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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 21, ISSUE 20 NOVEMBER 7–13, 2012

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TAK EE E ON E! INSIDE

NORTHWEST MOUNTAIN GUIDE Plan your winter adventures NEWS 8

SNOW ME THE MONEY In McCall, snow means cash FEATURE 12

SNOW BOUND The science behind making snow work for us FOOD 40

SOUP SEASON It’s time to bust out the hot soup

“There’s that tightrope walker aspect of it. We can screw up. And we do.”

NOISE 28

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BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Editorial Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Amy Atkins, Harrison Berry, Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Damon Hunzeker, David Kirkpatrick, Christina Marface, Andrew Mentzer, Ted Rall, Catie Young Intern: Jordyn Price Advertising Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Emile Lemoine, Emile@boiseweekly.com Zach Ritchie, Zach@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, production@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Patrick Sweeney, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Lars Lamb, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Elaynea Robinson, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2012 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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NOTE THE BUGGLES WERE WRONG ABOUT JOURNALISM Back when I was a reporter for my college newspaper at Portland State University, it was a regular occurrence to interview students for an article and learn that our conversation was the moment they discovered PSU had a student newspaper, let alone three of them. However, here in the big leagues, things are less different than you’d expect. I’ve lost count of the number of times that I am sent out on a story with Boise Weekly’s video camera to shoot a piece for our website and get the question, “What are you going to do with the video?” “Put it on Page 6,” I often reply. You’d think that seven years after the founding of YouTube and nearly three years after BW began its own dedicated video section to augment coverage, the answer would be obvious. Apparently not. And it’s not just interview subjects that seem puzzled by our video camera. Former BW Editor Rachael Daigle grumbled many a time about newspapers that pass the Internet off as a fad. Like it or not, recognize it or not, the news world is evolving from organizations that focus on a single medium to organizations that serve as multimedia news hubs, executing coverage in whatever format is best-suited to the story and to the audience. One of my favorite examples of this multimedia approach is from last year, when Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area installed a new high-speed quad chairlift on chair three. Moving the pieces of the lift into position on the backside of the mountain required a cargo helicopter, a dramatic and newsworthy event. And in covering it, news outlets could take any approach they liked. Still photos could capture an iconic moment. Words could paint a picture. Video could show the scope of the event. Most outlets took a single approach. Boise Weekly took all of them, putting a bold photo above a story that included an embedded video to offer a broader understanding of the story. Another great example is when local high school students walked out of class to protest Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna’s education reforms. Everyone wrote about it, but BW had the student walkout on video—images that helped readers truly understand the story. The Buggles were dead wrong about journalism. Video can save the radio star. It’s a multimedia future and I, for one, find it thrilling. Something new and exciting is being born, and we lucky few—readers and reporters alike—get to be a part of it what it grows into. —Josh Gross

COVER ARTIST

ARTIST: Julia Green TITLE: Big Helper MEDIUM: Acrylic ARTIST STATEMENT: Winter is nearly here. Time to snuggle up with your squirrel-y, rabbit-y, raccoon-y and s’quatch-y friends.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 7–13, 2012 | 3

WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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MAIL

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Economy of Snow: McCall plans for the white stuff 8

PAINTERS BY NUMBERS In the latest edition of Boise Weekly’s Graph of the Week, BW breaks down Idaho’s employment rates by counties. Find out who was rocking a 3 percent unemployment rate on Citydesk.

IDAHO’S NOT SO GREAT WALL The Idaho Statesman has announced a paywall for its website that will kick in this month. Get the whole story on Citydesk.

HOBBITS KNOW AIRLINE SAFETY Air New Zealand has produced a Lord of the Ringsthemed air safety video. If Idaho did the same for Napoleon Dynamite, we might retain more air routes. See the video on Cobweb.

‘DEAR CHURCHILL’ LETTERS The remains of a WWII messenger pigeon with a coded secret message still strapped to its foot were discovered in a UK chimney. Get the whole story on Cobweb.

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CITIZEN

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FEATURE Science of Snow

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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2012 NORTHWEST MOUNTAIN GUIDE

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NOISE Doing the math with El Ten Eleven

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MUSIC GUIDE

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ARTS Aaron Bell

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SCREEN Skyfall

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REC Best Snow in Idaho offers a looking into the history of Brundage Mountain 36 FOOD Warm winter soups to go 40 BEER GUZZLER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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MAIL

T H E MES S A G E R E A DS ‘ T R AP P E D I N A CH I MN EY. S E N D H E L P. ’ ” —chris, boiseweekly.com (boiseweekly.com, Cobweb, “Dead WWII Carrier Pigeon With Secret Message Discovered,” Nov. 2, 2012)

TRAPPER SPEAKS UP I’m a provider, mother, angler, huntress and a trapper. I take offense to the way some people think my life should be bent to their ideals. My obligation in life is to provide for my family. Part of my family’s sustenance comes from my efforts as a trapper. I sell some of the pelts for income, and we eat some of the wholesome meat, such as raccoon and beaver, that I bring home. My life is not for everybody, but does that mean special-interest groups should have the right to dictate what I do? I don’t cram trapping down anyone’s throat, but there are groups in Idaho who jam their anti-trapping and anti-hunting messages down everyone’s throats unsolicited. HJR 2 was written to protect hunting, trapping and fishing for future Idahoans. HJR 2 scares some people because it limits their ability to eliminate hunting, trapping—basically all animal use—by degrees. They attack trapping first because there aren’t that many of us. Their constant voter initiatives are a nuisance to the public. Hunters, trappers and anglers need constitutional protection from special-interest groups that have nothing better to do than assault the public with their dogma. My family has voted YES on HJR 2. We all need HJR 2 to pass so we

can teach our children the value of wildlife, proper and successful methods of conservation and the available options to provide for a family in the future. —Al Holloway, Meridian

DEVIOUS PLOT Bill Cope: Just thinking ... if abortion becomes a felony, then wouldn’t all those women have a record and, in the Republican world, lose their right to vote? How convenient. Just thinking. How sad. How devious. —Jamie Taylor, Boise

REAL BIKERS DON’T WEAR NEON One cool fall morning and where have all the cyclists gone? What a bunch of lightweights; nuzzling at mommy’s breast once again. Whenever one of you streakers go flying around me on the Greenbelt—with your precious alloy frames, team kit, DayGlo riding apparel—I usually mutter something under my breath like, “See you in January!” or “See you in February!” But, of course, I won’t. You guys don’t ride in the snow. You don’t ride in the rain, either. Heck, you don’t even ride when there’s rain in the forecast. You’ll never know if it actually rained during your commute window or not because you’re not

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

out there. And you sure as hell won’t be caught riding when temps are in the teens. How do I know? Because I ride every day— year around—regardless of the weather. And I don’t see you out there. Anywhere. You are the nancy boys and the girlie girls of the cycling world. Collectively, to me, you’re the fair weather, DayGlo crowd. I imagine you think you’re pretty hardcore. You most emphatically are not. But you could be. So here’s the challenge. Park that POS yuppie frame you paid way too much for (oh wait—it’s already parked—never mind) and any day, for about half of what you paid for that cute little DayGlo riding jacket, get on craigslist and buy yourself a real bike (aka a steel-framed mountain bike). Front shocks are OK. Rear suspension is for girls, so keep that in mind while shopping. Then get yourself a snowboard helmet. Mine has removable vent plugs and removable ear flaps which are cozy warm—like your mommy’s breasts—you’ll like ‘em. Once you get over your childish fear of the cold, you’ll be equipped to go snowboarding, too. A pair of ski gloves, some ski goggles and you’re good to go. Yes, you too can ride your bicycle ... even (gasp!) in the winter. So quit checking the friggin’ weather report. Get on your bikes and ride. By the end of October, I’ll be 59. If I can hump and pump 20 miles a day to get back and forth to work, year round, regardless of the weather, so can you. —Jim Peterson, Meridian

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OPINION/BILL COPE

IN THE INTERIM Idle chatter outside real time “An’ another thing ...” “Forget it, Red. It’s over.” “Whatchew mean? What’s over?” “The election. That was yesterday. There’s nothing more to say about it.” “You gone dotty, Cope? This here’s Friday. We got maybe six ’r eight days left. There’s plen’y of time to get a few more licks in.” “Make that four days, Red. Three, if you don’t count Tuesday. But the point is, anything we say today doesn’t get heard until Wednesday. And by then, what you think, what I think, none of it will mean squat.” “Dang, Cope. You’s givin’ me moose bumps. What y’r sayin’ makes me feel like I’m in that one movie where what’s-’is-name goes back in time to do somethin’-’r-other and ever’thing gets all boogered up.” “Back to the Future?” “Quit talkin’ like that, would ya’? It’s creeping me up.” “Fine. Last thing I want, Red, is to creep you up. Let’s change the subject. I have to start thinking ahead, anyway. Now that the election is over, it’s time to write about other things. You know ... things that don’t have anything to do with politics or the lying, sneaky, ignorant, racist, honorless sacks of sh ...” “So’s you got any ideas yet on what y’r gonna write about?” “Sort of. I’m considering a column on the new print policies in some newspapers that have done away with the italics on book and movie titles. It bugs the bejesus out of me, Red. The way it is now, readers can’t tell if a person means Gone With the Wind, or if he’s just saying something is ‘gone with the wind.’ Isn’t that stupid?” “Cope, I ain’t got no notion whate’er o’ what y’r talkin’ about.” “It’s just like now, when I said ‘back to the future,’ I had to say it that way instead of Back to the Future. See the difference?” “Uuuuuuuhhh ... not that I notice.” “See, for decades and decades, we’ve been italicizing major titles. And now, some genius has come up with new guidelines and we can’t do it any more. So if for some reason I write the line ‘I just re-read On the Road,’ people won’t know if I’m saying I read On the Road again, or if I was on the road the last time I read something. Get it?” “Uh, you mean it’s like what Willie Nelson said in that song o’ his.” “What!?” “You said ‘On the Road Agin,’ I heard ya’.” “No. That’s not what I meant, I ... um ... let’s see, where was I?” “Anyhows, Cope, if’n you want my honest ’pinion, whate’er it is y’r tryin’ to say is the gull durn dumbest idea f’r a column I ever heard. If you put somethin’ like that in

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y’r paper, folks’ll be thinkin’ you done flew over the cuckoo’s nest.” “Now see? That’s exactly what I’m getting at. Do you mean to say I ‘done flew over the cuckoo’s nest?’ Or do you mean One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest?” “Hows ‘bout we change the subject again, Cope. Let’s talk about somethin’ wheres I know what y’r talkin’ about. Like hows ’bout that Sandy. That was some storm, huh?” “You’re right, Red. That was some storm. Makes me wonder how many Libertarians are left in New Jersey.” “Is that s’posed t’ be funny? You sayin’ how Libratarians are such light-weight dust bunnies, they get blown away in a big wind?” “Ah, never mind. I don’t feel like having anything political in my brain right now.” “Cope, y’knows what I think? I think you need to find y’rself a vampire f’r y’r column.” “A vampire?” “Yassir! Ain’tcha noticed? There’s vampires in about ever’thing y’see anymore. Tells you what, if’n you want the kids to keep reading y’r writin’, y’r gonna need a vampire.” “Red, what on Earth would I do with a vampire?” “All I knows is, if’n they can stick vampires in a story about ol’ Abe Lincoln, there’s got o’ be some way you can stick a vampire in that newspaper what you write for. An’ it’s somethin’ you don’t see in none o’ the other newspapers here’bouts, so you’d be the first.” “I will take it under advisement, Red. But no zombies. I can picture having a semiintelligent conversation with a vampire but talking to a zombie would be like trying to make sense to one of Rush Lim ...” “Say, Cope, I meant t’ tell ya’. Y’know that buddy o’ mine what I go duck shootin’ with?” “You mean that Tom guy?” “Yup, Tom. He was in a bookstore lookin’ f’r a hows-to manual on makin’ mallard quackers, an’ he spots a spooky story you wrote for one o’ them ... what they call ... anthraploogies.” “I think you mean ‘anthology,’ Red. And yes, I and about 30 other Idaho writers have stories in a new one.” “Wull, what I’m sayin’ is that ol’ Tom saw y’r story in that bookstore.” “Now, Red, listen carefully. Are you saying ‘Tom saw my story in the bookstore?’ Or do you mean Tom Sawyer story in the bookstore?” “Garn blastit, Cope! I’m athinkin’ maybe that there president’s race knocked a few dings in y’r noodle.” “That hurts, Red ... especially coming from a guy who thinks I should have a vampire in my column.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

OPINION/TED RALL

IT’S 15 PERCENT ABOUT ROE V. WADE Why abortion isn’t the issue

As a poster to my blog commented sarcastically about President Barack Obama apologists: “Please vote for Obama. True, he sucks, but ...” Which summarizes the feelings of many Democratic voters. Others try to justify their cognitive dissonance with one simple plea: If Obama loses, abortion will be banned. You’ve heard their argument: “It’s all about the Supreme Court.” “It’s all about Roe v. Wade.” Indeed, because four members of the Supreme Court are in their 70s, a Mitt Romney victory could lead to the end of federally guaranteed abortion rights. Obama played on women’s fears in a recent interview with Rolling Stone: “I don’t think there’s any doubt [that Roe v. Wade could be overturned],” Obama said. “Typically, a president is going to have one or two Supreme Court nominees during the course of his presidency, and we know that the current Supreme Court has at least four members who would overturn Roe v. Wade. All it takes is one more for that to happen.” A woman’s right to control her body is important. It’s also popular—77 percent of Americans think abortion should be legal in some or all circumstances. But single-issue voting is morally problematic. How does one weigh abortion rights for American women against the right of Pakistanis to not get blown up by a Predator drone? Shall we turn a blind eye to the

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people of Honduras suffering through the aftermath of an old-fashioned military coup against a democratically elected president, an outrage backed by Obama? Let’s talk about abortion. If you can overlook Gitmo and the bankster bailouts and the lack of investigations of Wall Street and George W. Bush-era torturers, even if you’re cool with the health care sellout and the wars and a president who golfs while the unemployed lose their homes—if abortion is all you care about—there still isn’t much reason to vote for Obama. First, let’s be clear about what’s at stake. Abortion rights are not at stake. What we’re really talking about is whether abortion will be 85 percent safe and legal (post-Romney) or 100 percent (post-Obama). The status of abortion in America lives in an absurd legal netherworld, ad hoc, awkward and makeshift, neither legal nor illegal. Abortion should be a settled issue. Roe v. Wade, only as good as the current composition of the Supreme Court, can and should be supplanted by a federal law passed by Congress and signed by the president. Would Romney sign a federal ban? Probably not. An Obama campaign ad includes a 2007 debate quote by Romney, in which he said he’d be “delighted” to sign such a bill were it to cross his desk. But it leaves out what he said next, that a 11 ban is “not where America is today.”

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 7–13, 2012 | 7

CITYDESK/NEWS NEWS

NO BUSINESS LIKE SNOW BUSINESS The real color of money in McCall is white GEORGE PRENTICE

BW’s George Prentice talks with Sen. Mike Crapo.

ELECTION FATIGUE? NOW, THE REAL FIGHT BEGINS

UÊÓää£Ê>˜`ÊÓääÎÊ ÕŇiÀ>ʈ˜Vœ“iÊÌ>ÝÊ«Àœ‡ ۈȜ˜ÃÊiÝ«ˆÀi]Ê«Õň˜}ÊÌ>ÝÊÀ>ÌiÃÊÕ«Ê>VÀœÃÃÊ Ì…iÊLœ>À`° UÊ/>ÝÊVÀi`ˆÌÃÊi˜>VÌi`ʈ˜Ê̅iÊvi`iÀ>ÊÃ̈“ՏÕÃÊ iÛ>«œÀ>Ìi° UÊ/…iÊ«>ÞÀœÊÌ>Ýʅœˆ`>ÞÊ}œiÃÊ>Ü>Þ]ÊÀ>ˆÃˆ˜}Ê Ì>ÝiÃʜ˜Ê“iÀˆV>½ÃÊ£Èäʓˆˆœ˜ÊÜ>}iÊi>À˜‡ iÀð UÊ iÜÊ«ÀœÛˆÃˆœ˜ÃÊvÀœ“Ê̅iÊvvœÀ`>LiÊ >ÀiÊ VÌÊLՓ«ÊÕ«ÊÌ>ÝiÃʈ˜ÊœÀ`iÀÊ̜ʈ˜VÀi>ÃiÊ vi`iÀ>ÊÀiÛi˜ÕiÃÊLÞÊfÎ{°ÈÊLˆˆœ˜° UÊ “iÀ}i˜VÞÊ՘i“«œÞ“i˜ÌÊLi˜iwÌÃÊiÝ«ˆÀi° UÊf££ÊLˆˆœ˜Êˆ˜ÊVÕÌÃÊ̜Ê̅iÊ>“œÕ˜ÌÃÊ «…ÞÈVˆ>˜ÃÊ>ÀiÊ«>ˆ`Ê՘`iÀÊi`ˆV>ÀiÊ>ÀiÊ ˆ˜Ã̈ÌÕÌi`° The Tax Policy Center estimates that the effects total more than half a trillion dollars next year alone. The very wealthy would have the biggest hit, but the poor would not go unscathed. For households in the lowest income quintile, earning less than $20,113 a year, the average federal tax rate climbs 3.7 percent, with taxes increasing $412 annually, on average. “There’s genuine concern,” said Crapo. “But I don’t think we’re at the point where the American people realize the imminency and scope of this threat. We used to talk about this by saying, ‘If we don’t solve our debt crisis, our children or grandchildren will pay a terrible price.’ We create an impression that this issue is a decade or even a generation away.” In fact, the threat may be closer to days away, according to Crapo, who is anxious to head back to Washington, D.C., and get serious, no matter who’s in the Oval Office. “All the moving parts can be shuffled around, depending on political outcomes,” he said. “But whoever is president has to be willing to look at overhauling the tax code.”

summer. And yes, those people got killed,” said Certano. “But the media started convincing people that there simply wasn’t any skiing. GEOR GE PR ENTICE

Anyone foolishly expecting to exhale now that the bickering of who should be president has ended better take another deep breath. The doom swirling around something called “taxmageddon” could make sniping from political action committees look like amateur hour. “I think it’s accurate,” said Sen. Mike Crapo when Citydesk asked the three-term Idaho Republican senator about the apocalyptic-sounding term. “And if taxmageddon happens, every taxpayer in America, not just the wealthy, will see a significant increase in their taxes.” In an era that overabuses the cliche “perfect storm,” taxmaggeddon is indeed a confluence of occurrences that could wreck Hurricane Sandy-like havoc on the American economy. Unless a lame-duck congress comes to the rescue, here’s what happens to the U.S. tax code on Dec. 31:

“Call off Christmas,” snarled the wicked Sheriff of Notingham in 1991’s Robin Hood. Perish the thought.

The calm before the snow. [Left to right- Mike McLaughlin, owner of Bear Creek Lodge, Rick Certano, President of Brudage Mountain, David Carey, Owner of Jug Mountain Ranch and Hotel McCall and Mike DeBoer, owner of inIdaho.com. Carver, inIdaho.com’s office dog was preoccupied with a squirrel.

Neither a 14th century robber baron nor any other Grinch took responsibility for canceling Christmas at regional ski resorts last year. It was the big bad weatherman, with a little help from his dastardly media henchmen. “It was the first time in my 40 years in this business that I missed Christmas,” said Rick Certano, president and general manager of Brundage Mountain Resort, whose career includes managing resorts in Colorado, Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin. On Christmas Day Certano looked out his window and was greeted by a scant dusting of snow–certainly not enough to open Brundage–which has played host to holiday skiers for more than a half-century. “We didn’t open until Dec. 30 [2011]. Even then it rained,” Certano remembered. But by the time Brundage was going full-tilt in January–boasting some of its best snowfall in memory–reports in the national media were already writing the obituary of the 2011-2012 ski season. “The media is powerful. And who were they talking to? Resorts in Colorado, Utah and Lake Tahoe, where it still looked like

Well, we had very good skiing. It just started late. But by the time the news media had filed all of those reports, it didn’t matter.” Certano estimated that business dropped approximately 20 percent during the 2011 holiday season at Brundage. Traditionally, beginning in March, Brundage’s customer base trails off by approximately 50 percent each weekend until the mountain closes for the season. Brundage closed April 21 this year. “But this year, it went off a cliff,” said Certano. “There was never any momentum established at the beginning of the season. There was no critical mass and I heard that from my associates throughout the industry. They just couldn’t overcome the resistance.” InIdaho.com, the statewide central reservations system which books more that 1,100 rental properties throughout the Gem State–including 500 in the McCall area– reports that the 2011 holiday season was down approximately 18 percent. “But for the season, we were actually up 1 percent,” said Mike DeBoer, owner of inIdaho.com and president of Brundage

Mountain’s board of directors. “The average opening at Brundage in the past 30 years has been Dec. 2,” said DeBoer. “But several years ago, we opened on Nov. 12.” “That was my first year here,” said Certano. “I got here Sept. 13, 2005, and we opened two months later.” But Certano, DeBoer and a group of business owners and operators who sat down with Boise Weekly on Nov. 1 in midtown McCall agreed that the past was the past and, in fact, the future is very promising. “Bookings are up,” said DeBoer. “They’re up substantially. I’d say about 22 percent statewide.” DeBoer said he thinks Idahoans have “been hunkered down enough” for a while and will be returning to the ski hills at some of their highest numbers since before the recession. “People are excited, and I just don’t think they’re buying the idea that we’ll have two terrible years in a row,” he said. “People are booking for Christmas right now, and I can tell you, that’s a pent-up demand.” And some of the most recent statistics indicate that Idaho tourism may serve as a beacon through a still-foggy economic recovery in the Gem State. “I’ve been looking at the bed tax numbers: the number of beds filled in resort communities in Idaho,” said Certano. “And this past July, we just recorded our secondbest month ever in the history of McCall.” Certano paused for emphasis. “That’s ever,” he repeated. “Now, I have a theory: The previous high number was back in 2007 but if you remember, construction workers had filled our area hotels back then. That was back when construction was still booming here. So take that factor out, and I think, from a pure tourism standpoint, we’re doing better now than ever before.” But Certano said none of the recent success was accidental. He didn’t hesitate a beat when asked if McCall was being more aggressive. “Absolutely. More aggressive. More organized. More people-involved,” he said. Certano wears another hat as president of the McCall Chamber of Commerce, which, he was quick to add, bears no resemblance to its previous incarnations. “When I first got here, the old director of the McCall Chamber was literally locked in a jail for embezzlement,” Certano remembered. In fact, the McCall Chamber has had a troubled past, with more than one director behind bars. In 1990, Dennis Pierce admitted to stealing thousands of dollars from the Chamber in the 11 months that he served as

—George Prentice

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NEWS executive director. And in 2004, Chamber Executive Director Tracey Smith was convicted of stealing thousands of dollars from the Chamber’s bank account. “We rebuilt the Chamber, piece by piece by piece,” said Certano. “We don’t even have a Chamber director right now. All of the members, the business owners and managers are packaging and promoting together.” Mike McLaughlin said there’s a tangible change, all for the better, in the McCall business community. “When I first got here, it was dog-eatdog,” said McLaughlin. “Everybody was pushing each other away.” McLaughlin is the owner of Bear Creek Lodge, hosting hundreds of visitors each year: skiers and snowmobilers in the winter; hikers, bikers and anglers in the summer. “We’ve been booked pretty solid in the summer for weddings,” said McLaughlin, who is anxious to welcome snow enthusiasts. “We package it up really nicely. We hook them up with snowmobiles, dinners and, of course, Brundage supplies discounted passes,” he said, indicating that the average stay during the winter is three to four days. Certano doesn’t get overly excited about whether Brundage will be open for Thanksgiving. “It’s icing on the cake. Maybe we’ll get people up for a few days,” said Certano. “But here’s a little-known secret about this business: between Thanksgiving and Christmas, you can get absolutely bottom-dollar rates at a ski resort. You want to know why? Because people usually don’t come. Everybody’s caught up at work, with shopping and relatives. That time is probably the slowest time in the ski industry.” Certano called the window of time between Thanksgivng and Christmas “lost or found” business. “There’s really nothing we can do about it. In fact, we don’t even budget expenses or revenues for Thanksgiving,” he said. “We budget from Dec. 15 forward.” But all of that depends on the weather. “There’s nothing I can do about the weather. Let’s make that real clear,” said Certano. “We’re like farmers. We’re dictated by the weather. Everybody knows how to play this game and, yes, it’s a game.” But when that first substantial snowfall sweeps through McCall and up to Brundage’s 7,600-foot mountaintop, Brundage’s team will spring to action. “They have the plan. They get the core people, and we build from there,” said Certano, who employs 100-120 staff at season’s peak. “We don’t want to hire any sooner than two weeks before we open. I just tell my staff, ‘Be ready.’” One thing that won’t need to be ready is any snowmaking equipment. Brundage distinguishes itself by not pumping out manmade snow. “You want to talk about expenses for energy and water? Believe me, I pumped 60 million gallons a year at other resorts that WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

I managed,” said Certano. “And who pays for that eventually? Customers. Over at Sun Valley, they have to have snowmaking, but I don’t know how many millions that they’ve invested into that system.” David Carey, owner and operator of Jug Mountain Ranch and Hotel McCall, jumped in. “That’s something they bought into years ago,” said Carey. “But here, we have very good terrain and a good snowstorm covers us very fast.” Carey, also a board member at the McCall Chamber, gets particularly excited when he talks about weekday visitors. “Weekdays are the holy grail. We have more capacity for everything on weekdays here,” said Carey. “And here’s a secret: Even the weekdays of our winter carnival are pretty quiet.” Carey said McCall regularly hosting visitors from the Treasure Valley was “a double-edge sword.” “The bulk of our business still comes out of Boise. That business supports us, but those are not necessarily the folks who might come up on weekdays or book a weeklong vacation,” he said. Carey has been busy getting ready to reopen Hotel McCall’s gourmet restaurant, Rupert’s, for the fall and winter season Saturday, Nov. 17. Rupert’s is just one of what Carey calls “McCall’s hoods.” “‘Hoods’ is industry slang for a restaurant. The hood is what hangs over a large commercial oven or stove,” he said. “Well, the number of hoods in McCall hasn’t changed in a very long time.” And while some owners or names of restaurants may have changed in McCall over the years, the number of restaurant hoods has remained fairly stable. “Some people walk by and say, ‘Oh, my gosh, I didn’t recognize this town,’ and then 30 seconds later, somebody walks by and says, ‘Holy cow, I haven’t been here in years and it didn’t change at all.’” Carey is anxious to draw more business from the Treasure Valley, particularly those who are new to Idaho. “People assume that everyone in Boise knows everything in McCall. That’s just not the case,” said Carey. “A lot of new people are moving into Boise who aren’t familiar with McCall. It just takes time to expand their immediate footprint.” Certano wants newcomers, mainstays and everybody else to head back to McCall and up to his mountain. When asked whether he has detailed marketing plans for the 2012-2013, he grins a Cheshire Cat smile and simply answers, “Yes.” “Let me make it easy on you. I agree with Einstein, who defined insanity as doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results. We’re always thinking of our greatest opportunities. We’re planners. We spend the spring analyzing. We spend the summer planning. And currently, we’re in the execution.” Now, if it would only snow.

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CITIZEN

HAILEY DUKE When the skiing feels effortless GEORGE PRENTICE Hailey Duke looked out the window while talking to Boise Weekly, and surveyed the scene. “It snowed quite a bit overnight,” she said. Duke wasn’t describing conditions at an Idaho ski resort. Instead, she was looking out the window from her home-away-from-home, seven time zones away, in the Austrian Alps town of Stubai, southwest of Innsbruck. Idaho native Duke will be spending a lot more time in Europe this winter than at home as she has through much of her young life. By the time she was 23 years old, Duke had been named to the U.S. Ski Team, competed in World Cup events across the globe and picked to join Team U.S.A. at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. But adversity followed in the form of injury and being cut from the national team. Instead of retreating, Duke and fellow Olympian Megan McJames started their own team, called Independent Ski Racing. And on the eve of her first World Cup event of the season, Duke said she’s skiing better than ever and has the best motivation possible: skiing for herself.

When will you be in the starting gates for your first competition of the season? Saturday, Nov. 10, in Levi, Finland. Do you build toward Nov. 10 or could you compete tomorrow? I’m getting pretty anxious at this point. I would love for it to be tomorrow. But there’s always time for improvement. What would you like to improve between now and then? Continuing to build consistent, solid runs, making sure my speed is up to par. But I can tell you that things are going pretty well. You just celebrated your 27th birthday in September. Where are you, age wise, compared to the other women on the tour? You have the really young ones who pop out early, and you have the veterans in their 30s. I found out after so many years that age doesn’t really matter. Was there a downside to accomplishing so many of your goals by the age of 23?

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Once you come up, you have to come down. The last three years have been really hard, trying to get my skiing to come back. I was with the U.S. Ski Team for five years. And now, I’m out on my own. What led to your being cut by the U.S. Ski Team? Lack of result. But there are so many variables with skiing. In the end, you see the numbers and I know there were some things that went wrong. But it’s not as if I forgot how to ski overnight. Did you immediately know you needed to get back on that mountain to compete? I knew that I needed to have faith in my equipment and myself. And I found it. How is your Independent Ski Racing team getting its message out in order to encourage donations? It helps once the race season starts. When the snow starts falling, people get very interested. My message is that I’m heading out to perform at my best. It has nothing to do with

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what team I’m with. Hopefully, we can inspire people in that we’re putting the politics aside and just getting out there to ski. Are there politics in the world of the U.S. Ski Team? There’s going to be politics with everything, no matter what you’re doing, no matter what sport you’re in. You’re never, ever going to get away from it. But you can figure out how to deal with it and to keep the right things in mind. How would you characterize your current relationship with the U.S. Ski Team? There is absolutely no animosity between me and the U.S. Ski Team. What we’re doing, getting out here on our own, I think shows a lot of character and determination. It’s definitely not easy on your own. But for the first time, I’m skiing for myself and not anyone else. I’m guessing that your new independence has piqued quite a bit of interest from your peers. Absolutely. I just don’t think we need only one way to the top of ski racing. It should be open for anyone to go after. Did you suffer significant injury the last couple of years? It was more of a slow deterioration. I had shoulder surgery from a

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CITIZEN previous ski fall. And as my shoulder started getting worse, I experienced back problems. I had to stop and get everything back together. And not just my health, but my head back on straight, too. 10

Where are you today with your strength and conditioning? The best I’ve ever felt. It’s amazing when you’re happy in what you’re doing. I love taking on the responsibility of my conditioning and all the other aspects of my racing. I have total control in knowing what works for me. I’m pretty excited. Just a few weeks ago, I saw that you came back to Boise to attend Capital High School’s homecoming with your dad. I missed my own homecoming when in high school because of all of my training. Ten years later, I asked my dad to be my date. Did you go to the homecoming game and dance? Definitely the game. I still don’t know if Capital is ready for my dancing. How difficult is it to have a personal life while on the ski tour? It’s not easy. You see somebody, and then you say, “I’ll see you in a few months.” I’m single, if anyone’s interested. Do you still get homesick? I definitely crave cheeseburgers once in a while. I enjoy my own bed and not living out of a suitcase but I do love my life. It’s pretty cool. What would you say to a young girl who wants to do what you do?

I say, “Hi. Come take a run with me.” If you want to do this for a living, you’ve got to enjoy the skiing itself. Do what you love and work hard at it. Do you love it more today than before? I definitely have a greater appreciation. I realize what I’m capable of now, and that’s pretty cool. Your goal is to land in the top 20 by the end of the season. How probable is that? I don’t see why not. If I’m skiing the way I’m skiing now and live by my own motto– ski happy and enjoy it–there’s no reason I wouldn’t land in the top 20. It only takes a couple of solid races to get close and there are plenty of races to be had. On the grand horizon, do you have an eye on the Sochi Olympics in 2014? I’m in a way better place than I was in Vancouver. But Russia is long-term. I have to break it down to daily goals to get there. How long can you do this at the pace you’re at? If you pay attention and figure out what works, you can be smart and go as long as your heart desires. Are you faster than ever? We’re about to find out. When the skiing feels effortless, I know I’m on the right track. How bad do you want to be back on that winner’s podium? I’m already feeling as if things are going very well. My dad always told me, “Focus on the task at hand and the results take care of themselves.”

RALL Anything is possible, but not too many politicians—certainly not one 7 as craven and wishy-washy flexible as Romney—are willing to piss off 77 percent of the electorate. Would Obama sign a federal legalization? Definitely not. In 2007, he told Planned Parenthood that he would. However, after he became president—with a supermajority in Congress—he walked that back. “Now, the Freedom of Choice Act is not the highest [sic] legislative priority,” he said in April 2009. “I believe that women should have the right to choose. But I think that the most important thing we can do to tamp down some of the anger surrounding this issue is to focus on those areas that we can agree on. And that’s—that’s where I’m going to focus.” The White House ordered Democratic leaders in Congress to kill the Freedom of WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Choice Act. FOCA has never been introduced under Obama. Romney and Obama are continuing their parties’ cynical posturing on abortion. Knowing that abortion is popular, Republicans rile up their right-wing misogynist base with loud rhetoric and minor legislative initiatives that fall way short of a federal ban. Democrats, who exploit the fear that a right-wing Supreme Court would overthrow Roe v. Wade, would lose their leverage over pro-choicers if they legalized abortion. So, if you’re a pro-choice voter, if abortion rights is the main reason you’re voting for Obama, remember two facts: First, only 15 percent of abortion rights is at risk. Second, when Obama had the political capital and the Congressional backing to legalize abortion once and for all, he sold you out. For Obama, women are “not highest legislative priority.”

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ater rules the West—it’s not a groundbreaking statement, just a simple matter of fact since humans first started settling in the often dry expanses of the region. And since that time, man has sought to harness water in all its forms. Whether digging canals to irrigate crops in the desert or building dams to control the flow and location of water, mankind has never been satisfied letting Mother Nature run the entire show. We’re still trying to stack the deck any way we can, especially when it comes to snow. Where summer rains are scarce, winter snowpack is the ultimate deciding factor between a good year and a bad year for an array of Idaho businesses, from farmers and fishing guides to firefighters and utility companies. “Snow is really important here in Idaho,” said Jay Breidenbach, warning coordination meteorologist with the National Weather Service. “It’s one of the most important predictions we can make.” There’s a science to snow, and those who can predict it or manipulate it are often the ones who come out ahead.

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COURTESY SUN VALLEY RESORT

the idea of making snow The work for it rather than Natural simply relying on Mother Resources ConNature to kindly leave a solid servation Service has been Sun Valley Resort base and several inches of fresh credits high-tech carefully watching the West’s powder every day. Instead, most snowmaking with snowpack for nearly 100 its ability to meet ski areas make their own snow to years. It started with a water a Thanksgiving some degree, and Sun Valley dispute near Lake Tahoe opening goal. is a devout practitioner. when agriculture, mining The resort started snowand logging interests butted making in the 1970s, but the heads about how much technology wasn’t very efficient at water should be used for that time. It began using the current what. The dispute led to the realizasystem in 1982 and has expanded and tion that scientists could predict the improved it since then. Now, roughly next year’s water runoff by studying 80 percent of the groomed runs on Bald the snowpack. Mountain have snowmaking capability, and The research spread through the nearly all of Dollar Mountain is covered as country and in the 1930s, the Soil well. The resort also makes extensive use of Conservation Program organized its snowmaking abilities to shape and maina snow survey with standardized tain its terrain park at Dollar, including a measurements and methods. Since 22-foot super pipe. then, the snowpack science has continued Between making snow and grooming it, to grow and now, researchers have access to Sibbach said the resort works on its snow hour-by-hour data from automated sites in 24 hours a day during the season. key locations across the West. But making snow doesn’t just allow for In the Boise area the majority of snow good conditions on the slope; it has become runoff comes from elevations of 6,000essential for achieving the much-sought-af8,000 feet. Ron Abramovich, water supply ter Thanksgiving opening and the absolutespecialist for the NRCS, said 75 percent of ly necessary Christmas holiday opening. the area’s annual precipitation comes in the “Being open on Thanksgiving is not as form of snow, making monitoring snow[financially] important as the perception pack critical. that you’re open,” Sibbach said. “As a “We get a lot of users looking at that destination resort, it’s very important to be data,” Abramovich said, naming not only off to a good start.” hydropower providers but also highway He added that in eight out of 10 years, it departments concerned with public safety would be impossible to be open on Thanksand road maintenance, school districts that giving without snowmaking. use it to determine snow days, farmers and “The goal is to be able to be open from ranchers who plan their years by the data, top to bottom on Thanksgiving, and we’re and public land mangers who watch for nearly always able to do that,” Sibbach conditions that could lead to wildfires, flash said. “Last year, we wouldn’t have been floods or mudslides, as well as recreationopen for Thanksgiving or Christmas withists who want to get outside whether on the out snowmaking.” snow or the water. In a resort economy like Sun Valley’s, The economic ties to snowfall are vast. having good snow isn’t just of concern to “If you have a business and your busithe ski area. The entire community depends ness relies on tourists coming to town, on skiers and boarders heading to the resort you’ve learned to look at the weather,” for getaways, where hotel stays and dining Abramovich said. “Depending on how the out support the local economy. snow falls, you may make a slightly differ“Having good snow is extremely imporent decision.” tant to the economics of the [Wood River] “We’ve become snow farmers in the valley,” Sibbach said. winter,” said Jack Sibbach, director of marSun Valley Resort started making snow keting and PR at Sun Valley Resort. in earnest for this season Oct. 21 and has The ski industry was an early adopter of

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COURTESY SUN VALLEY RESORT

alweek, we can do $1 ready million.” announced For the previous three to four While other Idaho ski its Thanksgiving opening areas can only wait years prior the 2011-2012 seaday of Thursday, Nov. 22. for the storms, son, the area had seen roughly Of course, some years Sun Valley 350,000 skier visits per year. Resort creates Mother Nature feels like Last year there were only its own early helping out more than season snow. 235,000 skier visits, Moore said. others, and last season It was an economic wallop that was not one in which she stung even more because the ski area was feeling particularly had just replaced the Superior chairlift generous. with a new high-speed quad lift with a According to the National Ski price tag of $5 million. Areas Association, skier count last “As our historian put it, there’s a curse season was down industrywide by of Bogus Basin: When you build something about 15.8 percent from the 2010new, there’s a difficult snow year,” Moore 2011 season, the largest year-overjoked. year decline since the 1980-1981 But it wasn’t just Bogus that was afseason. Nationally, snowfall was fected. The roughly 700 seasonal employees down 42 percent compared to who man the hill during the winter weren’t the previous season, making it the biggest working either, and even many of the 35 year-over-year decline in 20 years. full-time employees had to be furloughed Sun Valley was down in terms of skier until the snow fell. visits as well but only by about 6 percent, Still, Moore said he’s willing to bet just according to Sibbach. The resort had about anything that Bogus will make the roughly 6,000 skiers per day during the allholiday opening this season. Rather than important week of the Christmas holiday, major improvement projects, the ski area although some years more than 8,000 skiers focused on smaller maintenance projects like per day pack the slopes. repainting buildings at the base of the hill, “After last year, [the snowmaking sysresurfacing the No. 1 parking lot, and skiers tem] again proved itself,” he said. “It’s part purchasing a new shuttle bus for that lot. of an insurance policy and part of a plan to “We’ve not spent a lot of money, but have a good product.” we’ve done a lot of projects,” Moore said. Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area “Bogus Basin will look a lot shinier.” wasn’t so lucky. Without any snowmaking He’s also optimistic when he looks at capabilities, Bogus was unable to open until long-range forecasts which call for an averJan. 19, the latest opening date ever. The age winter. previous record had been Jan. 6, 1970. “We love average,” Moore said. “We’ve been fairly consistent in our abilAverage isn’t bad for the folks at Idaho ity to open between Thanksgiving and the Power, but average can always be improved first week of December, but this last year upon. In fact, Idaho Power has been trying was so far off the charts that it doesn’t even to go above average since it started a regubear discussion,” said Alan Moore, general lar cloud-seeding program in 2003. manager at Bogus Basin. By introducing silver iodide into the Ski area officials have looked into the clouds of passing storm systems, the utility possibility of snowmaking, but the location is attempting to improve the snowpack in of the ski hill rules it out. key areas, thereby creating more runoff and “Bogus Basin being literally at the top more water to generate electricity in the of a mountain, we don’t have much water,” company’s hydroelectric dams. Moore said. “Even if we wanted to take “The more snowpack we have, especially the risk of using water, using electricity and in the higher elevations ... it’s really valupumping the water up the slopes ... you also able to the company,” said Derek Blestrud, have the temperature issue in the early seameteorologist with Idaho Power. son. Bogus doesn’t have the temperatures.” The cloud-seeding program began in the Last season Bogus Basin was down winter of 1996-1997, but because it was a about $2 million in revenue because of heavy snow year, it only operated for one missing the holiday opening. month. It wasn’t until February 2003 that “Those two weeks around Christmas Idaho Power had the funding in place to are so important to us. In a good holiday start it up again. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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Snowfall totals from the SnoTel site at Bogus Basin tell the story of variable snow years.

Efforts are now focused on two areas: the Payette River Basin and the Upper Snake River Basin. Idaho Power’s program started in the Payette River Basin, where the company now has 17 remotely operated ground generators. The generators are spread in a horseshoe across the basin from the northwest to the south roughly seven miles apart to allow for targeted seeding. The company occasionally uses a plane to do the seeding when conditions are more appropriate for it. Idaho Power also teamed up with several communities in the Upper Snake River area that had been using cloud seeding since the 1990s for irrigation. The partnership started in 2008 and it has allowed the program to grow to include 18 generators with plans for a 19th, as well as an additional 25 manual generators. There have been a few studies on the effectiveness of cloud seeding and Idaho Power cites studies that show a roughly 5-15 percent increase in snowpack in the Payette River Basin, with an average of a 13 percent increase. Studies on the effectiveness of the Upper Snake River program are still in the works, although there is an ongoing $13 million research project in Wyoming looking to better quantify the effects across three mountain ranges there. Last winter Idaho Power spent roughly $1 million on the cloud-seeding program, and while that may sound like a lot to invest, Blestrud said the cost-benefit ratio is between 3-1 and 4-1, adding that company estimates show that the program adds roughly 200,000 acre feet of water to the system. That amount can generate roughly 100,000 megawatts of electricity, enough to power an estimated 7,900 homes. Cloud seeding is not snow making, Blestrud cautioned; it’s working with what nature already provides. When a storm system comes across Idaho and into the West Central Mountains, Idaho Power meteorologists look to see if it meets the criteria they’re looking for, then they target the layers of super-cooled water

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within the clouds. The generators or plane then introduce silver iodide to super-cooled water—liquid water that is between -5 and -15 degrees Celsius—to encourage it to start freezing and drop out of the cloud as snow. When cloud seeding started, dry ice was originally used to start the freezing process. Then scientists discovered that on a molecular level, silver iodide actually looks like an ice particle and makes a good seeding agent. These days, there are four different types of cloud seeding: winter, like what Idaho Power is doing; hail suppression, which is used most commonly in the Plains; rain enhancement, which is a byproduct of hail suppression; and fog suppression, commonly used at airports to improve visibility. Idaho Power is one of only a few power companies utilizing cloud seeding as a tool. In fact, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, in 2001 only 66 cloud-seeding projects were operating in the West. Idaho Power officials are quick to point out that increased snowpack not only benefits the utility company, but it means there’s more water for all water users, be they irrigators, recreationists or fish and wildlife. Idaho Power started its annual program Nov. 1 and will run it through the end of April 2013, depending on what Mother Nature adds to the mix. But Blestrud is careful to add that snow doesn’t come from every storm—it has to be the right storm. “When it’s a thick, deep storm and it’s cooler, we can do a lot with that,” he said. “[Cloud seeding] can’t offset a drought—we can’t seed if the clouds aren’t there.” Forecasting what nature is going to do is the purview of the National Weather Service. Each day, the Boise office releases a weather balloon to get a better picture of what’s happening above the surface. Combine that info with numerical weather prediction models and it helps meteorologists understand the larger patterns. Breidenbach said that while the most accurate predictions are only a few days out, WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

longer-range predictions look at weather on a seasonal level. This year has kept officials on their toes. A few months ago all, indicators pointed toward an El Nino winter, when warmer equatorial ocean conditions lead to a drier, warmer winter in Idaho. But over the last several weeks, it appears as if the ocean isn’t going to warm as much as expected, keeping water temperatures near normal and creating what is called a neutral year. “The dice are equally weighted at this point,” Breidenbach said. If it is in fact a normal winter, Boise could receive roughly 20 inches of snowfall over the season. Of course, what is considered normal is changing this year. Percent of normal is measured in comparison to the past 30 years—but that 30-year period changes every 10 years. This year marks just such a shift, meaning the snowpack will be compared to the snowfall between 1981 and 2010 rather than 1971 to 2000, as it was last year. Abramovich said that means the relatively wet 1970s will

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no longer be used as a comparison but the dry 2000s will, which affects the percent of normal statistic. For example, the Bigwood Basin finished the 2011-2012 winter with slightly below normal snowpack, but that same snowfall would be considered slightly above average this winter. October’s early snowfall was welcome by more than just ski areas. Abramovich said record-low rainfall in August and September makes a good snowpack even more important. “After the long, dry summer, there’s a big deficit in the soil moisture,” he said. “Fall rain helps fill the void and prime the soil for next year’s runoff.” Abramovich and the NRCS crew will be carefully watching the snowpack monitoring sites—known as SnoTel sites—measuring snow not only in inches but in snow water content, or the amount of water in the snow that will melt into runoff. In a typical year, Bogus Basin receives roughly 260 inches of snow and has a 10 percent water density, which means all that snow melts down to 26 inches of snow water. The higher the elevation, the more precipitation and

the colder the temperatures (roughly 3 degrees per 1,000 feet), meaning that a location like nearby Trinity Mountain, which sits at 7,700 feet, compared to Bogus Basin’s 6,340 feet, gets roughly 380 inches of snow a year. While reservoirs were drained to meet irrigation demands because of the extremely dry summer, Breidenbach said normal snowpack would be enough to refill the area’s reservoirs. That is, as long as the snowpack doesn’t melt as fast as it did last spring when sudden warm temperatures meant so much runoff water hit at once that reservoirs had to release some of it. “That’s why we depend so much on our winter snowfall,” Abramovich said. But when it all comes down to daily life, most skiers are simply hoping that they can make the snow work for them this winter by taking advantage of a long ski season. For them, Abramovich suggests a new favorite number: 41. “Forty-one is the key number in Boise,” he said. “It has to be at least 41 degrees in Boise to snow at Bogus.”

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OTTO K ITS INGER

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events TONY DEB OOM

Trey McIntyre always brings his dancer friends along, whether it’s to the desert or South Korea.

SATURDAY NOV. 10 Lovers of the backcountry are nothing if not imaginative.

dance TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT

FRIDAY NOV. 9 powder WINTER WETLANDS ALLIANCE BACKCOUNTRY FILM FESTIVAL The snowy, silent depths of winter are just around the corner. Skiers and snowboarders are already psyching themselves up for another season on the slopes. Amid all the excitement, the Winter Wetlands Alliance would like to remind Boise to enjoy its winter landscapes responsibly—by holding the Backcountry Film Festival at the Egyptian Theatre Friday, Nov. 9, at 7 p.m. The festival features seven films celebrating both winter recreation and conservation. Skiing the Void by Sweetgrass Productions won the Best of the Backcountry award and highlights the trust and risk-taking needed during a group of friends’ two-year trip through the Andes. Best Grassroots Film-winner Alaska Wilderness Ski Classic by Luc Mehl recounts an epic ski journey through the Alaska wilderness, while Stories of Trust—winner in the Best Environmental Film category—is a 9-year-old activist’s plea for environmental conservation produced by the International Trust Campaign. Audiences can also catch a special cut of Teton Gravity Research’s Further, Denali Experiment by The North Face, Freedom Chair and Unicorn Sashimi. Admission costs $10 and funds raised go toward local efforts to manage winter recreation, provide avalanche and safety training, and fund winter education programs. Winter Wetlands Alliance has been putting the Backcountry Film Festival in Boise since 2005, and this house is always packed. With topics ranging from protecting natural spaces to visions of a snow-encrusted Japan, this year’s event will explore the season’s cinematic possibilities while inspiring audiences to get out and have some backcountry adventures of their own. 7 p.m., $10. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre.net.

THURSDAY, NOV. 8 sip-faced SIPPIN’ IN THE CITY Looking for a tour of Gem State vino? The Idaho Wine Commission’s second annual Sippin’ in the City has you

covered. The event boasts 30 varietals from Idaho wineries poured at Boise’s Linen Building Thursday, Nov. 8, alongside tasty eats. In 2011, visitors lined up to sample locally sourced snacks and refill their glasses with samples from 12 wineries. This year’s 15 wineries in-

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clude Telaya Wine Company, Mouvance Winery, Cinder and Coiled wines, as well as Bitner Vineyards, Fraser Vineyard, Fujishin Family Cellars, Huston Vineyards, Koenig Winery, Lost West Winery, Parma Ridge Vineyards, Sawtooth Winery, Ste. Chapelle Winery, Williamson Orchard and Vineyards and Zhoo Zhoo wines.

Boise is an eight-hour drive from a metropolitan area with more than 1 million people. The West’s wide-open spaces haven’t, however, proved to be a barrier to preaching the gospel of Boise’s brand of cool. Institutions like Trey McIntyre Project have been instrumental in putting Boise on the world’s cultural map. But TMP hasn’t just been propping up Boise’s image abroad: It’s bringing abroad to the Morrison Center. The Korea National Contemporary Dance Company will join TMP for a new production Saturday, Nov. 10, with performances at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Admission cost $20$63 and tickets are available online at treymcintyre.com/tickets. There are few universal languages, but along with mathematics, Mozart and suggestive glances from across the room, dance surely ranks in the top five. TMP’s collaboration with the KNCDC is a rare chance for an American audience to experience Korean themes without the aid of an interpreter. Founded by the Korean Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism in 2010, the KNCDC’s mission is much like TMP’s—to popularize contemporary dance at home and collaborate with other troupes abroad. Its Artistic Director Sung-yop Hong has helped pioneer contemporary dance in his home country of South Korea and brought its artistry to audiences in Europe and the United States. Audiences already familiar with TMP can revel in watching Boise’s own paired with a new partner, while dance newcomers can enjoy a kinetic exchange between cultures. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., $20-$63. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane., 208-426-1110, mc.boisestate.edu.

Wines being sampled include viognier, chardonnay, cabernet sauvignon, claret, syrah, merlot, pinot gris, pinot noir, tempranillo and blended creations. Should all that tasting lead to too much color in the cheeks, a selection of edibles can balance out the booze. Open Table Catering offers tasty treats, and Zeppole Baking Company shares an assor tment of ar tisan breads. Admission is $30 and gets you a wine glass for use at the event. In addition, Kathr yn House of Wine Wise Idaho hosts a class on the ins

and outs of pairing wine with food. House’s seminar begins at 5 p.m. and takes par ticipants through a taste-tour including a cheese plate, pastas, herbed chicken and an apple walnut salad. Prices for the seminar, which takes place immediately preceding Sippin’ in the City, range from $35-$50. 6:30-9 p.m., $30. Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., 208-332-1538, idahowines.org.

TUESDAY NOV. 13 sniffles BOISE STATE HEALTH FAIR It’s that time of the year when it seems that ever yone around you is sniffling, coughing and doing their best to infect you with all of their germy grossness. Even if you’re trying your hardest to avoid the common cold with copious amounts of hand sanitizer and Emergen-C at every meal, sooner or later you’re WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

SATURDAY NOV. 10

FIND

old timey

SOREL SNOW BOOTS

SQUARE-DANCING AT RE-ART 2012 is a big year for the City of Trees as it quickly approaches its sesquicentennial. For those of you who don’t speak anniversary, that means Boise is turning the big 150. In order to celebrate all of the unique things that make Boise the gem that she is, the City has created Boise 150, a program designed to help community members commemorate our past and look toward our future. As part of with Boise 150, Re-Art has selected classes that “reflect an old-timey spirit.” The art program through Treasure Valley Institute for Children’s Art offers classes to kids ages of 5-12. Its mission is to translate various art forms into a curriculum suitable and fun for kids, helping them tap into their own creativity. Every month from September through May, Re-Art offers a free art class at each of the Boise Public Library branches. In November, your kiddies can pull out their dancing shoes and join Ava Honey on Saturday, Nov. 10, and Sunday, Nov. 11, for square-dancing lessons. Honey teaches children about the history and culture of square-dancing while showing them a few traditional moves along with the art of calling. Who knows, maybe this is the way for your child to launch his or her career as the next Lord of the Dance? At the very least they’ll be way more prepared for all those family holiday hoedowns. Saturday, Nov. 10, 1-2 p.m., Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., 208-562-4995; 3-4 p.m., Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, 208570-6900; Sunday, Nov. 11, 1-2 p.m., Boise Main Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-384-4076; 3-4 p.m., Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, 208-562-4996. FREE. boisepubliclibrary.org.

likely to get knocked on your ass with something that feels reminiscent of the Bubonic Plague. So for anyone looking to preserve their health, we suggest you head on over to the Boise State Health Fair on Tuesday, Nov. 13. The fair takes place in the Jordan Ballroom of the Student Union Building from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

S U B M I T

The fair is coordinated and hosted by students enrolled in an upper-level Kinesiology class at Boise State, so let’s hope that these future chiropractors and personal trainers know what they’re doing. The event is packed full of health tips and ser vices, including things such as health screenings, fitness assessments, flu shots and (our favorite) massages.

We don’t need no stinkin’ nails.

TUESDAY NOV. 13 architecture IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S BROWN BAG LUNCH Back in 1944, Boise’s John Fairchild got wind of a building technique employed around the world—from ancient China to Spain—and set his heart on using the process to build a home. Nestled in the Foothills, the finished house has door jambs made of Owyhee rose stone, and it’s said Fairchild lugged 135 stones away from the original Boise City Hall— as it was dismantled—to use in landscaping. The result is a structure built without a single nail. The process is called rammed earth construction, a technique thousands of years old. The method has undergone a modern revival thanks to the use of sand, clay and soil to create sustainable building materials and homes free of lumber and glue—and with lower heating and cooling costs. The Fairchild home is also a home full of history. To unlock those details, TAG Historical Research and Consulting presents a free talk on the remarkable home—Underground Above the City: John and Marjorie Fairchild’s Rammed Earth House—Tuesday, Nov. 13, at the Idaho State Historical Museum. The rammed earth process was a massive undertaking in the 1940s. Marjorie Fairchild is reported to have said hers was the most “complicated house in the world.” It took the Fairchilds more than 20 years to finish the house as the city of Boise grew up around it. TAG is comprised of researchers Barbara Perry Bauer and Elizabeth Jacox, who will lead the talk. The Brown Bag series encourages visitors to grab lunch, drop in, tune in and walk away full of new knowledge. Noon-1 p.m., $5, $4 seniors, $3 children ages 6-12, FREE children 6 and younger, Friends of the Museum and ISHS members. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, 208-334 2120, ext. 12, history.idaho.gov.

Whether you’re a poor student looking for some free health swag or just interested in all things fitness, the Health Fair has it. Unless you happen to be suffering from any flu-like symptoms then do us all a favor and

In an inter view with Elle magazine, actress Olivia Thirlby dished about her love of dressing for a well-known Park City, Utah, film festival: “I love Sundance because of the fashion, actually. It’s a way to really show off your personal style because it’s not just about a dress and heels.” The festival’s snowladen locale forces stars to hang up their stilettos and rock a style that marries function with fashion—which is downright tricky. Those two “f” words have long repelled each other, much like “style” and “snow.” But stylistas prepping for Idaho Mountain Touring chilly, slushy climates— 1310 W. Main St., Boise, 208-336-3854, like Idaho winters—can idahomountaintouring.com rejoice. Sorel’s coldweather kicks are killer. Idaho Mountain Touring boasts some of the brand’s more unique styles. One just-rightfor-Boise design is the Crazy Cable Wedge ($320). In addition to a 4-inch wedge heel and a rubber sole to keep winter city slush away from toes, a knit legwarmer covers the leg of the boot with lodge-worthy bear designs across the top. The result: a utilitarian ’80s-influenced apres ski boot that even the high-heel faithful can enjoy. Granted, it’s not the best choice for wading through powder. But for that, check out the faux fur-trimmed Joan of Arctic boots, and don’t feel bad about putting your summer sandals in storage. —Sheree Whiteley

stay in bed until the NyQuil has done its job. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Jordan Ballroom at Boise State Student Union Building, 1700 University Drive, 208-4265800, sub.boisestate.edu.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 7–13, 2012 | 19

8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY NOV. 7 Festivals & Events CWI ADMISSIONS EXPRESS COLLEGE FEST—Visit College of Western Idaho for some fun and help in exploring college options. 4-8 p.m. FREE. College of Western Idaho-Micron Center for Professional Technical Education, 5725 E. Franklin Road, Nampa, 208-562-3000, cwidaho.cc. POETRY SLAM OF STEEL—Big Tree Arts presents this all-ages poetry slam workshop as part of the Idaho Loud Writers’ Project. The workshop will be followed by a slam at 7 p.m. Contact Cheryl Maddalena at 208-426-0383 for more info. 6 p.m. $5, $1 with student ID. The Crux, 1022 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-3213.

On Stage TIGERS BE STILL—When Sherry’s art therapy degree doesn’t yield the job of her dreams, she moves back in with her mother, who won’t come downstairs, and sister, who won’t move off the couch. Add to her misery a boss who brings a rifle to work and a tiger roaming the streets, and you can’t help but laugh while feeling a little sad at this big-hearted comedy. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Food & Drink DINE OUT DOWNTOWN BOISE RESTAURANT WEEK—Indulge your palate during downtown Boise’s restaurant week, when 14 downtown restaurants will provide delightful pairings and exceptional values from special prix fixe menus. $10-$30. Downtownboise.org. STUFFED SOLOMO AND CROQUETAS—Learn to make the Basque Market’s addictive croquetas, as well as traditional marinated pork loin stuffed with roasted solomo peppers. Price includes wine tasting, tapas and instruction. Preregistration required. 6 p.m. $35. Basque Market, 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-433-1208, thebasquemarket.com.

Workshops & Classes WELLNESS WHILE LIVING WITH ILLNESS—Join the Treasure Valley Family YMCA and the Idaho Psychological Association to learn ways to manage extra demands and stresses brought on by chronic illness. Presented by Dr. Amy Walters of Humphreys Diabetes Center. 6:30 p.m. FREE. St. Luke’s Meridian, Blackfoot Room, 520 S. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-381-2592, stlukesonline.org.

Talks & Lectures CONTINUING EDUCATION: FOOD AS MEDICINE—Jennifer Games from Acupuncture West discusses the principles of traditional Chinese medicine, the different energetics of com-

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mon foods and herbs, and how to use these concepts to boost immunity, extend longevity and regulate mood. Preregistration required. 6:30 p.m. $20, $15 IBG members. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

THURSDAY NOV. 8 Festivals & Events BOGUS SNOWBALL—Sport your snow gear, do a snow dance to the sounds of the David Andrews Band and enjoy $1 beers, food truck grub and an exhibition rail jam. The event and tax-deductible donations help fund improvements to the Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area. Visit pitchengine.com/bogusbasin for more info. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Basque Block, 601 Grove St., Boise.

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: MANNY MALDONADO—Enjoy some jokes followed by dueling pianos and music from DJ Mighty Delta One. 7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST—Gordon Reinhart directs the Boise State Theatre Arts Department’s production of Oscar Wilde’s play. 7:30 p.m. $9-$15. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu. LIQUID LAUGHS: DEREK RICHARDS—Also featuring Susan Jones. Purchase tickets at liquidlaughs.com, by calling 208-9412459 or at Liquid or Solid. Buy one, get one free tickets. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. THE MOUSETRAP—Laughing Stock community theater presents Agatha Christie’s 1952 mystery. 7 p.m. $20-$30. Nex-

NOISE/CD REVIEW PURITY RING, SHRINES Purity Ring is comprised of Megan James and Corin Roddick. The duo is young, Canadian and has just put out an uber-dreamy, full-length album. Shrines sounds like a walk at dawn through a misty forest, where at every turn, you find a poem etched into the bark of a mossy tree. The album is enchanting, as though a spell has been cast upon the listener. The record opens with “Crawlersout”—a wave of imagery that intertwines humans and nature for a haunting and compelling result. “Sea water is flowing from the middle of my thighs / Wild buffalo are dancing on cliff tops in the skies / Adorn me in feathers from dead birds and / Contemplate the size of leather palettes to wind me in / Put shutters on my eyes.” It comes as no surprise that much of the lyrical content on Shrines comes from prose James never expected to share, like a whispered secret. Words string a commanding thread through the entire album. In “Grandloves,” Roddick sings, “I’m in love with truth and sick and tired of this youth / I want it to be easy but I’m queasy at the thought of it / I don’t need no proof, no lucky charm, no wisdom tooth,” cementing the album’s conflicted, Peter Pan-ish vibe. Roddick’s deliberate, synth-heavy beats and voice support and enhance James’ innocently delivered, but raw poetry. Instead of drowning it out, this allows for an interesting and unexpected depth that becomes increasingly apparent after multiple listens. Purity Ring is a band to keep your ears open for in the coming years. —Catie Young WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT Stage Theatre, 120 S. Main St., Ketchum, 208-726-2985.

Workshops & Classes

FRIDAY

OF MICE AND MEN—The tragic story of two California migrant ranch workers during the Great Depression. Presented by The Acting Company of New York. 7:30 p.m. $44. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com.

BITTER SWEET: THE SHARP BITE BEHIND THE SUGAR HIGH—Learn about diabetes risk factors, prevention and treatment. 6:45 p.m. Main Health Solutions, 2300 Everest Lane W., Meridian, 208-895-0858, maximizedlivingdrmain.com.

NOV. 9

TIGERS BE STILL—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Literature IDAHO BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA AWARDS RECEPTION—Idaho Book Extravaganza holds the Top Idaho Author and Book Awards, plus the event’s opening reception. For full details, a schedule or to purchase workshop tickets, visit idahobookextravaganza. com. 5:30-8 p.m. FREE. Beside Bardenay, 612 Grove St., Boise, 208-426-0538, bardenay.com.

Food & Drink DINE OUT DOWNTOWN BOISE RESTAURANT WEEK—See Wednesday. $10-$30. Downtownboise.org. SIPPIN IN THE CITY—The Idaho Wine Commission presents the second installment of this event, which features an array of Idaho wines and food. Fundamentals of Wine and Food Pairing precedes the event for an additional $50. Advance tickets are available at sippininthecity. com. For ages 21 and older. Admission includes a wine glass. See Picks, Page 18. 6:30 p.m. $30. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-3850111, thelinenbuilding.com.

Odds & Ends LADIES’ LOUNGE—Swig back some cocktails with the ladies of Boise Weekly and enjoy prize giveaways, drink specials and oh so much more. Visit BW’s promo page to get the 4-1-1. 5 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s Saloon, 12505 Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-3315666, willibs.com.

Festivals & Events HUNT AND GATHER FASHION SHOW—Elise Vaughn releases her winter clothing line with a show and silent auction. For more info, email thewhitepine@ gmail.com. 7 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, flyingmcoffee.com. WHITNEY WOMEN’S CHORALE CHRISTMAS CRAFT FAIR—Featuring woodcrafts, needlework, jams, jellies, homemade baked goods and specialty items. Enjoy homemade soups and dessert for a suggested donation of $5. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Whitney United Methodist Church, 3315 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208343-2892, whitneychurch.org.

Art WHITE WHALE EXHIBITION— Students seeking bachelor’s degrees in fine arts present their final projects. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu.

On Stage

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: MANNY MALDONADO—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. HAPPILY EVER AFTER?—Company of Fools presents fairy tales in American musical theater. 7 p.m. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-5789122, companyoffools.org. THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $9-$15. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu. LIQUID LAUGHS: DEREK RICHARDS—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. THE MOUSETRAP—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $20-$30. NexStage Theatre, 120 S. Main St., Ketchum, 208-726-2985. TIGERS BE STILL—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Concerts | EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

BOISE BAROQUE ORCHESTRA—This brilliant brass performance features special guests Justin Stamps on trumpet and Dan Meier on French horn. Visit boisebaroque.org and caldwellfinearts.org for more info. 7:30 p.m. $6-$22. Jewett Auditorium, The College of Idaho, 2112 E. Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208459-3405 or 208-454-1376, caldwellfinearts.org.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 7–13, 2012 | 21

8 DAYS OUT Food & Drink

WEEK IN REVIEW

ADULT COOKING CLASS—This Italian Veterans Day celebration class involves three courses and a dessert. Visit the website for a full menu. 6:30-9 p.m. $50. Fuel for the Soul, LLC, 1941 N. 18th St., Boise, 208-342-7118, fuelforthesoulboise.com. DINE OUT DOWNTOWN BOISE RESTAURANT WEEK—See Wednesday. $10-$30. Downtownboise.org. SNAKE RIVER ALLIANCE COMMUNITY DINNER—The theme of the Alliance’s Fall Community Dinner is Idaho: Not a Chump for a Dump, featuring special guest Don Hancock of the Southwest Research and Information Center in Albuquerque, N.M. The hearty fall dinner will be prepared by chef Al Weighal. 6-8 p.m. $10$15, kids eat FREE. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 2201 Woodlawn Ave., Boise, 208-344-5731, boisefirstucc.org.

John Padlo debuted new work at Flying M, First Thursday, Nov. 1.

FLASHERS, LASERS AND MOUNDS OF EARTH Literature IDAHO BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA—The Idaho Book Extravaganza has become one of the Northwest’s premier book shows. If you want to learn how to write effectively, publish in the new era of publishing and hear from several speakers earning six-figure incomes in e-book sales, this is the place. For full details, a schedule or to purchase workshop tickets, visit idahobookextravaganza.com. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. $99-$199. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, boisecentre. com. POET JOHN WULF BOOK SIGNING—Boise mechanic-poet John Wulf signs copies of his new book, Lady Who Loves the Whisper. 5-7 p.m. FREE. Hastings, 680 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-345-9428.

Kids & Teens FAMILY FUN NIGHT—Come eat snacks, play video games and watch a new release feature film. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib.org.

Odds & Ends BELI DANSE HAFLA 2012— Performances by guest artists from Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Utah and the Treasure Valley’s finest dancers. Ada County Boys and Girls Club benefits from this event. 7-10 p.m. $10. Garden City Boys and Girls Club, 610 E. 42nd St., Garden City, 208-3219157, adaclubs.org.

SATURDAY NOV. 10 Festivals & Events PURPLE LIGHT 2012—Remember and honor those who have battled pancreatic cancer and create awareness and hope in our community. Purple glow

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First Thursday, Nov. 1, stuck to a seasonal theme. While the Idaho State Historical Museum gave a preview of its forthcoming Dia de los Muertos festivities, artists Cale Cathey and Conrad Garner, known as Meatbag, continued to celebrate Halloween at Solid. “Realistic black-and-white portraits of Alfred Hitchcock, Elvira and Vincent Price occupied the left edge of the show. … In the middle were three slightly smaller cartoonish portraits of heavily tattooed sailors that could have been straight from a cartoon by John Kricfalusi—creator of Ren and Stimpy,” observed Boise Weekly’s Josh Gross. Flying M Coffeehouse also gave a thematic nod to Halloween by featuring John Padlo’s bright, candy and superherothemed paintings. Down the street, Bricolage cast its gaze a bit further into the holiday future. “Bricolage appeared to be giving Thanksgiving a trial run with a candle-lit spread that included local cheese, breads, beer, wine and cider. A small group chatted and snacked in honor of Idaho’s Bounty’s 2013 Healthy Dozen calendar,” noted BW’s Andrew Crisp. The following evening, Nov. 2, Idaho Dance Theatre debuted its fall performance. The show included the premiere of a fourpart piece by Artistic Director Carl Rowe, called Four Characters With Attitude. “The ‘characters’ were Earth, Wind, Water and Fire,” explained BW’s Sheree Whiteley. “The piece began with dancers crawling swiftly on all fours, eventually working their way to standing one vertebrae at a time.” Whiteley continued: “The piece concluded with a pack of pyromaniac mobster flashers—or, according to the program, an elusive Joker. Fire was an entertaining and somewhat lighthearted romp, opening with flashes of light and trench coats. The audience giggled as dancers chased one another and opened their trenches while the others recoiled in horror.” Moving from flashers to flashes of light, Gross hit up Visual Arts Collective Nov. 2 for a set by Boise’s Le Fleur, Oakland, Calif.’s Mwahaha and headliners Talkdemonic. “The Portland, Ore.-based viola and drums duo Talkdemonic have always created intriguing music by layering effected strings and synth sequences over hip-hop beats. … But backed by glittering lasers shooting dramatic stabs of backlighting in front of the video projections, it was positively epic.” And on Nov. 3, the North End’s hideaway arts destination, Black Hunger, hosted an opening reception for artist Amanda Hamilton’s new body of work, The Middle Distance. “Inside, the floor of the gallery was dominated by a boatshaped brown form resembling a mound of earth from which small faux plants reached toward the ceiling,” observed Crisp. “A projector stood nearby tossing an image of river stones and water across the space and onto a large window.” —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT sticks provided. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Hatch Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1677, sub. boisestate.edu.

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: MANNY MALDONADO—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. HAPPILY EVER AFTER?—See Friday. 7 p.m. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208578-9122, companyoffools.org.

Concerts

Caldwell Blvd., Nampa, 208-4763643, artistbluegallery.com.

RANDALL THOMPSON’S FROSTIANA—Boise State Choral Department presents Randall Thompson’s Frostiana, conducted by baccalaureate candidate Nik Dumas. Choral ensemble will be comprised of Boise community members and Boise State Choral Arts students. Lecture will precede performance. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Morrison Center Recital Hall, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise State campus, Boise, 208426-1609.

IDAHO BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA—See Friday. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. $99-$199. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, boisecentre.com.

Food & Drink

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $9-$15. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

DINE OUT DOWNTOWN BOISE RESTAURANT WEEK—See Wednesday. $10-$30. Downtownboise.org. VETERANS DAY CELEBRATION—A nostalgic evening honoring military personnel with food, wine/beer, music, raffles and gifts. Wear a piece of your military uniform for wine/beer specials. Boise State football game will be on big screens. Must be 21 or older with valid ID to attend. 6-10 p.m. Helina Marie’s Wine and Gift Shop, 11053 Highway 44, Star, 208286-7960, helinamaries.com.

LIQUID LAUGHS: DEREK RICHARDS—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. THE MOUSETRAP—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $20-$30. NexStage Theatre, 120 S. Main St., Ketchum, 208-726-2985. TIGERS BE STILL—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Workshops & Classes

TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT: THE FALL SHOW—Trey McIntyre Project performs with Korea National Contemporary Dance Company. For more info, visit treymcintyre.com. See Picks, Page 18. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $10-$63. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

SECOND SATURDAYS—Local storytellers teach about animals and the natural world. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-514-3755, boiseenvironmentaleducation.org.

Literature IDAHO AUTHORS COMMUNITY—Idaho authors discuss genre writing with Idaho readers and writers. Canned food donations accepted. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Artistblue Gallery, 1509

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Talks & Lectures GROUNDS FOR APPRECIATION: UNDERSTANDING COFFEE—Christine Duft-McConville of Coffee Zealots instructs participants on selecting the right coffee. The event includes a tasting. 10 a.m. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-570-6900, boisepubliclibrary.com.

Citizen SERVICE SATURDAY—Get involved in service projects at charitable or nonprofit agencies. For more info, visit orgsync. com. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426INFO, sub.boisestate.edu. VETS THAT RIDE 2012—A benefit motorcycle ride, with all proceeds going to VFW Post 63, features ride shirts for the first 50 riders, raffle, 50/50 and silent auction. Dinner provided by VFW. Preregister at Cruisin Biker Wear and Bill’s Bike Works. Everyone is welcome, even if you’re not a rider. Show up after 3 p.m. for dinner and fun for only $8. Sponsored by Lucky Bastards M/C, Vietnam Vets,Legacy Vets M/C, Combat Vets Motorcycle Association, ABATE of Southern Idaho. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. $25, $40 couple. VFW Post 63, 8931 W. Ardene St. (behind Primary Health on Overland/Maple Grove), Boise, 208-424-8387, vfwpost63.org.

9:30AM - 1:30PM

8th Street from Bannock to Main Street & on the Grove Plaza

HOLIDAY MARKET - NOV. 3RD TO DEC. 22ND This Week at the Market Plan early for Thanksgiving, get your fresh Northwest Cranberries starting this Saturday at the Market!

* Fresh locally grown produce, herbs, & flowers * Idaho Specialty Foods & Wines * Great Selection of Local Artwork

Kids & Teens PARENTS NIGHT OUT—This event is for boys and girls ages 5 to 12, who can use all their energy through fun fitness-based activities. Featuring Planet Kid indoor playground, rock climbing, inflatables, gym games, team building, running, jumping, bouncing and laughing. For more information, check out wingscenter.com or call the Wings Center business office at 208-3763641. 6-11 p.m. $18 per child. Wings Center of Boise, 1875 Century Way, Boise, 208-3763641, wingscenter.com. RE-ART: SQUARE DANCING—Ava Honey will instruct students ages 5-12 on this art form. Visit trica.org for more info. See Picks, page 19. 1-2 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-562-4995; 3-4 p.m. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-570-6900; boisepubliclibrary.com.

Odds & Ends BELI DANSE HAFLA 2012—See Friday. 7-10 p.m. $10. Garden City Boys And Girls Club, 610 E. 42nd St., Garden City, 208-3219157, adaclubs.org. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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VERTICAL DROP: 3,100 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $66 ADULTS (AGES 18-69), $61 YOUTH (AGES 11-17), $41 SENIORS (AGES 70+), $5 CHILDREN (AGES 10 AND YOUNGER). 360-663-2265, SKICRYSTAL. COM. SNOW REPORT: 888-754-6199.

26 TIMBERLINE SKI AREA, GOVERNMENT CAMP, ORE.—When all other mountains and resorts have closed down for the season, Timberline will give you a few

09 POMERELLE, ALBION—If you just can’t wait to hit the slopes this season, keep

VERTICAL DROP: 2,200 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $40 ADULTS (AGES 12-65), $26 CHILDREN (AGES 6-12) AND SENIORS (AGES 66+), $3 CHILDREN 5 AND YOUNGER. 208-775-4452, PEBBLECREEKSKIAREA.COM.

Springs after a full day of skiing.

08 PEBBLE CREEK SKI AREA, INKOM—The only thing better than minimal lift lines and a variety of expert and novice trails is being able to hit up the nearby Lava Hot

VERTICAL DROP: 845 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $15 FULL DAY, $10 HALF DAY OR NIGHT. 208-9623624, COTTONWOODBUTTE.ORG.

tonwood’s easy prices and location offer a great deal.

07 COTTONWOOD BUTTE, FERDINAND—If you’re looking to escape the bigger ski resorts, this is a great alternative. With four major runs and several novice runs, Cot-

VERTICAL DROP: 900 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $35 ADULTS (AGES 19-69), $29 STUDENTS (AGES 13-18), $21 CHILDREN (AGES 7-12), $5 CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER, $25 SENIORS (AGES 70+). 541-856-3277, ANTHONYLAKES.COM.

jump for skiers and boarders. Take advantage of nearly 30 km of groomed trails, with more than half of them expert level.

LOST TRAIL POWDER MOUNTAIN, CONNER, MONT.—With a top-notch ski and snowboarding school and 300 inches of fresh powder each year, it’s easy to see

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VERTICAL DROP: 2,020 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $32 ADULTS, $20 JUNIORS AND SENIORS (AGES 70+). 406-834-3454, SKIMAVERICK.COM.

ski lines and long runs.

27 MAVERICK MOUNTAIN, POLARIS, MONT.—If you’re looking to get back to the basics of skiing, then head over to Maverick Mountain, where you’re guaranteed short

6 PLUS HOURS AWAY

VERTICAL DROP: 3,620 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $60 ADULTS (AGES 18-64), $50 TEENS (AGES 15-17), $40 JUNIORS (AGES 7-14) AND SENIORS (AGES 65-70), FREE JUNIORS (AGES 6 AND YOUNGER) AND SENIORS (AGES 71+). 503-272-3158, TIMBERLINELODGE.COM. SNOW REPORT: 503-222-2211.

more weeks of winter bliss as it offers the longest ski season in North America. For the true ski bum, there just isn’t any other choice.

take you 2,500 feet above the base in less than 10 minutes, but we bet you can make it down in half the time.

06 ANTHONY LAKES, NORTH POWDER, ORE.—With a recently rebuilt terrain park, Anthony Lakes now offers a table jump, loader tire, hip jump and a larger table

THREE HOURS AWAY

42 WHITEFISH MOUNTAIN RESORT, WHITEFISH, MONT.—With 3,000

VERTICAL DROP: 2,280 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $60 ADULTS (AGES 13-61), $41 YOUTHS (AGES 7-12) AND SENIORS (AGES 62-69), $12 CHILDREN (AGES 6 AND YOUNGER) AND SENIORS (AGES 70+). 425-434-7669, SUMMITATSNOQUALMIE.COM. SNOW REPORT: 206-236-1600.

ent peaks and covers nearly 2,000 acres. Don’t let the daunting terrain scare you away, as there are trails for all skill levels.

41 THE SUMMIT AT SNOQUALMIE, SNOQUALMIE, WASH.—Anyone looking to tackle a beast this winter should head over to The Summit, which sits across four differ-

VERTICAL DROP: 1,800 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $65 ADULTS (AGES 16-61), $45 YOUTH (AGES 7-12), FREE CHILDREN (AGES 6 AND YOUNGER), $15 SENIORS (AGES 70+). 206-812-4510, STEVENSPASS.COM. SNOW REPORT: 206-634-1645.

STEVENS PASS, SKYOMISH, WASH.—As if the abundant snowfall and extensive terrain wasn’t enough to get you to go, Stevens Pass also offers some great apres ski activities at the base village of the mountain.

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39 CRYSTAL MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT, ENUMCLAW, WASH.—For skiers and nonskiers alike, Crystal Mountain offers a gondola ride above Mt. Rainier that will

VERTICAL DROP: 4,350 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $89 ADULTS (AGES 18-69), $69 JUNIORS (AGES 1117) AND COLLEGE STUDENTS (WITH ID), $79 SENIORS (AGES 70+), FREE FOR KIDS AGES 10 AND YOUNGER, 800-548-4486, BIGSKYRESORT.COM. SNOW REPORT: 406-995-5900. VERTICAL DROP: 1,500 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $49 ADULTS (AGES 13-64), $29 JUNIORS (AGES 7-12) AND SENIORS (AGES 65-71), FREE FOR CHILDREN AGES 6 AND YOUNGER AND SENIORS (AGES 72+). 503-272-3206, SKIBOWL.COM. SNOW REPORT: 503-222-BOWL.

suggest ditching your job and taking the entire season to explore the 150 runs that span 3,832 acres. If you’re gonna be a ski bum, you might as well do it right.

38 BIG SKY, BOZEMAN, MONT.—If you’re looking for heaven on Earth, then it’s safe to say that you’ll find it here. If you really want to experience the wintery bliss, we

VERTICAL DROP: 1,150 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $38 ADULTS (AGES 18-61), $27 JUNIORS (AGES 7-17) AND SENIORS (AGES 62+), $36 STUDENT/MILITARY (WITH ID), FREE FOR CHILDREN AGES 6 AND YOUNGER. 208-744-1301. SKILOOKOUT.COM.

LOOKOUT PASS SKI AREA, WALLACE—While most birds fly south for the winter, snowbunnies should head north to Lookout Pass, where they will be treated with an annual snowfall of 400 inches and more than 500 acres of terrain to explore.

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VERTICAL DROP: 2,200 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $52 ADULTS (AGES 18-61), $37 YOUTHS (AGES 7-17), $47 COLLEGE STUDENTS/MILITARY, $42 SENIORS (AGES 62+), FREE FOR CHILDREN AGES 6 AND YOUNGER. 866-344-2675, SILVERMT.COM.

SILVER MOUNTAIN RESORT, KELLOGG—For the family with a wide array of interests, this is the perfect place. Take your time exploring the 1,600 acres of trails or try out your skills at ice skating and tubing; you’ll be too busy having fun to feel the cold.

VERTICAL DROP: 2,700 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $49 ADULTS, $22 SENIORS (AGES 70-79), $16 YOUTH (AGES 7-12), FREE FOR CHILDREN AGES 6 AND YOUNGER AND SENIORS (AGES 80+). 406-587-2111, BRIDGERBOWL.COM. SNOW REPORT: 406-586-2389.

MT. HOOD SKI BOWL, GOVERNMENT CAMP, ORE.—For those who consider themselves king of the (ski) mountain, we challenge you to Ski Bowl, boasting more black diamond runs than any other hill in Oregon and some of the most extensive night skiing. If skiing isn’t your style, you’re in luck as Ski Bowl offers other activities such as snowmobiling, tubing and snowshoeing.

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VERTICAL DROP: 7,300 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $74 ADULTS (AGES 15-64), $46 JUNIORS (AGES 7-14) AND SENIORS (70+), $56 SENIORS (AGES 65-69), $10 CHILDREN (AGES 6 AND YOUNGER). WEEKDAY SALES OFFICE: 503-659-1256, WEEKENDS: 503-337-2222, SKIHOOD.COM

don’t worry about wasting time on the lift, as the Stadium Express chair will allow you to clock in more hours cutting through powder.

24 MT. HOOD MEADOWS, HOOD RIVER, ORE.—Mt. Hood Meadows welcomes all levels of skiers, offering myriad trails ranging from bunny hills to black diamonds. And

VERTICAL DROP: 4,139 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $90-$105 ADULTS (AGES 15-64), $54-$63 YOUTH (AGES 14 AND YOUNGER), $72-$84 SENIORS (AGES 65+). 307-733-2292, JACKSONHOLE.COM. SNOW REPORT: 888-DEEP-SNO.

less time waiting in line and more time cruising the nicely groomed trails. Of course, there’s still a remarkable amout of expert-only terrain and the famous gondola to explore.

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BRIDGER BOWL, BOZEMAN, MONT.—Whether you’re looking for thrills on one of the eight chairlifts or hoping to warm up at one of the three different lodges, Bridger Bowl will undoubtedly have what you’re looking for.

VERTICAL DROP: 1,425 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $35 ADULTS (AGES 18+), $19 YOUTH (AGES 7-17) AND SENIORS (62-69), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER AND SENIORS 70+. 208-764-2526, SOLDIERMOUNTAIN.COM.

kid brother, this resort is family friendly and a great place to entertain skiers of all ages.

05 SOLDIER MOUNTAIN, FAIRFIELD—Offering more than 36 runs for all skill levels, Soldier Mountain is a real bang for your buck. Sometimes considered Sun Valley’s

VERTICAL DROP: 700 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $32 ADULTS (AGES 18+), $21 YOUTH (AGES 7-17), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER. 208-736-SNOW, MAGICMOUNTAINRESORT.COM.

snowbird, Magic Mountain has what you’re looking for.

04 MAGIC MOUNTAIN, TWIN FALLS—Myriad jumps and trails allow for a unique mix of novice to expert-only runs. So whether you’re just beginning or a lifelong

VERTICAL DROP: 405 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $13 ADULTS (AGES 17 AND OLDER), $11 CHILDREN (AGES 5-17), FREE FOR CHILDREN 4 AND YOUNGER. 208-634-5691, LITTLESKIHILL.INFO.

LITTLE SKI HILL, MCCALL—Little Ski Hill hosts an alpine hill, as well as 30 km of cross-country terrain. This is truly a community ski hill, where most locals learned to ski thanks to extensive ski school programs.

23 JACKSON HOLE MOUNTAIN RESORT, JACKSON HOLE, WYO.—New to Jackson Hole this year is a high-speed quad lift for the Casper area of the hill. This means

tubing areas, as well as the thrilling sport of snowbiking.

VERTICAL DROP: 1,035 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $45 ADULTS (AGES 13-64), YOUTH (AGES 6-12) AND SENIORS (AGES 65+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 5 AND YOUNGER. 541-822-3799, HOODOO.COM. SNOW REPORT: 541-822-3337.

VERTICAL DROP: 1,800 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $57 ADULTS (AGES 18-69), $37 YOUTHS AND SENIORS (AGES 12-17, 70+), $23 CHILDREN (AGES 7-11), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER. 208-634-4151, BRUNDAGE.COM. SNOW REPORT: 208-634-SNOW.

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22 HOODOO SKI AREA, SANTIAM PASS, ORE.—For a variety of snow activities outside of skiing and snowboarding, head over to Hoodoo to try out one of the largest

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VERTICAL DROP: 2,047 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: (2011-2012 RATES) $68 ADULTS (AGES 14-69), $42 YOUTH (AGES 7-13), $45 SENIORS (AGES 70+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER. 801-5341400, SKISOLITUDE.COM. SNOW REPORT: 801-536-5777.

BRUNDAGE MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT, MCCALL—With some of the best snow in Idaho, Brundage offers the option of thrilling expert-level trails, as well as groomed cross-country and snow cat ski trails. New expansions to the main lodge make apres ski even more appealing.

TWO HOURS AWAY

the pudding, as you’ll enjoy skiing in this winter wonderland.

ance on runs with 2,000-foot vertical drops.

VERTICAL DROP: 2,600 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $43 ADULTS, $40 STUDENTS/SENIORS, $19 CHILDREN (AGES 6-12), FREE FOR CHILDREN AGES 5 AND YOUNGER. 406-549-9777, MONTANASKIBOWL.COM.

21 SOLITUDE, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH—Solitude caters to the intermediate skier, with shorter lift lines, 65 runs and three bowls. With a name like Solitude, the proof is in

VERTICAL DROP: 1,800 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $48 ADULTS (AGES 12-69), $20 CHILDREN (AGES 7-11), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER AND SENIORS (70+). $22 NIGHT ONLY. 208-3325100, BOGUSBASIN.ORG. SNOW REPORT: 208-342-2100.

34 MONTANA SNOWBOWL, MISSOULA, MONT.—If you just can’t get enough powder, then get ready for knee-deep trails and terrain that will test your skills and endur-

GUIDE 2012

VERTICAL DROP: 3,240 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $85 ADULTS (AGES 13-64), $42 KIDS (AGES 7-12), $65 SENIORS (AGES 65+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER. 801-933-2222, SNOWBIRD. COM. SNOW REPORT: 801-933-2100.

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BOGUS BASIN MOUNTAIN RECREATION AREA, BOISE—Where else can you spend the entire day skiing and still make it down the hill in time to warm up with some dinner and brews? Take advantage of the terrain right next door and explore the trails ranging from beginner to expert.

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SNOWBIRD, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH—With one of Utah’s longest ski and snowboarding seasons, Snowbird boasts an impressive average of 500 inches of fresh powder each year and was voted the No. 1 ski resort in North America in 2008 by Outside Magazine.

WITHIN ONE HOUR

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VERTICAL DROP: 3.100 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: PRICES VARY DAILY. 800-222-PARK, PARKCITYMOUNTAIN.COM. SNOW REPORT: 435-647-5449.

family friendly ski hill.

19 PARK CITY, PARK CITY, UTAH—Offering a variety of 114 beginner to expert trails, four terrain parks, backcountry skiing and an Alpine coaster, Park City is a truly

VERTICAL DROP: 3,000 FEET. TICKETS: $102 ADULTS (AGES 13-64), $64 CHILDREN (AGES 4-12), $73 SENIORS (65+), $21 TODDLERS (AGES 3 AND YOUNGER). 800-424-DEER, DEERVALLEY.COM. SNOW REPORT: 435-649-2000.

DEER VALLEY RESORT, PARK CITY, UTAH—With runs from the 2002 Olympic Winter Games, Deer Valley gets a gold medal for its trails. The skier-only resort is host to six mountains and 100 runs, offering a season full of entertainment.

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VERTICAL DROP: 3,190 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $105 ADULTS, $60 JUNIORS (AGES 7-12) AND SENIORS (AGES 65+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER. DISCOUNTS ON ALL TICKETS PURCHASED ONLINE. 435-649-5400, THECANYONS.COM. SNOW REPORT: 435-615-3456.

THE CANYONS, PARK CITY, UTAH—When it comes to The Canyons, “go big or go home” couldn’t be a more appropriate statement. With world-class skiing, dining and resorts, The Canyons is the perfect getaway for anyone looking to be dazzled both on and off the slopes.

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VERTICAL DROP: 1,745 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $64 ADULTS (AGES 13-69), $31 YOUTH (AGES 8-12), $37 SENIORS (AGES 70+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 7 AND YOUNGER. 800-873-5512, BRIGHTONRESORT.COM.

ners looking to hit the slopes. It boasts an expert ski school, night trails and high-speed quad lifts.

16 BRIGHTON, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH—With some of the freshest and best powder that Utah has to offer, Brighton is the place to be for experts, as well as begin-

VERTICAL DROP: 2,020 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $75 ADULTS, $40 CHILDREN (AGES 12 AND YOUNGER). 801-359-1078, ALTA.COM. SNOW REPORT: 801-572-3939.

boarders allowed.

15 ALTA, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH—With more than 115 runs and a snowy heap of expert runs, Alta offers some fierce competition. Only one catch: skiers only, no

VERTICAL DROP: 1,000 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $39 ADULTS (AGES 12-64), $31 CHILDREN (AGES 5-11) AND SENIORS (AGES 65+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 4 AND YOUNGER. 208-538-6251, SKIKELLY.COM.

KELLY CANYON, IDAHO FALLS—Aside from 26 runs ranging from intermediate to expert and the only night skiing in the area, Kelly Canyon is host to the X Games every year. From extensive runs to a full-service terrain park, Kelly has it all.

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VERTICAL DROP: 2,270 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $69 ADULTS (AGES 13-64), $29 YOUTH (AGES 6-12), $44 SENIORS (AGES 65+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 5 AND YOUNGER. 307-353-2300, GRANDTARGHEE.COM. SNOW REPORT: 800-827-4433.

entertainment.

13 GRAND TARGHEE, ALTA, WYO.—With top-rated trails, guided adventures and an average of 500 inches of snow every season, Grand Targhee is guaranteed

VERTICAL DROP: 3,365 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $76 ADULTS (AGES 19-64), $65 TEENS (AGES 13-18) AND SENIORS (AGES 65-69), $46 YOUTH (AGES 6-12) AND SENIORS (AGES 70+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 5 AND YOUNGER. 800-829-2442, MTBACHELOR.COM. SNOW REPORT: 541-382-7888.

intimidate even the most experienced skiers, its longer ski season will give you plenty of time to work your way up the mountain.

12 MT. BACHELOR, BEND, ORE.—With the highest skiable terrain in both Oregon and Washington, Mt. Bachelor is nothing to squabble about. While many of the runs may

SIX HOURS AWAY

VERTICAL DROP: 3,400 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $95 ADULTS, $54 YOUTH, $66 SENIORS (AGES 65+). 208-622-4111, SUNVALLEY.COM. SNOW REPORT: 800-635-4150.

SUN VALLEY SKI RESORT, SUN VALLEY—The creme de la creme of Idaho skiing, Sun Valley is a great escape for snow bunnies across the country, as well as Idahoans. With more than 6,000 feet of Nordic and snowshoeing trails, Sun Valley is a must-ski.

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VERTICAL DROP: 400 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $17 ADULTS AND CHILDREN, $15 SENIORS, FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER. 208-983-3866.

SNOWHAVEN RESORT, GRANGEVILLE—While it is only open on weekends and holidays, the low prices make for a great getaway for the entire family. Offering both ski runs and tubing hills, Snowhaven has a little bit of everything for everyone.

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VERTICAL DROP: 1,000 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $35 ADULTS (AGES 13-69), $25 YOUTH (AGES 7-12) AND SENIORS (AGES 70+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER. 208-673-5599, POMERELLE. COM. SNOW REPORT: 208-673-5555.

an eye on Pomerelle, as its copious snowfall typically leads to an earlier opening than other hills. As a bonus, there are two terrain parks to choose from.

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VERTICAL DROP: 2,000 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $49 ADULTS (AGES 18-69), $42 COLLEGE AND MILITARY (WITH ID), $39 YOUTHS (AGES 7-17), $26 SENIORS (AGES 70+), FREE FOR CHILDREN AGES 6 AND YOUNGER. 509-238-2220, MTSPOKANE.COM. SNOW REPORT: 509-443-1397.

about the setting sun as Mt. Spokane offers 16 runs open for night skiing.

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33 MT. SPOKANE, COLBERT, WASH.—Test your skills at the terrain park, where you can enjoy miles of kickers, hits and jibs for freestylers of every level. Don’t worry

VERTICAL DROP: 1,125 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $42 ADULTS, $38 STUDENTS, $33 CHILDREN (GRADES 1-8) AND SENIORS (AGES 65+), FREE FOR PRESCHOOLERS (KINDERGARTEN AND YOUNGER), 509-382-4725, BLUEWOOD.COM. SNOW REPORT: 509-443-1397.

BLUEWOOD, DAYTON, WASH.—Looking to get lost in some perfect, dry powder? Check out the serene trails at Bluewood, where you won’t have to waste time waiting in long lines to try out the 24 runs.

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VERTICAL DROP: 1,851 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $57 ADULTS (AGES 18-69), $48 YOUTH (AGES 7-17), $51 COLLEGE STUDENT/MILITARY, $52 SENIORS (AGES 70+), $10 CHILDREN (AGES 6 AND YOUNGER). 509-935-6649, SKI49N.COM.

49 DEGREES NORTH, CHEWELAH, WASH.—If you’re looking for a trail that will test your endurance, then check out the 2.75-mile-long run, but when you start to feel the burn, don’t say we didn’t warn you. Feel free to cool down on one of the other 75 trails it has to offer.

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VERTICAL DROP: 2,388 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $40 ADULTS (AGES 13+), $20 CHILDREN (AGES 12 AND YOUNGER) AND SENIORS (AGES 65+). 406-563-2184, SKIDISCOVERY.COM.

mountain hosts a mix of Nordic trails and a freestyle park that allows snow bunnies to really put their skills and endurance to the test.

30 DISCOVERY BASIN, PHILIPSBURG, MONT.—There is a little bit of everything at every level at Discovery Basin with trails for all levels for skiers and boarders. The

VERTICAL DROP: 2,050 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $59 ADULTS (AGES 13-64), $37 JUNIORS (AGES 7-12) AND SENIORS (AGES 65-72), $5 CHILDREN (AGES 6 AND YOUNGER) AND SUPER SENIORS (AGES 73+), 509-672-3201, SKIWHITEPASS.COM. SNOW REPORT: 509-672-3100.

as increased parking sites. There is a mix of beginner, intermediate and advanced trails with night skiing available on Saturdays and holidays.

29 WHITE PASS SKI AREA, YAKIMA, WASH.—White Pass has managed to nearly double in size with recent expansions, including the opening of a new basin, as well

VERTICAL DROP: 1,800 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $37 ADULTS (AGES 13-59), $27 JUNIORS (AGES 6-12), $29 GOLDEN AGERS (AGES 60-69), $14 SENIORS (AGES 70+), FREE FOR CHILDREN AGES 5 AND YOUNGER. 406-821-3211, LOSTTRAIL.COM

why people keep coming back to get lost in the trails.

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class trails and terrain weren’t enough, skiers and boarders alike know how to party on and off the slopes, well after the last call for night skiing.

46 LAKE TAHOE, LAKE TAHOE, CALIF.—The Mecca of ski resorts, Lake Tahoe offers seven different mountains to snow lovers who flock there annually. As if the world-

VERTICAL DROP: 2,400 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $50 ADULTS (AGES 19-64), $40 JUNIORS (AGES 13-18), $36 COLLEGE STUDENT, $32 MILITARY, $42 SENIORS (AGES 65-69), $20 CHILDREN (AGES 6-12), $16 SUPER SENIORS (AGES 70+), FREE FOR CHILDREN AGES 6 AND YOUNGER. 800-444-8977, REDLODGEMOUNTAIN.COM. SNOW REPORT: 406-255-6973.

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RED LODGE, BILLINGS, MONT.—Red Lodge offers the necessary terrain to work your way up from a beginner all the way to an expert (or at least somewhere above a novice). Whether you’re hitting up the terrain park or cruising the long trails, you’ll have plenty of room to work on your skills.

VERTICAL DROP: 2,400 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $68 ADULTS (AGES 18-64), $50 JUNIORS (AGES 7-17), $58 COLLEGE STUDENT (WITH ID) AND SENIORS (AGES 65+), FREE FOR CHILDREN AGES 6 AND YOUNGER. 208-263-9555, SCHWEITZER.COM. SNOW REPORT: 208-263-9562.

SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT, SANDPOINT—At the top of Schweitzer, you can see three mountain ranges, three different states and our Canadian neighbors to the north—now there’s something to write home about. And with more than 90 runs, we’re not sure you’ll ever want to leave.

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VERTICAL DROP: 1,563 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $49 ADULTS (AGES 11-64), $30 YOUTHS (AGES 6-10) AND MASTERS (AGES 65+). 541-345-SNOW, WILLAMETTEPASS.COM.

annually, two terrain parks and night skiing are just the tip of this very chilly (and thrilling) iceberg.

43 WILLAMETTE PASS SKI AREA, EUGENE, ORE.—Don’t let the small size fool you. Willamette Pass has more than enough fun to offer. Its 400 inches of snow

VERTICAL DROP: 2,353 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $67 ADULTS (AGES 19-64), $56 SENIORS (AGES 65-69), $59 TEENS (AGES 13-18), $36 JUNIORS (AGES 7-12), FREE FOR CHILDREN AGES 6 AND YOUNGER AND SUPER SENIOR (AGES 70+). 800-858-3930, SKIWHITEFISH.COM. SNOW REPORT: 406-862-SNOW.

acres of ever changing terrain, Whitefish is designed to keep skiers of any level entertained. You’re just one 7.5-minute chairlift ride away from experiencing pure winter bliss.

8 DAYS OUT SUNDAY NOV. 11

MONDAY NOV. 12

On Stage

Festivals & Events

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $9-$15. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

VETERANS DAY CEREMONY— Hear on-campus and community speakers and a children’s choir from Garfield Elementary School. For more info, call 208-4264239. 11 a.m. FREE. Bronco Stadium, Boise State, Boise, 208-426-1000, boisestate.edu.

LIQUID LAUGHS: DEREK RICHARDS—See Thursday. Buy one, get one free. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. THE MOUSETRAP—See Thursday. 3 p.m. $20-$30. NexStage Theatre, 120 S. Main St., Ketchum, 208-726-2985.

Citizen VETERAN’S DAY OBSERVANCE—Join the College of Western Idaho to honor veterans and reflect on the importance of this day with the national anthem and flag raising. Special

guest speaker and refreshments inside. 9 a.m. FREE. College of Western Idaho-Canyon County Center, 2407 Caldwell Blvd., Nampa, 208-562-2100; 11 a.m. FREE. College of Western Idaho-Nampa Campus, 5500 E. Opportunity Drive, Nampa, 208-562-3400, 208-562-3400; 1 p.m. FREE. College of Western Idaho-Ada County Campus, 1360 S. Eagle Flight Way, Boise, 208562-3000; cwidaho.cc.

TUESDAY NOV. 13 Festivals & Events ALZHEIMER’S AND MEMORY SCREENING—Individuals can

Concerts COMMON GROUND CHORUS: PROUD TO SERVE—The choir performs several selections honoring our military in this Veteran’s Day concert, directed by Grammy Award-winner Randy Coryell. The box office opens one hour prior to each performance. 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. FREE$10. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. IN THE MOOD: A 1940S MUSICAL REVUE—The touring show features singers and dancers as the String of Pearls Big Band Orchestra brings its 1940s style of entertainment to Boise as part of its 19th season. Tickets available at the Morrison Center box office, all Select-ASeat outlets and idahotickets. com. 4 p.m. $19.50-$39.50. Morrison Center for the Per forming Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu.

Food & Drink DINE OUT DOWNTOWN BOISE RESTAURANT WEEK—See Wednesday. downtownboise.org. $10-$30. VETERANS DAY BREAKFAST— Enjoy pancakes, eggs, sausage and live entertainment. For more info, call 208-465-6446. 8 a.m.-noon. $6, $4 seniors, veterans, children ages 4-12. Warhawk Air Museum, Nampa Airport, 201 Municipal Drive, Nampa, 208-465-6446, warhawkairmuseum.org.

Kids & Teens RE-ART: SQUARE DANCING—See Saturday. 1-2 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3844200; Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-562-4996; boisepubliclibrary.org.

NOISE/CD REVIEW ANIMAL COLLECTIVE, CENTIPEDE HZ Every Animal Collective album is different. And Centipede Hz moves the psychedelic electronic band in yet another direction, adding to its rainbow oeuvre of challenging music. Centipede Hz is a glitchy, loud, mixed-up circus of an album. At first listen, it is difficult to get through. At just under 55 minutes, Centipede Hz is Animal Collective’s longest record since its 2003 debut, Spirit They’re Gone, Spirit They’ve Vanished, and it’s debatable which is more of a chore to ingest. Centipede Hz was recorded using traditional instruments to mimic the quality of the group’s live performances. While this goal may have been achieved, the sound produced by an Animal Collective live show isn’t meant for headphones and the result is an album that would be more agreeable in a large, audience-filled venue. As has been the case with most everything from the band, Centipede Hz hits highs and lows. The single “Today’s Supernatural” is catchy in spite of its grittiness and the listener is actually able to discern the subtly sentimental lyrics: “Come and join me in the speaker there’s a ruby in your eye and we don’t have to be the same / ’Cause your own is the sweetest thing inside of you / And our home is bigger than a mountain view / You’ll find something you believe that you should do.” But overall, the range spanned on this album is narrow and lacks the rewards hidden in previous records. “Amanita,” the album’s closing track, is a lackluster, tribalsounding call to arms ending with the lines, “What are you gonna do? / Go into the forest! / Until I really can’t remember my name / I’m gonna come back and things will be different / I’m gonna bring back some stories and games.” Animal Collective has proven one thing for certain with Centipede Hz: each time it comes back, things will be different. —Catie Young

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8 DAYS OUT take advantage of free, confidential memory screenings as part of National Memory Screening Day, an annual initiative of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America to promote proper detection of memory problems. For more info, visit nationalmemoryscreening.org. Call 866-AFA-8484 or visit alzfdn. org for more info about the Alzheimer’s Foundation. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Willow Park Assisted Living, 2600 N. Milwaukee St., Boise, 208-373-1234, willowparkseniorliving.com. HEALTH FAIR—Get low-cost early detection and preventative screenings. Free prizes and giveaways. For more info, call 208-367-8787. See Picks, Page 18. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-4636, boisestate.edu.

Food & Drink

Workshops & Classes

Talks & Lectures

DISHCRAWL BOISE: THE “BEST OF” EDITION— This first Dishcrawl event for Boise features four restaurants that have recently been voted as a “Best Of Boise” in the Boise Weekly’s 2012 competition. Ticket price includes all food at all four restaurants, plus tax and tip. For more info, log onto dishcrawl. com, or follow on Twitter @DishcrawlBoise. “Like” the event on Facebook to get all the latest updates. 7 p.m. $39, dishcrawl.com/boise.

CHRISTMAS CARD WORKSHOP—See Tuesday. 6-9 p.m. $80. Idaho Poster and Letterpress, 280 N. Eighth St., Ste. 118, Boise, 208-761-9538, idahoposterandletterpress.com.

CWI VISITING SCIENTIST SERIES—The College of Western Idaho Department of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math hosts Dr. Ralph Budwig, director of the College of Engineering Boise and the Center for Ecohydraulics Stream Laboratory. Join the exciting conversation regarding research taking place at the University of Idaho and how you can become involved when you transfer to UI. 5:30 p.m. FREE. College of Western Idaho-Nampa Campus Room 116, 5500 E. Opportunity Drive, Nampa, 208562-3400, 208-562-3400.

PUTTING SOCIAL MEDIA TO WORK—Learn effective uses of social media from Amanda Larrinaga, META marketing and communications specialist. Special guest presenter will be Gabrielle Krake. Lunch from Honey Baked Ham. Information and registration: email alarrinaga@metaidaho.org, call 336-5533, ext. 501, or go to metaidaho.org. 11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m. $20. US Bank Building, 101 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-345-8519, unicoprop.com.

HEALTH FAIR FOR REFUGEES—Boise State University’s School of Nursing presents this health awareness event for local refugees. Contact ryokohayashi@u.boisestate.edu or call 208-9942806 for more info. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Candlewood Suites, 700 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-322-4300.

Food & Drink COOKING CLASSES JUST FOR KIDS—This class features a Thai menu. Classes limited to four participants. See fuelforboise.com for a complete menu. Call to register. 3:30-6 p.m. $55. Fuel for the Soul. 1941 N. 18th St., Boise, 208-342-7118.

Workshops & Classes CHRISTMAS CARD WORKSHOP—Design and print your own Christmas cards using antique lead and wood letters, along with old-fashioned holiday images. Class size limited to six people. Email bingo@ bingopress.biz to register. 6-9 p.m. $80. Idaho Poster and Letterpress, 280 N. Eighth St., Ste. 118, Boise, 208-761-9538, idahoposterandletterpress.com.

Literature AUTHOR READING—Conda Douglas and Kathy MacIntosh discuss their work. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org.

Talks & Lectures BROWN BAG LECTURE—Underground Above the City: John and Marjorie Fairchild’s Rammed Earth House is the topic for this lecture by historian Elizabeth Jacox. See Picks, Page 19. Noon-1 p.m. $3-$5, members FREE. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, history.idaho.gov.

Kids & Teens TEEN MATINEE—Watch new releases and classic favorites. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib.org.

Religious/Spiritual FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS—Join Diwali, the annual festival of lights for an evening of meditation, dancing, drama and vegetarian ethnic Indian food. The temple altar will be lit by the warm glow of hundreds of lamps. Light a lamp of your own at 6:15 p.m., with the mesmerizing unveiling at 6:45 p.m. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Hare Krishna Temple, 1615 Martha St., Boise, 208-344-4274, boisetemple.org.

WEDNESDAY NOV. 14 On Stage THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $9-$15. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu.

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NEWS/NOISE NOISE

EL TEN ELEVEN Dedicated Servers is dedicated to its craft.

GET IN TO IT, BOISE Look, on the net! It’s a concert listing! No, it’s a band bio and series of articles! No, it’s a bunch of streaming audio and video! Actually, it’s all of these things. Boise Weekly has launched the musical motherload, GetN2it, which supercharges our concert listings pages with content from YouTube, ReverbNation, iTunes and more, putting damn near everything there is about a band online into each of our concert listings. This is not just great for readers browsing through the music listings for something to do, it’s fantastic for bands, as well, because it creates a promo hub of content about them, pretty much automatically. You aren’t going to find a better tool for navigating local music offerings anywhere. Check it out at Boise Weekly’s music page online and prepare to be dazzled. In offline news, Boise author Alan Heathcock has been raking in the accolades for his short-story collection, Volt, earning everything from big cash-money lit prizes to a bevy of film adaptations. And this month, the stories in his book will get a musical treatment, as well, courtesy of Boise songwriter Chad Summervill. Summervill adapted four stories from the collection—“Freight,” “Fort Apache,” “Smoke” and “Lazarus”—into Americana ballads rich with Heathcock’s imagery. All four will be released as digital downloads at an event later this month. Another local digital album comes courtesy of Boise hip-hop duo Dedicated Servers, which apparently isn’t that interested in sleeping. The album’s title, While You Were Sleeping, speaks mostly to the group’s work ethic. This is the duo’s third release in a year, and another is on the way. Dedicated, indeed. The 13-track album marks a return to the more electronic sound of the group’s earlier work and is available as a free download via Bandcamp or streaming on Boise Weekly’s blog. Another album getting set to launch comes from fretless semi-local wonder Ned Evett, who will be dropping his new album, Treehouse, at The Linen Building Friday, Nov. 16. Treehouse was recorded during the last two years in Nashville, Tenn., and produced by Adrian Belew, who has worked with everyone from David Bowie to Nine Inch Nails to Paul Simon. That show starts at 8:30 p.m. and costs $10 in advance or $15 at the door.

Post rock instrumental duo goes through Transitions on new album JOSH GROSS It was the second day of El Ten Eleven’s 31city tour when Boise Weekly spoke to Kristian Dunn, bassist and guitar player for the Los Angeles band. He was already exhausted. “It’s like we’ve been on tour for a month, but it’s only been two days,” he said. Dunn had stayed up the night before the band left home, finalizing the details for its new stage show—a series of colored panels that backlight the band in time with its songs, something Boise will get to see Monday, Nov. 12, at Neurolux. El Ten Eleven will bring its instrumental wizardry to Boise on eleven twelve twelve. “It’s really cool,” said Dunn. “It’s this huge thing we’ve never done before. You complex sound than 2010’s It’s Still Like a signing Portland Ore.’s, Girlfriends. Dunn and kind of have to see it to understand but it Secret, and a wider melodic scope than the Fogarty were turned on to the band during an will be worth your money.” band’s earlier material. online interview session. The self-described power-duo consists “All of our other records, usually you “Everything is really coming together, reof Dunn performing and looping complex ally starting to work,” said Dunn. “So to just can hear really definable verse-chorus-versefinger-tapping melodies on a double-neck chorus,” said Dunn. “They’re really kind take all this and say now is the time [to sign bass-and-guitar mutilated by effects pedals, of pop songs, even though most people with a label] just didn’t make sense.” while drummer Tim Fogarty keeps time on wouldn’t define them that way. But with And thanks to the band’s strong fan base, an acoustic drum kit with live loops. He this record, we wanted it to be like one El Ten Eleven didn’t have to. It set out to also uses tuned electronic drums to play subtle underlying melodies. The full sound is raise $2,000 for the new album on Kickstart- song, like a piece of classical music.” One of the things that drove the shifting a wildly catchy combination of indie, electro er with perks ranging from downloads and vinyl to private music lessons, and got nearly approach was the band’s recording techand rock that routinely leaves jaws on the nique. On previous albums, El Ten Eleven six times that amount, meaning the band floor in a live setting. While most bands would outsource stage didn’t have to pay for anything out of pocket. had taken care to record things as they The album was funded would be performed live. The band abanshow prep before a doned that philosophy on Transitions. entirely by fans. tour, El Ten Eleven is “We decided to have three guitars and And for the next short on a big road El Ten Eleven with Michna, and Yourself and two basses come in at once and there’s no several weeks, El Ten crew. Unlike most The Air, Monday, Nov. 12, 7 p.m., $8 adv., way I can do that,” said Dunn. “I’d have to Eleven is working bands touring a long $10 door. grow some more arms.” to not let those fans circuit with a big live NEUROLUX But that strategy backfired slightly. down, by pushing show, the duo is do111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886 “There’s a song called ‘No One Died Transitions nationwide. ing it all on its own. neurolux.com This Time!’ and it was one where we Dunn said TransiAnd unlike thought let’s not worry about how to play tions was written many bands whose this one live,” said Dunn. “But it’s one that about dark times the independent status is getting a lot of attention and now we band was going through, including both stems from a lack of label or management interest, El Ten Eleven goes rogue by choice. members getting divorced and Dunn moving have to figure it out.” To do so, Dunn said the band may to another city. But since El Ten Eleven is an Dunn personally has been signed to seven have to rearrange the song to adhere to its instrumental band, those things were chanrecord labels, including Atlantic Records, rejection of pre-recorded loops or laptopneled into arrangements instead of lyrics. and the band was courted repeatedly by “There’s a lot of crazy changes,” he said. triggered samples, which Dunn and Fogarty labels that wanted to release its new album, consider cheating. “Out of the blue, there’s a tempo change Transitions. But El Ten Eleven respectfully “A lot of bands do it and a lot of bands and time signature changes, and that’s what showed them the door. it was like. There’s this thing that seems jar- aren’t doing that well,” he said. “People “It’s kind of tempting because there’s aren’t going to shows as much anymore. some labels where just the name would open ring, but then you start to settle into it.” And I think that’s why. Why would you Dunn said most people probably some doors for us,” said Dunn. “But we want to pay good money to see someone don’t want to give up control, especially at a wouldn’t get that with just a cursory listen press the space bar and lipsynch? It’s not time when we’re developing our own label.” but he said that doing the research and exciting. Whereas, what we do, there’s that The band’s imprint, Fake Record Label, has knowing the backstory can bring a deeper tightrope walker aspect of it. We can screw recently come together as a business, taking on appreciation of the new album. up. And we do.” Transitions brings a smoother, more a marketing agency and a publicist, and even

—Josh Gross

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LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY NOV. 7

THE POTENT BLENDS TOUR— Featuring Emaculent, X-Kid and Willie Joe and Unique. 9 p.m. $3. Fatty’s

BAND OF BUSKERS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

BEN BURDICK—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

SKATE NIGHT—Featuring Dj Auz, Fly Life and Arthur Maddox. 8 p.m. FREE. Shredder

BURLEY GRIMES—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s COLT FORD—With J.J. Lawhorn. 8:30 p.m. $18-$45. Knitting Factory

TEENAGE BOTTLEROCKET, NOV. 8, RED ROOM Wyoming punks Teenage Bottlerocket could give a shit about pushing musical boundaries. The band didn’t even bother to change the album art on any of its five records, altering only the colors and title beneath its skull and crossed rockets logo. Instead, the band concentrates on what really counts: blazing guitars, shout-along choruses and keeping four nailed solidly to the floor in the vein of the Ramones, Screeching Weasel and even The Descendents—which Teenage Bottlerocket supported in the United Kingdom in 2011. But that’s not the only gold star it has collected. The band’s resume is a who’s who of punk dynasty. It has also supported bands like Dropkick Murphys, NOFX and Propagandhi, and one of its guitar players, Kody Templeman, also plays in The Lillingtons. That band’s straightforward style can be heard in Teenage Bottlerocket’s sound, as well. You can say pop punk is dead. Just don’t say it to Teenage Bottlerocket. —Josh Gross With The Useless and Hotel Chelsea. 8 p.m., $10 adv., $12 door. Red Room, 1519 W. Main St., redroomboise.com.

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STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DUCK CLUB PRESENTS TYPHOON—With Laura Gibson and Lost Lander. See Listen Here, Page 31. 9 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. VAC

THURSDAY NOV. 8

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

EVIL WINE PRESENTS TEENAGE BOTTLEROCKET—With The Useless and Hotel Chelsea. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Red Room

JAC SOUND—8:30 p.m. FREE. Reef JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s LARRY CONKLIN—10:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La

FIRES IN FRANCE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

PAUL DRAGONE—6 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

GWAR—With Devil Driver, Cancer Bats and Legacy of Disorder. 7:30 p.m. $23-$35. Knitting Factory

THE PORK TORTA—With The Hand. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

HOLLOW WOOD—8 p.m. $10. Neurolux

SALLY TIBBS AND KEVIN KIRK—5:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

METAL NIGHT—9 p.m. FREE. Frontier Club

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club

OLD DEATH WHISPER—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

OLYGHOST—With Tony P, Bmac, Illest Lyricists, 3rd Degree and Plan B. 8 p.m. $5. Shredder

FRIDAY NOV. 9 A TASTY JAMM—10 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s BAND OF BUSKERS—8 p.m. FREE. The Crux BIG WOW—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle DAN COSTELLO AND THE TRUCK STOP TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper FIVE SMOOTH STONES—9 p.m. FREE. Monkey Bizness GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid GENERATIONALS—With Races. 8 p.m. $10. Neurolux GIZZARD STONE—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

JAMES ORR—9 p.m. FREE. Reef

JOHN JONES—5:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

PAUSE FOR THE CAUSE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—10 p.m. $5. Reef

POP CULT KIDS—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s THE QUICK AND EASY BOYS— With Jupiter Holiday and Danger Beard. 8 p.m. $5-$8. VAC ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club SPUDMAN—7:30 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s TODD DUNNIGAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

SATURDAY NOV. 10 BAND OF BUSKERS—8 p.m. FREE. Burger Belly THE BIG WOW—10 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s BLACK TOOTH GRIN—With Sil Shoda, Uintahs and P36. 8 p.m. $6-$8. Knitting Factory DAN COSTELLO AND THE TRUCK STOP TRIO—8 p.m.

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE E40—8 p.m. $20-$35. Revolution

DUCK CLUB PRESENTS MV & EE—With Blurred Vision and Lucid Aisle. 8 p.m. $5. Red Room

ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

KEVIN KIRK—9:30 a.m. FREE. Bar 365

FIVE SMOOTH STONES—9 p.m. FREE. Monkey Bizness

LARRY CONKLIN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

SUNDERGROUND—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

APOLLO RUN—With New Cassettes and Fort Harrison. 9 p.m. $5. Shredder

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

TERRI EBERLEIN—10:15 a.m. FREE. Berryhill

CROWN POINT ALBUM RELEASE PARTY—9 p.m. $5. Reef

TURNS OUT—Midnight. FREE. Liquid

JOHNNY SHOES—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Moon’s

PAUL DRAGONE—6 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

NED EVETT—8 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

OPHELIA—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

SKATE NIGHT—Featuring Social Antidote and Upinatem. 8 p.m. FREE. Shredder

FREE. Gamekeeper

MEDICINE MAN—10 p.m. $5. Reef OLD DEATH WHISPER—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s NEW TRANSIT—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s ROOMRUNNER—With Range Life. 8 p.m. $3. Red Room SALLY TIBBS AND KEVIN KIRK—5:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club TURNS OUT—Midnight. FREE. Liquid

SUNDAY NOV. 11 BEN BURDICK—Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

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MONDAY NOV. 12 DATSIK—With Terravita. Xkore and Getter. 8 p.m. $19-$45. Knitting Factory EL TEN ELEVEN—With Michna and Yourself and The Air. See Noise, Page 28. 7 p.m. $10. Neurolux PRAY FOR SNOW PARTY— Featuring Hotel Chelsea, The All The Wayz and Piranhas. 10 p.m. FREE. Graineys PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

TUESDAY NOV. 13 ANTIQUE SCREAM—With Krystos. 8:30 p.m. $5. Red Room

WEDNESDAY NOV. 14

THE FRESH BEAT BAND—7 p.m. $29.50-$39.50. Morrison Center JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s LARRY CONKLIN—10:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BAND OF BUSKERS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s BRANDON PRITCHETT—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle BREWFISH—10 p.m. FREE. Reef

V E N U E S

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

TYPHOON AND LAURA GIBSON, NOV. 7, VAC A handful of Oregon musicians will bring songs of transformation and travel to Visual Arts Collective, Wednesday Nov. 7. Portland, Ore.,’s Typhoon come armed with intensely personal songs. Singer and principal songwriter Kyle Morton wrote on Typhoon’s website that the intimate tracks on the troupe’s forthcoming album, White Lighter, “perhaps ought to be burned or buried rather than paraded before an audience.” But, luckily, what starts out solemn is turned cathartic by Typhoon’s large, orchestral cast. Laura Gibson, on the other hand, finds release through pilgrimage. With her January release, La Grande, Gibson’s songwriting has transformed from soft and timid to bright and confident. Lost Lander will join its Portland peers, rounding out the Oregon trifecta. —Andrew Crisp 8 p.m. doors, 9 p.m. show, $10 adv., $12 doors. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

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NEWS/ARTS ARTS/VISUAL AAR ON B ELL

SNOWED IN Boise State BFA candidates present White Whale and Cipher in three campus galleries.

WHITE WHALES AND WRITERS IN THE ATTIC Boise literary hub The Cabin debuts a new annual anthology by Idaho writers Wednesday, Dec. 5. Rooms: Writers in the Attic includes short stories from new and seasoned authors focused on a single theme. Cort Conley, director of literary services at the Idaho Commission on the Arts, reviewed and selected 32 tales from roughly 75 submissions. “The theme was a single room that had meaning to the author,” said Conley. “It could wind up as a cerebral description or an actual description.” Stories fall into six categories: refuge, shelter, territory, space, realm and reliquary. The Cabin’s Jocelyn Robertson said the quality of the work spurred the organization to offer both e-book and paperback editions. Though Writers in the Attic is available now at The Cabin, it will be officially released at a public reading at the Linen Building Wednesday, Dec. 5. Also on Dec. 5, the Art/Dialogue series curated by Ben Browne continues with artist Jill Fitterer at Surel’s Place, 212 E. 33rd St. in Garden City. The series takes place from 6:30-8 p.m. in Mitchell’s former home, the site of an artist-in-residence program. Though the events are free, donations to the program are accepted. Speaking of art that sparks dialogue, the City of Boise is looking for a visual artist to bring more color to the Linen District. Idaho artists are encouraged to submit proposals for the chance to add original work to a stretch of black fencing on Grove Street between 14th and 15th streets between the Linen Building and Big City Coffee. Fun fact: The fence is recycled from the Modern Hotel’s former life as a Travelodge. A panel will select one artist, who will be commissioned to create four pieces that will remain on display for one year. Materials involved must be strong enough to withstand the elements. Those interested are asked to submit an application, resume, letter of interest and examples of past work online or by mail no later than 4 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14. The selected artist will be paid $3,000. More info can be found at boiseartsandhistory.org. And over at Boise State University, bachelor of fine arts candidates take over three galleries to present White Whale and Cipher, Friday, Nov. 9 from 6-8 p.m. Works by more than a dozen students will festoon the walls of the Student Union Building gallery, Gallery One in the Liberal Arts Building, and Gallery Two in the adjacent Hemingway Western Studies Center. Both shows continue through Thursday, Dec. 13.

Aaron Bell’s snowy watercolors capture a lonely mountain landscape TARA MORGAN When Aaron Bell talks about the forest, his eyes light up with the zeal of a minister mid-Sunday sermon. “I’ve spent a lot of my life hiking; I’m fascinated by the forest, I really am ... There’s just a spiritual feeling and a harmony there that you don’t get elsewhere, especially when you’re alone.” On a recent weekday evening Bell had just driven in from Idaho City, where he and his wife, Shelly, built a couple of cabins on a hillside surrounded by towering pines. In jeans and a black-and-white flannel shirt, Bell Aaron Bell’s black-and-white paintings are chillingly evocative. looked every bit the rugged Idaho woodsman—or possibly a character who had just Bennett’s longtime partner, Jim Moyer, est so that all that was left were these dead trudged out of his own snowy black-andstanding pine trees and they were all charred is also an artist. He told Bell that his lack white watercolor landscapes. of formal training has been a major asset to black,” said Bell. “We drove through there A land surveyor by day, Bell is reluctant his creations. as it was just getting light and it was the to call himself an artist. “Rather than put a lot of water in and weirdest eerie, haunting, tragic beauty. It “I have no training in any of this. I just doing soft, washed out watercolors, I’m bought high-end watercolors and paints and was 15 miles of dead pine trees. No green, putting paint and a tiny bit of water so that no foliage. The branches were there but canvas and started painting and that’s what happened,” he said, gesturing to a collection they were charred. It was like being in some it’s really thick,” said Bell. “[Moyer] said, ‘In school, they would’ve told you not to do of prints on display at the Green Chutes art- black-and-white film because there was no that; they would’ve told you to move to oil. color anywhere. The trees [I ist’s co-op. … Because of your lack of having been told paint], that’s why they don’t Bell started with more you can’t do something, this is why you’ve have any foliage on them. I textbook watercolor subject More info on Aaron Bell can be found on his website, created this unique look.’” tried to capture the shadows matter—“the Mediterranean aaronbellartist.com, or at: Bell is currently working on the ninth that kick off the mountain villas with the bougainvilbehind our little cabin and the painting in his series of 12 black-and-white leas and the blue door and GREEN CHUTES ARTISTS landscapes. But he’s not stuck in the snow. trees that I saw that morning stucco”—but eventually CO-OP 4716 W. State St., Bell hopes to expand his color palette and in that forest.” found himself drawn to the 208-342-7111, experiment with depicting other seasons. Though he never intended moonlit mountain outside his greenchutesboise.com “What I’d like to do is maybe transition to show his work publicly, cabin window. into more of the alluvial fans, where the Bell’s friend and art enthusi“A year ago, I sat down mountains in the background have a little ast Rae Bennett saw some[and thought], ‘I wonder if I more contour in them and start to bring can recreate what’s out back there?’ Because thing special in it. some color, maybe some brown, maybe “I was over there one day and he said, in the back of my head I kept saying, ‘paint fall,” said Bell. this, paint this hill,’” Bell said. “So I got the ‘You know, I do art a little bit, too,’” BenBut for now, Bell’s work is striking a nett remembered. “I said, ‘You do?’ This watercolors back out and I sat down and I chord locally with outdoor enthusiasts. One is after knowing him three years before he just started painting.” woman told Bell his paintings are reminisvolunteered that.” What came out were a series of stark cent of the view from her parents’ cabin She continued: “He put three pieces that black-and-white landscapes with pine trees when she was growing up. he had done—actually number one, two casting dramatic shadows on mounds of “Every time she looks at this, it takes her snow under a glowing moon. The paintings and three—up on the mantle. With the difback to her childhood,” said Bell, smiling. feel chillingly isolated, yet they’re somehow ferent light, it showed different ways and “It’s this really humbling feeling that people imbued with all of the mysticism and rever- gave it a different mood. I looked at that are looking at these things and finding and said, ‘You know, you should be showence Bell holds for the forest. something in them.” ing your work.’” “I’ve had people say that because it’s Bennett agreed. Bell’s work has the abilBennett helped get Bell into Green wintertime, because it’s nighttime, there’s ity to transport viewers to the middle of the Chutes and on the bill for the RAW: Natua cold, lonely feeling. But at the same forest, standing quietly alone while the pine ral Born Artists showcase in October. She time, the trees and the shadows create this tree shadows creep out onto the blanketing has also been selling his work on greeting warmth,” said Bell. snow. cards and pushing prints out to her art But the view from his cabin wasn’t Bell’s “I think that people look at it and go, only inspiration. Another recent forest expe- world contacts on both coasts. ‘Wow, I could see myself being there,’” said “I’ve sold over 80 prints now across the rience left an indelible mark on his memory. Bennett. “We went up to a forest southeast of Red United States, mostly to corporate investors,” said Bennett. Fish Lake and it had burned the entire for-

—Andrew Crisp

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LISTINGS/SCREEN Special Screenings

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

BOND’S BEST BACKCOUNTRY FILM FESTIVAL—There is no better way to celebrate the fun and beauty of winter than with the Backcountry Film Festival sponsored by Winter Wildlands. Buy advance tickets from The Egyptian Theatre box office. Admission to the Reef afterparty is FREE to all attendees 21 and older. For more info, log onto winterwildlands.org. Friday, Nov. 9, 6 p.m. $10. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES—Watch The Dark Knight Rises with free popcorn and soda. For more info visit involvement.boisestate.edu. Thursday, Nov. 8, 7 p.m. $1, FREE for Boise State students. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. HONOR AMONG THIEVES—A band of thieves steal from a notorious mobster. Starring an allBoise cast. (NR) Opens Saturday, Nov. 10, 3 p.m., $5. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3424222, theflicksboise.com.

SHELTER ME—Positive, uplifting stories about shelter pets and their new homes produced and directed by Steven Latham. Hosted by Boise Bully Breed Rescue. A Q&A panel will be available after the show to answer questions about shelters, companion animals, therapy dogs and how you can help. Proceeds will benefit shelter dogs in Idaho. Sunday, Nov. 11, 1 p.m. $10. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com.

Opening

THE DETAILS—A doctor wrestling with suburban life falls into infidelity, murder and organ donation. (R) Opens Friday, Nov. 9. The Flicks.

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Mission accomplished in 007’s 25th film, Skyfall GEORGE PRENTICE The James Bond story was never meant to be fine art. As crafted by Ian Fleming, 007’s character belonged alongside the kind of pulp fiction tucked into a bedside stack of titles by Mickey Spillane or Erle Stanley Gardner. Beginning in 1953, Fleming—a World War II naval intelligence officer—began writing the Bond spy novels. He eventually penned 12. Not expecting much interest from Hollywood, Fleming settled for a mere $1,000 Daniel Craig channels his best Bond in the latest film from the franshise, Skyfall. from CBS for the television rights to his first novel, Casino Royale (the show was quickly of cyberterrorist Raoul Silva (Javier Bardem) Bond has endured, surviving 10 U.S. forgotten). In fact, Fleming actually pocketed in Bond’s latest outing, Skyfall. presidents, the Cold War and decades of mimore—1,500 pounds per novel—for comic In the expert hands of director Sam sogyny. True, there was a painful span in the strip adaptations in the late 1950s. Mendes, Skyfall breaks our hero down emo1980s (Timothy Dalton, anyone?), but when But everything changed in 1961. When tionally and physically—not unlike this sumDaniel Craig stepped into the tux (following asked at a press conference what his reading mer’s deconstruction of Batman in The Dark no fewer than six previous Bonds) in 2006’s preferences were, President John F. KenKnight Rises. In the opening hour of Skyfall, Casino Royale, some desperately needed selfnedy said he was a Bond fan. Fleming’s titles British intelligence slaps Bond with a battery examination was the quickly shot to the top order of the day. Bond of tests that prove he is neither mentally nor of the bestseller lists, and the viewing public physically fit for any assignment, let alone any and a motion picture SKYFALL (PG-13) were better off because world-saving. So when he is dispatched to project was launched Directed by Sam Mendes take care of the bad guy (and, holy shit, this of it. within months starring Starring Daniel Craig, Javier Bardem and guy is bad), we are sincerely worried for his Craig’s Bond is a moderately known Naomie Harris (and our) survival. It’s thrilling stuff. more battered and Sean Connery. Opens Friday, Nov. 9 at Edwards 9, 22. Mendes and Craig elevate Bond to bruised than buff. Following a 1962 something the franchise has seen before: an More importantly, White House screening Oscar-caliber effort. Bond may need to have 007’s psyche is bloodof Dr. No—the first that tux pressed once more for next Februstained. But Bond is a hired gun and, more of 25 Bond films—JFK was quoted as saying, ary’s Academy Awards. Utltimately, Skyfall is often than not, he remains the only thing “I wish I had James Bond on my staff.” The indeed fine art. Cuban Missile Crisis erupted only weeks later. between us and chaos—which takes the form

SCREEN/THE TUBE half-wits something to do. It’s hardly organic or necessary to provide them with their own arc of espionage even when they have secret Showtime’s Emmy-adorned drama Homeland deserves most of its agent-sounding names like Xander and Finn. Besides, teenagers aren’t critical approval. But it’s not flawless. going to start watching the show in significant numbers until the writers Season two retains the riveting pulse of the first season—partially introduce a crying vampire. because of the inherent suspense of a looming attack on America, but The closest thing to that on Homeland is Claire Danes. She’s the pomostly because of the exceptional acting by Damian Lewis. He plays a tential terrorist’s main adversary in the CIA but also a victim of bipolar former Iraqi POW who endured years of disorder. Without her medication, she’s brutal torture before converting to Islamic prone to impetuous promiscuity and implofundamentalism, ultimately returning to sions of irrational emotion. It’s the kind of his wife and kids as a committed agent of performance that gathers awards, but it’s mass destruction. a distraction—like giving Luke Skywalker Yet he manages to elicit sympathy for an insulin syringe with his light saber. the character, mostly by subverting stereoAlso, the writers seem intent upon restypes. It’s refreshing to see a red-headed urrecting the first season’s sexual tension Caucasian praying over the Quran before between the two leads. It’s suspenseful strapping a bomb to his chest. Plus, he’s for the audience to know what’s hapnow a congressman, so his nefarious acpening before the characters do, but the tivities—adultery, deceit, plotting doom— principle gets diluted when you try to force just seem like part of the job. a will-they--or-won’t-they-again component However, Homeland risks descending into an already intriguing international into the type of narrative pandering that political thriller. afflicts many TV shows, appealing to the Claire Danes and Damian Lewis star in Homeland. —Damon Hunzeker adolescent market by giving high-school

THE INCREASINGLY MANIC-DEPRESSIVE HOMELAND

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LISTINGS/SCREEN EXTRA/SCREEN

SKYFALL—Daniel Craig stars in the 25th installment of the James Bond franchise. Also starring Javier Bardem. See review, Page 34. (PG-13) Opens Friday, Nov. 9. Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22. 24

SAY WHAT? A round up of last week’s wittiest TV quotes

“Here in Manhattan, the power is still out downtown, or as we refer to it now, Little North Korea.”

For movie times, visit boiseweekly. com or scan this QR code.

—Jon Stewart The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Oct. 31

“More than 2.7 million people in Florida have already cast their vote. Unfortunately, since it’s Florida, most of them just stuffed their ballot into a toaster oven.” —Jimmy Fallon Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Nov. 2

T H E AT E R S EDWARDS 22 BOISE 208-377-9603, regmovies.com EDWARDS 9 BOISE 208-338-3821, regmovies.com EDWARDS 14 NAMPA 208-467-3312, regmovies.com THE FLICKS 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com MAJESTIC CINEMAS MERIDIAN 208-888-2228, hallettcinemas.com

“A town in England that hosts an annual bonfire night has chosen Lance Armstrong as this year’s celebrity they will burn in effigy. “Close one!” said Jerry Sandusky.” —Seth Meyers Saturday Night Live Weekend Update, Nov. 3

FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: NORTHGATE CINEMA COUNTRY CLUB REEL NAMPA REEL 208-377-2620, reeltheatre.com OVERLAND PARK $1 CINEMA 208-377-3072, opcmovies.com NORTHERN LIGHTS CINEMA AND GRILL 208-475-2999, northernlightscinemagrill.com

THE WEB/SCREEN THE BIG THINK Ted Talks present bold ideas from the world’s leading thinkers. There’s only one problem: They can be too long. The attention span for most YouTube viewers sits around two or three minutes, and Ted Talks often clock in closer to 20. That’s where The Big Think comes in. Take the conceptual grandeur of Ted Talks, World of Warcraft could revive the economy. replace the studio audience with a simple And it’s a star-studded cast. “Science-Guy” white background, shrink the presentation Bill Nye recorded one on why creationism isn’t down to a more easily consumable size and appropriate for children. Howard Dean argued you have The Big Think. why America should go over the fiscal cliff. It’s not that The Big Think dodges inPenn Jillette, Malcolm Gladwell and Henry Roldepth presentations. Its YouTube lins have also made videos. channel has plenty of videos that But if you want to learn why approach the hour mark. the penis is shaped like it is from bigthink.com But its backbone is comprised Scientific American’s Jesse Berof hundreds of regularly uploaded ing, you’ll have to sit still for a full shorter pieces from interviews with 14 minutes. thinkers, entertainers and policymakers on —Josh Gross everything from how we perceive color to how WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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NEWS/REC COURTESY IDAHO PARKS & REC

REC

The great yurt wait of 2012-2013.

PLAN AHEAD Shoulder season is always tough—fondly looking back on adventures of the season that was but still unable to jump into the next season’s sports. That dusting of snow in the hills feels like winter is taunting us a bit, but that’s still no reason not to plan ahead. Of course, planning ahead becomes a little more challenging when the reservations you thought you had are suddenly canceled on you. Such is the dilemma of many who had reserved yurts near Idaho City run by the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation. Jennifer Okerlund, communications manager for Parks and Rec, said the cancellations came after officials decided to review the liability and insurance agreement the department had in place with the U.S. Forest Service, which manages the land the yurts are on. Summer wildfires prompted the review, and Okerlund said Parks and Rec took the opportunity to revamp the deal between the agencies. Unfortunately, since it’s an agreement between two government agencies, there are a lot of hoops to jump through, and Parks and Rec is still awaiting final approval. Once everything is OK’d, Okerlund said the department will call people whose reservations were canceled and offer them the chance to reinstate their reservations. There’s still no ETA for when the deal will be complete but all reservations through the end of the year have been canceled and no new reservations are being accepted. If you suddenly find yourself yurtless, you can console yourself by either picking up some new-to-you gear on the cheap or by getting rid of some of the gear that’s filling your garage. Backcountry Pursuit opened at 671 S. Capitol Blvd. in downtown Boise roughly a month ago, offering a home for consignment outdoor adventure gear. The store celebrated its grand opening Nov. 3, and owner Tyson Stellrecht said the 1,700-square-foot store is already filled with gear for myriad outdoor sports including plenty of ski gear. Not limited to one season, the store also sells gear for basically all outdoor sports, Stellrecht said. “If you can get out in the mountains and play with it, we want it in the store,” he said. Those who want to sell their old gear (clean and in good condition, of course) split a percentage of the sale price with the business—ranging from 50 to 70 percent, depending on the cost of the item. Stellrecht said he already has plans to open a tent room in the store and hopes to expand the selection of high-end mountain bikes. The store is open Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. For more info call 208429-1124 or visit backcountrypursuit.com.

Brundage Mountain Resort has endured 50 years of waiting for Mother Nature to send snow, not to mention a lot of questionable ski fashion.

HISTORY ON SKIS New book details the history of Brundage Mountain CHRISTINA MARFACE One of the first photos in Eve Chandler’s new book, Best Snow in Idaho, shows a family in long wool coats, raising their hats to a young boy, arms above his head in triumph as he shoots off a ski jump. The photo—taken at the first McCall Winter Carnival in 1924—captures the winter sports culture of the area that is home to Brundage Mountain Resort. That culture and history is the centerpiece of Chandler’s book celebrating the McCall ski area. The book is filled with photos and stories of the mountain that claims to be home to the “best snow in Idaho.” “I’ve always loved the ski area, so when I was approached to write a book about Brundage, I was delighted because it’s a great mountain,” Chandler said. “It’s a very different story than the Bogus Basin story because it’s privately owned, but both ski areas have a real focus on families and teaching children how to ski.” Brundage Mountain is Chandler’s second book; she previously detailed the history of Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area. Her new book tells the story of Brundage’s 50 years but also explores the culture of the McCall area that allowed the mountain resort to thrive. According to Chandler, winter sports gave people living in the area a way to endure the long, snow-filled season. “There’s a wonderful history of the whole area in the book,” she said. “It starts out with the 1924 winter carnival, so to people who like history, it’s more than just a book about a ski area.” An Idaho native and avid skier, Chandler spent a portion of her childhood on Brundage’s slopes, so she was eager to preserve the history of the mountain and the unique offerings it brings to Northwestern skiers. “It just has a different feel because Brundage is a much smaller ski area,” she said. “When people go to Brundage, they feel like they’re on vacation. They’ve left their problems

at home, because when they come to Brundage, it really removes them from their home environment. I kind of feel like, when you go up to Bogus Basin, you still feel like you’re connected to the community of Boise.” Chandler said she has always been drawn to historical writing. Now in the latter part of her career, she has recently devoted her time and her talent to documenting the histories of local ski areas, and not, she believes, without due cause. “I think Idaho is just so fortunate to have this wonderful skiing and snowboarding culture that’s grown up throughout the years. It’s enriched our lives,” she said. “I’m very pleased that the people responsible for both Brundage and Bogus Basin wanted to preserve their history. That’s an important thing to do.” Chandler also includes a chapter about what the future may hold for Brundage. After 20 years of negotiations with U.S. Forest Service officials, the resort recently added 388 acres adjacent to the ski hill. The area’s highest priority is the addition of a new lift, which will add nearly 300 acres of skiable terrain. The lift is planned for Sargent Mountain, the highest elevation on the hill. The longest new run will have 1,200 feet of vertical drop. According to April Russell, spokesperson for Brundage, the changes highlighted in Chandler’s book are long-term goals, but visitors can still expect smaller changes and improvements this season. Some of those include a custom weather forecast for the mountain, a mobile phone app and the conversion of 1,000 square feet of deck into an indoor expansion of the lodge. Additionally, Brundage officials plan to add a snow ruler equipped with a live-streaming webcam to the mountain’s summit. One such ruler is already installed at the base of the mountain and Russell said the website receives more than 500,000 hits each year.

“We’re known as a powder skiing place, so people are always interested in exactly how much fresh snow we’re getting,” she said. “Generally speaking, in ski resort lore, there’s a reputation that the ski resorts lie about how much snow they get. We want to prove that we’re telling the truth by letting people see with their very own eyes the actual snow on the mountain,” Russell added. When nearby Tamarack Resort opened in 2004, it was regarded as a major competitor for Brundage’s business. But as Tamarack has faced one setback after another, including foreclosure, repossession of one of its lifts, a string of federal charges filed against its most recent investor and failure to operate for several seasons, Brundage has continued to thrive. Tamarack is slated to open this year but Russell isn’t worried. “We’ve learned over the last six or eight years that we can operate successfully with Tamarack as our neighbor. We’ve proved that we can operate successfully if Tamarack is not operating.” Not even a dry winter can keep Brundage down. Last year’s low snowfall led to a late opening for the resort; the first skiers didn’t take to Brundage’s slopes until Dec. 30. Bogus Basin didn’t open until Jan. 19. Missing out on so much of the ski season tightened this season’s budget but Russell said Brundage officials are looking forward to a better year despite those significant financial setbacks. “What we’ve learned is that we can operate successfully missing a big chunk of the holiday period,” she said. “The conclusion is that we’ve got a real solid foundation for our business and that we’ve figured out a way to weather some of those storms, or weather the lack of storms, maybe, is the right way to say that. We’re really proud that we’re still able to offer meaningful improvements to people this year.”

—Deanna Darr

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REC/LISTINGS Events & Workshops CHEER CAMP—The Boise High School Cheer Squad teaches basic cheerleading skills including tumbling, dance and voice projection. 4-6 p.m. $28-$42.85, 208-608-7684. For t Boise Community Center, 700 Robbins Road, Boise, cityofboise.org/parks.

INTRO TO OLYMPIC LIFTING WORKSHOP—Have you ever wondered about the basics of power cleans and hang cleans? Or how to implement this type of lifting into your program? This hands-on workshop teaches proper techniques for these two lifts. Wednesday, Nov. 14, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $5 Rec Center members, $10 nonmembers. Boise State Rec Center, 1515 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5641, 208-426-1131, rec.boisestate.edu. BOISE STATE MEN’S BASKETBALL—vs. Texas Southern University, Sunday, Nov. 11, 2 p.m.; vs. Oakland, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 7:30 p.m.; $8-$11. Taco Bell Arena, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-4737, tacobellarena.com. WATER FITNESS WORKSHOP—Boise State Recreation Ser vices offers continuing education in water fitness with instructor Mark Grevelding Saturday, Nov. 10 and Sunday, Nov. 11 at the Boise State Recreation Center Aquatic Complex. A variety of classes will be offered throughout the two-day workshop. Visit the Rec Center’s website for more info or to register. Saturday, Nov. 10-Sunday, Nov. 11. $39-$79 per class. Boise State Rec Center, 1515 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5641, 208-4261131, rec.boisestate.edu.

Recurring CURVESQUE—The class is designed to whittle your middle and accentuate your curves. You can expect to break a sweat with easy-to-learn dance-inspired moves and reconnect with your feminine side through lots of fluid movements. For women only. Tuesdays, 7-8 p.m. $9. Ophidia Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd., Ste. A, Garden City, 208-409-2403, ophidiastudio.com.

Register LIFE TIME TURKEY DAY 5K— Register at register.bazumedia. com through Tuesday, Nov. 20, for this 5K fun run/walk/jog, held Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, Nov. 22, in downtown Boise. Athletes are encouraged to dress

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MINI-CASSIA TURKEY TROT— Register through race day for this family friendly fun run at Minico Middle School in Paul on Thursday, Nov. 22. For more info, visit minicassiaturkeytrot.com. Through Thursday, Nov. 22, 8 a.m. $7-$25.

REC/PLAY VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

DROP-IN BODY COMPOSITION TESTING—Body composition refers to the relative percentages of body weight comprised of fat mass and lean body mass. Participants leave with an explanation of their own composition after a pinch test. Appointments for testing may also be set up by calling the Rec Center. Second Tuesday of every month, 6-7 a.m. and second Wednesday of every month, 5-6 p.m. $5 Rec Center members, $10 non-members. Boise State Rec Center, 1515 University Drive, Boise, 208426-5641, 208-426-1131, rec. boisestate.edu.

in Thanksgiving attire and the best costume wins a prize. Dayof registration costs $35 adults and $20 youth. Preregistered participants can pick up materials Wednesday, Nov. 21, from 3-6 p.m. at Thomas Hammer Coffee. Race starts at Main Street and Capitol Boulevard. Bring a nonperishable food item and receive an extra ticket for a raffle. Through Thursday, Nov. 20, 8 a.m. $25 adults, $15 ages 17 and younger.

RIVER ESCAPE, SANS BOAT As I descended the steep, switchbacked canyon road to the confluence of Cow Creek and the South Fork of the Boise River, feelings of yore crept in. I had spent much of my youth frequenting this region. Camping, motorcycling, fishing and rafting were all pastimes that have thankfully stayed with me into my 30s—largely due to the accessibility and ease of places like Anderson Ranch Dam to Danskin. This 10-mile stretch of river frontage boasts some of the best trophy fishing and chukar hunting in the region, making it a prime candidate for a weekend-long or overnight “cast and blast” session with friends. Just more than an hour’s drive from Boise, the South Fork provides a host of fun and scenic recreation opportunities spread across five distinct access points, many with public toilets and ample camp sites. Rainbow trout measuring 20-25 inches are not uncommon in this area, however the fishing was miserly during my most recent visit. It’s understandable considering the hefty contingency of day trippers who made the banks of the South Fork look like a Walmart parking lot on that particular Saturday morning. It is undoubtedly best to go mid-week if you can. If nymphing is your cup-o-tea, mountain whitefish are also abundant, according to area Idaho Department of Fish and Game signage. A childhood buddy and I left Boise and ventured toward Mountain Home on I-84 before heading northeast on Highway 20, en route to the Prairie turnoff. Less than five miles in on the well-groomed dirt road, cellphone service and email became a thing of the past—much to our enjoyment. The beaten path took us straight into the canyon and the bridge at Cow Creek. All we had to worry about now was finding the rest of our group and taking in the fall foliage. Tools of the trade included a 9 mm pistol for plinking, a buffet of weaponry for our guttural little chukar friends on the hillside, two precisely trained Drahthaar hunting dogs, an assortment of dry and wet flies and leader arrangements commensurate with the hatch, and enough whiskey to keep cool overnight lows at bay. The river is now below 300 cfs, making waders a useful addition and boats more of a hindrance. Hobo dinners on the fire and a late evening “spirit walk” wrapped up an excellent day on the South Fork. We were back in Boise the next day by lunch time. All said and done, our group came home with one chukar, zero fish and all smiles—a disappointing catch on paper but a worthy experience, no less. —Andrew Mentzer WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BEERGUZZLER/FOOD EARLY WINTER BREWS

Deschutes Jubelale Festive Winter Ale This brew pours a ruby-tinged mahogany with an admirable twofinger, mocha-colored head. It has lots of toffee-laced malt on the nose, colored by cookie dough, spice, date and roasted grain. This beer is very smooth up front with rich and spicy malt flavors, but the hops kick in on the finish, which turns surprisingly bitter with flavors of unsweetened chocolate and gritty espresso. A bit abrasive at first, this beer grows on you. Ninkasi Sleigh’r Dark Double Alt Ale A dark ebony in the glass, this beer is topped with a thick, persistent burnt-sugar colored froth. You get a nice mix of aromas, including rich chocolate, creamy latte, subtle spice, sweet fig and a kiss of fruity hops. This brew is nicely balanced in the mouth where lightly toasted, carameltinged sweet malt plays against bitter dark chocolate, subtle hops and spice. Pyramid Snow Cap Winter Warmer Ale The light-tan head that covers this dark ruby-brown pour isn’t thick, but it has staying power. The aromas are light and lovely with sweet malt backed by nutmeg, chocolate, smoky herb and a touch of resiny hops. The hop profile on the palate is much bigger than the nose would suggest, but it works beautifully with the nutty, chocolate malt flavors. —David Kirkpatrick

40 | NOVEMBER 7–13, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Restaurants get one chance to hit BW with their best shot. LAU R IE PEAR M AN

Another Halloween is behind us and Thanksgiving is just around the corner. But for some, the surest sign of the holiday season is the arrival of the first winter seasonals. There has been a definite shift in style for this category over the past several years. Winter warmers once perfectly described the sweet, malt-laden brews that were most prevalent. But lately, hops have taken on a more prominent role. Sierra Nevada’s Celebration Ale has always done an amazing job of balancing hops and malt. It is a perennial favorite. But while you wait for its release, here’s a trio of other worthy winter brews:

FOOD/DISH

WINTER SOUP-PLIES Before hitting the slopes, grab some soup to-go JOSH GROSS Let’s face facts. That sandwich you pack for yourself when you head up to Bogus is going to end up as smooshed and unsatisfying as the Powerbar you were considering eating to replace it. You could stop by the cafeteria but you don’t want to blow past your hot dog quota before you get a chance to hit Sixth and Main on Saturday night. When you’re out in the snow all day, you want something hot, nourishing and backpack safe. To that end, we recommend a thick and hearty soup—which will retain its shape and flavor in a thermal container despite the gnarliest of faceplants. Here are some of Boise’s super soup spots with convenient to-go options. A’Tavola, 1515 W. Grove St., 208-3363641, atavolaboise.com. Fancy market A’Tavola rocks some serious soups in its grab-and-go case. The selection of house-made soups is rotated daily, including offerings like pork chili verde, marsala mushroom and white bean prosciutto. Those soups are sold cold in 32-ounce plastic jugs that you can heat up, throw in a thermos and schlep up the mountain with you. The price varies depending on the soup, but most of the 32-ounce containers are $9.99.

Sick of smashed sandwiches? Slurp down some soup after skiing or snowboarding this season.

The Boise Co-op, 888 W. Fort St., 208472-4500, boisecoop.com. The Boise Co-op has a rotating array of house-made soups often utilizing organic and local ingredients, anything from spiced winter vegetable to turkey and wild rice. Four hot soups are available daily in 8-, 16and 32-ounce to-go cardboard containers for $3.99, $4.99 and $8.99 respectively, and more flavors are available in the cold case for reheating. And even better, if you bring in your own thermos, the Co-op will knock a quarter off the price.

Jenny’s Lunch Line, 106 N. Sixth St., 208-433-0092, jennyslunchline.com. Because of its limited hours—11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Monday-Friday—Jenny’s Lunch Line isn’t the most convenient place to pick up a to-go soup to take to the mountain. But the rotating menu of house-made delights like Greek tomato, Thai chicken and autumn pumpkin are worth it. And though Jenny’s isn’t open to grab a thermos-full on weekends, if you stop by on a Friday, you can pick up a frozen 32-ounce container for $5. Those often disappear quickly.

FOOD/NEWS rant in Boise. Then they’re going to end it at Melting Pot for chocolate fondue. And there is going to be a food truck; I won’t say which one,” she said. The bar crawl is a prized tradition—stumbling from dive to dive, Schrauth said that each stop at the $39 event will include a downing Purple Pantydroppers while a bullhorn-wielding tour guide vegetarian option and that the whole experience should take around tries to herd you on to the next location. But thankfully, DishCrawl three hours. Boise uses the word crawl in a less literal sense. “I just want [people] to be more engaged with the local restaurants The new-to-Boise venture, which hosts similar events in cities like in the community. This is really good for the restaurants to get some Austin, Texas; Los Angeles and Boulder, Colo., will bring foodies toexposure and be able to talk one-on-one gether for a guided downtown restaurant with people who go there and get them tour Wednesday, Nov. 14. excited about the food here in the city,” “We’re going to have 25 people and said Schrauth. we’re going to tour four restaurants in As of press time, there were still 14 one night. At each restaurant, you’re gotickets left for the event. This won’t likely ing to get a little speech from the owner be the last Dishcrawl event in Boise. or the chef to talk about the food,” said “Since the holidays are coming up, DishCrawl Boise’s Elisia Schrauth. “Each this will be the first and only one for place is ser ving up a sample of some of 2012, and then we’ll probably come their most popular dishes.” back in Januar y and do this once a Though Schrauth said Dishcrawl month,” said Schrauth. doesn’t reveal the restaurant list until Moving from crawls to 48 hours before the event “to build suscrushes, Eagle recently got a new pense,” she did give away some secrets. wine bar called Crush in one of “For ones that are definitely con41 the spaces adjacent to Brewforia firmed: Shige Japanese, which was the DishCrawlers will dip into Melting Pot for dessert. Eagle. [Boise Weekly’s] best Japanese restau-

DISHCRAWL DOMINATES DOWNTOWN AND CRUSH COMES TO EAGLE

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NEWS CONT’D/FOOD VIA FA C EB OOK

FOOD/DISH

SOME LIKE IT HOT Warm up with these liquid treats TARA MORGAN For most of the year, booze and ice are buds. They mellow out in highballs, shake their stuff in martinis and chill in coolers. But come winter, liquor likes to crank up the heat. From Spanish coffees to hot toddys to buttered rums, nothing licks a winter chill like a steaming cup of hot hooch. In preparation for the pending frosty season we hit up some of Boise’s best cocktail spots to find out what warm wonders are waiting to add a glow to cheeks this winter.

MODERN HOTEL AND BAR, LA TERRAZA “A reposado tequila infused with toasted basmati rice and a steamed milk almond syrup and cinnamon. It’s sort of like a horchata made hot, spiked with tequila, except actually using horchata doesn’t taste as good hot. I think the fat content in the milk makes these better. ... It feels like something you’d sit out on the terrace drinking at the end of the night.” —Michael Bowers, head bartender at Modern Hotel and Bar

BARDENAY RESTAURANT AND DISTILLERY, AUTUMN NIGHT “The Autumn Night is definitely one of our more popular ones. The coffee we use is the Dawson Taylor European dark blend. It has Frangelico hazelnut liquor, Godiva chocolate liqueur and Bailey’s Irish Creme. So we put that in there and top it off with the fresh roasted coffee and a float of house cream whipped up in-house here, it gives it a … little extra sweetness to it, nice coolness. And the cinnamon stick looks cool in there, as it kind of sinks down, the drink can get a light hint of it, which is kind of nice. Not too overpowering.” —Craig West, day bartender at Bardenay Restaurant and Distillery downtown

13TH STREET PUB AND GRILL, S’MORE “It’s got Black Velvet toasted caramel, it’s got marshmallow vodka, hot cocoa, whipped cream. And it’s also got a graham cracker rim to it.” —Phil Compton, bartender at 13th Street Pub and Grill

MAI THAI, HOT BUTTERED RUM “We want ours to kind of remind you of burnt sugar and pralines. We use a butter pecan ice cream. We actually burn our own sugar, so we do a caramelized burnt sugar. We toast our own spices that go in it—freshly ground spices. We use cinnamon, nutmeg and allspice. We add heavy cream, we add our butter pecan ice cream, which is all natural, but we don’t make it. ... Then we add our burnt sugar, dark brown sugar and a secret ingredient that goes into it that makes sure it’s got kind of a butterscotch flavor to it. We combine it with Cruzan vanilla rum and unsweetened lightly whipped heavy cream.” —Michael Reed, head bartender at Mai Thai

RED FEATHER LOUNGE, MARKAZARK II “The liquid portion of it is just honey and bourbon and hot water, and the top is an egg-white foam made with lemon honey ginger and then some aromatic angostura bitters on top. ... It has all of the components of the original Markazark, except for it’s separated out and it’s kind of like an adult hot chocolate. It’s got the foam that’s a flavor component and then the liquor. So as you drink it, it’s like a hot cocoa with whipped cream.” —Casey Tschikof, bartender at Red Feather Lounge WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Crush threw a music-filled grand opening party.

“We’re not your average wine bar,” said co-owner Amy Allsop. 40 “We’ve got a huge extensive wine list, we’ve got tapas, we’ve got great music, and we’re a little bit funk on the inside; it’s not quiet and wine bar-ish—no smooth jazz.” In fact, for Crush’s grand opening celebration Oct. 27, Allsop and business par tner Kevin Quinn brought in San Francisco rockers Soft White Sixties and local Desirae Bronson to per form. Allsop said the 45-seat “stainless steel, cr ystal, dark wood” space will regularly feature up to 20 wines on tap including a variety of Idaho and Northwest wines. “We’ve got wine from all over—anywhere from a $6 pour to a $450 magnum,” Allsop said. In addition, Crush also dishes up an array of apps. “We are actually in par tnership with 3 Girls Gourmet and Brewforia next door, so we offer Brewforia’s flatbreads—you can order them right from us. … From 3 Girls, we’ve got tapas, cheese plates, hummus plates, pulled pork sliders, chicken salad sandwiches, that kind of thing,” she said. Though Allsop doesn’t have prior experience in the food ser vice industr y, she said it has always been a dream of hers to open a wine bar. “I’ve always wanted to have a place where people would come and gather and love to come back and stay,” she said. Moving from a new concept to an old downtown classic, Moon’s Kitchen Cafe has new owners. Gar y and Shelly Torrey took over the cafe in July from Bob and Lisa Dempsey. “When I first walked in, I told my wife I was probably going to buy this restaurant, and she started laughing,” Gar y said. “And it just ended up coming out that way.” The Torreys have kept most things the same at the classic downtown diner—including the name, the type of cuisine and the hours—but they have tweaked some menu items. “Ever ything’s fresh for our milkshakes now (it was canned before), strawberries, raspberries. … We increased our burger size by two ounces; we hand-press our burgers now,” said Gar y. “Our Philly cheesesteaks are made out of filet mignon that’s pounded down and really tender.” The Torreys also added three full-screen TVs and will soon be offering Dawson Taylor espresso drinks. —Tara Morgan

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 7–13, 2012 | 41

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2BD, 2BA condo on the beach. Masatlan, Mexico, nera Playa Escondida. Available 7 full days, 12/1-12/8. Full kitchen, includes private transportation to & from airport. Price $1000 OBO. 8708714.

HOUSING BW FOR RENT Downtown/Greenbelt/Library/ BODO, 2BD, $590/mo. No pets. 343-5476. NORTH BOISE Charming & Private Triplex - Super cute! End Unit! 785 sq. ft., plus additional storage space in the attic. Rent $595/mo. Includes W/S/T. Lease term: 12 mo. Credit report & landlord references required. Cats would be considered. Sorry - we do not have facilities for dogs. Non smoking unit & property. Call 867-7435. Fresh paint throughout! Gas heat.

BW FOR SALE 20 ACRES FREE. Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/month. Money back guarantee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com

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C A RE E RS BW CAREERS Discover how to BE, DO or HAVE ANYTHING your heart desires! For a free CD and more information, please call our 24-hour recording at 1-800-385-8470. EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012 AwardMakeupSchool.com HELP WANTED!! Extra income! Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.themailingprogram.com Help Wanted!!! Make $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-usa.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay. com

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42 | NOVEMBER 7–13, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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BW CLASSES PREPPERS Would like to talk & share ideas with other preppers. 297-5038.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW MASSAGE

COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS Cipher: BFA Exhibition Reception November 9, 6:00-8:00p.m. Student Union Gallery. Senior standing Boise State University Bachelor of Fine Art Visual Art candidates each display a body of work for exhibition. Free & open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. Prepper would like to talk & share ideas with other preppers. 297-5038.

A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas. Cold Outside? Come in for a Massage! 322 Lake Lowell. Betty 283-7830. Embrace the moment with a sensual massage at ULM. Now accepting new clients. ULM 3408377. Hrs. 8:30AM-8PM.

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com FULL ROOM MASSAGE Deep tissue Swedish. Full body: $50/hr., $40/half hr. Foot Massage: $25/hr., $20/half hr. 7 days a week. 9am-10pm. 626-3454266. 320 N. Orchard St. Tantra sessions available with Jamie. 440-4321. RELAXATION MASSAGE Pamper yourself with a relaxing massage. I offer full body massage $40 for 60 mins. & $60 for 90 mins. I offer in & out services. I’m in SE Boise. Call or text Richard to schedule your massage at 208-695-9492.

*A MAN’S MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. New website massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio.

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YOGA Teacher training starting soon in the North End. Call or text for details. 208-440-6344.

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Get a free apothecary bottle of your favorite essential oil with your first visit for any service at Wholistic Beauty Boutique. Go to massageboutique.com for treatments. 16th & State Street Boise. 841-9062.

ADOPT-A-PET

COUNSELING

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/ Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 8662759.

BEAUTY

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

COUNSELING MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

PEACH SPA O R I E NTA L M A S S A G E BEAUTY

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RALPH: 1-year-old male boxer mix. High energy puppy. Needs a strong, consistent owner. Daily exercise a must. (Kennel 405- #13355372)

ZOE: 7-month-old female Lab. Heart of gold, affectionate, lively and energetic. Needs training. Good with other dogs. (Kennel 414- #17557278)

KING: 8-month-old male pit bull terrier. Appears to be house-trained. Gets along with other dogs. Knows his basic commands. (Kennel 417- #17470590)

SNOOPY: 5-year-old male domestic longhair. Gentle giant. Seems to prefer a quiet home life. (Kennel 13#16721223)

BRUCY: 5-month-old male domestic shorthair. Sweet, sensitive kitten. Hesitant at first but melts with any gentle attention. (Kennel 107- 16944207)

JAR JAR BINKS: 2-month-old male domestic medium hair cat. Fluffy coat will require regular brushing into adulthood. (Kennel 07- #17750017)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

ALLISTAIRE: This cool cat has crossed eyes only for you.

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ESKIMO PIE: Let this big boy sweeten up your life.

EMBER: Sweet and playful, this lady will light your fire. Only $10.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | NOVEMBER 7–13, 2012 | 43

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Jack ___ Dry white wines Some protests Cheerful superhero? Facts of life? Oklahoma birthplace of Oral Roberts 43 “___ surprised as you are!” 44 Cases for E.M.T.’s 46 Onetime U.N. leader 50 Guard dog’s target 52 Take a patient approach to revenge? 56 Benefit 57 Abandon 59 “Mamma ___!” 60 Sleeper agent 61 Sallie ___ 63 Barbaric 65 Some electrical workers 68 Stand offering, briefly 71 Ones who stop giving to their church? 74 Future grads: Abbr. 75 Emaciated 77 “Hoarders” airer 78 ___ loss 80 Hombre, formerly 81 Everyone’s bets 83 Ford sedan 85 T.A.’s overseer 89 Softly exhale cheap sentiment? 93 Tenacious sort 95 San Antonio mayor Julián, keynote speaker at the 2012 Democratic convention 96 1978-79 CBS detective drama 97 Fool 98 Big bygone bird 99 ___ Kong 101 Mad scientist’s sadistic exclamation upon attacking the Empire State? 106 “Popsicle,” in “Fifty Shades of Grey,” for one 110 Anatomical ring 111 Like a 12-Down 112 First-floor apartment, maybe 113 Rake 115 Ain’t correct?

116 Canon fodder? 117 Prime minister of 1945 119 What the Grim Reaper’s backup carries? 124 Evan-___ (women’s clothing brand) 125 Its alphabet has 44 consonants 126 Log time 127 Sailors’ saint 128 Ends of Alaska? 129 Farm females 130 Macho man 131 1,000 years before the coronation of Queen Elizabeth I

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Metric distance: Abbr. Author Levin Summer recreation area Ready to mate Confederate Genteel gathering Tasks around the house Web site with a “Send Money” tab 9 Psychologist Jean 10 P.R. hours 11 First name in Chicago politics 12 Weenie 13 Coach for dancing? 14 Wall St. opening 15 “If you don’t like my anger, do something about it!”? 16 Black in country music 17 Vote in 18 Results of lying too much? 24 Involve 25 ___ Johnston, former fiancé of Bristol Palin 30 London facilities 32 Replacement refs, maybe? 33 “The Taming of the Shrew” setting 34 Backbeat component, often 35 Drink to throw back 37 Recognize as a source 39 Cry on arrival 40 Big wheel at a reception? 45 Snide response

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Smithereens Red Wing or Blackhawk Cold temps Bijou “___ #1!” Carnival Cruise Lines stop 54 Go over again 55 Christine ___, “The Phantom of the Opera” girl 58 Junk 62 Killed a hero? 64 Horne and Olin 66 It’s measured in cups 67 W.W. II craft: Abbr. 68 “Your Business” airer 69 Director Kurosawa 70 Family inheritance 72 Finish line, often 73 Together, in music 76 Hate coke? 79 “Dragnet” message, for short 82 Spring phenomenon 84 Winning by a small margin 86 Dirt spreader 87 Psalm starter 88 Unreliable 90 Suppose, to Shakespeare 91 They’re often toasted L A S T A L A S J O C KEY P C S B R A T I S LAVA

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D E T E R A S MINE B I S A L B O A C R E E A E S T R A T R I E E P S T A T I N N E V A M I L A M

A E D N A D T R E E T R E S F R O M A F A R

A D M I R E R

Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

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92 Cornell who founded Western Union 94 Off-campus local 97 Really sing 100 Miracle-___ 102 It might cause photophobia 103 “One World” musician John 104 Flatters 105 Hollered 106 Wet bars? 107 Prankster-like 108 “Get on the stick!”? 109 Tidies up, in a way 114 Come back 116 Durst of Limp Bizkit 118 Disney doe 120 Deviate from the course 121 Bird ___ 122 Owner of Abbey Road Studios 123 Babe

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scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on November 29, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Oct. 10, 2012. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Taja Thomas January 21, 1970 Case No. CV NC 1217949 NOTICE IF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Taja Rene Thomas, now residing in the City of Garden City, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Taja Rene Roselle. The reason for the change in name is: I have

been divorced and want neither my maiden name nor previously married name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on December 11, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: October 12, 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBRA URIZAR Deputy Clerk Pub. October 24, 31, November 7 & 14, 2012. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the matter of name change of: SARAH ANN FOY, An Adult. Case No. CV NC 1217415 NOTICE OF HEARING A petition by SARAH ANN FOY, who was born on December 9, 1979, at Oregon City, Oregon,

and now residing at 3988 N. Pepperwood Drive, Boise, County of Ada, State of Idaho, has been filed with the above -entitled Court a Petition for Change of Name to SARAH ANNE CLENDENON, for the reason that Petitioner and her fiance’ have a child together, and Petitioner wants to have the same surname, as she and her fiance’ are not planning to marry for several years. Petitioner’s father is BRADLEY JOHN FOY, residing at 12221 S.E. Eagle Glen Drive, Happy Valley, Oregon 97086. The Petition for Change of NAme will be heard at 1:30 o’clock p.m. on the 27th day of November,

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NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Katrina Joy Holmes-Knight Case No. CV NC 1217429 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Katrina Joy Holmes-Knight, now residing in the City of Garden City, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Kevin Jesse Holmes. The reason for the change in name is: transgenderism: I am transitioning female to male. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on November 15, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Oct. 2, 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Melissa Lorraine Roberts Case No. CV NC 1218062 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Melissa Lorraine Roberts, now residing in the city of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Lilo Wright. The reason for the change in name is: for personal self-help in mental health issues. A hearing on the petition is

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BW 2012, at the County Courthouse, located at 200 W. Front Street, Boise, Idaho. Objections may be filed by any person who can, in such objections, show to the court a good reason against such a change of name. DATED this 28th day of September, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT By DEBRA URIZAR Deputy Clerk Pub. Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14 & 21, 2012. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estates of: CARL J. SIELAFF and LILLIAN PAULINE SIELAFF, Deceased. Case No.: CV IE 1212266 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated and filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED This 19th day of October, 2012. Tamalla Hart, Personal Representative c/o Richard A. Cummings 412 East Parkcenter Boulevard, Suite 325 P.O. Box 1545 Boise, Idaho 83701 Telephone: (208) 367-0722 Pub. Oct. 24, 31 & Nov. 7, 2012. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estates of: LOUIS J. RAFFETTO and JEAN R. RAFFETTO, Deceased. Case No.: CV IE 1217850 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated and filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED This 19th day of October, 2012. Thomas J. Raffetto, Personal Representative c/o Richard A. Cummings 412 East Parkcenter Boulevard, Suite 325 P.O. Box 1545 Boise, Idaho 83701 Telephone: (208) 367-0722 Pub. Oct. 24, 31, & Nov. 7, 2012. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the matter of the Estate of: DOROTHY MAXINE CHASE, Deceased. Case No. CV IE 1219719 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed as Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or her estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publica-

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY tion of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated or filed with the Clerk of the Court. Kevin Chase 2288 East Faunhill Dr. Meridian, ID 83646 (208) 860.2876 Todd S. Chase 18 Bakers Hill Road Weston, MA 02493 (781) 899.5528 DATED this 24th day of October, 2012. BRADLEY B. POOLE Attorney for Personal Representative 1110 North Five Mile Road Boise, Idaho 83713 (208) 322-5536 Pub. Nov. 7, 14, 21 & 28, 2012.

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FOR SALE BW FOR SALE ANTIQUED DRESSER Blue, antiqued, 5-drawer, Samuel Lawrence dresser. $300 OBO. Refurbished, like new. 971-8321946.

PETS BW PETS BLACK KITTEN NEEDS YOU! Roadside rescue kitty Franklin needs a “forever” home! He’s about 3 1/2 mo. old with long black hair, fine with dogs & other cats, litter box trained & first shots. He’s a little bit wobbly when he walks or runs, but it doesn’t slow him down at all. Karla 850-5700. DEAD BROKE THOROUGHBRED MAR We have to sell our horse cause we can’t afford her anymore. She is great with horses & other people.You can drop a bomb by her & she will not move. She was a race horse so she was trained very well & also was trained for western riding. If interested call 208-713-1479.

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DRIFT BOAT One of kind! Classic in great condition, comes with everything. 16’ w/ brand new cover. Anchor system, trailer w/new tires, Cataract oars, leg locks & ample storage. Motivated seller. Asking $4,000. Call for more info. 208-761-9969. MANUAL WHEELCHAIR Only used twice. Seat width is 17 ”, depth is 15 .” Chair is in good condition. $100 OBO. 376-2353. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643. QUEEN SIZE MATTRESS & CHAIR In good condition. $10. No box spring. Red office chair. Cushioned. Rollers. $5. 761-6266. BLACK DISHES FOR SALE Black Octagon Shaped dishes 4 placings including: 4 cups, 4 salad plates, 4 dinner plates, 8 bowls. Asking $30 OBO. Please call Emily 283-6760. FUTON FOR SALE Great shape, folds into a full size bed cover is removable $125 OBO. 283-6760.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): The data that’s stored and disseminated on the Internet is unimaginably voluminous. Yet the 540 billion trillion electrons that carry all this information weigh about the same as a strawberry. I’d like to use this fun fact as a metaphor for the work you’re doing these days—and the play, too. Your output is prodigious. Your intensity is on the verge of becoming legendary. The potency of your efforts is likely to set in motion effects that will last for a long time. And yet to the naked eye or casual observer it all might look as simple and light as a strawberry. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What if you have a twin sister or brother that your mother gave up for adoption right after you were born and never told you about? Or what if you have a soul twin you’ve never met—a potential ally who understands life in much the same ways that you do? In either case, now is a time when the two of you might finally discover each other. At the very least, Taurus, I suspect you’ll be going deeper and deeper with a kindred spirit who will help you transform your stories about your origins and make you feel more at home on the planet. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I urged my readers to meditate on death as a metaphor for shedding what’s outworn. I then asked them to describe the best death they had experienced. I got a response that’s applicable to you. It’s from a reader named Judd: “My best death was getting chicken pox at age 13 while living in the Philippines. My mother banished me to the TV room. I was uncomfortable but hyperactive, lonely and driven to agony by the awful shows. But after six hours, something popped. My suffering turned inside out and a miracle bloomed. I closed my eyes and my imagination opened up like a vortex. Images, ideas, places, dreams, people familiar and strange—all amazing, colorful and vibrant—flowed through my head. I knew then and there that no material thing on this Earth could hook me up to the source of life like my own thoughts. I was free.” CANCER (June 21-July 22): Conservationists are surprised by what has been transpiring in and around Nepal’s Chitwan National Park. The tigers that live there have changed their schedule. Previously, they prowled around at all hours, day and night. But as more people have moved into the area, the creatures have increasingly become nocturnal. Researchers who have studied the situation believe the tigers are doing so in order to better coexist with humans. I suspect that a metaphorically similar

development is possible for you, Cancerian. Meditate on how the wildest part of your life could adapt better to the most civilized part—and vice versa.

too. Your motto comes from your fellow Scorpio, writer Robert Louis Stevenson: “Judge each day not by the harvest you reap but by the seeds you plant.”

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): What is a dry waterfall? The term may refer to the location of an extinct waterfall, where a river once fell over a cliff but has since stopped flowing. Doda Fallet in Sweden is such a place. “Dry waterfall” may also signify a waterfall that only exists for a while after a heavy rain and then disappears again. One example is on Brukkaros Mountain in Namibia. A third variant shows up in Cliffs Beyond Abiquiu, Dry Waterfall, a landscape painting by Georgia O’Keeffe. It’s a lush rendering of a stark landscape near the New Mexico town where O’Keeffe lived. Soon you will have your own metaphorical version of a dry waterfall, Leo. It’s ready for you if you’re ready for it.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): On a beach, a man spied a pelican that was barely moving. Was it sick? He wanted to help. Drawing close, he discovered that ants were crawling all over it. He brushed them off, then carried the bird to his car and drove it to a veterinarian. After a thorough examination, the doctor realized the pelican was suffering from a fungus that the ants had been eating away—and probably would have removed completely if the man hadn’t interfered. Moral of the story: Sometimes healing takes place in unexpected ways and nature knows better than we do about how to make it happen. Keep that in mind during the coming weeks, Sagittarius.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You are getting to where you need to be, but you’re still not there. You have a good share of the raw materials you require to accomplish your goal, but you don’t have enough of the structure that will make everything work. The in-between state you’re inhabiting reminds me of a passage from the author Elias Canetti: “His head is made of stars, but not yet arranged into constellations.” Your next assignment, Virgo, is to see what you can do about coalescing a few constellations. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Doctors used to believe that ulcers were caused by stress and spicy foods. But in the 1980s, two researchers named Barry Marshall and Robin Warren began to promote an alternative theory. They believed the culprit was H. pylori, a type of bacteria. To test their hypothesis, Marshall drank a Petri dish full of H. pylori. Within days, he got gastric symptoms and underwent an endoscopy. The evidence proved that he and his partner were correct. They won a Nobel Prize for their work. (And Marshall recovered just fine.) I urge you to be inspired by their approach, Libra. Formulate experiments that allow you to make practical tests of your ideas, and consider using yourself as a guinea pig. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): This is not prime time for you to rake in rewards, collect hard-earned goodies and celebrate successes you’ve been building toward. It’s fine if you end up doing those things but I suspect that what you’re best suited for right now is getting things started. You’ll attract help from unexpected sources if you lay the groundwork for projects you want to work on throughout 2013. You’ll be in alignment with cosmic rhythms,

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A farmer in Japan found a 56-leaf clover. Actually, he bred it in his garden at home. It took effort on his part. Presumably, it provided him with 14 times the luck of a mere four-leaf clover. I don’t think your good karma will be quite that extravagant in the coming week, Capricorn, but there’s a decent chance you’ll get into at least the 16-leaf realm. To raise your odds of approaching the 56-leaf level of favorable fortune, remember this: Luck tends to flow in the direction of those who work hard to prepare for it and earn it. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The largest bell in the world is located in Moscow, Russia. Called the Tsar Bell, it’s made of bronze, weighs 445,170 pounds and is elaborately decorated with images of people, angels and plants. It has never once been rung in its 275 years of existence. Is there anything comparable in your own life, Aquarius? Some huge presence that has never actually been used? The time is near when that stillness may finally come to an end. I suggest you decide how this will occur rather than allowing fate to choose for you. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Are you interested in experiencing a close brush with a holy anomaly or a rowdy blessing? If not, that’s perfectly OK. Just say, “No, I’m not ready for a lyrical flurry of uncanny grace.” And the freaky splendor, convulsive beauty or mystical mutation will avoid making contact with you, no questions asked. But if you suspect you might enjoy communing with a subversive blast of illumination—if you think you could have fun coming to terms with a tricky epiphany that blows your mind— then go out under the night sky and whisper a message like this: “I’m ready for you, sweetness. Find me.”

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