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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 52 JUNE 20–26, 2012

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 9

NEW FOCUS Idaho Dems crunch the numbers FEATURE 12

PICTURE PERFECT BW’s 10th annual Black and White Photo Contest NOISE 25

WILCO WAGON Feverish fans caravan to Idaho Botanical Garden SCREEN 28

MAGIC KINGDOM Wes Anderson’s new flick is worth the wait

“The rate of immigration detention is through the roof.”

CITYDESK 9

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Interns: Emily Anderson, Tabitha Bower, Christina Marfice, Amy Merrill, Jessica Murri Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Randy King, David Kirkpatrick, Michael Lafferty, Ted Rall, Carissa Wolf ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Brenda Stroud, Brenda@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Patrick Sweeney, Tom Tomorrow, Ben Wilson CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Elaynea Robinson, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE MEDIA AFTER THE MOTOR CITY Recently, I spent time rubbing elbows and throwing back cocktails with fellow alties from across the country at the annual Association of Alternative Newsmedia convention. We spent a couple of days in Detroit taking notes on increasing Web revenue, recording the rather bleak economic assessment offered in a business-writing workshop, and finding inspiration in unexpected places—like the brief speech given by 95-year-old Motor City resident and activist Grace Lee Boggs. Unlike conventions past, this one felt almost free of the frantic desperation many couldn’t seem to shake as their papers struggled in a rapidly changing media landscape at the mercy of a stumbling economy. It’s tough to tell if the swing is trending up or if those still struggling just stayed home. Likely it’s a bit of both, but by my guess, the papers doing the best are the ones who have taken the change in stride, redefining who they are and what their role should be in delivering the news—be it hard, fluffy, longform or digital. When I was reporting on business issues as a staff writer at BW, one source at the Idaho Small Business Development Center had a sort of standing explanation about why some businesses fail and why some succeed, about why some suddenly shutter after many successful years and others manage to eke by: He said success in business relies on meeting your customers’ needs; those needs may change over time and successful businesses continually evolve to meet those needs. And while many alt weeklies become more dynamic, their daily counterparts continue to erode. While New Orleans’ Times-Picayune falters, The U-T San Diego daily paper openly eschews objectivity in a profit-driven editorial model that, as its chief executive told The New York Times, is “pro-conservative, pro-business, pro-military.” It’s a reminder that these are still strange times in the newspaper business, even though some of us smaller local guys seemed to have found a shelter. Also at that conference, Boise Weekly was sent home with two awards. In the Innovation/Format Buster category for papers with a circulation under 50,000, BW won first place for “Red Potatoes,” by myself, Deanna Darr and Adam Rosenlund. Additionally, Rosenlund, former BW graphic designer, took third place in Illustration for papers with a circulation of under 50,000 for “Where are They Now?” And if you manage to dig up the photo of me accepting the first-place award, yes, that is underwear on my head. What? We’re alt journalists. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Daniel King TITLE: The Pier at Redfish Lake MEDIUM: photograph ARTIST STATEMENT: Dan King is a amateur photographer whose primary interest is outdoor landscapes. He and his wife Sandi enjoy traveling and photographing the Pacific Northwest. Through his connections with Outdoor Idaho and Idaho Public Television, he has worked with City Club of Boise shooting forums and events. He is owner of Sterling Lawn and Grounds Maintenance.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. ANDR EW C R IS P

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Idaho’s Democratic Party switches gears

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CITIZEN

BE PROUD Nearly a thousand people gathered at the Capitol for the annual Pride rally on June 16. From there, they marched to Ann Morrison Park through downtown Boise carrying a rainbow flag half a block long. Details at Cobweb.

GO, GO, GODMOBILE A headline like “Idaho Family Wants Godmobile to Be Born Again” tends to pique a reader’s interest. But what does it mean? Citydesk has the story.

ELECTIONS HEAT UP From 1st District Congressional candidate Jimmy Farris calling for his opponent Rep. Raul Labrador to be “put on waivers” to former state senatorturned-2nd Congressional District candidate Nicole LeFavour calling her opponent, Rep. Mike Simpson, “an architect of obstructionist Congress,” BW’s Election Page has been full of interesting news. Read more about those comments in News this week on Page 9 and get even more news on Election 2012 at boiseweekly.com. Click on the Election banner.

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FEATURE 10th annual Black and White Photo Contest

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE Catching up with Wilco

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MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN Moonrise Kingdom

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REC The great northern frog hunt

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FOOD Neighborhood markets change the nature of a Bench neighborhood

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BEER GUZZLER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | 5

OPINION/BILL COPE

W SPEAKERING The endorsement I’d love to gag through Today, we have a speech George W. Bush has not yet delivered in support of Mitt Romney—and it’s unlikely he ever will deliver it, as it appears Romney would rather be seen on stage with a 200-pound tap-dancing turd than George W. Bush. Bush didn’t actually write this speech. I did. I was inspired to do so after watching Bill Clinton a couple weeks back speak on behalf of President Barack Obama. I thought it fitting and timely to remind readers what we got the last time we elected a privileged son of extreme wealth with a peculiar way of saying things. If you object to me putting words in Bush’s mouth, I assure you, I have used many of his own statements (in italics), just as he first expressed them, along with the year they were originally sputtered. Whatever isn’t an exact (or near-exact, adjusted for current realities) quote from the good old Bush days was written with faithful consideration of his unique sense of humor, enunciation, syntax, verb tense and thought patterns. To anyone still offended I would presume to write a speech for this man, I must ask: surely you don’t believe he ever wrote one for himself, do you? U “Good evening, lady and gentlemen, and thank you for that big clapping. I see a lot of the bubbas who worked in my administration who’ve shown up. (2003) How you doing, Rummy? You here looking for another job, heh heh? And there’s Big Dick. Got some color back in your face, looks like. Must of been the best ticker money could buy, heh heh. I tell you what, MittBoy … that man there is who you oughta pick for your vice president. There have been no finer vice president of the United States than Dick Cheney. (2003) And no law I know says he can’t be vice president as many times as he feels like it, is there? Anybody got a book? Look it up, would ya’? “This is an impressive crowd. The haves and the have mores. Some people call you the elite. I call you our base. (2000) And it’s good y’all come out for the Mittster here. He’s gonna make a excellent president, isn’t he? I’d say us Republicans picks us a winner, wouldn’t you? Mitty, you’re doing a heck of a job. (2005) What about old Fit Mitt here is the same as they used to thinks about me. They misunderestimated me (2000), and now they’re misunderestimating Mitten here. But he’s like me. I know what I believe, I will continue to articulate what I believe and what I believe, and I believe what I believe is right. (2001) “That’s what Mittaroony here believes, too. He’s believes, uh, what I call them the job generators, uh, that they should be more opportunity given to not pay taxes, which is what I believe and did back when I was the decider. Old Mitto here will get us

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right back to those economical foundations, uh, that is the economical foundations of our current prosperousness right up until it wasn’t no more. Mitt ... heh heh, am I saying that right? ... ‘Mitt’ like in zit? ... heh heh, the Mitt-Dawg here believes that, too, uh, that the way out of this economical recession is to take it back to the, uh, what I call, uh, the conditions ... uh, of the economical before the recession what the Obama say made the recession happen. “What I say to that Obama is, there’s an old saying in Tennessee ... I know it’s in Texas, probably in Tennessee, too… that says, ‘fool me once, shame on ... uh, shame on you. Fool me, uh ... you can’t get fooled again.’ (2002) And Mittsky here won’t. It’s just like I told a divorcee once who worked three jobs to support her children. I said to her, ‘You work three jobs? ... Uniquely American, isn’t it? I mean, that is fantastic that you’re doing that.’ (2005) “The Mitt Bomb here gets what I got at. He’ll being just what we need for the future of this uniqueish country and divorced women like her who have that entrepreneurialist spirit to work three jobs when others would sit back and only work one or two. That’s why I, uh, calling myself a compassionate conservative. Because I believe the benefits of helping someone is beneficial. (2000) “I see some of you brought your young’uns. That’s, uh, a good deal. Families is where our nation finds hope, where wings take dream. (2000) And Mitt-Full here isn’t afraid to ask the same question I ask once. Is our children learning? (2000) I know the old Mitt Muffin will finish off what I starting to better our children learning. If you teach a child to read, he or her will be able to pass a literacy test. (2001) We want results in every single classroom so that one single child is left behind. (2003) Any skeptic about what I’m talkin’ about oughta come and talk to the people who know what they’re talkin’ about. (2003) Another thing. Just like me, old Kid Mitt here won’t be afraid to do what it taking for makes Americas safe. We marched to war. I don’t if you remember, on your TV screens ... it said ‘March to War.’ You turn on the TV, and there it says: ‘March to War.’ (2003) Our enemies never stop thinking about ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we. (2004) Our answer is bring them on. (2003) Isn’t that about right, Mitty? Bring ’em on, heh heh. What I mean by saying is, by making the right choices, we can make the right choice for our future. (2003) This is historic times (2003), and I want to thank you for what you’re fixing to do, which is to man the grass roots. (2003) Now what say we be gittin’ old Mitt-Man in the White House so’s he can take up where I left off? WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

UNDER R THE

2012 PLAYS ROMEO AND JULIET

By William Shakespeare Sponsored by Hawley Troxell and Idaho Statesman’s Scene and Treasure Magazines

THE MOUSETRAP

By Agatha Christie Sponsored by D.A. Davidson & Co., and KTVB 7 Idaho’s Newschannel

THE IMAGINARY INVALID

Freely adapted from Molière by Oded Gross and Tracy Young. Originally produced by Oregon Shakespeare Festival Sponsored by Holland & Hart, LLP and Boise Weekly

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By William Shakespeare Sponsored by 200 Teachers, UBS Financial Services, Inc., and Boise State Public Radio

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By Michael Frayn Sponsored by Stoel Rives, LLP, and 107.1 KHITS

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Photo Credit: Dan Lawrence*, Christian Durso*, Romeo and Juliet (2012). Photo by DKM Photography. *Member Actors’ Equity.

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | 7

OPINION/TED RALL

EDUCATING POLITICIANS Why both parties are missing the big picture

Public education is mirroring American society overall: a tiny island of haves surrounded by a vast ocean of have-nots. For worried parents and students, the good news is that public education has become a campaign issue. Mitt Romney is pushing a warmed-over version of the old GOP school voucher scheme. The trouble with vouchers, experts say, is that allowing parents to withdraw kids from “failing schools” deprives cash-starved schools of funds, leading to a “winner takes all” sweepstakes that widens the gap between the best and worst schools. Critics—liberals and libertarians—also dislike vouchers because they allow the transfer of tax dollars into the coffers of private schools, many of which have religious, non-secular curricula unaccountable to regulators. Both parties are missing the mark. Republicans want to gut public schools by slashing budgets that will lead to bigger class sizes, which will reduce the individual attention. Democrats rightly oppose educational austerity, but are running a lame defense rather than aggressively promoting positive ideas to improve the system. Both parties are too interested in weakening unions and grading teacher performance with endless tests, and not enough in raising salaries so teaching attracts the brightest college graduates. Is the system in crisis? Yes, said respondents to a 2011 Gallup-Phi Delta Kappa poll, which found that only 22 percent approved of the state of public education in the United States. The No. 1 problem? Not enough funding. According to Andreas Schleicher of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, one of the world’s leading

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experts on comparing public school systems, the United States is falling rapidly behind other countries. In Canada, an average 15-year-old is a full year ahead of his or her American counterpart, he told a 2010 Congressional inquiry. The U.S. high-school completion rate is ranked 25th out of the 30 OECD countries. The elephant in the room is to replace localized control of education with centralized federal control, as is common around the world. Why run public schools out of Washington, D.C.? When schools in rich districts get the same resource allocation per student as those in poor ones, influential voters tend to push for increased spending of education. Centralized control also eliminates embarrassing situations like when the Kansas School Board eliminated teaching evolution in its schools, effectively reducing standards. A streamlined curriculum creates smarter students. It’s easier for Americans, who live in a highly mobile society, to transfer their children midyear from school to school. Many students, especially among the working poor, suffer lower grades due to transiency. Of course, true education reform would need to abolish the ability of parents to opt out of the public school system. That means banning private education and the class segregation we see today, particularly in big cities, and integrating the 5.3 million kids (just less than 10 percent of the total) into their local public systems. Decades after forced busing, many students attend schools as racially separated as those of the Jim Crow era. If we’re to live in a true democracy, all of our kids have to attend the same schools.

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NEWS/CITYDESK NEWS PATR IC K S W EENEY

HOW IDAHO DEMOCRATS COULD WIN A lot of door-knocking and a little help from GOP’s far-right wing GEORGE PRENTICE Politics on the back of a napkin—campaigns are won and lost from strategies mapped out next to coffee stains. So it wasn’t uncharacteristic for Larry Grant, chairman of the Idaho Democratic Party, to grab a stray napkin and do some quick vote counting. In particular, he was mapping out the newly redrawn Idaho 2nd Congressional District, represented by seven-term Republican Rep. Mike Simpson and challenged by Democratic Boise State Sen. Nicole LeFavour. “I’ve looked at the numbers and she can win,” said Grant as he mapped out the district on the napkin. “The district includes the North End of Boise, as well as the Boise Bench and east side of the city. Add in Democratic-friendly Blaine County, downtown Pocatello, downtown Idaho Falls, downtown Twin Falls. I’m telling you, that’s half the vote right there. “According to the [National Committee for an Effective Congress], the 2nd District has 42 percent of what they call a democratic performance, and there’s something called a ‘persuadable’ sector of the voting public and that’s 17 percent in the 2nd District.” The numbers surprised more than a few people at the June 14-16 Idaho Democratic State Convention, not the least of which was LeFavour. “Larry’s numbers are impressive and rather surprising,” LeFavour said. “But I must admit that as I travel to small towns across the district, far from Boise, I’m so surprised when people recognize me and my work at the Legislature. That’s something that Mike Simpson or any amount of his money can’t get.” But LeFavour is the first to admit that she needs money aplenty. “I think it’s pretty impressive that I’ve raised $100,000 by mid-June, but I need about $180,000 in the next two weeks,” said LeFavour. “But I’m proud to say that all of my donations have come from individuals, not political action committees.” Grant conceded that a good chunk of the money that LeFavour will need to raise between now and November will be from outside of Idaho and, yes, that would include PACs. “But I’m pretty sure she can get it. There’s a lot of excitement about her and our full slate of legislative candidates this WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Nicole LeFavour, candidate for 2nd Congressional District: “I’m so surprised when people recognize me and my work. That’s something that Mike Simpson or any amount of his money can’t get.”

November,” said Grant. The slate is one of the most-robust ever put out by Idaho Democrats. The party recruited more than 90 statehouse candidates and 82 of them will be on the Tuesday, Nov. 6, ballot, representing every district except three: No. 14, which includes Eagle and Star, and Nos. 27 (Mindoka and Cassia counties) and 30 (Bonneville County). Grant said some of the Democratic candidates had better odds of being elected than others but having a near-full slate was imperative. “You never know when somebody is going to have too much to drink and take somebody’s SUV,” said Grant, referring to former Republican Sen. John McGee, who won by a comfortable margin two years ago but resigned from the Senate following a string of charges involving a 2011 Father’s Day drunken-driving incident and alleged impropriety with a Senate attache. “And you never know when a lawmaker is going to refuse to pay their taxes,” referring to Athol Republican Rep. Phil Hart, who also won by a wide margin two years ago but lost in the May GOP primary while dodging charges of tax evasion. Morgan Hill, House minority chief of staff, was paying particular attention to the age of the Democratic candidates on this year’s ballot. He’s also the president of the Idaho Young Democrats. “If you look at the youth vote in 2010, it was terrible,” said Hill. “We’re going to change that. The jobs outlook, education and human-rights equality are such big issues for young adults in Idaho. And ethics comes up time and again among our peers.” To be eligible for membership in the Idaho Young Democrats, an individual is supposed to be 36 years old or younger. Holli

High Woodings fits right in. The 33-year-old mother is running for House Seat B in Boise’s District 19. But politics isn’t in her bloodline. “My gosh, no. I come from a family of loggers,” said Woodings. “But I have a drive to make things better. I spent a lot of time during the primary knocking on about 1,500 doors. And the Republicans’ war on women is really on a lot of people’s minds. It really resonates and it transcends party lines. When the Republicans introduced the ultrasound bill, it disenfranchised so many women. And I wouldn’t be surprised if the Republicans bring it back next year.” Mary Staley couldn’t be happier about Woodings’ candidacy, even though she can’t vote for her. Staley, 84, is from Fresno, Calif., and represents the National Women’s Political Caucus. “That’s why I’m here. To raise funds and show support for more female candidates,” said Staley. “The lack of women in the Idaho Legislature is an abomination.” Staley sells T-shirts, buttons and bumper stickers to raise the funds. Her big sellers in Boise included shirts that said: “Friends don’t let friends vote Republican” and “If you think education is expensive, try ignorance.” In fact, Grant is certain that education could well become the prime issue come Election Day. In particular, he said the GOP’s attack on the teachers’ union will backfire. “They went after trade unions with Right to Work. Now they’re after teachers with the Luna laws,” said Grant, referring to Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna’s school-reform package. “Next, they’ll go after police and firemen. I would remind the GOP that the election is in November and school starts in September. Teachers, parents and even students aren’t going to be too happy about how things are.”

LEGAL EAGLE: INCREASED IMMIGRANT DETENTION LEADS TO ‘PERVERSE INCENTIVE’ FOR PRIVATE PRISONS While Idaho and the nation anxiously awaited a ruling on the future of Arizona’s controversial immigration law, better known as Arizona Senate Bill 1070, one of the American Civil Liberties Union’s top legal defenders argued that the Southwestern border state’s strict crackdown on undocumented workers is only the beginning of a growing legal tangle. Tanaz Moghadam, who was part of the ACLU litigation team challenging SB 1070, pointed to skyrocketing taxpayer expense and courtroom logjams associated with new anti-immigration laws. “The costs of litigation are pretty remarkable,” Moghadam said in a June 13 Boise address hosted by the ACLU of Idaho. “We certainly believe these laws need to be litigated and rights need to be vindicated. Is it worth the taxpayers’ money to have to defend it?” The Department of Homeland Security reported to Congress that its immigration detainment system, operated by its Division of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, would cost taxpayers more that $2 billion in 2012, a $254 million increase from 2010. With an estimated 33,000 people in more than 250 U.S. facilities on any given night, DHS said the cost per day of immigrant detainment is nearly $5.5 million. “The rate of immigration detention is through the roof,” Moghadam said. “Since the 1990s, it has gone up 15-fold, so that every given year, something like 400,000 people are held just for immigration—not criminal just for immigration purposes to see if they are deportable or not.” Moghadam pointed to the increased number of detained immigrants sent to privatized prisons in the United States as an additional challenge. In fact, she referred to the Correction Corporation of America, which operates the controversial Idaho Correctional Center, part of the Idaho Department of Correction’s prison campus, south of Boise. The ICC came under intense scrutiny following allegations of high levels of inmate violence. Records obtained by the Associated Press showed that between September 2007 and September 2008, ICC had more inmate-on-inmate assaults than all other Idaho prisons combined. “The more you detain immigrants, the more you throw them in jail, the higher the profit margin,” said Moghadam. “And that’s a really disturbing, really perverse incentive that gets so little attention and that I think would really frustrate and anger a lot of Americans.” Moghadam said immigrants were “easily vilified when things are down and there is a recession, as there is now.” “There is a lot of scapegoating going on,” she said. “And I don’t think it is a coincidence that as the economy here has turned, it really correlated with the rise of these laws.” Moghadam’s appearance was the first in a series of summer Law and Liberty lectures sponsored by the ACLU of Idaho. Capital punishment and women’s reproductive rights are on the docket for July and August events. —Tabitha Bower

BOISEweekly | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | 9

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Half of all Ada County restaurants, and 46 percent of all Idaho restaurants, are considered fast food, compared to a national average of 25 percent.

SIDE OF FRIES WITH YOUR POVERTY? Economic inequality drives health concerns JACLYN BRANDT The 2010 census, the once-a-decade benchmark used to determine everything from federal subsidies to mapping legislative districts, has unveiled an ever-growing income-equality gap. Even more startling is how the wage disparity relates to death rates. According to new statistics, every additional $10,000 your family earns could decrease your chances of death by 16 percent. And with nearly 14 percent of Idahoans earning below the poverty level, caregivers and social workers consider indigence to be a matter of life and death. “We know that poverty has an adverse affect on health,” said State Community Services Coordinator Katy Kujawski of Community Action Partnership Association of Idaho. Kujawski and her colleagues are particularly interested in a new study from countyhealthrankings.org, a project by the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, which recently ranked Ada County as ninth in the state in terms of overall health outcomes, but 42nd (dead last) in physical environment. Chief among the reasons was air pollution and lack of access to healthy foods. In fact, half of all Ada County restaurants and 46 percent of all Idaho restaurants are considered fast food, compared to a national average of 25 percent. The survey found that 5 percent of Ada County residents and 9 percent of all Idahoans have limited access to healthy foods, which is described as “residents who are low income and do not live close to a grocery store.” That number is just above zero for the rest of the country. “From the availability of affordable healthy foods, to the simple fact that many cannot afford preventive health care and end up in

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emergency room triage, poverty is the root cause of the inequities,” said Kujawski. The study also revealed that 45 out of every 1,000 Idaho Medicare patients that end up in a hospital bed are there for preventable reasons. Additionally, 19 percent of Idahoans are uninsured. “What the uninsured tend to do is go to emergency rooms when they’re at that stage instead of regularly seeing a doctor to manage their medications,” said Christina Zamora, executive director of CAPAI. “And of course, the emergency room bill is huge and that drives further behavior of not going to the doctor because it takes so long to pay it off.” Rural Idaho has an even greater struggle. “Rural areas struggle a little more because they are predominantly lower income and because access to transportation in relation to health care can really be an issue,” said Zamora. “If a doctor is 50 miles away, that gas may be better spent going to Walgreens and getting something over the counter.” Hui Zheng, an Ohio State University sociology professor who conducted the study, cited many reasons for the disparity. “The wealthiest people may push government for more services for themselves rather than invest in public goods like education or affordable medical services—services that can affect health for the majority of people,” said Zheng. Zamora thinks the new statistics should fuel political debates when Idaho voters go to the polls this November. “I think that higher-income people tend to get their way more often,” she said. “Lowerincome people are just trying to survive and they don’t have the time to support a candidate that would support their interests.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

      

CITIZENS



RYAN GIBSON AND KENDRA KNIGHTEN Students to gain a new view of the world while spending a summer in Bangladesh JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

GEORGE PRENTICE When Ryan Gibson and Kendra Knighten posed for a portrait for this article, BW asked them to sit close to one another so that we could get both into the picture. “This is as close as we’ll ever sit to one another in Dakha,â€? said Gibson. He was referring to the capital of Bangladesh, where Muslims frown on familiarity between unrelated men and women. Cultural taboos are just one of the hurdles that the 21-year-old College of Idaho students will need to negotiate as they spend their summer in one of the world’s most densely populated but poorest nations. They’ll also confront poverty, disease and one of the harshest climates on the planet. But their 12-week internships for Partners in Sustainable Development International should give them invaluable experience as they build wells and new tin roofs in large cities and tiny villages throughout the South Asian nation. They’re blogging about their experiences at pdintl.org and collegeoďŹ daho.edu/blog/ Bangladesh. How did you secure this internship? Knighten: Last summer, I was working at a golf course in McCall. I was the only waitress on duty one day when I struck up a conversation with a couple and told them about my hopes for a career in international development, and they happened to know someone involved in microďŹ nance, speciďŹ cally in Bangladesh and Tanzania. That was Dr. Pat Werhane. I had almost forgot about it when, a month went by, and one day, I was work-

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ing again and a woman approached me and asked “Are you Kendra? I’m Pat.â€? I freaked out a little bit. She told me about an opportunity in Bangladesh but she warned me that it would be rough. I said, “I grew up in Idaho, and I’m low maintenance.â€? She said, “No, it was really, really rough.â€? Gibson: She told me about that last fall. I was really jealous. But her sponsors told her that they preferred that she work with a partner. I quickly sent my resume and began talking with PSDI. How intense are the summers there? Gibson: The CIA suggests that you don’t go there in July and August, and that’s because of the weather. Yesterday, the heat index was 117 degrees. Plus, it’s monsoon season. Doesn’t that make it a breeding ground for disease? Knighten: We needed 11 or 12 vaccines. I spent about $2,500 on vaccinations. There was hepatitis A, hepatitis B, typhoid, polio, rabies. Plus tuberculosis and cholera are there. Gibson: And we have to take malarial pills. What have you been told about your diet? Gibson: We won’t be eating anything uncooked. Knighten: We may eat something with a peel like an orange or banana, but we deďŹ nitely won’t be eating any salads. How about sanitation? Knighten: Our showers will be buckets.

I’m presuming that the Islamic culture will dictate what you wear. Knighten: I’m not taking any makeup. I should be covered well below the knee and below the elbow. I’ve been asked to be covered to the wrist. And certainly nothing low cut, preferably to the neck.

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And how you relate to a man will be closely watched. Knighten: It’s something I’m not used to. When I’m at college, I live in a house full of guys. This most certainly will change your view of the world. Knighten: For most people there, having one meal a day is the living standard. Gibson: I don’t look forward to seeing poverty, but it’s very meaningful to understand what true poverty is. What are you nervous about? Gibson: Illness. Knighten: A new view of the world is a double-edged sword. Understanding poverty is important but I’m terriďŹ ed of the process. On a scale of one to 10, how nervous are your parents? Knighten: They tell me six, but it’s probably 11.

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or one issue each year, a little of the color drains out of Boise Weekly—and that’s a good thing in the case of the annual Black and White Photo Contest. For the last decade, photographers from across the Treasure Valley—and sometimes beyond—have sent in their best black-and-white images, all vying to come out on top of the heap. And what a heap it is; this year, there were 238 entries. Contest judges are continually impressed with the level of talent and artistry displayed by local photographers, as well as the fact that the quality of images keeps getting better, resetting the bar each year. Judges represent a variety of disciplines, backgrounds and experiences. Making return appearances on the panel this year were veteran photographer Paul Hosefros, a longtime photog with The New York Times whose book, Idaho Wine Country, has become a local favorite. Also returning was photographer Laurie Pearman, whose images are seen almost weekly in the pages of Boise Weekly, and who is a former winner of the Black and White Photo Contest. Rounding out the panel was BW Art Director Leila Ramella-Rader and BW Features Editor Deanna Darr. For the first time, BW readers became part of the judging panel as well, when they had the opportunity to vote for the Readers’ Choice Award in each category through an online vote. Thank you to the readers who took the time to cast their votes and an extra-special thank you to all the photographers who entered the contest. We can’t wait to see what you bring us next year. —Deanna Darr

PLACES GRAND PRIZE & FIRST PLACE

$310 DANIEL KING // BOISE

PLACES

PLACES

3RD // $60 // KIMBERLY INGRAM // NAMPA

2ND // $110 // ALEX BORELLI // BOISE

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THINGS

THINGS

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1ST // $155 // ELI CRAVEN // BOISE

THINGS

2ND // $110 // TODD ALLMAN // BOISE

3RD // $60 // RYAN BRADSHAW // BOISE BOISEweekly | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | 13

PEOPLE 1ST // $155 // SARAH CRANE // BOISE

PEOPLE 2ND // $110 // SUSANNE SWANSON-BERNARD // BOISE

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PEOPLE

3RD // $60 // CHAD ESTES // BOISE WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

READER’S CHOICE THINGS

PLACES

$25 // TODD ALLMAN // BOISE

PEOPLE

$25 // KIMBERLY INGRAM // NAMPA

TIE // $25 // KIMBERLY INGRAM // NAMPA

PLACES

TIE // $25 // CECILIA VEGA // BOISE

HONORABLE MENTIONS PEOPLE CECILIA VEGA // BOISE

PLACES

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BRUCE R. CROFFY // GARDEN CITY

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HONORABLE MENTIONS

GREG WORTHEN // BOISE

PEOPLE

CHAD ESTES // BOISE

PEOPLE

RYAN BRADSHAW // BOISE

PEOPLE

SUSAN VALIQUETTE // BOISE

THINGS

THINGS

KASEY ELLIOTT // BOISE

KIM GRIFFIN // BOISE

PEOPLE

RONDA GIBBONS // BOISE

THINGS

PLACES

CECILIA VEGA // BOISE

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PLACES

JESSICA RAMONE // BOISE WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Boise Weekly’s mascot race will feature an array of kooky characters as part of the Main Street Mile.

FRIDAY JUNE 22 runnin’ Make your stomach say “Oy!” at Deli Days.

THURSDAY-FRIDAY JUNE 21-22 deli-cious DELI DAYS Put down the bologna and packaged pepperoni. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel is flying in authentic pastrami and corned beef from the East Coast for the annual Deli Days, a celebration of scrumptious food and Boise’s Jewish community. Deli Days will take place Thursday, June 21, and Friday, June 22, at Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel. The foodie-friendly event will feature a New York-style kosher deli replete with meaty goodness. But don’t leave your vegetarian friends behind: veggie-centric fare will be available, as will locally grown produce and many homemade desserts. The festivities also include a beer and wine garden, so you can wash back all the food you’ve crammed in your belly, along with live music and dancing. While you digest all that authentic goodness, take a tour of Boise’s historic synagogue, which was constructed in the late 19th century, making it the oldest synagogue in continuous use west of the Mississippi River. It once stood on State Street and was relocated to the Bench. “Deli Days is an opportunity to showcase the Jewish community to the community at large,” said Billy Ganz, an event coordinator. Can’t wait for the event? Orders for everything from potato knish to dinner for four can be placed by phone and delivered to most Boise locations for free. Check out the congregation’s website for a menu, prices and stipulations. Thursday, June 21, 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Friday, June 22, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel, 11 N. Latah St., 208-343-6601, ahavathbethisrael.org.

SATURDAYSUNDAY JUNE 23-24 eco-fun IDAHO GREEN EXPO So learning about ways to live green sounds dull, eh? Well get ready—the fifthannual Idaho Green Expo

will leave you contemplating how you’re going to learn the ins-and-outs of backyard beekeeping, follow your path to inner healing and have time to take in the recycled fashion show. On Saturday, June 23, and Sunday, June 24, at Expo Idaho, you can sip a local eco-brew while filling your cranium with enough eco-info to fill a cart with reusable shopping bags.

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“We are hoping that people will spend more time there, that people will attend the workshops, talk to the vendors and see what people are doing in the Treasure Valley,” said Joanie Bear, event program director. The two-day event will feature hands-on workshops focused on sustainability, more than 120 booths of vendors displaying sustainable products and services,

MAIN STREET MILE Prostate cancer awareness doesn’t garner the sort of attention it should and is occasionally—excuse the pun—the butt of jokes. But it’s no laughing matter. One in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, according to Ryan Canning, executive director of the Main Street Mile. Canning said the event’s focus is on getting the word out. “We’re trying to up awareness. About as many men get prostate cancer as women get breast cancer,” Canning said. “We’re encouraging men to take better care of their health.” The ninth annual Main Street Mile will take place Friday, June 22, and draws battalions of Boiseans to downtown for a day of fun and awareness. There’s an event for most everyone— the Meadow Gold Children’s Half Miler features an ice cream truck hounded by children. But the lactose intolerant can also select from a slew of different runs. The Boise Weekly Mascot Run features a cast of kooky characters, and the Boise Legacy Constructors Foundation Mayor’s Mile for Everyone is a non-competitive run/walk/stroll alongside Boise Mayor Dave Bieter. The 94.9 FM the River Beauty and the Beast Mile is for the 40-and-older set, the 100.3 FM The X First Responder Team Challenge is for police, fire, military and emergency medical personnel, companies can engage in team building sans the cheesy activities with the Idaho Power Team Mile Challenge, fifth- through 12th-graders can compete in the Bandanna Running Prep Mile Showdown and the “king and queen of the streets” will be determined with the KeyBank Men’s and Women’s Open Mile. The Boise Hawks will rock special jerseys at every Friday home game as part of the “Batting for Men’s Health” campaign. Info on how you can score one is available at the Hawks’ and MSM websites. Proceeds from MSM are used to fund awareness, outreach programs and free screenings. Visit bemanenough.org for more info. 6:25 p.m., $25, $10 children 10 and younger. Sixth and Main streets, 208-353-8983, mainstreetmile.org.

local food, beer, music and a “green within” room exemplifying green health. DL Evans Bank and the Small Business Development Center are sponsoring 12 emerging businesses, enabling up-and-comers such as Urban Worm and Sol Bakery to participate. “There are some really neat businesses here that are just starting out and have a green component to them,” Bear said. Musicians will play throughout both days, and the line up includes locals

Nate Fowler, New Transit and AKA Belle. A concert will be held after the Expo’s official closing time at 7 p.m. on June 23, starring Bill Coffey and Cash Money Cousins. Vendors including Brown Shuga Soul Food and Asian Boy BBQ will dish out local treats during a food-truck rally, and around-the-clock workshops will be offered on everything from raising urban chickens to worm composting, sustainable building and electric vehicles. For the kiddies, a petting farm will feature the off-

spring of weed-eating goats from werentgoats.com. Kids’ yoga and a sandbox dump will also provide fun for the young and young at heart. Thrift store fashion shows, an eco auto show, a silent auction and a scavenger hunt will round out the weekend’s festivities. Saturday, June 23, 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sunday, June 24, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; $5, FREE for children ages 12 and younger. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-565, idahogreenexpo.org. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FIND LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

Celebrate Boise’s growing cultural diversity at World Refugee Day. Who doesn’t think of a crab fest and blues festival when you think of the high dessert?

FRIDAY-SUNDAY JUNE 22-24

JILLOPY MID-CENTURY MODERN

celebrate

songs & seafood

WORLD REFUGEE DAY

SUMMER SOLSTICE BLUES AND CRAB FEST Concert ticket budget taking a recessionary hit? If an outof-town, music-laden weekend is what you seek, the Solstice Blues and Crab Fest may be just the pick-me-up you and your wallet have been looking for. “We wanted to keep it within a price range so people could actually go,” said Carl Scheider, vice president of administration at Gruntwerks Event Planning. “With the way ticket prices are for concerts today, you pretty much have to pick and choose.” Keeping the low price in mind, festival organizers combed the country for affordable blues acts that provided a quality variety of music, including Too Slim and the Taildraggers, E.C. Scott, Jason Elmore and a slew of local bands. The Deadliest Catch’s Capt. Harry Lewis is hosting a crab dinner for what will be Oasis Event Center’s kickoff weekend. Located just west of Mountain Home, the 3,000-capacity venue features a campground, festival stage and space for food vendors and beer gardens. “It’s relaxed. You’re away from the city, but it’s an easy drive from town,” said Scheider. “There are no camping concert facilities in this valley.” Tickets are $33.50 in advance online, or $40 at the gate, and include admission to all three days, as well as a spot in the campground. Single-day tickets are available as well and do not include a camping space. Scheider says he wants to make the Summer Solstice Blues and Crab Fest a getaway for the whole family. “We’re trying to keep an idiot-free festival, basically,” he said. “I mean, well, that’s probably too harsh, but we’re making it as extremely family friendly as we possibly can.” Various times, $20-$40, FREE for ages 12 and younger with a parent. Oasis Event Center, 10395 W. Kodiak Drive, Oasis, oasiseventcenter.com.

SATURDAY JUNE 23 culture AFRICAN SUMMER NIGHT BALL Mix entertainment, delectable food, dance and booze, and you’ll have to try harder than you did on your SATs to have a bad time. The African Summer Night Ball blends all those party necessities and adds a dose of cultural.

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SATURDAY JUNE 23

The ball is the brainchild of Travis Goss, the evening’s host. Goss explains on the event’s Facebook page that the event was compiled as a social-networking ball for the African Community to enjoy its culture with food, music and entertainment. Depending on the success of the ball, the future goal is to make it a nonprofit event to help raise funds for refugees and scholarships. Plan on being fashionable—semi-formal attire is encouraged, no jeans and

Every Saturday morning, the Capital City Public Market sprawls through downtown Boise’s streets and encompasses Boise’s crafty and fresh-food-driven culture. But Saturday, June 23, will highlight cultures from Sudan, Congo, Somalia and elsewhere for Boise’s celebration of World Refugee Day. From 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., refugees will bring ethnic food and cultural performances, as well as sell things they’ve made or brought from their home countries to Grove Plaza. Dances, songs, poetry and storytelling make up the annual festival, which began sharing the farmers market in 2008. One new performance taking place this year is a series of three puppet shows put on by refugees from the English Language Learning Center and Family Literacy Center. The shows will act out African and American folklore throughout the day. Boise is seen as a safe haven for refugees. Kara Fink, communications specialist at the Idaho Office for Refugees, said that’s because Boise is a smaller city in a safe location, with a welcoming community. Relocating to a safe home as a refugee can be an incredibly complicated and long process, Fink said. The process takes into consideration the imminence of danger and persecution. But Fink said she’s excited for the event, which is held the Saturday nearest the internationally recognized World Refugee Day, observed June 20 each year. “It’s a fabulous opportunity for all Boiseans to get to know each other and get to know their new neighbors, and get to sort of appreciate the things that refugees have brought—the pieces of their culture that have increased the diversity here in Boise,” Fink said. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., FREE. Grove Plaza, Downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, idahorefugees.org.

tennis shoes—but don’t plan on being fashionably late. Dinner is served beginning at 8 p.m., and includes six different dishes prepared by New Americans now making Boise their home who represent their native cultures of Ethiopia, Nigeria, Liberia, the Ivory Coast and Congo. Entertainment will also represent varied cultures and include a fashion show, native New Guinea dance and a drum performance. A DJ will take over in the later

AMC’s hit Mad Men has upped the value of mid-century modern goods. Starburst clocks, sleek chairs and Eames sofas that were once coveted by design nerds now appeal to a wider swath of decorators. Now Meridian has its own JILLOPY MID-CENTURY mid-century furniture hub. JilloMODERN py Mid-Century Modern opened 650 E. Fairview Ave. less than three months ago at Meridian 650 E. Fairview Ave. in Meridian 208-884-4599 and specializes in “mid-century jillopy.com modern teak furniture and accessories to complement it.” “We bring a lot of the Danish-sculpted wood pieces made out of teak and rosewood,” explained Jillopy co-owner Steven Fraser. “We go to Europe to buy the pieces and pick them out and then we ship them over to Boise.” A decade ago, Fraser, his wife Jill and their kids moved into a mid-century ranch-style home. As they revamped the space room by room, they uncovered their inner designers. “We try to cater toward that more eclectic group of people that like their Scandinavian car or Swedish-looking car, and then we also look for the liberal arts-type people that like form and design and function,” said Fraser. “The usefulness of this furniture is by far the reason why people buy it—it looks good, its beautiful wood, it’s very organic.” The Frasers plan to host a number of events in the Jillopy parking lot. For more info and to view a product gallery, visit jillopy.com. —Tara Morgan

hours and inspire audience members to dance away the remainder of the evening to the sultry sounds of African music, soca, reggae, hip hop and R&B. The event is open to everyone 18 and older, and a full bar will be available with ID. Tickets are available by calling 208-695-6587. 8 p.m.-2 a.m., $10 adv., $15 door. The Mardi Gras Ballroom, 615 S. Ninth St., 208-342-5553.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT

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Festivals & Events PEDAL 4 THE PEOPLE—There’s plenty of bicycle-themed fun to be had at this interactive festival. Attend a scheduled event or add your own to the community calendar. Visit boisebicycleproject.org for a full list of events. SPLASH BASH POOL PARTY— Check out the weekly pool parties, featuring a poolside bar, special appetizers and live music from 7-10 p.m. This week: music by Jeff Crosby and the Refugees. All ages welcome. 5-10 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza.com.

Food & Drink EVERYTHING’S COMING UP ROSES—Want to learn more about one of the hippest and fastest-growing wine categories? In this course, you’ll discover roses from around the globe and discover how these wines are grown and produced. Only 20 seats available and pre-registration is required. Visit winewiseidaho.com to learn more. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $35. Wine Wise Labs, 104-1/2 E. 44th St., Garden City, 208-297-9463, winewiseidaho.com. SPRING TEA AND SILENT AUCTION—Join the Good Samaritan Home for its fifth-annual fundraiser. It will be an delightful afternoon of tea, snacks, live music, door prizes, a raffle and auction. For more information, log onto goodsamaritanleague. com. Call Julie at 208-343-6051 to reserve seating. 2 p.m. $25. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza.com.

Talks & Lectures GOLDEN EAGLE AUDUBON SOCIETY PRESENTATION— Sherrida Woodley, author of Quick Fall of Light—a novel with a passenger pigeon in a starring role—will give a talk concerning the passenger pigeon. She will share what she’s discovered about the bird of our past and how it affects our future. 7 p.m. FREE. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-3342225, fishandgame.idaho.gov.

Odds & Ends CELEBRATION PARK ARCHAEOLOGICAL DAY TRIP— Visit Idaho’s only archaeological park along the Snake River. Park staff will lead a walking tour of the petroglyphs, explain the prehistory of the area and teach you how to throw an Atlatl. Enjoy a picnic lunch and visit historic Guffy Bridge. Trails may be rocky and terrain uneven, so wear sturdy shoes and be prepared for an adventure. Depart from the Rec Center at 9 a.m., return by 3 p.m. Includes lunch. Sponsored by Karcher Estates. 3 p.m. $15. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

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WEEK IN REVIEW LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

WEDNESDAY JUNE 20

Poster Party 2012 put prints from 30 local artists into the hands of adoring local fans.

BOISE TURNS INTO ONE BIG COSTUME PARTY All of Boise was abuzz this week with costumed events across the Treasure Valley, from the Nampa Nickelback concert, to Ye Olde Renaissance Faire at Eagle Island State Park, to Evel Knievel-esque duds in Garden City. At the Idaho Center in Nampa June 14, camouflage threads were the clothing of choice, according to Boise Weekly New Media Czar Josh Gross. That evening marked the culmination of BW’s national attention, as the “Nickelback Kerfuffle,” the viral Internet sensation set off by Gross’ suggestions for better ways to spend $45, came to a close. Gross wrote: “It is important to wear camo to an event like this. Otherwise, people will see you at a Nickelback concert.” In Garden City, Boise Bicycle Project Director Jimmy Hallyburton was bedecked in red, white and blue rather than camo—one onlooker remarked that he looked like the great, great, great-grandson of the late Evel Knievel. Crooked Fence Brewing officials hosted an event to measure cyclists’ longest skidmarks, put down on their parking lot pavement by burning rubber tires. Top cyclists skid almost 100 feet. That event was part of the Pedal 4 the People festival, as was Poster Party 2012, which transformed the Oliver Russell building into a makeshift art gallery. Popular prints included local artist Craig Tanner’s vintage cycling images labeled with modern text, such as “Everyday I’m Hustlin’.” Things took on a sultry vibe June 16 at the Mickey Avalon show, which BW’s Copy Datatante Sheree Whiteley attended. Despite a lackluster showing from the raunchy girl duo Millionaires, Avalon delivered. According to Whiteley, “the quirky electro beats of ‘Mr. Right’ opened his set and provided the impetus for a bump-and-grind, fall-all-over-someone-else dance party that lasted near the stage for the duration of Avalon’s performance.” A different crowd hustled over to Neurolux that night to catch Chicago band Maps and Atlases. According to Gross, “Maps and Atlases dropped complex finger-tapping guitar lines over a combination of world percussion and speed metal blast beats. Dressed up in frontman Dave Davison’s almost cartoonish voice, it is an unexpectedly perfect blend that is far more than the sum of its parts.” Rounding out the week’s costumed theme were the annual Ye Old Renaissance Faire at Eagle Island State Park, and the annual Boise Pride parade. On June 16, BW intern Tabitha Power caught one of two days of the medieval carnival, with festival-goers swathed in period costumes. According to Bower: “Over at the stockades, warrants were served for those mischief makers, including pirate Jack Sparrow.” Colorful clothing took center stage back downtown, as the Boise Pride parade pulled LGBT celebrities into a thousandmember march. Many sported rainbow-colored body paint or clothing, while others pulled a giant rainbow flag that required dozens of hands to stay airborne. —Andrew Crisp WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT FAT WEDNESDAY 4 BEACH PARTY—Trikata, Sailor Jerry’s, Rockstar Energy Drink and Fatty’s bar have teamed up to bring you Fat Wednesday 4 Beach Party, complete with Firefly Sweet Tea Vodka and commemorative glasses, hula and limbo contests, grass skirts and more. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. FREE. Fatty’s, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-514-2531, drinkfattys.com.

THURSDAY JUNE 21 Festivals & Events

Odds & Ends RAW ARTISTS BOISE PRESENTS SOLSTICE— Featuring film, music, a fashion show, hair/makeup design, accessory design and all visual arts. Nohost bar will be available. For 18 and older; cocktail attire requested. Get your advance tickets at rawartists.org/boise/solstice. $10 adv., $15 door. Powerhouse Event Center, 621 S. 17th St., Boise, 208-433-0197, powerhouseevent.com.

FRIDAY JUNE 22

Evening snack, continental breakfast and indoor/ outdoor sleeping area provided. For children ages 6 and older and one adult per four children. 7 p.m. $40-$50. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-384-4125, zooboise.org.

Festivals & Events

PEDAL 4 THE PEOPLE—See Wednesday. boisebicycleproject.org.

CIVIL LIBERTIES SYMPOSIUM—See Thursday. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. $35-$70. Boise State Student Union, Simplot Grand Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu.

SUMMER SOLSTICE BLUES AND CRAB FEST—Grand opening weekend for the Oasis Event Center. Owner Capt. Harry Lewis (formerly on Deadliest Catch) will host a crab dinner, with music by an array of bands. See Picks, Page 19. $20-$40. Oasis Event Center, West Kodiak Drive, between Boise and Mountain Home, Oasis, 208-514-1474, oasiseventcenter.com.

FAMILY SNOOZE AT THE ZOO OVERNIGHT—Zoo guides will provide your family with evening and early morning treks through the zoo to investigate animals, as well as their habitats, behavior and care.

CIVIL LIBERTIES SYMPOSIUM—The theme of the seventh-annual Civil Liberties Symposium is Through the Eyes of Children: Prejudice, Education, and Community. This year’s symposium will explore the effects of curtailed civil liberties on children, their families and communities, and their education. Co-sponsored by Minidoka National Historic Site, the Friends of Minidoka, the College of Southern Idaho and Boise State. See story at boiseweekly.com. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. $35-$70. Boise State Student Union, Simplot Grand Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. AN EVENING IN THE GARDEN—Listen to music by Dan Costello and sample wines from Wood River Cellars while shopping and touring the new nursery and gardens. 5-8 p.m. Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road, Boise, 208995-2815, madelinegeorge.com. PEDAL 4 THE PEOPLE—See Wednesday. boisebicycleproject.org.

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: MIKE PACE—Catch the comedic stylings of this funny man. Visit mikepace. com for more info. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. FIDDLER ON THE ROOF—The Starlight Mountain Theatre presents its rendition of this classic tale. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Rd., Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com. LIQUID LAUGHS: MARC YAFEE—This installment of Liquid Laughs also features Adam Stone. Purchase tickets at liquidlaughs.com, by calling 208941-2459 or at Liquid or Solid. 8 p.m. $8. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Food & Drink DELI DAYS—Enjoy traditional Jewish deli selections and homemade desserts, beer, wine, music, dancing and tours of the historic synagogue. See Picks, Page 18. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel, 11 N. Latah St., Boise, 208-343-6601, ahavathbethisrael. org.

Art WOMEN’S CREATIVE FLOW—Craft batik prayer flags and mosaic designs every Thursday. 6-7:30 p.m. $12-$20. 1804 Vermont Ave., Boise, 208-9193635.

Talks & Lectures IDAHO SMALL BUSINESS DAY SEMINAR—Featuring guest presenter Martin Johncox of Alexander and Associates Pubic Relations and Marketing and Kim Sherman-Labrum from Idaho Small Business Development Centers. 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. FREE. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-333-8000.

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | 21

8 DAYS OUT On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: MIKE PACE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-9060658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

Food & Drink DELI DAYS—See Thursday. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel, 11 N. Latah St., Boise, 208-343-6601, ahavathbethisrael.org. THE GARDEN PLATE—Idaho Botanical Garden is affiliated with the national Let’s Move! initiative that is mobilizing cities around the country to reduce childhood obesity, make healthy food more accessible and increase physical activity. The Garden Plate demonstration will provide inspiration for using healthy, seasonal vegetables as part of a daily diet. 7 p.m. FREE for IBG members, $5 nonmembers. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Talks & Lectures DRINKING WITH DEAD WOMEN WRITERS—Through historical fiction and liberal libations, authors Elaine Ambrose and Amanda Turner meet and greet 16 famous dead women writers and discover many fascinating facts. It’s a provocative peek into the private lives of some of the world’s most-famous authors. Book signing and cocktails to follow at Iconoclast. 5 p.m. FREE. The Community Library, 415 Spruce Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-3493, thecommunitylibrary.org.

Kids & Teens FRIDAY NIGHT POOL PARTY— Youth ages 12-18 can swim, hang out with friends and listen to music from Wild 101.1 FM DJs. Sponsored by Boise Parks and Recreation, visit cityofboise.org/parks for more info. 9-10:30 p.m. Ivywild Pool, 2250 Leadville, Boise, 208384-1697.

On Stage

CRUIZIN IN PARADISE CAR SHOW—Unity Cruizers presents this fundraiser for the Suicide Prevention Action Network of Idaho. Featuring food, bounce houses, contests for kids and adults, a raffle and lots more for the whole family. Noon. FREE. Whittenberger Park, corner of Chicago Street and Centennial Drive, Caldwell.

COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: MIKE PACE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-9060658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

Food & Drink

NOCHES FLAMENCO SATURDAYS—Music and dance performance by Luis de La Tota (Jerez, Spain), Estefania “La Ichi,” Juan Sefardi and La Escuela de Ritmo. Also, exhibit on flamenco and culture of southern Spain, tapas Andaluz and refreshments, demo dance/rhythm class and more. For more info, email nwfcollective@gmail.com. $5-$10 donations, kids FREE. Escuela de Ritmo Dance Studio, 4507 Alamosa St., Boise.

WINE AND CHEESE PAIRING— Featuring different cheeses from the Boise Co-op paired with a selection from the Winemaker Series. Noon-5 p.m. $10. Ste. Chapelle Winery, 19348 Lowell Road, Caldwell, 208-453-7843, stechapelle.com.

Green IDAHO GREEN EXPO—Celebrate sustainable living in the Treasure Valley with a variety of demos and workshops on sustainable topics. Check out idahogreenexpo.org for a complete listing of activities. See Picks, Page 18. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. $5, FREE for kids 12 and younger. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, expoidaho.com.

PEDAL 4 THE PEOPLE—See Wednesday. boisebicycleproject.org. SPORTS CARD SHOW—Enjoy the Treasure Valley’s original and largest sports card show. Thirty tables will display cards and memorabilia, along with a selection of vintage items. Buy, sell or trade. For the entire family. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. The Boise Hotel and Conference Center, 3300 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208343-4900.

Citizen

WORLD REFUGEE DAY—Come together with new Idahoans to celebrate their international cultures and contributions to our society. The event is put on by the Idaho Office for Refugees and local resettlement agencies, with support from the Capital City Public Market and the Boise Department of Arts and History. See Picks, Page 19. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza, Downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, Boise.

HORSE POWER AND PONIES MOTORCYCLE POKER FUN RUN—Cruise to five different locations on a 78-mile loop, stopping and drawing a card at each. Riders with the best hands win prizes. All-day family events, featuring Nashville recording artist Andy Griggs and Tim Mcdonald with Bad Habit Band, a raffle, silent auction, food, ponies face painting and jumper house. Proceeds benefit Personal Ponies. 9 a.m. $20. High Desert Harley-Davidson, 2310 Cinema Drive, 208-338-5599, highdeserthd.com.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

ONE-DAY BATIK—Children in fourth-ninth grades may participate in this batik class. Cost includes all tools and materials. Bring a lunch. Call 208-9193635 or email fitsofcreativity@ yahoo.com to register. 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. $30-$45. 1804 Vermont Ave., Boise, 208-9193635.

SATURDAY JUNE 23 Festivals & Events AFRICAN SUMMER NIGHT BALL—Featuring a variety of African foods as well as music and performances. See Picks, Page 19. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Mardi Gras Ballroom, 615 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-3425553. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

22 | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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8 DAYS OUT Kids & Teens

on Facebook. 9 p.m. $8. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

KALEIDOSCOPE CHILDREN’S ART FEST—The McCall Arts and Humanities Council hosts the 14th celebration of Kaleidoscope, the annual FREE children’s arts festival. Featuring woodworking, clay molding, painting, tie-dye, Japanese gyotoku printing, paper flower making, dress-up, beaded jewelry and flowerpot decoration. Live music, a tactile tunnel, cardboard castle and paper airplane booth will also be available. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Central Idaho Historical Museum, 1001 State St., McCall, 208-634-4497.

IDAHO FAMILIES FOR CLEAN WATER FIELD TRIP—Meet in the MK Nature Center parking lot for a field trip to the CuMo mining exploration site in the upper Grimes Creek drainage. 8 a.m. FREE. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-3342225, fishandgame.idaho.gov.

SUNDAY JUNE 24

YOUTH WRITING WORKSHOPS—These workshops for kids ages 9-12 will focus on sharpening skills in observing and writing about nature, using the garden grounds as inspiration. Limited to 12 participants. 10 a.m.-noon. $15-$20. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3438649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Workshops & Classes TRANSFORM YOUR CRAZY SUGAR LOVE AFFAIR—Join certified health and nutrition coach Tamara Cameron for an interactive workshop about our relationship with sugar. Learn practical, easy-to-implement tools to transform your lurid affair with sugar into a loving relationship. Register at healthharvest.com/sugar or call 415-602-4174. 10 a.m.-noon. $29. Boise WaterCooler, 1401 W. Idaho St., Boise.

Odds & Ends HOT SUMMER SALSA—Kick off the evening with beginner lessons in merengue, bachata and salsa, followed at 10 p.m. by performances and social dancing with DJ Giovanni. For ages 18 and older; full bar with ID. FREE tickets available while they last online at salsaidaho.com or Salsa Idaho

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Green GARDEN TOUR—Spend the day with a garden tour visiting nine inspiring private gardens in Boise. This special tour is a fund-raiser for Idaho Botanical Garden. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $20. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. IDAHO GREEN EXPO—See Saturday. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $5, FREE for kids 12 and younger. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, expoidaho.com. RIVER GREENBELT LITTER PATROL AND BIRD WATCHING— Enjoy a walk downriver from the new bridge at Bown Crossing while birding and picking up litter. Bring gloves, water and binoculars. Meet in the Greenbelt parking lot behind the Tavern at Bown Crossing. 9 a.m. FREE.

MONDAY JUNE 25 On Stage PRETTY THINGS PEEPSHOW— A bevy of beauties breathe life into the amazing acts of yesteryear. You’ll see sword swallowing, human blockhead, juggling, burlesque, the Chinese execution blade box, whip cracking and more. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

Kids & Teens

9:30AM - 1:30PM

8th Street from Bannock to Main Street & on the Grove Plaza Chef Abbigail Carlson - Cooking with fresh, seasonal produce from the Market - Saturdays Q 10am to Noon

JOIN US FOR THE WORLD REFUGEE CELEBRATION ON THE GROVE PLAZA

EVERY SATURDAY AT THE MARKET

* Fresh locally grown produce, herbs, & flowers * Idaho Specialty Foods & Wines * Great Selection of Local Artwork

A Free Service of the Market!

IMPROVISATIONAL ACTING INTENSIVE—Children ages 8-15 can gain valuable theatrical training in a supportive, non-competitive atmosphere. Register at the website or by phone. Class runs through Saturday, June 30. 9 a.m.-noon. and 1-4 p.m. $265. The Open Space, 12 N. Fisher Park Way in Eagle Island Crossing, Eagle, 208-938-6128, theopenspacevenue.com.

TUESDAY JUNE 26 On Stage FIDDLER ON THE ROOF—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com.

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Literature CRAIG JOHNSON READING— The New York Times bestselling author will read from his newest novel As the Crow Flies. 7 p.m. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3764229, rdbooks.org.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | 23

8 DAYS OUT Kids & Teens TUESDAY YOUTH GLASS ART MORNINGS—Kids ages 8-15 make a fused glass project with a studio artist. 9:30-11 a.m. $35. Fusions Glass Studio, 347 S. Edgewood Lane, Ste. 120, Eagle, 208-938-1055, fusionsidaho.com.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 27 Festivals & Events SPLASH BASH POOL PARTY— See Wednesday, June 20. 5-10 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-3434611, owyheeplaza.com.

Workshops & Classes HOW TO GET YOUR PIECE OF THE PIE—Howard Olivier, former owner of the Flying Pie Pizzeria, will share his business secrets. To register, call Shannon Gentry at 208-336-6722, ext. 221, or email sgentry@mtnstatesgroup. org. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $20. US Bank Building, 101 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-345-8519, unicoprop.com.

Talks & Lectures GARDENING WITH NATIVE PLANTS—Elisa Clark of Flutterby Gardens and North End Organic Nursery will use the center’s native plant garden as a walkaround classroom to help you envision your own yard blooming with native plants. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-514-3755, boiseenvironmentaleducation.org.

Animals & Pets SNIP BENEFIT DOG WASH— Doggie Day Spaw in Meridian is hosting a dog wash with 100 percent of the proceeds going to Spay Neuter Idaho Pets. Noon-9 p.m. $10. Doggie Day Spaw, 1760 W. Cherry Lane, Ste 100, Meridian, 208-888-5489, doggiedayspaw.net.

Call to artists BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART SUBMISSIONS—Each week’s cover of Boise Weekly is a piece of work from a local artist. BW pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded. For info contact Leila Rader at leila@boiseweekly.com or 208-344-2055.

24 | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | BOISEweekly

ARTS/BOOK REVIEW FAVORITE MONSTER Editors at publishing houses typically advise authors to put their best short story first in a collection. As in so many things, if the author can’t grab the reader right out the gate, his or her attention can easily be lost. It’s a piece of advice clearly taken to heart by author Sharma Shields for her book Favorite Monster. Its opening is so strong, so predictive of what is to come, that if you’re not hooked then, you never will be. “We were all surprised when Brian hired the Cyclops. His references only spoke Greek. His sole experience was shepherding. It was uncertain if he could commit to two years.” And from there, the literary ride just gets stranger. The bulk of the collection is short pieces of magical realism that cover everything from dating the office Cyclops to the perils of having Medusa as a childhood friend to the pitfalls of having dentures whose personal chemistry with your girlfriend outshines your own. Those stories are short and sharp, each of them picking an absurd and monstrous concept and taking it for granted to build a story around. Shields depicts a flirtatious relationship between a woman and a man she knows to be a serial killer, and explores a world in which Tylenol causes hallucinations of a perky blonde cheerleader. The prose is snappy, the characters intriguing and the concepts so charmingly bizarre that it is hard not to get sucked in. Brains and Beauty, the sixth story in the collection, is especially good in its recounting of a young Medusa. The story’s narrator spends her life secretly glad that Medusa turned her brother to stone as a child because he was such a bully. Medusa, on the other hand, descends into depression and mental illness over the incident. The stone brother is kept in the family living room like a statue and sometimes in the yard like a bird feeder. His sister dresses him up when she is bored. It is strange and sad and funny all at once. But the collection has a few non-monster stories tossed in as well. “Antropolist” recounts two sisters competing with one another as they start a business selling ant farms. “Sunshine and the Predator” is a disturbing coming-of-age tale that plays out between high-school girls during a summer job at a rundown amusement park. But the most compelling of the bunch is “Pulchrutudinous,” the story of a teen grocery clerk and her complicated friendship with an older co-worker who she alternately defends and wrongs in the worst possible way. Favorite Monsters is not perfect. A few short pieces feel like forgettable filler but its best moments manage to surpass the brilliant opening sentences by maintaining the same absurdity and wit, delivering them inside stories of unexpected substance. —Josh Gross WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NOISE/NEWS RYAN PFLEGER

NOISE AU S TIN NELS ON

WILCOMMUNITY After 18 years, Wilco has amassed a loyal following

A Seasonal Disguise is one of six bands heading to the Mile High City to rep Boise.

ANDREW CRISP Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy was staying at Dublin, Ireland’s Morrison Hotel, off Lower Ormond Quay, next to the River Liffey. It was sunny and beautiful there, he said after Boise Weekly rang the frontman ... by accident. The band’s public relations rep had scheduled the interview with bassist John Stirratt but Tweedy’s voice came on the line instead. “I can go get John for you, if you want,” he joked. From Tweedy’s humble demeanor, it would be hard to guess he was a driving force behind a band credited with creating the altWilco helped create the alt-country genre and now commands a sort of cult following among fans. country genre, a band now booked for more than 100 shows a year. A comparison of his With this tour Wilco calls on its fans to take vocals to the late John Lennon elicited a laugh. folk elements, strings and tinkling xylophone part in politics. The get-out-the-vote promoto keep things fresh. “That’s very sweet,” he said. tion follows the band to Boise Tuesday, June “That’s kind of the goal, to be able to emTweedy helped start the influential Chicago26, where volunteers and travelers of “The brace more, as opposed to less,” said Tweedy. area group Uncle Tupelo in 1987. The band Great American Road Trip” will staff a voter Wilco’s style has continued to evolve over focused its sound on love and loss in the blueregistration drive at Idaho Botanical Garden. collar Midwest rather than the country genre’s the years, including its 2011 release, The “As citizens, I think that that’s an opportutraditional cowboy motifs. Tweedy was key to Whole Love. Electronics make a debut in the nity that we have to participate that’s unique band’s historically analog sound. that three-piece, penning songs alongside coto us,” said Tweedy. “Over the course of many records, I think songwriter Jay Farrar. Of Wilco’s founding members, only Tweedy maybe we’ve tried to broaden our approach “Uncle Tupelo definitely had a certain amount of folk and country influence that was and not narrow it down to one thing, and kind and Stirratt, both in their early 40s, remain. Though the band has morphed considervery prominent,” said Tweedy. “We didn’t feel of accumulated different stylistic trappings ably over the years, newer members Nels here and there,” said Tweedy. “Some technollike it was uncommon for folk and country to Cline, Glenn Kotche, Pat Sansone and Mikael ogy has seeped in there that somehow fits.” be a part of rock ’n’ roll; it’s no less prevalent Jorgensen are not averse to playing the classics But as with any long-running band, many in bands like The Beatles.” alongside newer tracks. fans reminisce about their favorite Wilco alAfter relations between Tweedy and Far“A Ghost is Born is the last record that bums. Boise fan Stephanie Coyle is most fond rar soured, the remnants of the band formed there was a lineup change. The current lineup of Yankee Hotel Foxtrot. Wilco and critics have called Wilco’s carrying got together and we made Sky Blue Sky,” “That is the one that scored my love for of the Uncle Tupelo cross an extension of the Tweedy said. “Now, we’ve been together for Wilco,” she said, adding that A.M. and Sumcountry genre. Lap steel guitars and Tweedy’s three albums and a live record.” merteeth are close favorites. barroom crooning on the group’s inauguBut despite the band’s success, Tweedy “I like all the changes that they’ve made. ral 1995 release, A.M., resulted in constant doesn’t embody the typical rock star persona. comparisons to Gram Parsons, Neil Young and Jeff Tweedy just really connects with the audiHe said he gets anxious in public. the like. But Tweedy doesn’t think the band fits ence on a really great level,” she said. “But I do OK with one-on-one,” he added. Coyle runs Go Listen Boise and is a selfcomfortably into that category. Tweedy said he hasn’t had a drink for “like confessed Wilco geek. In 2009, she filled a “I would never categorize ourselves as 20-something years,” but his migraines and chartered bus full of Wilco fans to catch the specifically country,” he said. fear led him to other vices. band’s show at Woodriver Cellars in Eagle. Now, 18 years after its inception, the Mid“I did have a fairly well documented bout The 55-seat bus filled quickly—$20 netted fans western troupe has put out a slew of albums, a seat and a keg cup; it with painkillers,” he said. “But I definitely do including a record something different now when I get offstage. was a veritable Wilco with unreleased tracks I’ve always been a bit socially anxious, so parbooze cruise. from the legendary Wilco with Blitzen Trapper. Tuesday, June 26, tying hasn’t been a big part of the repertoire. Tweedy said that Woody Guthrie, which 5 p.m. gates, 6:30 p.m. show, $44. Onstage, for some reason, I’ve always felt a while Wilco’s fans may certainly didn’t stop the IDAHO BOTANICAL GARDEN little bit more comfortable than offstage.” be passionate—wilcocountry comparisons. 2355 Old Penitentiary Road Tweedy said he ignores the distraction of 208-343-8649 base.com is a gathering “Yankee Hotel idahobotanicalgarden.org flashing stage lights and cheering fans and place for the band’s Foxtrot actually comes focuses on the music. large community of up as ‘country’ under “Music is a great centering mechanism,” super fans—he doesn’t iTunes,” said Tweedy. he said. “If you get too far behind yourself, let all the fervor go to his head. “We got a pretty good laugh out of that.” if you’re thinking too much about what hap“It’s really nice and sweet and flattering Yankee Hotel Foxtrot (2002) is often pened, or too much about what’s about to but it’s not for us. I don’t try to get too much regarded as Wilco’s breakout moment, a time happen, you lose where you are. That’s a really in that mindset. I definitely think it’s more for when the band chipped away at the country them. It’s a place to share their experiences and bad thing to do when you’re playing music, is label. It marked a change from the band’s to lose where you are.” their passion for something.” previous three releases and incorporated new WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

TAPS FLOW AT CRUX, DENVER TAPS BOISE BANDS FOR FEST Downtown coffeeshop The Crux temporarily lost its permit to ser ve beer and wine earlier this year. It was a blow to the local music community, which had found The Crux to be an excellent venue for bands and fans of all ages to co-mingle, both on and off the stage. But the shop’s issues with Idaho’s Alcohol Beverage Control have been worked out and the taps are now flowing alongside the French press, meaning parents of young music fans can now sip a much-needed beer to survive the noise their kids call music when they show up to a gig. The shop also finished construction on its interior, more than doubling its seating area with a second wing. But The Crux isn’t the only local player in the music community with big news. Boise is sending six bands to Denver’s big shindig the Underground Music Fest, which goes down Thursday, July 19-Sunday, July 22. A Seasonal Disguise, The Dirty Moogs, Finn Riggins, Junior Rocket Scientist, Owlright and Shades will represent the City of Trees in the city of giant animal statues. Passes to the multi-day, multi-venue festival range from $30-$120. Speaking of The Dirty Moogs, the local Kraftwerk-esque electro-noodling band announced it will release its new EP on Sunless Sea Records, the local label started by Flying M Coffeegarage booker Nathan Walker. Expect that EP to drop sometime this summer. Another thing that will be dropping this summer is the first volume of Orchid, the comic book penned by Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello. The story revolves around a prostitute-turned-warrior who battles a mutant warlord in a postapocalyptic world. “It’s a passion project of mine, and it provides an intellectual outlet as well. For me, it’s about exploring a completely different art form,” Morello told blog io9. Expect it to hit stands in July. No word yet on when the soundtrack Morello is composing to accompany the comic will be available. And finally, world-class asshat Chris Brown switched things up a bit and allegedly fought a dude—rapper Drake. Then he tweeted about it. Surprise surprise, the police are now investigating the incident. Perhaps the Miranda warning should be updated to include the phrase: “FYI, you also have the right not to incriminate yourself via Twitter.” —Josh Gross

BOISEweekly | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | 25

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE SOUL SERENE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

ROBERT JAMES—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

STEADY RUSH—8 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s

TOMMY EMMANUEL—8 p.m. $30-$45. Egyptian Theatre

ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Featuring Polecat with The Fav. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

YAWPERS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

THE BOURBON DOGS—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

SUMMER BEACH BLAST—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s

WEDNESDAY JUNE 20

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MICKY AND THE MOTORCARS, JUNE 22, KFCH Depending on who you ask, Micky and the Motorcars is either a Stanley- or Austin, Texas-based alternative country band. Although the band originated in Idaho, its first album, Which Way From Here, wasn’t released until after the group relocated to Austin. But technicalities aside, Idaho has claimed the band as its own, and Micky and the Motorcars returns that love with lots of live concerts and the annual Braun Brothers Reunion, which takes place this year Thursday, Aug. 9-Saturday, Aug. 11 in Challis. After the recent death of former MMC bassist, Mark McCoy, the band’s April 27 Boise show was rescheduled for Friday, June 22. Tickets from the previous show will be honored. The group’s latest album, Raise My Glass, channels a Springsteen-esque vibe and drips with unapologetic melancholy on tracks like “Raise My Glass” and “A Thousand Tears.” —Amy Merrill With Jimmy Bivens. 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show, $21-$40. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

26 | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | BOISEweekly

GIZZARD STONE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JAMES MCMURTY—With Jonny Burke. 8 p.m. $15. Neurolux

THURSDAY JUNE 21

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

BLAZE AND KELLY—7 p.m. FREE. Buster’s

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

BROCK BARTEL—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

KATIE MORELL—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La

DAVID DONDERO—With Brother Dan. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

PAMELA DEMARCHE—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE— Featuring Steve Eaton and Phil Garonzik. 6:30 p.m. $7 IBG members, $10 nonmembers. Idaho Botanical Garden

SINIZEN AND MAKESHIFT INNOCENCE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid SORROWER—With Six Brew Bantha, Roskopp, Sourpatch, Hod and Deaf Kid. 6 p.m. $7. Venue

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LIKE A ROCKET—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

FRIDAY JUNE 22

MICKY AND THE MOTORCARS—See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $21-$40. Knitting Factory PICKWICK—See Listen Here, Page 27. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux THE RINGTONES—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s

A TASTY JAMM—7:30 p.m. FREE. Angell’s

ROSE’S PAWN SHOP—9 p.m. $5. Reef

AMY WEBER QUARTET—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid

BISON BISON—With Childchildren and Stargaze Unlimited. 8 p.m. $3. Red Room

THE SHAUN BRAZELL QUARTET—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BOSS HAWG AND THE SHORT BUS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye BRANDON PRITCHETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

WATER TOWER—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s WITCH MOUNTAIN—With Lord Dying and Cerebus Rex. 9 p.m. $8. Shredder

CHUCK SMITH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE DEVIL WHALE—8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid INNOCENT MAN AND NEW TRANSIT—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid JOSHUA FOULK—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

SATURDAY JUNE 23 AMY WEBER QUARTET—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper THE BIG WOW—9 p.m. FREE. Montego Bay DC3—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid HDS AND THE BLACK KENNY ROGERS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid THE HOOT HOOTS—With Deaf Kid and Scatter Gather. 9 p.m. $TBD. Red Room MOOSH AND TWIST—With Aer, Capitan and Nerk. 6 p.m. $12$14. Venue ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s

ICARUS THE OWL—With An Airbag Saved My Life. 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement JOHNNY SHOES—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid MUSIC FROM STANLEY—Featuring Steve Baker with Jon Engelund and Louis McFarland. 4 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge PAT RICE—1:30 p.m. FREE. Solid VIOLET LIGHT—With The Blue Cinema. 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club STEADY RUSH—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub TAUGE AND FAULKNER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s TED HOGANDER—7:30 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s WATER TOWER—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s WORKING DJS—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

MONDAY JUNE 25 CASE IN THEORY—With Unithas and Third to Last. 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

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BARBARA LAING—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers PIRANHA AND FRIENDS—With The Jerkwads and Nude Oil. 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s RADIO BOISE TUESDAYS— Featuring the Roy Kay Trio, the Country Club, Bridgeport and DJ Sadie Mayham. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux SOUL SERENE—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers WILCO—6:30 p.m. $44. Idaho Botanical Garden

FROM INDIAN LAKES—With The Rocketboys, The Nightlife of Trees and Sheep Among Wolves. 6 p.m. $8. Venue PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid SHAUN BRAZELL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SUNDAY JUNE 24

TUESDAY JUNE 26

SHAUN BRAZELL AND SAM STROTHER—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers TRAVIS WARD—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

Dedicated Servers. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers HAMMERFIST—With Skare Tactic, Brawl, Days of Struggle, Bad Influence, Compromised, Hordes and Urban Struggles. 6 p.m. $8. Venue JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s REBECCA SCOTT—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub REILY COYOTE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid SCHOOL KNIGHTS—7 p.m. $3. Neurolux SHANA FALALNA—8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage

WEDNESDAY JUNE 27 ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Featuring Andy Frasco and the U.N. with

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SUMMER BEACH BLAST—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s WILLISON ROOS—7 p.m. FREE. Montego Bay

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

PICKWICK, JUNE 22, NEUROLUX After bucking the tired Americana/folk style, Seattle quintet Pickwick ditched its acoustic guitars, pushed the powerful pipes of singer Galen Disston to the front and filled out the rest of its sound with funky, soulful rhythm. Since morphing into a modern soul band, the gang has recorded a split EP with Seattle dance-pop band Concours d’Elegance and crafted three 45s, dubbed Myths, volumes 1-3. Many of those tracks strike a more somber chord, incorporating piano riffs that emulate the smoldering sound of Tom Waits over the group’s funkier pursuits. Disston’s huge vocals send out golden tones in waves, while the rest of the band bangs tambourines, pounds on keys and thumbs bluesy bass lines. The single “Hacienda Motel” smacks of a bygone era, fleshed out by modern subject matter. In December, the band began recording a full-length album with Richard Swift of the Shins at his studio in Oregon. On June 22, Pickwick will perform at Neurolux. —Andrew Crisp 8 p.m., $8-$10. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | 27

V i s i t b o i s e w e e k l y. c o m a n d c l i c k on Scr een for movie times.

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

WES ANDERSON’S MAGIC KINGDOM Moonrise Kingdom is a box of cinematic sweetness GEORGE PRENTICE

Wednesday, June 20, 8:45pm

Gizzard Stone

Friday, June 22, 8:45pm

The Ringtones

Saturday, June 23, 8:45pm

Tauge & Faulkner

Sunday, June 24, 8:00pm

TBA

Tuesdays, 6-8pm

Old Time Jam Session

with The Hokum Hi-Flyers 9:00pm - Booze Clues Trivia plus Prizes with EJ Pettinger Mondays, 8:00pm Open Mic with

Rebecca Scott & Rob Hill Thursdays, 8:45pm

The Frim Fram 4

Open 7 days a week at 3 pm No Cover & Smoke Free

Moonrise Kingdom, Wes Anderson’s Whitman Sampler of a paradise found, is 2012’s first bona fide Oscar contender as we apKara Hayward and Jared Gilman star in Wes Anderson’s new coming-of-age film, Moonrise Kingdom. proach the halfway mark in a pretty average year for films. troop to the parade and you have a search ooze with attraction, we are assured that From its opening moment, Anderson party that scurries more than scours. nothing naughty is going on. In fact, Anderframes his scenes in oh-so-precise crinkly “Jiminy Cricket, he flew the coop,” son coaxes his characters to walk a delicate wrappers, not unlike Mr. Whitman’s box deadpans Norton as the Scout leader tightrope between sweetness and rapture, of delights—an oozy chocolate cream of a Ward. He and Willis are wonderful as the never falling into the canyon of cynicism memory here, a chewy nougat of complexstory’s uniformed oddballs who are anywhere so many other movies lie. ity there. Themes of innocence, bravery thing but uniform. A Wes Anderson film is nothing if not a and stick-to-itiveness are considered, and, Anderson’s craftsmanship behind the lens collection of unforgettable characters, and of course, tucked underneath, just like is a singular achievement. But his script, cothey are in abundance here. While the enthe sampler, is another layer of heart-felt semble is star-packed, young Jared Gilman as written by Roman Coppola (co-writer of The morality. Flawed as his characters may be, Sam and Kara Hayward as Suzy tower above Darjeeling Limited), is delightfully snappy. Anderson always gives them just enough “Frances, where the hell are you?” shouts wiggle room to do the right thing before the the rest, even if they require a treehouse. McDormand, who for some loony reason When, in pursuit credits roll. likes to employ a megaphone while talking. of adventure and Anderson, a grace“I’m up here,” says Murray, his head popcompanionship, they ful filmmaker who MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG-13) ping out of an upstairs window. go missing, a pursuit introduced us to the Directed by Wes Anderson “Does it concern you that your posse mobilizes, inbizarrely lovable Starring Jared Gilman, Kara Hayward, daughter has run away from home?” cluding a small-town Royal Tenenbaums Bill Murray, Edward Norton blasts McDormand. sheriff (Bruce Willis), and the off-kilter Opens Friday at The Flicks (Pause.) Sam’s Scout master academy of Rush“That’s a loaded question,” he replies. (Edward Norton), more, has hit perfect Anderson’s characters live in that wonderSuzy’s parents (Bill stride with Moonrise ful place between reality and Disneyland, Murray and Frances McDormand) and a Kingdom, the fictional name for a cove that where expert storytelling finds the magic tightly wound Tilda Swinton, who identifies is the backdrop to the quite-real infatuation in our earthbound lives. I can’t remember herself only as Social Services (to complicate of a twosome of 12-year-olds. matters, Sam is an orphan). Add Sam’s Scout whimsy feeling this good. While the two puberty-bound pen pals

SCREEN/DVD BOISE’S FAVORITE DVD RENTALS THIS WEEK

1. SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS First week in release.

28 | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | BOISEweekly

2. SAFE HOUSE Dropped from No. 1 on June 13.

—Source: Video Memories, 4504 Overland Road, Boise, 208-385-0113

3. JOHN CARTER Dropped from No. 2 on June 13.

4. JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND Up from No. 5 on June 13.

5. GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGENCE First week in release.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | 29

NEWS/REC PATR IC K S W EENEY

REC

FROGGER Hunting for amphibians BY RANDY KING

FIRE AND WATER The day this issue of Boise Weekly hits stands lands on the official first day of summer—a season in Idaho that inevitably leads to smoke, as in wildfires. Wildfires in the West are a fact of life, but that doesn’t mean we can’t do everything we can to make sure that Mother Nature is the only firestarter out there. By this point, we should all know things like making sure your campfire is really out, not tossing cigarette butts out the window and not driving over dry grass, but now officials from the Bureau of Land Management are asking people to avoid using exploding targets. The targets—used for rifle target practice—explode when they are hit by a high-powered bullet and scatter incendiary bits for several feet. If these pieces land in dry vegetation, they can quickly start a fire. In fact, officials believe that four fires have been started by exploding targets already this year. The use of exploding targets—as well as tracer rounds and fireworks—is illegal between May 10 and Oct. 10 each year. If you’re caught using them, it could cost you up to $100,000 in fines, plus the cost of fighting any fire that starts. One place a fire is far less likely to start is on the water, and luckily for Treasure Valley residents, playing on the water is about to get a lot easier. Boise’s River Recreation Park will officially open to the public Thursday, June 28, with a community celebration to mark the much anticipated occasion. In-river work on the first phase of the park was completed in February, but high cold water and continuing work along the banks kept it from being officially open to the public—although that hasn’t stopped many kayakers from poaching the manmade wave. The artificial wavemaker will be maintained by trained techs who will be able to adjust it to compensate for river flows and the needs of users. The next phase of the river park is already in the planning stage, but supporters are still working to raise money for the project, as well as to finalize legal agreements with downstream water users. Work on the neighboring Esther Simplot Park is expected to begin this fall, and amenities will include bathrooms and changing areas for those using the River Recreation Park. The opening celebration will be held from 5-7 p.m. at the park overlook (near 3400 W. Pleasanton Ave.), with remarks beginning at 6 p.m., followed by the ribbon cutting. Neighboring Idaho River Sports will host refreshments following the opening. —Deanna Darr

30 | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Blame it on Duck Dynasty if you want, or maybe on the cacophonous croaking of frogs along the canal I live by, but I have developed an itch for bullfrog gigging. Gigging frogs is a time-honored tradition for gathering the grub—just not in Idaho. Warmer climates and abundant swampy areas tend to breed frog populations, and the high desert state of Idaho is not known for its swampy conditions. As such, the state does not have much of a frog-hunting tradition, but I wanted to change that dynamic for my family. Mostly because I love to eat me some frog legs. Frog gigging is considered a summertime pleasure to many of my Southernborn friends. It is a right of passage to muck through the swamp after amphibians. Proper gigging, however, requires special equipment. Most notable is the gig spear tip. Think: the tip of Neptune’s trident but frog-sized. None of the local sporting goods stores I called carry any frog-gigging equipment, but, undeterred, I found a four-tined spear tip for $3 online and ordered two. After they arrived in the mail a few days later, I headed to the lawn and garden department of Walmart to buy a bamboo stick. I attached the spear tip and was on my way to find a gigging spot. First, I had to find out where the city would allow me to do it. My initial attempt at securing a place to gig frogs was a failure. No one was quite sure what to make of a guy calling the City of Boise to ask if I could gig frogs in city limits. My inquiry was met with an awkward silence on the end of the phone line. Fishing is allowed in city limits at the river and various ponds strewn throughout Boise, but the idea of a guy with a gig spear wandering around Ann Morrison Park seemed to have a few people on edge. So I abandoned Boise altogether and called the City of Nampa. No awkward silences there. I got a quick and easy “go for it” over the phone. As long as I did not throw the spear and was not in a city park after dark, Nampa said that I could gig to my heart’s content. With my DIY equipment and the legal permission granted, four of us—Grandpa, two of my boys and I—made the “past my bed time” trek to a local pond. Frog gigging is a nighttime affair. A hunter first listens for the telltale croak of a bull frog. The croak is a low guttural sound somewhat reminiscent of a bull cow, thus their name. We could hear the croaking of frogs from hundreds of yards away. I stepped into the pond and my boots sank about a foot into

it to break the trance and duck away. As long as the light is shining on the frog it will stay in one place, giving the hunter and his spear a serious advantage in the stalk-and-dart routine. A quick spear thrust into the frog and then a quick scooping motion bringing the tip of the gig toward the sky should seal the deal. If all goes well, the hunter has just bagged part of a nice meal. At one point on our excursion, we could see 27 sets of eyes gleaming back at us, entranced. Game time. The bull frogs darted, dived, croaked and in general made the evening a complete success. We missed more shots than we landed. But the number of frogs alone gave us ample picking. Sixteen frogs later (four for each of us), we walked back to the trucks. Our heaviest frog to date is just less than 2 pounds; he was a total toad. We took them back to the house and further processed them into the classic of French cuisine—the gourmet frog leg. The legs of these little beasties have a curious culinary history with connections to monks, Catholics and the odd classification as fish rather than meat. With a number meatless days per year dictated by the church, dutiful Catholics in France made the frog leg a national food treasure for the country, if not the world. In the United States, frog legs often show up in Cajun and Creole cooking, which, of course, both have roots in French cuisine. However the tradition of eating frogs hasn’t really ever hit it big in Idaho. In fact, I get more turned-up noses when I tell water that smelled like rotten eggs. Our huntpeople about frog gigging than I get culinary ing posse split into two teams, each going a excitement. different direction around the pond. I carried But that is not a personal deterrent for me. my younger son through the muck, and we I soaked the legs overnight in milk to let them could immediately see frogs. expunge the vague sulfur smell of the pond The normal pattern for frog hunting, develthey swam in. Next, we battered them in a oped over thousands of years, is for the hunter little flour and pancake mix recipe I to creep slowly and silently toward the found on the Internet. We then fried beasts while lowering his spear. At the them outside on the barbecue burner. last moment most frogs dart into the It was a culinary revelation for me. I water, escaping the hunter. Sure, some have had frog legs from San Francisco don’t make it quickly enough, but this to Macau, but I’ve never eaten them stalk-and-dart routine is a well estabfried. This chicken-fried frog leg thing lished pattern. Some frogs float out in was addictive. The meat was as white the water making for harder targets. VIDEO: A as cream and as soft as a poached baby Other frogs kindly wait on the banks. group of BW reporters chicken. Not a hint of flavor from the Some croak loudly and bound across frog gig. pond came through. It was like a comthe top of the water to freedom. bination of meat and fish that screamed The modern flashlight gives the for some buttermilk biscuits and an ear of hunter a notable advantage. Frogs cannot resweet corn. It was heaven in a bite. Three sist the power of our Duracells. A frog hunter generations of King boys chowed down on the shines a light across a body of water until he frogs and made plans for further excursions. spots a frog’s eyes. At that point, he must keep So say grace, frogs, we are coming for the light on the frog to keep it mesmerized. you. Removing the light from the frog’s eyes allows B EN W ILS ON

It’s time to play at the Boise River Recreation Park.

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LISTINGS/REC PLAY/REC

Events & Workshops LET’S MOVE BOISE $1 SWIM NIGHT—Boise Parks and Recreation and the Treasure Valley YMCA present $1 swim night. Participating pools include Ivywild, Fairmont and West YMCA/ Boise City Aquatics Center. Splash down and pick up some cool prizes. Call 208-608-7675 for info about Ivywild and Fairmont, or 208-377-9622 for info about West YMCA. Wednesday, June 20, 7-9 p.m. $1.

DIABLO III IS FUN BUT NOTHING NEW Sometimes you run into that song, movie or television show that is merely a retelling of an older theme. Gaming is notorious for that as well. If a game has some success, you can bet there will be half-a-dozen new games that try to emulate it. Diablo and Diablo II inspired a variety of dungeon-crawl wannabes that tried to imitate Blizzard’s franchise success. Most paled by comparison, though there were a few that were decent enough to hang in there. Diablo II was released 12 years ago. In the interim, rumors about D3 ran rampant. It’s here and it’s sort of an MMO—you have to have an online connection to battle.net to play. You can play solo but if you need help with a boss, you can open your game and allow other community members to drop in. As for the rest of it … For those who remember Diablo and Diablo II, D3 is the same game—sort of. Graphics are updated, the story has some changes but, by and large, this is the same pointand-click dungeon crawl. The old-school charm is back, the hack’n’slash can be entertaining, but the constant click, click, click for movement and targeting can get a tad wearing. Still, the game got quite a few smiles simply because of the sheer destructive force of the characters and resulting animations that are the stock of a Diablo game. Want an example? A barbarian wanders through the wastes, the fog of war slowly lifts, but a variety of monsters materialize and attempt to bring the quest to a crashing halt. The barbarian leaps into battle, his or her battle axe blazing and separating flesh from bone as enemies rag-doll it across the landscape with ribcages and other body DIABLO III parts spinning. Blood splatters, diablo3.com some cheesy catch-phrase follows, loot is collected. Skill sets have been refined so players can fine-tune characters as they work up. The graphics look smooth on higherresolution machines, though the point of view is the same as previous Diablo incarnations. Still, the game is broody, moody and enjoyable. The character classes (there is now a barbarian, demon hunter, monk, witch doctor and wizard) are diverse and fun to play. In spite of a familiarity, one aspect that’s detracting is that this feels like a been-there, done-that, got-the-T-shirt rehash of the first games. Character creation is weak and the player interface is all point and click. Due to the volume of players on battle.net, lag seems to be an issue at times. The game also makes it clear—no cow level (though there has to be some sort of Easter egg tucked away in there). So, is this a pass or a play game? Let’s put it this way: Hours upon hours were devoted to D2 but that may not be the case with D3. It feels like an extension of the license with the same look, same user interface and mechanics, and is, essentially, the same game. One would think that all of that adds up to a pass but not really. For those who have not experienced an old-school dungeon crawl, D3 is entertaining. For experienced players, this feels like an old friend come to visit. Yes, it’s fun, but maybe not quite as much as the first games were. —Michael Lafferty WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

2012 BLUE CRUISE—Blue Cross of Idaho Foundation for Health is sponsoring the ninth-annual Blue Cruise, a recreational cycling event for charity. This year’s beneficiaries are the Miles of Smiles Dental Van and Bikes for Kids. Donations of bicycles and parts will be accepted. Visit bluecruiseidaho. org for more info and to register. Saturday, June 23, 7 a.m. $40. Blue Cross of Idaho, 3000 E. Pine Ave., Meridian, 208-3454550, bcidaho.com. TRY LEARN TO SKATE—Beginning skaters ages 4 and older can give Idaho IceWorld’s Learn to Skate program a trial run. Skates will be provided. Registration is required. Visit the website for more info and to register. Saturday, June 23, 1:30-2 p.m. FREE. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-3310044, idahoiceworld.com. WALK LIKE MADD—Every step helps raise funds and awareness for Mothers Against Drunk Driving’s services. Registration includes a T-shirt for people and a doggie bandana for canines. Visit walklikemadd.org/boise for more info and to register. Saturday, June 23, 8:30 a.m. $20, $15 ages 5-21, $10 dogs. Veterans Memorial Park, 930 N. Veterans Memorial Parkway, Boise.

Recurring GR8 TO SK8—Wear a crazy costume while you hone your ice skating skills. Dress in the day’s theme and receive $3 off your public skating session. Visit the website for a list of themes. Fridays. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-3310044, idahoiceworld.com.

Register BOISE PARKS AND REC FALL SLOWPITCH SOFTBALL LEAGUES—New teams can register for adult slowpitch softball leagues from Monday, June 18-Friday, June 22. League play runs late July through September. For more info, email sports@cityofboise.org or call 208-608-7650. Boise City Recreation office, 110 Scout Lane, Boise, 208-384-4256, cityofboise.org/parks. YOUTH INSTRUCTIONAL HOCKEY CLINICS—Improve your skating and hockey skills in one-hour clinics with a different emphasis in each session. Clinics are open to boys and girls ages 7-18, and limited to 30 participants per session. Full hockey equipment is required. Clinics include a onehour on-ice session. Tuesdays, 5:15-6:15 p.m. $10, purchase five and receive one free. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-331-0044, idahoiceworld.com.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | 31

NEWS/FOOD LEILA R AM ELA- R ADER

FOOD LAU R IE PEAR M AN

The Smoke Inn on State Street closed after 45 years in business.

DIVE DEVELOPMENTS The Smoke Inn opened in 1967 at 3912 W. State St., selling burgers and finger steaks. In 1992, Jay Liles took over the operation from his father, and on June 15, after 45 years, the restaurant closed. Liles said business slowed a few years ago and never picked up again. “The economy has just finally taken its toll,” Liles said. As for what to do with the remaining inventory, Liles is still trying to figure that out. He may give it to employees, send what he can back to his brokers and sell the rest. Liles, 54, said he doesn’t plan to open another business. And in other State Street staple news, Terry’s State Street Saloon celebrated its 16th year in business with a party June 9. But it was a coming-out party as much as an anniversary: Terry’s will soon come under new ownership. Jeff Larsen, now a manager and bartender at Terry’s, is slated to take the reins of the saloon Sunday, July 1. With new management will come changes to one of Boise’s most well known karaoke bars. Larsen will make some cosmetic improvements to Terry’s, including painting the walls, possibly installing a new air conditioner and beer coolers, and replacing the carpets. Overall, though, he says it will look like the same bar. “The name out front is Terry’s,” Larsen said. “I’ll just be the one running it.” One substantial change Larsen will make is using social media to attract new customers and advertise nightly drink specials. But he’s still figuring out exactly how it works. “I want to use it as a guerilla marketing tool,” Larsen said. “It’s still all Greek to me, though.” And speaking of long-running Boise dives, the Dutch Oven Cafe, located at 599 N. Orchard St., is moving, according to donlday.com. The small counter joint opened in 1959 and was known for its simplicity, serving only breakfast or lunch. Bill Carter took over the cafe when owner Tom Sweeney died in 2010, and he will soon reopen the joint at 1621 N. Orchard St., in an old home with a 32-seat capacity and living quarters located above. And further down Orchard Street, retro drive-thru Patty’s Burger Time at 1273 S. Orchard St. is now under new ownership and called simply Burger Time. New owners Karen Rohm and Rennie Cloninger took over the restaurant May 1 and opened for business June 1. Burger Time will no longer offer local produce and dairy and will instead carry Darigold milk products and pre-made Tri-City meat patties. —BW Staff

32 | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Recently local Fuji apples sold for 49 cents per pound at Stonehenge Produce, which was converted into a produce market from a convenience store.

PRODUCE TO THE PEOPLE New neighborhood markets bring local, organic food to a new demographic CARISSA WOLF “We’re a different kind of convenience store Angela Ruggiero fills her shopping basket with now,” said Stonehenge manager Tom Miller. fresh fruits and vegetables—much of it local “We have people who come almost every day and some of it organic—three to four times a week. And like her Boise Bench neighbors, just and buy what they need for the day. It has a matter of blocks separate the produce market almost a European feel to it. Instead of going to a box store and shopping for the week, you where she shops from her dinner table. can come here and buy fresh every day.” Bench dwellers say Stonehenge Produce’s The convenience factor, along with oldneighborhood location and bargain prices have not only changed how they’re eating, but fashioned customer service, has helped transition the location into a thriving neighborhood how they’re shopping. Stonehenge is bringing produce to the people while also democratizing market and community gathering spot. “You walk in and you feel like you’re local food. walking into a family that you know and they “We’re eating much more produce than make you feel honored,” said Molly O’Shea, we did before. We’re eating a lot more salads. Stonehenge’s first customer. We’re eating healthier,” Ruggiero said. O’Shea is referring to the guys who stock That wasn’t always the case for neighbors the produce, work the cash register and send who trickled into the now defunct Circle K shoppers out with boxes of produce, free convenience store that Stonehenge calls home. samples and a dose of conversation. ReguBeer, cigarettes and lottery tickets once lars at the family operated business are on crossed the counter at 2207 Overland Road. a first-name basis, with the exception of the Now grass-fed beef, cage-free eggs and local four Eds, who each have an Fuji apples fill the carts of shopepithet attached as a last name. pers that crisscross the space. The personal touch makes the Though the boxy shop still STONEHENGE PRODUCE market a place where some stop holds a physical resemblance 2207 Overland Road 12624 Fairview Ave. in just for a chat. The Overland to its earlier incarnation—a 208-333-9481 Stonehenge is part of a family tall sign towers out front and a stonehengeproduce.com owned and operated enterprise lineup of prime parking spots that includes another location makes the store an accessible at 12624 Fairview Ave. dream—it no longer serves as “Business is great. We’ve exceeded our a nemesis to waistlines, cholesterol levels and expectations,” Miller said. mortality rates. This contrast to processed, In addition to the constant flow of foot preservative-filled, calorie-packed convetraffic streaming in from the neighborhood, nience foods emerged in February 2011, when Stonehenge Produce sold its first gallon Stonehenge also attracts boaters on their way to Lucky Peak who pop in for picnic supplies of local, raw milk.

and fill bags with chips, homestyle salsas and Kobe beef. Downtown commuters heading to the east and south veer just a couple blocks off the Vista corridor to pick up dinner, where they can find lentils, local breads, spices and, in the summer, about 80 percent local produce. All of this means that Stonehenge courts a much different demographic than Miller expected. He sees older, neighborhood folks as opposed to the young and affluent who typically fuel local and boutique markets. “There really is a sense that local food is something that middle-, upper-class people do,” explained Morning Owl Farm owner Mary Rohlfing. “And I think that the localfood movement itself has perpetrated that myth, partly because a lot of the local-food growers were immediate adopters of social media and ... [posted] beautiful delicate pictures of their produce growing. Or the people at the farmers markets all seem to have driven up in their BMWs.” Rohlfing said that growers and sellers need to do more than hawk veggies to demystify local food. That starts by bringing it closer to the people and lending a hand at putting a dent at food insecurity, she said. “The job for the farmer is to democratize the food a little bit,” Rohlfing said. “But it’s hard to do it all. There are so many things that a farmer has to pull off, and then saying, ‘Yes, I’m going to help with food insecurity,’ then becomes another thing you have to pull off.” But by making area-grown produce 33 more accessible, Rohlfing said that WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

CON’T/FOOD BEER GUZZLER/FOOD

HOT SEASON SEASONALS It’s officially summer, and we have the heat to prove it. Fortunately, we also have a trio of new seasonals that will take the edge off a hot afternoon, or make the perfect, refreshing reward for a well mowed lawn. Don’t have any grass to tame? Then celebrate your liberation from that tedious chore with any one of the following: NINKASI BREWING CO. RADIANT ALE This Eugene, Ore., entr y pours a copper-tinged amber with a worthy head that collapses quickly. The hop presence on the nose is subtle and lightly herbaceous, but sweet malt aromas are more dominant. This brew offers a decent hop bite from start to finish, backed by toasty malt and sweet fruit flavors. The beer finishes with a refreshing bitterness and a bit of crisp citrus. ODELL BREWING CO. ST. LUPULIN EXTRA PALE ALE From Colorado, this brew has a lightly hazy golden pour with a thin head. Things get interesting with the first whiff of enticingly floral- and pine-tinged hops, backed by hints of peach and citrus. The flavors don’t take a back seat, with heady hops playing against smooth malt in an impeccably balanced brew colored by ripe mango, spicy apple and peach. Named for the hop cone resin (lupulin) that is an essential beer ingredient, this is a deliciously drinkable summer brew. WIDMER BROTHERS MARIONBERRY HIBISCUS GOSE A tribute to north German wheat beers, which are typically tart with a salt tinge and a touch of coriander, this Portland, Ore., brewery adds berry and hibiscus to the mix. Matt Gelsthorpe, “the Beer Guy” at Boise Co-op calls this the rose of beers, and it’s an apt description. This brew pours a hazy, rhubarb pink with a decent head and light aromas of grain, currant and berry. It’s delightfully different and eminently drinkable, marked by lively, just tart fruit flavors with a salty edge and subtle spice. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

shoppers start to discover local food is no more expensive than what you may find at a grocery store. Rohlfing stopped selling goods at the Capital City Public Market five years ago and has now set up shop on Saturdays in Hyde Park, right in front of Dunia Marketplace. She found that by bringing food closer to people’s homes and walking routes, the folks who might have shied away from buying local produce in the past are now loyal customers. Rohlfing’s accessible point of sale has helped break down many of the barriers that prevent some people from going local. Many weekend markets require customers to make a long trek past crowded tents in the heat after finding a coveted parking spot. That alone can steer the crowdshy, elderly and disabled away from local food. But putting local, organic foods in neighborhoods changes all of that. Miller said he sees a mix of socioeconomic backgrounds in his clients— from rim-view residents to retired Bench longtimers. This Bench pocket sports a hodgepodge of tidy, pre-war cottages, backyard businesses and infill starter homes. And with one of the highest foreclosure rates in Boise and a number of low-cost rentals, the Bench neighborhood that hugs the train tracks remains proudly proletariat. And price-conscious area residents like that they can still find high-quality local produce at affordable prices. One recent week, local Fuji apples sold for 49 cents per pound, avocados for 69 cents each, and a package of seasonal berries went for less than $2. Neighbors like Ruggiero have even purchased dehydrators and juicers to process all the produce they’ve been purchasing. “It really comes down to price; we’re a price-driven store,” Miller said. “When we find something, we buy it in quantity and pass the savings along.” 32

BOISEweekly | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | 33

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boise’s organic skincare Facials and waxing By appointment only Gift certificates available Éminence organic skincare products 729 N. 15th St. 208 344 5883 remedyskincareboise.com

NORTH END HOME FOR RENT Charming North End home available August 1, 2012 for rent. Enjoy the inside: 3BD, 2BA. Enjoy the North End lifestyle! $1100/ mo. plus all util., $1100 dep. Call 208-631-4803 to set up a viewing appointment. Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

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C A RE E RS BW CAREERS Help Wanted!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping HomeWorkers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. theworkhub.net TECHNOLOGY Hewlett-Packard Company is accepting resumes for Interactive Design Engineer in Boise, ID (Ref. #BOIACA1). Develop concepts, wireframes, and actionable design specs. Develop concepts and support material to help the organization progress to the next level. Mail resume to Hewlett-Packard Company, 5400 Legacy Drive, MS H1-6F-61, Plano, TX 75024. Resume must include Ref. #, full name, email address & mailing address. No phone calls please. Must be legally authorized to work in the U.S. without sponsorship. EOE. Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com.

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packes

LOOKING FOR ACTORS SUMMER! We are looking for talent for an upcoming horror movie filming this summer. Please respond with face and full shots and a portfolio of experience. Let us know if you are SAG for distribution purposes. sourbamboo@gmail.com

BW CAREER TRAINING

BOISE’S ONLY NUDIST CLUB BareBackers Mountain Resort is located just 20 mins. from downtown Boise, on over 130 acres of private, wooded acre. Here, members meet, camp, hike, and relax around the pool, enjoying sunshine and nature ... without the restriction of clothing. A gated, family oriented nudist club, BBMR welcomes visitors. Schedule a free visit to see our mountain & meet our members. Call 208-322-6853 or visit our website at www.bareidaho.com

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SEE WILCO & REGISTER VOTERS HeadCount is coming to Boise for the Wilco tour & is looking for 6 volunteers to register concert goers to vote. In return, you will get the opportunity to see the show! Please contact if you are interested in this fun & important event. 732-770-2551. hallie.schreiber@ gmail.com Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Call 344-2055.

WEEKEND MARKET

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RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

EAT HERE

Drink Like the Locals 12 TAPS: Sockeye, Payette Brewing, Guinness, Sam Adams, Pyramid, Mac & Jack’s, Dos Equis And More

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BW FOUND Binoculars. 392-5884.

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BW CLASSES, WORKSHOPS & SEMINARS to

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identify

BW LOST

LOST CAT Ridenbaugh & 7th area of North End. Calico, mostly white with big black & orange spots, tail is black. Missing on May 26th. Call 890-3277.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

OIL PAINTING WORKSHOP FOR BEGINNERS

5 hr. workshops. 3rd Sat. of each mo. 1-6 pm at LEE Gallery, 409 S. 8th Street #101, downtown Boise. Discount materials from Quality Art. French Impressionist painting style. Paris trained instructor, Antinon Passemard. Limited to 15 students for personal instruction. Learn the basics of composition, mixing color & brush stroke technique. Cost: $45. + materials. Call to register 208-830-2937.

EXPERIENCE AYURVEDA TODAY! If you are suffering from chronic illness, digestive issues, high stress, obesity, mental conditions, and the like; you have come to the right place. I want you to experience better health and Ayurveda offers many transformational modalities to get you there. Ayurveda, which literally means the “knowledge and wisdom of longevity,“ is the traditional healing system of India. It is a system of holistic healthcare that considers the uniqueness of each individual as it helps them to create a state of internal harmony and optimal health. 297-8233.

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COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM Hot tub available, heated table, hot

*A MAN’S MASSAGE BY ERIC*

oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/ Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. RELAXATION MASSAGE Call Ami at 208-697-6231. ULM 340-8377. Hrs. 8:30AM8PM.

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. New website massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio. Most relaxing massage ever. Mystic Moon Massage. Esalen/ Swedish. Open 7 days by appt. 283-7830. Betty.

ADOPT-A-PET

SPECIALIZING IN PAIN RELIEF

FREE Head & Should Massage with 1 hr. Chinese Reflexology Foot Massage at VIP Massage. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

SHOP HERE

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

ROCKY: 3-year-old male German shepherd/rottweiler mix. Strong and sturdy. House-trained. Good with other dogs and older kids. (Kennel 323- #15832671)

BREEZY: 2-year-old male American bulldog mix. House-trained. Knows basic commands but needs training on leash. (Kennel 321- #11028779)

OREO: 5-year-old female, domestic shorthair. Good with cats and calm dogs. Litterbox-trained. Somewhat independent. (Kennel 01- #16076632)

POKIE: 4-monthold male domestic shorthair. Adorable, playful kitten. Likes to play with other kittens. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 17- #16434844)

MARKY: 1-year-old male domestic shorthair. Large, lanky cat. Energetic, athletic, loves to play. Acts like a big kitten. (Kennel 19- #16019214)

CUBBY: 18-month-old male shih tzu. Mellow, young dog. Good with calm dogs. Has two different colored eyes. House dog. (Kennel 400- #16282501)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

NESTLE: Looking for a sweet treat? Satisfy your craving and adopt me.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

ADOBE: Staff Pick for June, only $20 takes me home this month.

LADYBUG: Petite lovebug seeks forever home. Is it yours?

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | 35

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B O I S E W E E K LY A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383.

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SERVICES - HOME

YOGA STUDIO BIZ FOR SALE Full turn key studio for sale. Includes all furniture & fixtures, mats/props, website iam-yoga. com, marketing materials, 300 plus customer base, signage. Ample parking & 4 large windows in studio. All the work has been done, just come in & start teaching! The studio is centrally located to attract clients from the entire Treasure Valley sub-lease or move to a new location! 11521 W. Fairview Ave # 103 Boise. Call Julia 208-899-2114.

BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com

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FOR SALE

M U SI C

YOGA THERAPEUTICS TRAINING Saturday & Sunday, July 7-8th, with Karen Sprute-Frankovich, MA, ERYT. Study, practice & delight in the alignment, action & poetry of the lower body. Sat. 10:30-1:30 & 3:30 - 6:30, Sun. 10-1. To register, or for more information, contact Brittany McConnell: brittanym.mcconnell@ gmail.com or 918-1136.

BW STUFF

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CHERRIES - ORGANIC SPRAY rockypointorchard.com Call 2830652. Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Call 344-2055 by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale

VOICE & GUITAR LESSONS $30/hr., $20/half hr., or $40/hr. if I drive to your place. Call now to reserve your time with. ..Tom Taylor 208-401-5904 or E-mail: samueltomtaylor@msn.com

NYT CROSSWORD | GETTING AROUND BY XAN VONGSATHORN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 22 Horseplay? 23 *Ready for the present? 25 *Makeshift swing 27 Pennsylvania city or county 28 Blocks 30 Hockey feint 31 Call from a crow’s nest 32 Sit on it 33 Chimera, e.g.

ACROSS 1 Benedictine monk who founded Scholasticism 7 Fire 11 Initial request? 15 One of three in Toyota’s logo 19 Lunchtime errand 20 Have an ___ grind 21 What a koala really isn’t 1

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34 They’re seen but not recognized 36 Bit of fallout 38 ___ populi 39 Grievances 40 Ring around the collar? 43 Vessel commanded by J.F.K. 47 *Brushback pitch 51 *All-in-one 53 Lot to take in

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Soulful Baker “Yeah, right” Bub ___ Martin Cognac Pickup capacity, maybe Bit to split Wife of Uranus *Animal that gives birth to identical quadruplets 72 Don’t fess up to

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Kind of counter “Excalibur” role Protest singer Phil Comical Charlotte South Pacific capital Silent goodbyes Cry of delight popularized by Homer Simpson 86 *Saturn and others 90 *Contents of a chest? 93 Heated patch 94 Broken off 95 Maker of watches and calculators 96 Signs off on 97 Unlock, poetically 98 “Jabberwocky” starter 99 Slack-jawed 102 Title acquired the moment someone is born? 106 7x – 6 = 2x2 subj. 108 Five-spots 110 Salon supply 112 Curbside buys 113 *Surfaced, in a way 116 *Be repetitive … or what parts of the answers to the starred clues do? 118 Lipstick print, maybe 119 Co-worker of Clark 120 Alternatively 121 It’s got chops 122 Like some praises 123 Start to matter? 124 Keeps the nest warm 125 Narcissus, e.g.

DOWN 1 Get riled up 2 Afrique ___ 3 World capital that’s also a girl’s name 4 Embark (on) 5 “Ben-Hur” novelist Wallace

6 Styx song with some Japanese lyrics 7 Frank with the album “Sheik Yerbouti” 8 Nationals, before they were Nationals 9 Big blast, informally 10 Rock band composition? 11 Diamond stat 12 Party for departing parties 13 Redgrave of “Atonement” 14 Nursery school, briefly 15 Decide (to) 16 Deign 17 Duke of ___ (noble Spanish title since 1472) 18 Big name in cinemas 24 Tiptop 26 Lots and plots 29 Hush Puppies material 35 Oats, e.g. 37 ___-toothed 38 Cleared out 39 Recycling holder 41 Gentrification target, maybe 42 Nonsense word repeated before “oxen free” 43 Antidrug ad, e.g., briefly 44 Half a dovetail joint 45 Shrovetide pancakes 46 Repeatedly 47 “___ open!” 48 Greek water nymph 49 Searched (through) 50 Be a union buster? 52 Repeating part of “Hey Jude” 56 ___ Grand 57 TripTik, e.g. 60 “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” fairy king 62 Uplifting piece

63 65 67 68 69 70

Spanish wine High conflicts TV scientist Bill Gain maturity Grassy plain Add spring to, with “up” 71 “You’re ___ talk!” 75 Boo-boo 76 Mass. neighbor 77 Cookout item 78 Ones you can count on? 81 Fingers 83 Job application fig. 85 No walk in the park 86 Parks with no intention of moving 87 Dander 88 South Vietnam’s first president ___ Dinh Diem 89 Have a crush on, in middle school lingo 91 Responded to, as a tip 92 Something to try 96 Grp. that includes Ecuador and Venezuela L A S T L A S H

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99 Garlicky sauce 100 Meal 101 “___ of God” (1985 drama) 102 Certain lens 103 First name in 1960s diplomacy 104 Shakes hands with, maybe 105 Plus 106 Kindergarten stuff 107 Wower 109 Banjo master Fleck 111 Gains maturity 114 Command to a dog 115 23rd in a series 117 Sponge alternative Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

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D E E J A Y

R R O O S T E L S Y K N E D W E E R I I N N G G A

S O S A N O C H L O O W P L M E E A M S O T S C C H L E O F S E

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WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

WILD HUCKLEBERRY SEEDS/BUSH Easy to grow & delicious. Berries are ready to pick this summer! Great for container gardening. Packets come with instructions & are $3,$6,& $15. Can send to you. Also have Wild Huckleberry Bushes, $5, $8 & $20, if you’re over this way, Hurricane, Southern Utah. 435-635-7681 or 435-680-0167. **GARDEN STARTS FOR SALE **Locally Grown Garden Starts. Heirloom Tomatos, Peppers, Herbs, Melons, Squash, Cucumbers, Flowers. $1-$4. 2426 Ona, Boise 761-3807. www.yourgardenstarts.com

BW ART, ANTIQUES & COLLECTABLES ATOMIC TREASURES Atomic Treasures 409 S. 8th St. Between Broad & Myrtle. Celebrating reuse with an eclectic mix of vintage, retro, art & found objects. Decorative & unique treasures for home, jewelry, accessories, clothing, books and collectibles. Stop by today!

BW WANT TO BUY DISCOUNT HAIR ACCESSORIES Hair barrettes, hair brushes, hair cutting capes, hair clips, hair combs, hair nets, hair pins, hair rollers, & more. simplyhairaccessories.com

BW EAT HERE PASTURE FED LAMB Reserve now for October/November butcher. One left Red California ram lamb. Fed nothing but green pasture and oat and molasses treats (sweetens the meat). Call now to reserve. 208-866-5184 (Deposit required).

4-WHEELS BW FOR SALE 1995 TOYOTA 4-RUNNER SR5, V6, 5-speed manual 4x4 with 161K mi. Good condition with some slight top-coat paint peeling. Towing & chrome packages, power moon roof, windows & locks. Newish tires, clutch, breaks. Super clean & maintained. $4,800. Contact darrdeanna@gmail.com for info. 2011 HONDA CRV Great vehicle, great condition & great gas mileage. 15k mi. Clean title. All wheel-drive. Light blue exterior, gray interior. Well-maintained/clean. Smoke & pet free. $21,750. Below Kelly Bluebook 914-0109. CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com Ford F-150 Truck 1986 good motor, few dents, double tank, $3000. 22 horse tractor, hooks up to planter, cart & lawn sweeper with bag, $1000. 208-731-1254 or 208-7317852.

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B OISE W E E KLY

NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDSICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: HILLARY E. McLEAN. Case No. CV NC 1209126 NOTICE OF HEARING A Petition by Petitioner, Hillary E. McLean, born on the 4th day of September, 1981, in American Fork, State of Utah now residing at 28740 Cherry Lane, #G208, Boise, Idaho is proposing a change in name to the Petitioner has been filed in the above entitled court, the reason for this change in name being that she desires to return to her maiden name: The names and addresses of the Petitioner’s nearest relatives are: Kendal G. Eyre (Father) 3033 Chieftain Way, Boise, ID 83709 Rebecca Eyre (Mother) 3033 Chieftain Way, Boise, ID 83709 Jerem Eyre (Brother) 1628 Renaissance Way, Springfield, UT 84663 Brookann Hessing (Sister) 3831 N. Bryce Canyon Pl., Meridian, ID 83646 Corey Eyre (Brother) 1602 S. Juanita St., Boise ID 83706 Shannon Willardson (Sister) 366 East 100 South, Provo, UT 84606 Trevor Eyre (Brother) 6981 N. Swift St., Portland, OR 97203 Alicia Eyre (Sister) 175 West 3rd South, Rexburg, ID 83440 Such petition shall be heard at 130 p.m. on 26 day of July, 2012, or at such time as the court may appoint, and objections may be filed by any person who can, in such objections, show to the court a good reason against such a change of name. WITNESS my hand and seal of said District Court this 25 day of May, 2012. By DEIDRE PRICE Clerk DATED this 25th day of May, 2012. BRADLEY B. B. POOLE Pub. June 13, 20, 27 & July 4, 2012. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO. IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Tamara Lynn Higginbotham Case No. CV NC 1208363 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Tamara Lynn Higginbotham, now residing in the City of Kuna, State of Idaho, has been filled in the District Court in ADA County, Idaho. The name will change to Tamara Lynn Hoy-Higginbotham. The reason for the change in name is: to include my maiden name along with my married name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on July 19, 2012 at the ADA County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: May 25, 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. June 13, 20, 27 & July 4, 2012. Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20.

PETS BW PETS DOG TREATS MADE IN U.S.A. Shop JustDogTreats.com for all your dog treat needs. Offering a wide selection of all natural dog treats, dog biscuits & cookies. Gourmet dog treats, allergy free dog treats, made in U.S.A. Visit our website for more information: jsutdogtreats.com

C O N N E C T IO N S E C T IO N BW ENTERTAINMENT HOT GAY & BI LOCALS Browse & Respond FREE! 208472-2200. Use FREE Code 5914, 18+. MEET SEXY SINGLES Reply to Ads FREE! Straight 208345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7760. Visit MegaMates.com, 18+. WHERE SINGLES MEET Listen to Ads FREE! 208-345-8855. Use FREE Code 7759, 18+.

BW DATING SERVICE

BW I SAW U AT ALIVE AFTER FIVE JUNE 13 W. - was that you near the Beanery beer line, in a white shirt? Handsome & grinning at me (I was in the pink top). It didn’t dawn on me til later that it might have been you. You were the guy from the Flicks, who sat next to me & chatted kindly, months ago. I still remember it.

BW KISSES I MISS MY STUFFED TIGER I’ve seen you out recently. I’m sorry for staring at your handsome face. But as Calvin told Hobbes, “The world’s a complicated place.” MIKE IS OUR HERO Mike from Pianos’n’Things, you are awesome. Thank you for the great kindness you showed while helping us with my grandma’s piano. Jerimi & Travis. OH DEAREST, I am so grateful for every moment that we had together. Every moment I am loving you. I believe in you, I believe in us. Forgive me for my faults and my hurries. Someday when you are ready to see me, here I am, loving you and excited to see your face again.

BW PEN PALS Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates.

Attention women: I am a handsome country boy with a trade who is pre-trained looking for a woman who knows what she wants in life. Upon release, I may fit that bill. You never know where you may find a diamond in the rough. Nicholas Studer #65626 ISCI Unit 15-A PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. SM, 28, 6’, hazel eyes ISO for a F pen pal. 17 months to top. Maybe hook up when I get out. Michael Girard #89733 ISCI Unit 14-46A PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. Jesus Christ is Lord. SWM ISO F for friendship and/or relationship. Thomas Chew #99212 Unit 24 PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. 38 YO SWM looking for a F for a pen pal. I’m a country boy who enjoys football, hockey and quiet evenings at home. I also enjoy camping, hiking and can even cook. Oh yea, did I mention I’m also a certified massage therapist. If you want to know more shoot me a letter. Tim Wood #37502 SICI MCU B-6 PO Box 8509 Boise, ID 83707. Fun loving, energetic, 24 YO, WM looking for someone who loves to laugh to help me pass the time. I’m 5’11”, blue-green eyes and brown hair. I feel like a squirrel trapped in a pinball machine with ADD! So, help a goofball out. If I made you laugh write Jonathan Schick #86213 ISCI 15-A-45B PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. M, 20 YO, looking forward to meeting someone I can write too for the next year or so. I’m 6’, blonde hair and blue eyes. I’m willing to write to anyone my age or couple years older than I am. Anyone that wants a friend or a BF I’m FREE! Jonathan Covington #99695 MA IDOC PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. I am a 45 YO WF who is looking for a pen pal to write while I complete my few months left. I have green eyes, strawberry blonde hair, 5’5”, 160 lbs. Hope to hear from someone Juliet Summers #87208 13200 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. Kuna, ID 83634.

22, SHF, looking for someone to write. Love to laugh and kick back. At least another year of lockdown. Crazy, adventurous and funny! Elena Pena #97813 PWCC Unit 3C-28B 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204.

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JUNE 20–26, 2012 | 37

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Swans, geese and ducks molt all their flight feathers at once, which means they may be unable to fly for several weeks afterward. We humans don’t do anything like that in a literal way, but we have a psychological comparison: times when we shed outworn selfimages. I suspect you’re coming up on such a transition, Aries. While you’re going through it, you may want to lie low. Anything resembling flight—launching new ventures, making big decisions, embarking on great adventures— should be postponed until the metamorphosis is complete and your feathers grow back. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 2011, car traffic began flowing across Jiaozhou Bay Bridge, a newly completed span that joins the city of Qingdao with the Huangdao District in China. This prodigious feat of engineering is 26.4 miles long. I nominate it to serve as your prime metaphor in the coming weeks. Picture it whenever you need a boost as you work to connect previously unlinked elements in your life. It may help inspire you to master the gritty details that’ll lead to your own monumental accomplishment. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): An apple starts growing on its tree in the spring. By early summer, it may be full size and as red as it will ever be. To the naked eye, it appears ready to eat, but it’s not. If you pluck it and hope it will be more delicious in a few weeks, you’ll be disappointed. So here’s the moral of the story, Gemini: For an apple to achieve its potential, it has to stay on the tree until nature has finished ripening it. Keep that lesson in mind as you deal with the urge to harvest something before it has reached its prime. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Dear Rob: In one of your recent horoscopes, you implied that I should consider the possibility of asking for more than I’ve ever asked for before. You didn’t actually use those words, but I’m pretty sure that’s what you meant. Anyway, I want to thank you. It helped me start working up the courage to burst out of my protective and imprisoning little shell. Today I gave myself permission to learn the unknowable, figure out the inscrutable and dream the inconceivable.—Crazy Crab.” Dear Crazy: You’re leading the way for your fellow Cancerians. The process you just described is exactly what I advise them to try in the coming weeks. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Picture yourself moving toward a building you haven’t seen before. What type of path are you on? Concrete, dirt, brick or wood? Is it a long, winding way or short

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and direct? Once you arrive at the front door, locate the key. Is it under a mat, in your pocket or somewhere else? Next, open the door and go inside to explore. Where have you arrived? See everything in detail. This is a test that has no right or wrong answers, Leo—similar to what your life is actually bringing you right now. The building you’ve envisioned represents the next phase of your destiny. The path symbolizes how you get here. The key is the capacity or knowledge you will need. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): My first poetry teacher suggested that it was my job as a poet to learn the names of things in the natural world. She said I should be able to identify at least 25 species of trees, 25 flowers, 25 herbs, 25 birds and eight clouds. I have unfortunately fallen short in living up to that very modest goal, and I’ve always felt guilty about it. But it’s never too late to begin, right? In the coming weeks, I vow to correct for my dereliction of duty. I urge you to follow my lead, Virgo. Is there any soul work that you have been neglecting? Is there any part of your life’s mission that you have skipped over? Now would be an excellent time to catch up. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Here’s my nomination for one of the Ten Biggest Problems in the World: our refusal to control the pictures and thoughts that pop into our minds. For example, I can personally testify that when a fearful image worms its way into the space behind my eyes, I sometimes let it stimulate a surge of negative emotions rather than just banish it or question whether it’s true. I’m calling this to your attention, Libra, because in the weeks ahead, you’ll have more power than usual to modulate your stream of consciousness. Have you ever seen the bumper sticker that says, “Don’t believe everything you think”? Make that your mantra. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the hands of a skilled practitioner, astrology can help you determine the most favorable days to start a new project or heat up your romantic possibilities or get a tattoo of a ninja mermaid. Success is, of course, still quite feasible at other times, but you might find the most grace and ease if you align yourself with the cosmic flow. Let’s consider, for example, the issue of taking a vacation. According to my understanding, if you do it between now and Monday, July 23, the experiences you have will free your ass and your mind will then gratefully follow. If you schedule your getaway for another time, you could still free your ass, but may have to toil more intensely to get your mind to join the fun.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): What is your most hateable and loveable obsession, Sagittarius? The compulsion that sometimes sabotages you and sometimes inspires you? The longing that can either fool you or make you smarter? Whatever it is, I suspect it’s beginning a transformation. Is there anything you can do to ensure that the changes it undergoes will lead you away from the hateable consequences and closer to the loveable stuff? I think there’s a lot you can do. For starters: Do a ritual—yes, an actual ceremony—in which you affirm your intention that your obsession will forever after serve your highest good and brightest integrity. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): As someone who thrives on simple organic food and doesn’t enjoy shopping, I would not normally have lunch at a hot dog stand in a suburban mall. But that’s what I did today. Nor do I customarily read books by writers whose philosophy repels me, and yet recently, I have found myself skimming through Ayn Rand’s The Virtue of Selfishness. I’ve been enjoying these acts of rebellion. They’re not directed at the targets that I usually revolt against but rather at my own habits and comforts. I suggest you enjoy similar insurrections in the coming week, Capricorn. Rise up and overthrow your attachment to boring familiarity. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The ancient Chinese book of divination known as the I Ching speaks of “catching things before they exit the gate of change.” That’s what happens when a martial artist anticipates an assailant’s movement before it happens, or when a healer corrects an imbalance in someone’s body before it becomes a fullblown symptom or illness. I see this as an important principle for you right now, Aquarius. It’s a favorable time to catch potential disturbances prior to the time they exit the gate of change. If you’re alert for pre-beginnings, you should be able to neutralize or transform brewing problems. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Neurophysiologists say that singing loudly can flush away metabolic waste from your cerebrum. I say that singing loudly can help purge your soul of any tendency it might have to ignore its deepest promptings. I bring these ideas to your attention, Pisces, because I believe the current astrological omens are suggesting that you do some really loud singing. Washing the dirt and debris out of your brain will do wonders for your mental hygiene. And your soul could use a boost as it ramps up its wild power to pursue its mostimportant dreams.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 20 Issue 52