ROAD NO. 4 BANJARA HILLS HYDERABAD-500034 PH: 040-23393915/23392794 SREENIDHI INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL #8-2-293/82/A/727, JUBILEE HILLS HYDERABAD-500033 PH: 040-23552362/23555423 E-MAIL:INFO@SREENIDHIINTERNATIONAL.COM WEB: WWW.SREENIDHIINTERNATIONAL.COM SRI AUROBINDO INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL #2-2-4/2, O.U. ROAD VIDYA NAGAR, ANDHRA MAHILA SABHA, NALLAKUNTA, HYDERABAD-500044 PH: 040-27071012 E-MAIL: ADMIN@SRIAURBINDOINTERNATIONALSCHOOL.IN WEB: WWW.SRIAURBINDOINTERNATIONALSCHOOL.IN AZAAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL #8-2-684/3, NOOR-UL-HABEEB ROAD BANJARA HILLS, HYDERABAD-500034 PH: 040-23304000 E-MAIL: ED@AZAANSCHOOL.COM WEB: WWW.AZAANSCHOOL.COM

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ORCHIDS THE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL 729, ROAD NO.36, JUBILEE HILLS, HYDERABAD - 500 034 TEL: 040 – 23556601/23556602 FAX: 040-23556604 E-MAIL: ORCHIDS_INTL@YAHOO.CO.IN WEB: WWW.ORCHIDSINTSCHOOL.COM OAKRIDGE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL KHAJAGUDA, ON NANAKRAMGUDA ROAD, CYBERABAD, HYDERABAD - 500 008 TEL: 040-25502460/23006436 FAX: 040- 23006161, E-MAIL: INFO@OAKRIDGE.IN WEB: WWW.OAKRIDGEINTERNATIONAL.COM DRS INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL SURVEY NO. 523,OPP.APPAREL PARK, HOOLAPALLY,MEDCHAL MANDAL, R.R. DISTRICT , HYDERBAD PH:040-23792123, 24, 25. E-MAIL: INFO@SRIINTERNATIONALSCHOOL.EDU.IN WEB:HTTP://WWW.DRSINTERNATIONAL.COM GLENDALE ACADEMY BESIDE SUN CITY, NEAR ARTILLERY CENTRE GATE, , HYDERABAD TEL: 040-64611937/6552-3980 E-MAIL : INFO@GLENDALEACADEMY.NET WEB: HTTP://GLENDALEACADEMY.NET SRI INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL 3-5-1016, STREET NO. 5, NARAYANGUDA HYDERABAD - 500029 PH: 040 – 23261111/9247566666 E-MAIL : INFO@SRIINTERNATIONALSCHOOL.EDU.IN WEB: WWW.SRIINTERNATIONALSCHOOL.EDU.IN PARKWOOD SCHOOL INTERNATIONAL NEAR MANNEGUDA VILLAGE, HYDERABAD VIKARABAD ROAD PUDUR MANDAL, R.R DIST - 501101 PH: 08416 - 274400 FAX: 08416 - 274328 EMAIL: INFO@PARKWOODSCHOOL.COM WEB: WWW.PARKWOODSCHOOL.COM

THE JAIN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL SURVEY NO. 349 & 364 MEDCHAL HIGHWAY, VILLAGE KALLAKAL MANDAL TOOPRAAN, DISTRICT MEDAK PH: 9391092931 / 41 040- 65575246 / 65225246 FAX: 040 66325246 E-MAIL: TJISHYD@JAINGROUP.INFO WEB: WWW.TJIS.AC.IN/HYDERABAD INDUS INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL-HYDERABAD SURVEY NO. 424 & 425, KONDAKAL VILLAGE, NEAR MOKILA, (M) SHANKARPALLY, RR DISTRICT PHONE: 08417 302101 WEB: WWW.INDUSSCHOOLHYD.COM: E-MAIL: MAIL@INDUSSCHOOLHYD.COM QUEENS INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL ALKAPUR TOWNSHIIP, MANIKONDA ROAD RAJENDRA NAGAR,HYDERABAD – 500030 PH: 040-6587 6848/9848121860 E-MAILQUEENSINTERNATIONAL@GMAIL.COM WEB: WWW.QUEENSINTERNATIONALSCHOOL.COM SADHU VASWANI INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL 150-152, JAYABHERI PARK BEHIND CINE PLANET MULTIPLEX KOMPALLY, SECUNDERABAD - 501401 PH: 9291417576 / 8418-232440 E-MAIL: ADMIN@SVISHYD.IN, SVISHYD@GMAIL.COM WEB: WWW.SVISHYD.IN GLOBAL INDIAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL SURVEY NO. 8 & 9, PEERJADIGUDA, UPPAL MANDAL, HYDERABAD – 39, INDIA TEL: 91770 97097,91770 37037 FAX: (40)27622727 WEB:WWW.GIISHYDERABAD.ORG E-MAIL: ADMISSIONS@HYD.GLOBALINDIANSCHOOL.ORG GENESIS INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL #98, MADINAGUDA, MIYAPUR, HYD-49 PH: 040 - 64581865 E-MAIL: INFO@GENESISINTSCHOOL.COM WEB: WWW.GENESISINTSCHOOL.COM December-2009

GREENWOOD KINDERGARTEN 6-3-249/1/1, RANGARAJU LANE, ROAD-1, BANJARA HILLS, HYDERABAD, ANDHRA PRADESH – 500034 PH:040 – 23397226 WEB: WWW.GREENWOODKINDERGARTEN.COM E-MAIL:GREENWOODKINDERGARTEN@YAHOO.COM

SUPRABHAT INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL GATKESAR MANDAL, MAIN ROAD, AUSHAPUR, RANGAREDDY - 501301 PH:(8415)-260126/9985311107, EMAIL:SUPRABHATINTERNATIONALSCHOOL@GMAIL.COM

VIPS INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL PLOT NO 152 & 153, SHAHEEN NAGAR, NIRAJ INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL CHANDRAYAN GUTTA, HYDERABAD – 500059 6-3-1219/6/1, NCR, 1ST FLOOR, SUBBAMMA PH: 040-65186418/9246873131/ TOWERS, UMA NAGAR, BEGUMPET - 500016 9849648031 SCHOOL SITE: 132, 133, KANDLAKOYA, MEDCHAL WEB:WWW.VIPINTERNATIONALSCHOO.COM MANDAL, RR DISTRICT, HYDERABAD (A.P) INDIA. WWW.VIPEDUCATION.COM PH :08418 260476, [* INTERNAL ERROR: INVALID FILE FORMAT. | IN-LINE.WMF *]FAX: 40 SRI VIDYANIKETHAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL ROAD NO 92, JUBILEE HILLS, 66103717 HYDERABAD – 500034 E-MAIL:INFO@NIRAJINTERNATIONALSCHOOL.COM WEB:WWW.NIRAJINTERNATIONALSCHOOL.COM PH: 040-23600367 E-MAIL:INFO@VIDYANIKETHAN.EDU AUROMIRA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL WEB:WWW.VIDYANIKETHAN.EDU B-2 DURGABHAI DESHMUKH COLONY, TOWARDS SHIVAM ROAD, NEAR FRIENDSBAKERY, INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES SHIVAM ROAD, HYDERABAD – 500044 PH: 040-27426442/27641738/9848493442 PLOT NO 221 ISIT TOWERS, MYTHRI NAGAR, E-MAIL:PRAMEELA53@HOTMAIL.COM MADINAGUDA, MIYAPUR, HYDERABAD – 500138 SAMHITA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL PH:40149999/934656112 BEHIND T V TOWER, ASMANGAD, E-MAIL: INFO@ISIT-IT.COM WEB: WWW.ISIT.EDU.IN MALAKPET, H-36, HYDERABAD – 500036 KISHOR SURYWANSHI INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL PH:040-24064941,24064941,66821811 DINDORI ROAD, BEHIND AROGYA VIDYAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF THINKING VIDYAPITH, NASHIK, FLAT NO 303, ANNAPURNA BLOCK ADITHYA NASHIK – 422001 ENCLAVE, NEAR SATYAM PH: (253)-6450720/6450721/9225130923, THEATER, AMEERPET, HYDERABAD – 500016 E-MAIL:INFO@KSISNASHIK.COM PH: 040-64199561/988505554,924615554 WEB:WWW.KSISNASHIK.COM E-MAIL:INFO@ISTHYDINDIA.COM, ISTHYDNEW@YAHOO.CO.IN SPRINGDALE ACCAMEDY DE INTERNATIONAL 34, TIRUMALAHILLS, DILSUKHNAGAR, WEB:WWW.ISTHYDINDIA.COM HYDERABAD – 500036 SUNSHINE PH: 040-64555722/64555866/9393038844 AN INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS PRE SCHOOL E-MAIL:ADMISSIONS@SAIAPEC.COM MIG-36A, ADJ. TO MCH PARK INDIAN AIRLINES WEB:WWW.SAIAPEC.COM COLONY, LANE 2 STREET, 3, BEGUMPET, SCHOLASTIC INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL HYDERABAD – 500016 10-3-311/7/2 CASTLE HILLS, VIJAY NAGAR PH: 040-64546743/9703334783 , COLONY, HYDERABAD – 500057 E-MAIL:SUNSHINE@SATNAVTECH.COM PH: 040-23592200/2359388/9704229922 E-MAIL:INFO@SISHYDERABAD.COM

December-2009

Q S INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL SHINE NAGAR BUS STOP, BARKAS, HYDERABAD – 500002 PH:040-24441900 RAINBOW INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL 11-5-437, OPP PRAGATHI PRINTERS, RED HILLS, HYDERABAD – 500004 PH:040-66048392 E-MAIL: SPRY.EDMEDIA@YAHOO.CO.IN KAUSHALYA GLOBAL THE INTL SCHOOL 7022, AL KARIM TRADE CENTER, RANIGUNJ, HYDERABAD – 500003 PH: 040-32431582/32422831/9391013636 E-MAIL: KAUSHALYA.TCS@GMAIL.COM WEB: WWW.KAUSHALYAGLOBAL.COM SWAMI NARAYAN GURUKUL INTL SCHOOL YENKAPALLY MOINABAD NEAR GANDIPET, HYDERABAD, HYDERABAD – 500001 PH:040-32932481 /9440754520 JAIN HERITAGE A CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL PLOT NO 536, NO 8-2-293/J/1, PHASE 3, FILM NAGAR, ROAD NO 86, JUBILEE HILLS, HYDERABAD – 500034 PH:040-32438181,32458181,32525252 E-MAIL:MALINISAMAYAM@YAHOO.COM WEB:CHANDRASHEKAR@JAINGROUP.NET GLOBAL INDIAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL SURVEY NO. 8 & 9, PEERJADIGUDA, UPPAL MANDAL, HYDERABAD - 39 TEL: 9177097097 (MAIN) 99893-37538 (MOBILE) SANTA MARIA YOUSUFGUDA, HYDERABAD-500045 TEL: 040-23544300/5642 FAX: 040-23545639

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Residential Schools ABHYASA RESIDENTIAL PUBLIC SCHOOL PLOT NO.1253, ST. JOHNA ROAD,SECUNDERABAD OPPOSITE KEYS HIGH SCHOOL, HYDERABAD-500003 PHONE: 040-66047855 E-MAIL: ABHYASASCHOOL@YAHOO.COM WEB: WWW.ABHYASASCHOOL.COM

SHANTI NIKETAN VIDYALAYA SHAMIRPET CHANAKYAPURI SHAMIRPET ROAD R R DISTRICT, HYDERABAD – 500001 PH: 040-65219999/8418244444/ 8418244738 E-MAIL:SISYA27@YAHOO.CO.IN WEB: WWW.SHANTINIKETAN.NET

CHAITANYA RESIDENTIAL HIGH SCHOOL BHAGYA NAGAR COLONY, UPPAL BEERAPPAGADDA, NEAR UPPAL DEPOT, HYDERABAD500039 PH: 040-27205131, 996354660

VIGNAN HIGH SCHOOL RESIDENTIAL NEAR SINGAPORE TOWN SHIP, GHATKESAR, HYDERABAD – 500001 PH:8415309237/9866399774

SRI KAKATIYA SCHOOL OF EXCELLENCE 23-70/2, OPP KOTHAPET FRUIT MARKET, NETAJI NAGAR, DILSUKHNAGAR, HYDERABAD – 500036 PH: 040-24040192/24140867/9885426666 SRI RAJDHANI RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL 2-79, NIZAMPET, RAJDHANI VIDYANAGAR, KUKATPALLY, HYDERABAD – 500072 PH: 040-23058077/23067132/23067078 VIGNANS PRABODHANADA PRASHANTI NIKETAN GHATKESAR KONDAPUR VILLAGE, HYDERABAD – 500001 PH: 8415395582/84153095738/415309574 9866399771,9391356849,9866399774 E-MAIL: VIGNAN.HYD@GMAIL.COM

HITECH MODERN RESIDENTIAL HIGH SCHOOL ATHVELLI VILLAGE, RAGHAVENDRA NAGAR NEAR MEDCHAL COURT, R R DIST, MEDCHAL, RANGAREDDY – 501401 PH: 9848438877/9848871243/9848214868 E-MAIL:ADMIN@HITECHRESIDENTIAL.COM ST. PAULS DAY CUM RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL QULI QUTUB SHAH URDU RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL WEB:WWW.HITECHRESIDENTIAL.COM DAYAKAMAL TOWERS 4TH FLR, PADMAJA COLONY, MAISDARAM, BARKAS, HYDERABAD – 500002 VICTORIA MEMORIAL HOME & RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL PH: 040-24443851, FLAT NO401 & 402 NEAR HUDA COLONY, SAROOR NAGAR, HYDERABAD KARKHANA, HYDERABAD – 500009 VASISTHA RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL PH: 040-27744315/40350415/9849008935 – 500035 BESIDE POST OFFICE, E-MAIL: STPAULS_SHAMIRPET@YAHOO.CO.IN PH: 040-24045144 WEB: WWW.STPAULSSCHOOLS.COM , FATHE NAGAR, HYDERABAD - 500018 INDO ENGLISH RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL PH: 040-23710313/9347333767 GURUKULA VIDYAPEETH HIGH SCHOOL M N R BUILDING, SRIVANI NAGAR OPP JNTU, CRYSTAL RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL IBRAHIMPATNAM, HYDERABAD – 505450 KUKATPALLY, HYDERABAD – 500072 BTM CAMPUS, RAMPALLY POST KEESARA PH:040-66045604 PH: 23058671/ 23053380/23065795/ MANDAL, R L NAGAR, HYDERABAD – 500001 E-MAIL: GVPDSRAO@YAHOO.CO.IN 23065897 WEB:WWW.GURUKULAVIDYAPEETH.ORG PH: 040-65457235 VSK MEMORIAL HIGH SCHOOL JOY LAND SCHOOL AND HOSTEL VIVEKANANDA NAGAR EXTN, SRI KRISHNA NAGAR SIRIA ORPHANS RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL JOY LAND CAMPUS, NEAR ARTILLERY CENTRE, COLONY, KUKATPALLY, HYDERABAD – 500072 BESIDE SHAM MARBELS, ROAD NO 4 HYDER SHAKOTE, LANGER HOUSE, PH: 040-23068155/23161209/9849695336 SAI NAGAR COLONY, NAGOLE, H NO 2-3-457/2, HYDERABAD – 500028 HYDERABAD – 500036 SIDDHARTHA RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL PH: 040-66048389 PH: 040-24222644/9866670278 , 8-3-1060/B-8, OPP BIG BITE LANE, E-MAIL:FWSDMK@YAHOO.COM E-MAIL:SIRIA98_ORGN@YAHOO.CO.IN WEB: WWW.FWS.IN , SRI NAGAR COLONY, HYDERABAD – 500038 WEB: WWW.SIRIAINDIA.ORG , PH: 040-23744240/23741986 A.P. RESIDENTIAL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION JAWAHAR VIDYA NILAYAM HIGH SCHOOL E-MAIL: SIDRES@1995YAHOO.COM 5-8-591 3RD FLR GAGAN VIHAR, NEAR SUDARSHAN THEATER, JAWAHAR NAGAR, MOZAMJAHI ROAD, NAMPALLY, MUSHEERABAD, HYDERABAD – 500048 HYDERABAD – 50000 PH: 040-27666562 PH:040-24680415/24734898 9849872773/9866005814 ACM RESEDENTIAL SCHOOL NEAR RAILWAY GATE, MEDCHAL, RANGAREDDY – 501401 PH: 8418221390/8418317221/9246158925

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December-2009

LTBC RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 11-13-70/A/9/A, LAL BAHADUR COLONY, HARIPURI COLONY, DILSUKHNAGAR, HYDERABAD – 500036. PH: 040-24036864

VIGNANS PRABODHANADA PRASHANTI NIKETAN GHATKESAR KONDAPUR VILLAGE, HYDERABAD, HYDERABAD – 500001 PH: 9391356849,9866399774 8415309574, 8415395580 E-MAIL: VIGNAN.HYD@GMAIL.COM

A.P. SOCIAL WELFARE RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS NR. PAHADI HANUMAN TEMPLE, MAHENDRA HILLS, RAOS RESIDENTIAL HIGH SCHOOL EAST MARREDPALLY, HYDERABAD – 500026. PH: BALAJI NAGAR, KUKATPALLY, 040-27730203 HYDERABAD – 500072 PH:040-23056317/65178888 KAKATIYA ACADEMY KUKATPALLY (RESIDENTIAL) V.R.S & V.J RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL PLOT NO. 160, SAPTAGIRI COLONY BEHIND VIVEKANANDA NAGAR, KUKATPALLY, #4 – 45, NEAR VNR ENGINEERING COLLEGE MADNIGUDA, MIYAPUR, HYDERABAD – 500039 HYDERABAD – 500072 PH: 040-23060852/23161424/9848145594 PH: 040-23041511/ 23041512 SHANTINIKETAN RESIDENTIAL INSTITUTION PLOT NO. 10, GAUTHAMINAGAR, VANASTHALIPURAM, HYDERABAD – 500661 PH: 040-24021975 E-MAIL: SHANTINIKETAN_MR@YAHOO.COM CREEK PLANET SCHOOL(RESIDENTIAL) BOWRAMPET, MEDCHAL HIGHWAY ROAD, QUTBHULLAPUR MANDAL, MIYAPUR, HYDERABAD – 500138 PH: 040-23161364,64581223,64581177 E-MAIL:DIRECTOR@THECREEKSCHOOL.COM WEB:WWW.THECREEKSCHOOL.COM

December-2009

A.P SCOCIAL WELFARE RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL MHINDRA HILLS BALAM RAI SOCIETY WEST MAREDPALLY , HYDERABAD-500026 PH: 040-27730203 ANDHRA PRADESH RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL NEAR GOKUL THETARE , N.R.M PURAM, BORABANDA, SANATH NAGAR, HYDERABAD-500018 PH: 040-23835065

SHANTI NIKETHAN VIDLAYA RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL OPPOSITE RATNA DEEP SUPER MARKET VIKRAM PURI KRKHANA, SECUNDERABAD. H.O, HYDERABAD-500003 PH: 040-26219999 ST. AGENS DAY RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL SURVEY NO -104, (P) GUNDLA POCHAMPALLY MEDCHAL, KAPRA R.R DIST HYDERABAD-500062 PH: 04027900228 ST.PAULS RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL NEAR KFC RESTURAN , #402DIA KAMAL TOWERS PADMAJA COLONY , TIRUMALA GIRI HYDERABAD- 27744315/ 9849008935 JAWHAR VIDYA NILAYAM HIGH SCHOOL NEAR SUDARSHAN THETARE, JAWHAR NAGAR MUSHEERABAD HYDERABAD-500048 PH: 040-27666562 ST. JOHNS CHURCH PRIMARY SCHOOL 24-D, EAST MAREDPALLY SECUNDERABAD-500026 PH: 040-27732007 VIHJAY BHARATHI RESIDENTIAL 10B, BANJARA HILLS, HYDERABAD-500034 PH: 040-23547698

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Best Schools of Hyderabad 2009