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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 48 MAY 23–29, 2012

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TAK EE E ON E! FEATURE 14

SUMMER GUIDE BW’s guide to all things sunshine NOISE 30

TALK BACK Girl Talk’s Gregg Gillis assaults pop pretentions SCREEN 36

SIZZLE AND FIZZLE Your preview of summer’s biggest hits and flops FOOD 42

BIKE, BEER, EAT, REPEAT Destination dining on two wheels

“I think the media today is more coarse and less informed than it was 20 or 30 years ago.”

NEWS 11

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Intern: Emily Anderson, Jessica Murri Contributing Writers: Peter Buffington, Bill Cope, David Kirkpatrick Andrew Menzter, Ted Rall ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Brenda Stroud, Brenda@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Elaynea Robinson, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE SUMMERTIME AND THE LIVING IS EASY As we were putting together this issue, our Annual Summer Guide, I had two thoughts: First, there’s lots of good stuff in here to keep me busy all summer long. Second, though the suggestions are great, it’s almost overkill because one need only know one thing in order to get the most out of Boise in the summer: be outside. That may sound like a mandate to be more athletic than you’re naturally inclined to be, but in Boise, so many of summer’s best opportunities don’t require Spandex or special gear. Nope, we’re actually pretty good at taking life indoors and turning it inside out so that those who still want to watch movies, drink beer and catch a band don’t have to sit in a dark place inside in the summertime to do it. Theater heads to the amphitheater. Live music cranks it up in the Grove. Movies flicker in the park. Happy hour populates sidewalk patios. And it’s with that in mind—the idea that the best of summer in Boise is simply moving our routine into the wild open space of this Western landscape in which we live—that we put together this edition of Summer Guide. Whether you just want suggestions on new places to pedal your cruiser for an after-work (or afternoon) beer or you’re in need of a new trail to hike, we have ideas. The main story is a compendium of places and events not to miss—from midnight moon hikes to farmers markets in Boise’s surrounding rural communities. In Food (Page 42), Tara Morgan talks bikable patios, in Rec (Page 39) we take a look at road races, and if you must be productive, check out Arts (Page 34) for a collection of summer camps to keep your kids acting and painting and writing all summer long. Also this week, I’d like to draw your attention to boiseweekly.com. In the last week, there’s been some interesting discussion online about who was at fault in an accident in which a police officer, driving the wrong direction on a oneway street while responding to a call, hit and injured a cyclist. And in news of the ironic, a story at Cobweb reported that #IDAHO was trending on Twitter, not in reference to our fair state but as an acronym for the International Day Against Homophobia. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Brienne Oliver TITLE: Goober Peas MEDIUM: Reduction Linocut and Screenprint

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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ARTIST STATEMENT: The marvelous peanut plant and one of its beneficial insects, the lovely lacewing. Support your local farmers and your local artists. Peanuts are good for you and so is art.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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MAIL

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Idaho Public Television’s shaky foundation 11 Death row inmate’s lethal injection scheduled 12 CITIZEN

BY THE POWER OF GREYSKULL Can Boise’s electrical grid support the power draw of electric vehicles? In a follow-up to the April 25 story “Plug It In and Fill It Up” about alternative fuel vehicles, Citydesk chats with Idaho Power about the city’s readiness to provide electricity for cars.

ON THE SCENE WITH BW Boise Weekly’s social calendar was one tightly packed beast last week, with Spondee’s CD release party, Idaho Japan Day, Pigapalooza, Boise Bike Week’s block party, Jerry Seinfeld’s gut-busting show, honey cake at the Russian Food Fest, the inaugural RAW event ... It’s a long list, folks. For a brief rundown of our take on the week in A&E, read the Week in Review on Page 22 or head to Cobweb and get the full reports.

TAX THE SHIT OUTTA THE RICH Check out the TED Talk they didn’t want you to see. Amazon bigwig Nick Hanauer, himself a 1-percenter, talked about wealth inequality and his solution: tax the wealthy. Heavily. Scan the QR code to the right to see the video.

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FEATURE Summer Treasure

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE Speaking Girl Talk

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MUSIC GUIDE

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ARTS Kids get artsy with summer camps

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SCREEN Summer movie guide

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REC Summer race season at a full run

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FOOD Summer booze and food bike tours 42 WINE SIPPER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2012 | 5

MAIL REBUTTAL Your story on Idaho Freedom Foundation and the Primary elections (boiseweekly.com, Citydesk, “Primary 2012: North Idaho GOP Moderates Wind ... In Spite of Wayne Hoffman,” May 16, 2012) makes several incorrect comments. I would like to set the record straight. First, IFF does not endorse in elections. It does not support candidates nor does it oppose candidates. It does not give money to candidates. To suggest, as you did, that I or my organization wanted certain people to win in the election is not accurate. Second, Idaho Freedom Foundation’s Freedom Index covered about 150 bills this last legislative session. To claim, as Sen. Shawn Keough did, that our Freedom Index is a narrow review of the legislative session is far from true. Finally, we have never suggested that legislators are “big spenders” merely by passing a budget as the Legislature is constitutionally obligated to do. What we have said is that the 2012 Legislature passed a general fund budget with a 7-percent increase over the previous year. Too few legislators objected. Yes, the Legislature must pass a budget. It should have passed a smaller one. —Wayne Hoffman, executive director, Idaho Freedom Foundation

DO NOT LIKE I wanted to voice my distaste for Boise Weekly posts on Facebook. While I enjoy having the ability to see highlighted stories, access links to the website, right on my news feed throughout the day, I find the comments that your staff includes on the posts offensive. Often they are

snide and condescending remarks about some issues that I truly care about. The story and post that Boise Weekly’s Cobweb ran on Project 404 is a great example of how whoever is posting the stories on Facebook is rude, for a lack of a better word. (Not to mention that article was probably the worst thing I have ever read with BW’s name on it.) I do enjoy and appreciate the fact that Boise Weekly and its staff are allowed expression but I find the comments on Facebook unwarranted or just annoying. A recent post called everyone who read it a “hoser”—why? It comes across as incredibly arrogant and I hate Boise Weekly’s Facebook because of it. Please make it stop. I just want your wit and story, not someone’s cranky, snide, condescending remarks. —Brittany O’Meara, Boise

THANK YOU On behalf of the Bunyaad Oriental Rug Program at Ten Thousand Villages, Ephrata, Pa., and the 850 artisan families that we work with in Pakistan, we thank the Boise community for a wonderful sixth Fair Trade Oriental Rug Event hosted by Dunia Marketplace in Boise’s historic Hyde Park. This event helps to provide employment with a living wage to artisans in Pakistan who knot Oriental carpets within their homes. This year, the rug artisans are especially challenged by the rising costs of food and other necessities of living. Every rug sold at this event gave a job with a living wage that will help sustain the artisans during this difficult time. The Boise community was

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. 6 | MAY 23–29, 2012 | BOISEweekly

not only supportive in their purchases of these pieces, all crafted by fairly paid adults, but also in their willingness to help promote this special event. We thank the local businesses and individuals that have helped to promote this event by hosting brochures and posters. Thank you for this kind reception and supporting fair trade and making a difference in the world! —Dede Leister, Bunyaad Oriental Rugs at Ten Thousand Villages, Ephrata, Pa.

END PANHANDLING I was reading the small piece about panhandling in the April 18 issue (BW, Citydesk, “City Talks Panhandling Ban and Graffiti”), and I’ve been wondering why the city hasn’t cracked down harder on these people. I actually dread going to the grocery store because of these people and their bent up cardboard signs that they pull out of their backpacks when it’s time to make a little money for cigarettes or another drink. It used to be one per corner but now it’s nothing to see three or four at a time taking turns with a sign while the others are standing, sitting or sleeping on the grounds—some even drinking a beer. I’ve spoken to several men and women that spend time at Corpus Christie and some are on Social Security, they have a place to sleep, they have free food and clothes, access to computers but still go out to the street with a sign. I personally would like to see all panhandling stopped and if more help is needed for these people then provide that help, especially for families. I’m not uncaring or selfish. When I was working and was able to give, I donated food, clothing and furniture. When a person doesn’t have a lot, it doesn’t take a lot to get them started. —Judy Taylor, Boise WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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OPINION/BILL COPE

PARTY HOPPING I laugh (hah hah) at your closed primary! “So, Red, who’d you vote for last week? The guy who says he’s more for smaller government than the other guy is? Or the guy who says the other guy is only pretending he’s a real smaller-government guy?” “Dang it all, Cope. Truth is, I ended up not voting for anyone (whimper whimper).” “Ooooooh, Red. I’m sorry. And you were so excited about the closed primary, weren’t you? How, for the first time, you could vote along with nothing but pure, non-Muggle Republicans. So what happened? Did you forget?” “Hecks no, I di’n’t forget (snort snort). What happened was, when I walked in, the first lady I runs into wants t’ know if I’d care to afflixiate as a ’Publican or a Demercrat, and I got all het-up in my brain and says to her, ‘Whar’s the shoot agin yoose go t’ sposhin’ me a Demercrat!’ Wull, I think the only word she understood out o’ that was ‘Demercrat,’ so they handed me a ballot wit’ nothin’ but Demercratses names on it. Wull gull durnit, I ain’t never voted for no Demercrat in my life ... exceptin’ for maybe that time I voted for ol’ Lyndon LaRouche ... and I tweren’t about to start!” “Why didn’t you just ask to change your ballot?” “I did, I did! When I finds out I gots me a Demercrat one, I get real discomboobalated, if you know whats I mean. So I go back and says, ‘Gash a’Moshes! Airn’t no wherfin’ whatsit ah’ll e’er splot up this’n votin’ Demercrat!’ Wull I’ll be danged if this old gal sitting at the far end o’ the table doesn’t take that ballot out o’ my hands and drop it in a box. Then she says out real loud like, “Red T. LaRose has voted.’ I was so dang mad I coulda spit up Drano, so I thought the best thing for me t’ do would be t’ get my fanny outta there before I said somethin’ that’d get me in trouble. And the upshot is, I didn’t get t’ vote for nobody (harumph harumph).” “Gee, that’s a shame, for sure. I imagine you’re thanking your Republican pals for screwing this up, right?” “What you mean?” “Think about it, Red. If the rabid needlenosed weasels who are running the Idaho GOP these days hadn’t thrown their little pissy fit about closing their side of the primaries to everyone but registered Republicans, none of your trouble voting would have happened, right? It would have been like before, where the ballot would have all the candidates on it and you could choose in private which party you wanted to vote for.” “You always got t’ be blaming ever’thing on ’Publicans, Cope! I’ll bet there’s plenty o’ places where Demercrats closed up their primaries, too (huff huff)!” “All I know is, here in Idaho, it’s the Republicans rigging the system. And have you noticed how the more Republicans mess around with how we vote, the less people

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end up voting? That’s a fact. Is that your idea of how democracy ought to work, Red … if you’re having trouble getting your way, just screw other people out of their vote?” “Cope, you’re just mad ’cause there’s never enough Demercrats on a ballot to need a primary ’lection. I’ll bet you didn’t even go vote ’cause there weren’t nobody to choose betwixt (chuckle chuckle).” “Actually, I did go vote. You’re right about not having any contested Democrat races in my district, but I voted anyway.” “Oh yeah? So why’d you do that. T’ make sure the only guy running was agonna win (yuk yuk)?” “No. I voted Republican.” “Whaaaaaaaaa’! You cain’t do that! You gotta be a registered ’Publican to do that! You ain’t no registered ’Publican (puff puff)!” “I am now. They asked me which party I’m affiliated with, and I said, ‘Republican … for this election, at least. Next primary season, we’ll see what comes up.’ They looked at me a little funny, but they marked me down as a Republican and handed me a ballot.” “You cheater, you! You gull durned cheater (bitch bitch)!” “I didn’t cheat, Red. I voted and that’s not cheating. Ever. Not as long as you do it just once per election.” “But that’s ’zactly why them leaders o’ mine … what you call them rabid needlenosed weasels … took the state t’ court for, Cope! T’ stop fellers like you from coming over and slopping up our side with them RINO moderators and compromistists what ain’t true t’ the Holy ’Publican code. How couldja do it, Cope? How couldja jigger up our new rules (moan moan)?” “Because I can. Because there’s nothing those party leaders of yours can do to stop me, not as long as I’m willing to stoop so low as to call myself a Republican. And happily, my party leaders are committed to keeping their primary open to every one. Moderates, independents, Libertarians ... whatever. That’s because we Democrats don’t expect ideological purity, Red. We just expect democracy.” “But you gone and corrupitated our election! Now hows we know if some guy di’n’t win because o’ your stinkin’ vote (grumble grumble)?” “You don’t have to worry about that. I don’t know what I’ll do in future primaries, but this time, I did a write-in for every office. Every last one. And I didn’t just make up some nonsense candidate either. I wrote in what I truly believe, in both my mind and my heart, is best for my district and Idaho.” “Yeah? So who’d you write in (huh huh)?” “‘None of the above.’ Then I went home and took a hot shower.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

TED RALL/OPINION

THE LAST CIVIL RIGHTS STRUGGLE Sluts of America, arise! “A sitting United States president took sides in what many people consider the last civil rights movement,” Adam Nagourney of The New York Times wrote in reaction to Barack Obama’s endorsement of gay marriage. The last civil rights movement? No. Sadly, even as he belatedly championed equality for some, the president’s statement expressed a pernicious, widely accepted form of prejudice. Look for the caveat as you read: “I have to tell you that over the course of several years as I have talked to friends and family and neighbors, when I think about members of my own staff who are in incredibly committed monogamous relationships, same-sex relationships, who are raising kids together ... at a certain point, I’ve just concluded that for me personally, it is important for me to go ahead and affirm that I think same-sex couples should be able to get married.” In Obama’s worldview, in other words, it’s OK to be gay. But only if you behave like straight people—straight as in hetero and straight as in conventional. Obama is exposed as a monogamist: one who discriminates against people who have sex with multiple partners. Monogamism is commonplace. And it is bigotry. Monogamism is no more justifiable than racism or sexism or homophobia and, one day, it will be as reviled. Mia McKenzie of the blog Black Girl Dangerous responds to Obama: “So, basically, what the president is saying is that same-sex couples who are in relationships that look

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a certain way (monogamous, for example) should be able to have all the rights of straight people. Hmm. What about those of us, queer and straight, who aren’t into monogamy but are into committed relationships? (And, for the record, you can be poly and be committed to multiple people.)” To which I’ll add: What about people, straight and gay, who sleep with multiple partners? What about those who don’t want committed relationships? Shouldn’t they get tax breaks and insurance benefits, too? And what about the open, tricky, ever-sodirty secret—that many people in “incredibly committed monogamous relationships” cheat, that they’re de facto polygamists or just garden-variety sluts? (“A full 99 percent of Americans say they expect their spouse to be faithful,” according to U.S. News & World Report in 2008 but, The New York Times reported the same year, “University of Washington researchers have found that the lifetime rate of infidelity for men over 60 increased to 28 percent in 2006.” Hmm. Not to mention, obviously, that not all cheaters confess their sluttery to pollsters.) Like all oppressed people, sluts have their work cut out for them. “The Ethical Slut” (1997) by Dossie Easton and Catherine A. Liszt unleashed a landmark broadside against monogamy with a simple argument: Anything that two consenting adults do is OK as long as they approach one another, and their other 10 partners, with honesty and openness.

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OPINION/TED RALL

I SU GGE ST T HAT WE NEED MULTIPLE FORMS OF CULTUR ALLY AC C EPTAB LE SE XU A L RE LATI O NS HIP TYPES —INC LUDING SE XU A LLY OP E N R ELATIONS HIPS —THAT EX IS T WI THOU T HI E RA R C HY OR HEGEMONY.”

Casual hook-ups, open relationships, swinging, group sex and other alternative forms of sexual expression, wrote Mmes. Easton and Liszt, are not immoral so don’t feel guilty about them. “We believe it’s OK to have sex with anybody you love, and we believe in loving everybody,” they wrote. Fifteen years later, however, tens of millions of sluts live underground, compelled to sneak around. Unlike straights and Obamaapproved monogamous gays, America’s secret sluts have to hide their sex lives from their friends, families and co-workers. (Ethical sluts tell their partners the truth.) “My FWB and I had an awesome foursome with this couple we met online” isn’t the smartest Mondaymorning conversation starter for the wannabe upwardly mobile. Monogamy may be a myth, to paraphrase the title of the 1989 book that found that roughly half of all married Americans cheat, but as Obama’s statement suggests, it’s harder to kill than herpes. Now here comes The Monogamy Gap: Men, Love and the Reality of Cheating by Eric Anderson, a devastating critique of monogamy that has been ignored by book reviewers and buried by the mainstream media. “The Ethical Slut” says it’s OK to be slutty. The Monogamy Gap goes further. It states loudly, brashly—and mostly convincingly—that while monogamy is right for some people, it’s wrong for most. Which makes monogamism a form of bigotry not only based on a lie, but like other forms of discrimination, downright bad for society. Not so deep down, we know he’s right. When there’s a public sex scandal—John Edwards, Eliot Spitzer, etc.—you don’t hear a lot of expressions of disgust, just harrumphs and how-about-thats from people, most of whom can imagine themselves “guilty” of the same “crime”: hard-wired horniness. “I suggest that we need multiple forms of culturally acceptable sexual relationship types—including sexually open relationships— that exist without hierarchy or hegemony,” Anderson writes. Men, Anderson asserts, are trapped in a state of “dyadic dissonance” in which they are painfully torn between monogamist social programming and their sexual desires to sleep with multiple partners. “If [men] entertain with their partners the possibility that sex and love are separate and that they could maintain the love with their partner while seeking thrilling sex with outsiders (an open sexual 9

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relationship), they risk losing their partners. Even mentioning this is thought to be an affront to love. Love, they falsely believe, is enhanced through sex, and sex with outsiders is falsely believed to detract from the love of a couple. We all too often believe that if our partner ceases to desire us sexually, he or she ceases to love us.” What is a (stymied) manslut to do? “In desiring but not wanting to cheat,” Anderson continues, “men set out to rectify their dissonance through pornography, visualizing themselves having sex with someone else while having sex with their partner, and/or flirting with others online. Eventually, however, these imagined/cyber forms of extradyadic sex are not enough. Men strongly desire to have sex with someone else, and they often begin to feel anger or aggression at their partner because (at one level) it is their partner that is preventing them from having the type of sex that every cell in their body demands.” So they screw around. But cheaters aren’t bad people. They’re just sluts. They’re wired that way. Many—most of us—are sluts. Don’t be shocked. After all, contemporary marriage—based on love rather than property, monogamous rather than polygamous—is still in its experimental stage, less than a century old. And the rate of divorce suggests that the experiment isn’t going well. Anderson says monogamism forces us to choose between guilt and frustration: “Although cheating remains almost universally taboo in modern societies, my research suggests that cheating might actually save relationships [because] cheating permits men to have the sex with others they somatically desire. ... With cheating, they do not have to deal with the threat of losing their partners by mentioning their sexual desires for others.” I have some issues with The Monogamy Gap. Anderson concludes that “it is only in open relationships where long-term sexual and romantic satisfaction can be found for people who somatically desire sex with others,” yet he hardly considers the needs and desires of heterosexual women. Do they want open relationships? Maybe. Maybe not. Anderson’s preferred model—one or several core committed, longer-term relationships plus a la carte “hit it and quit it” assignations—leaves out other formats, such as swinging. Overall, however, I strongly recommend The Monogamy Gap for anyone who wonders why a society that elevates monogamy can’t seem to follow its rules. America needs to begin this discussion. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NEWS/CITYDESK NEWS LAU R IE PEAR M AN

BETTER RECEPTION Idaho Public Television enjoys ratings success while facing fiscal restraint

While a growing number of grandparents and other relatives raise foster children, caregivers receive little to no assistance.

FAMILY MATTERS: MORE IDAHO CHILDREN RAISED BY OLDER, POORER RELATIVES

GEORGE PRENTICE Television, according to former Federal Communication Commission Chairman Newton Minow, is a “vast wasteland.” “When television is good, nothing—not the theater, not magazines or newspapers—nothing is better,” said Minow. “But when television is bad, nothing is worse.” Minow’s remarks, made more than a half-century ago, scorched the very medium he managed. Soon thereafter, Congress responded with the All-Channel Receiver Act of 1961—broadening an ultra high frequency broadcast spectrum—to help launch nonprofit television stations throughout the country. By 1965, Idaho Public Television hit the airwaves. Nearly 50 years later, IdahoPTV is one of the most successful broadcast operations in the United States. “The November 2011 ratings indicated that Idaho Public Television was the second-most watched PBS station, per capita, in the United States,” said Peter Morrill, IdahoPTV’s general manager. “We’re very proud of that fact.” However, Morrill doesn’t wear his pride on his sleeve. The son of an Episcopal minister, he usually speaks in humble, measured tones, though he is surrounded by accolades. His Orchard Street broadcast center features hallways lined by shelves stacked with trophies and honors. Since 2000, approximately 200 awards have been bestowed to Dialogue, D4K, Idaho Reports, Outdoor Idaho and dozens of specials. IdahoPTV’s landmark documentary, the Color of Conscience, examining human rights in Idaho, garnered the Edward R. Murrow Award and the American Bar Association’s Silver Gavel Award. No fewer than 17 Emmy Awards fill the shelves, and IdahoPTV is nominated for five more Emmys, which will be handed out Saturday, June 2. But not unlike a Masterpiece Theater drama, in which the glitz and glamour are upstairs at IdahoPTV, there is great complexity and even mounting concern downstairs. “What keeps me awake at night is our capital equipment replacement, because we have very, very limited [funding] to keep our statewide delivery system, both broadcast and online, up to date,” said Morrill. And IdahoPTV’s delivery system is unlike any other in the Gem State, pushing out more than 1,000 hours of programming each week, across eight broadcast, cable and online platforms. “On the technology side, there are some WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Peter Morrill, general manager (left), and Ron Pisaneschi, director of content (right), manage more than 1,000 hours of programming over IdahoPTV’s eight platforms.

real challenges,” echoed Ron Pisaneschi, director of content. “Right now, we may be in a pretty good position, but we’re not on a funding path that is sustainable long-term.” Pisaneschi and Morrill’s nightmare scenario is a disaster—literally. “If something small or medium-size crashes, we have options,” said Morrill. “But if we had some major component die, a catastrophic equipment failure that would cost more than a couple hundred thousand dollars, well, that equipment will probably stay down for a while. A full-power transmitter is about $600,000 just for the cabinetry.” Morrill said he was delighted to procure $189,000 from the 2012 Idaho Legislature for some replacement capital equipment, but he’s worried that it won’t sustain the station. “We have to be careful with that money,” he said. “We delayed a number of needs that needed to be addressed sooner than later,” Morrill told the Idaho State Board of Education on April 19. (The board holds the broadcast license for IdahoPTV.) “But I’m never totally comfortable. Only the paranoid survive. With the approximate $200,000 from the state … well, that’s wack-a-mole money.” State-appropriated funds represent 19 percent of IdahoPTV’s $6.2 million annual operating budget. Community service grants from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting bring in another $940,000. “But the big mogumba for us are the individual contributions,” said Morrill. “About 65 percent of our income comes from pledges and donations.” Morrill’s colleagues recently wrapped their spring pledge drive, Festival 2012, to great success. “We’re very pleased,” said Morrill. “We’re still crunching the numbers, but I can tell you that we’ll be very close to the highest pledge drive of all time. That was back in 2007.

Remember 2007, when things were better economically? This year was an unmitigated success.” But that success is a delicate balance: attempting to raise the lion’s share of income through a small window of opportunity. “There’s a lot of risk associated. We build our pledge drive around a very compressed amount of time: 16 days in March and maybe three or four days in December,” said Pisaneschi. “If we don’t hit our numbers, there are serious repercussions. But I can tell you that most stations around the country are pledging 50, 60 or even 70 days a year.” Pisaneschi and Morrill are certain that the chief reason for this year’s pledge success rests on the quality of their year-round programming, which they said has never been higher. A review of the November 2011 ratings indicate success across the schedule, beginning with daytime programming. “We’re kicking butt,” said Pisaneschi. “The numbers are terrific.” George (the curious one), Clifford (the red one), and their friend the bird (the big one) regularly make the Nielsen’s Top 25 list of popular shows. In primetime, Antiques Roadshow, airing five times a week on two of IdahoPTV’s stations, continually ranks near the top. But nothing came close to the juggernaut that is Downton Abbey. “It’s pretty phenomenal,” said Pisaneschi. “It hasn’t been on the air in months, and I still get hit up in the grocery store on a regular basis. Everyone wants to know when we’re getting the third season. Next season can’t come soon enough.” Downton Abbey, the British mini-series chronicling the fictional Crawley family and their servants in the early 20th century, caught the imagination and loyalty of millions of viewers on both sides of the pond. By its second season, it became 12 the most successful British costume

A growing number of Idaho children are being cared for by relatives other than their parents. Stepping Up For Kids, a sobering report authored by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, reveals that the number of children in so-called “kinship” care has increased by 100 percent during the past decade. Currently, more than 7,000 Idaho children live with grandparents, uncles, aunts and older siblings. “Kinship caregivers are more likely to be single, older, less educated, unemployed and poor,” said Lauren Necochea, director of Idaho KIDS COUNT. “Kinship families face great challenges.” Not the least of which is enough money to put food on the table. “It costs an average $990 per month to raise a child, according to the United States Department of Agriculture,” said Necohchea. “Kinship families in the foster care system receive an average $511 per month, while kinship families who receive Temporary Assistance for Needy Families funding get only $249 a month.” Less than 12 percent of kinship families receive any assistance from TANF, although nearly 100 percent are eligible. According to the report, “even those who are able to get help find themselves navigating through thickets of bureaucratic rules.” Money is just one of the challenges facing kinship caregivers. Extended relatives sometimes lack the necessary legal authority to enroll a child for school or access basic medical care. Additionally, kinship providers must contend with child trauma and emotional issues tied to abuse or neglect. Considering that nearly a third of all Idaho children that have been separated from their parents by the state of Idaho are currently in kinship care, the alternative would be to place more children in foster homes, requiring a greater financial burden to taxpayers and increased stress to an already over-burdened court system. President Barack Obama and Oprah Winfrey are two of the millions of American men and women who were raised by grandparents or other relatives. “When children cannot remain safely with their parents, other family and friends can provide a sense of security, positive identify, and belonging,” reads the report. But unless Idaho and the nation responds to a growing need for financial, legal and emotional support for kinship care, the innovative program, which depends upon the better part of our human nature, could hang in the balance, resulting in more children in traditional foster care. —George Prentice

BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2012 | 11

NEWS drama since Brideshead Revisited of the 1980s or Upstairs, Downstairs of the ’70s. “I never would have expected this kind of success from Downton Abbey,” said Pisanechi. “It’s basically a classic drama, and yet my 22-year-old daughter and her friends are all tweeting about it. It’s different from what we ever would have expected from Masterpiece.” But in his search for the next Downton Abbey, Pisaneschi said he’s regularly testing new programs that are still in development. “I sit in a dark conference room for days on end, watching one eight-minute clip after another until I go blue in the face,” he said. “You’re always saying to yourself, ‘This one works. This one doesn’t.’” But he hinted at what he thinks could be his next big hit. “We’ll probably go after what I consider to be a very interesting show,” said Pisaneschi. “It’s a drama—a British production—about a group of London midwives in the 1950s. I’ve already watched a few episodes and I can tell you that it’s great.” 11

The series, Call the Midwife, is a ratings smash in Britain. Morrill said his wish list would include more Idaho productions. “Depending on funding, we have aspirations to start up an ongoing history series, with the working title The Idaho Experience,” said Morrill. “We would showcase significant public figures in Idaho history. We would also love to produce three or four high-level, live performance programs.” He also looks for an opportunity to make Idaho Reports, the weekly examination of state government during the Idaho legislative session, become a year-round program. “But we know that it would cost us about $150,000 to go year-round,” said Morrill. Morrill and Pisaneschi are certain that the current media landscape provides more opportunity to present higher-quality programming. “I think the media today is more coarse and less informed than it was 20 or 30 years ago,” said Morrill. “I guess that’s why I continue to be so passionate about our increasingly relevant role. There’s a lot of junk out there. And that’s a major opportunity for us to help create thoughtful, quality programs.”

A NEW ERA OF EXECUTIONS Idaho schedules its next lethal injection GEORGE PRENTICE

Brent Reinke, director of the Idaho Department of Correction, is a man of many details. He can quote policies and procedures without missing a beat. But he had to pause for a moment when asked where he was in July 1984. “I have to think about that,” he said. “I was a businessman in the Magic Valley, and that was right about the time I started as a [Twin Falls] county commissioner.” Ten years prior, Reinke lived in Blackfoot. “That’s where my wife and I met,” he said. “I can’t exactly recall, but I’m sure we talked about it.” “It” was the July 17, 1984, murder of 31-year-old Danette Elg in her Blackfoot home. She was sexually mutilated and stabbed or slashed 15 times. The day before, she told Blackfoot Police that Richard Leavitt, a man she had met through a mutual friend, was stalking her. Leavitt was even bold enough to accompany police when they entered Elg’s home on July 21, 1984, finding Elg’s body wrapped in the tattered rubber of what had been a waterbed. Within two months of his arrest, Leavitt was found guilty of first-degree murder and use of a deadly weapon. Following decades of appeals, Leavitt learned his fate on May 17, when a death warrant was issued, triggering a series of

12 | MAY 23–29, 2012 | BOISEweekly

events that will lead to his scheduled execution on Tuesday, June 12, at 10 a.m. “[On May 17] at 5 p.m., we moved inmate Leavitt into a holding cell of F block [the execution wing],” said Reinke. The revised execution procedures will bring a number of changes to Idaho’s second execution in less than a year but only the third since 1957. “We have decided to use a fourth option [as a lethal injection],” said Reinke. The option requires two syringes each carrying 2.5 grams of pentobarbital, which should result in a much quicker death. “We’ve been tracking the same process in other states and it’s almost 40 percent less time,” said Reinke. “But the main reason we’re using this process is the availability of the drug.” Reinke said select teams of IDOC employees have been running through execution practices ever since the November 2011 execution of Paul Ezra Rhoades. “We never stopped our rehearsing,” he said. “We need to be as prepared in June as we were in November.” And that rehearsing will continue past June. “We could see another execution in another six or seven months. It’s entirely possible,” said Reinke. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

CITIZEN

GINA STAMPER A veteran’s veteran GEORGE PRENTICE

Did you find fulfillment in your time with the Coast Guard? I loved it. I was the 911 operator of the ocean. I’m guessing you were involved in some pretty serious rescue operations. We had a particularly harrowing situation in February 1997. I was the telecommunications specialist on watch aboard Coast Guard Group Port Angeles, Wash. We received a garbled Mayday call. I couldn’t quite figure out where the vessel was, so I was waking people everywhere up and down the U.S. and Canada coast, trying to pinpoint the location. The sailboat had already lost its mast.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

(The waves measured 25-feet; the winds were clocked at 30-knots. As the civilian vessel became flooded and the engine failed, it began to drift dangerously close to rock formations between the Quillayute River and the Pacific Ocean. According to official accounts of the rescue, Stamper took charge of all communications between the sinking sailboat and a fleet of rescue cutters, lifeboats and helicopters.) Our first rescue boat had problems. (The sea rolled one rescue boat three times, ripping its superstructure off from the hull.) There were four souls on that boat. We lost three of them. The only Coastie who survived on that boat was a guy straight out of boot camp. He had tethered himself to the boat. Was the rescue successful? It was. We managed to pluck the two civilians out of the water just before their craft smashed against the rocks. The pilots of the helicopter were honored with the Distinguished Flying Cross. That’s how bad things were. (Stamper was commended for her performance by the commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard.) Why did you leave the service? By then, I was a mom and decided to discharge and come back home. I took a job as a receptionist at the Boise Veterans Home. That was in December 2000. A couple of years later, I became a service officer and about a year after that, I was appointed to be the state’s women veterans coordinator. Isn’t it fair to say that a good many veterans don’t know about their benefits? A lot of them are intimidated by the VA system

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Memorial Day stirs personal memories for Gina Stamper. She has served with and for thousands of Idahoans who have worn a uniform, women in particular. She also remembers a number of her fellow servicemen and women who were lost too soon while serving their nation. Having served as Idaho’s state women veterans coordinator for seven years, Stamper now serves as the treasurer for the National Association of State Women Veterans Coordinators. Stamper spends her days advocating for approximately 11,000 Idaho women who have served in the armed forces. Stamper also wore a uniform—that of the U.S. Coast Guard. Straight out of high school, she turned 18 years old in boot camp. “My mom didn’t believe I would do it until we were driving to the airport,” she said. “It was so far outside of anything I could have imagined.” Boise Weekly spoke to Stamper about her advocacy, her own service and her involvement in one of the most-dramatic rescues at sea in maritime history.

And isn’t that especially true for females? Many women who have served don’t consider themselves veterans. Does that come from the cliche of what we think a veteran is? I think so. When we first started organizing our state women veterans conference, I had to convince quite a few women that they were indeed eligible for their health care benefits. As of last November, we have approximately 11,000 women veterans in Idaho. I’m certain you expect that number to grow. We had 101 women deploy with the 116th [Cavalry Brigade Combat Team] to Iraq. That was 15 percent of the total. And we’re seeing the number of new women enlistees jump as well. How is the VA preparing to meet that growing demographic? The medical center just opened a new women’s clinic just a few weeks ago. Women now have their own physicians and nurses. That’s huge. I must note that your eyes welled up several times during our conversation. Well, I’m a state employee. I can tell you I’m not here for the money. I’m quite cognizant that I would not have got to be where I am today without all of the women who came before me.

BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2012 | 13

SUMMER TREASURE

EXPLORE THE

The weekly Saturday farmers market is the place to stock up on fresh fruit, veggies, flowers and myriad other locally produced goods. It also happens to be the best place to catch up with your capitalcitypublicmarket.com neighbors and do some quality people watching.

CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET

DEANNA DARR | ILLUSTRATIONS BY ADAM ROSENLUND

I

t’s the journey, not the destination that counts, and when that journey involves making the most of summer in Boise, it’s worth the effort. To help you navigate a proper Boise summer, all you have to do is follow Boise Weekly’s map to summer to find your own seasonal treasure. Need more help? Measure your progress with the help of BW’s summer to-do lists.

WESTERN IDAHO FAIR Friday, Aug. 17 to Sunday, Aug. 26 idahofair.com

BET ON THE PONIES

Nothing says summer like a fair, especially that wonder ful combination of greasy fair food and spinning carnival rides.

AT LES BOIS PARK

lesboispark.com

GO TO A

BOISE HAWKS GAME

Watch Boise’s own boys of summer take the field while you sip a beer along the first base line.

Get dressed up, have a few cocktails and feel like a big spender as the ponies race the first full season at the park in years.

CHECK OUT BOISE’S NEW RIVER

RECREATION PARK

boiseriverpark.com

Years in the making, the whitewater park is sure to be a major draw for anyone who loves a good Eskimo roll.

milb.com

WATCH THE HOT AIR BALLOONS AT THE

There’s nothing quite like the sight of hot air balWednesday, Aug. 29 loons over to Sunday, Sept. 2 the city of spiritofboise.com Boise.

SPIRIT OF BOISE BALLOON CLASSIC

JOIN THE TOUR

DE FAT BIKE PARADE

Join the two-wheeled community as it takes over town with Saturday, Aug. 18 bikes, music and newbelgium.com/tour-de-fat lots of beer.

DISC GOLF

AT JULIA DAVIS PARK

cityofboise.org

Real golf is just too hard sometimes. Play for free and understand a whole new type of frustration.

14 | MAY 23–29, 2012 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

CLIMB THE HILL AT

CAMEL’S BACK PARK

Why? Because it’s fun to act like a kid once in awhile. Maybe get crazy and hit the playground.

HYDE PARK STREET FAIR Friday, Sept. 14 to Sunday, Sept. 16 northendboise.org

A celebration of all things North End with three days of music, entertainment, craft booths and food.

GO CHECK OUT SIBERIA AT THE

Nothing reminds you of how good you have like visiting solitar y OLD IDAHO STATE itconfinement at an old prison. Besides, it’s history.idaho.gov/ at least nice and cool old-idaho-penitentiary in the hole.

PENITENTIARY

HIKE TABLEROCK

AT SUNRISE

ridgetorivers.cityofboise.org

The view from the top is worth the work, and a cool summer morning is the best time to do it.

TAKE IN A CONCERT AT IDAHO

BOTANICAL GARDEN

idahobotanicalgarden.org

With the Outlaw Field concert series bringing in national big name acts and the weekly Botanical Garden Concert Series keeping things low key and local, the garden is one of the best spots to chill all summer.

ATTEND A PLAY AT

IDAHO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL idahoshakespeare.org

Theater under the stars with a picnic and wine—do you really need more reasons?

FLOAT THE BOISE RIVER

If there���s one quintessential thing Boiseans must do ever y summer it’s plop themselves on something that floats and head down the river. Join the hydro-highway cityofboise.org all summer and take advantage of the shuttle ser vice.

ART IN THE PARK Friday, Sept. 7 to Sunday, Sept. 9 boiseartmuseum.org

The entire city (with children and dogs in tow) turns out for this fundraiser for Boise Art Museum with more than 200 artisans from around the country as well as music, food and a kids area.

FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS

AT ANN MORRISON PARK

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Feel your patriotism swell as you watch things explode over the city with thousands of your neighbors.

RIDE YOUR BIKE

Spend a day pedaling along the paved path but schedule frequent stops at the many riverside restaurants and bars beALL THE WAY TO cause we wouldn’t want LUCKY PEAK you to lose your strength, cityofboise.org would we?

ALONG THE GREENBELT

BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2012 | 15

A SUMMER OF EATING AND DRINKING TAKE A TASTING TOUR OF THE CANYON COUNTY WINERIES idahowines.org

If Idaho doesn’t seem like wine countr y, spend a weekend afternoon tr ying to hit all the tasting rooms at the wineries just outside of Boise and you’ll be a believer.

HIT A FOOD TRUCK RALLY facebook.com/foodtruckrally

Gourmet food from a mobile eater y seems even better when the weather is warm and you’re surrounded by like-minded eaters.

EXPLORE MULTIPLE FARMERS MARKETS Capital City Farmers Market, capitalcitypublicmarket.com East End Market, facebook.com/eastendmarketatbowncrossing Meridian Farmers Market, meridianfarmersmarket.com Eagle Saturday Market, eaglearts.org

Fresh food, veggies and season-long people watching.

DRINK A PITCHER OF MOJITOS ON THE PATIO AT BARDENAY IN EAGLE bardenay.com

There are worse ways to spend an afternoon than on the shaded riverside patio with a big-old pitcher of something so refreshing.

PICNIC ON THE BANKS OF THE BOISE RIVER Nothing seems quite so summer as a casual nosh while watching the river rafters float by.

16 | MAY 23–29, 2012 | BOISEweekly

TROPICAL DRINKS ON THE ROOFTOP PATIO AT REEF reefboise.com

How many excuses do you need for a giant fruity drink in a tiki mug?

BRUNCH BEFORE/ DURING THE FARMERS MARKETTO PEOPLEWATCH ALONG EIGHTH STREET A per fectly warm morning on a patio with great food and a parade of entertainment.

SAVOR IDAHO Sunday, June 10 savoridaho.org

When Idaho wineries and restaurants team up for an afternoon outdoors, nobody loses.

DUCK INTO GRAINEY’S BASEMENT ON SUNDAY TO COOL DOWN WITH CHEAP BEERS 109 S. Sixth St.

Cold, cheap beer in a subterranean hideaway.

FEAST ON FAIR FOOD AT THE WESTERN IDAHO FAIR Friday, Aug. 17Sunday, Aug. 26 idahofair.com

Corndogs, burgers, ice cream and churros might not fit with the whole locavore movement, but sometimes you just need one ... or two.

TRY OUT THE SUMMER BREWS AT EVERY LOCAL BREWERY 10 Barrel Brewing Company, 10barrel.com (opening summer 2012) Crooked Fence Brewing Company, cfbrewing.blogspot.com Highlands Hollow Brewhouse, highlandshollow.com Payette Brewing Company, payettebrewing.com Sockeye Brewery, sockeyebrew.com TableRock Brew Pub, tablerockbrewpub.com

Are you up to the challenge?

EAT A SNOWCONE Act like a kid and love ever y second of it.

SAN IGNAZIO FESTIVAL Friday, July 27Sunday, July 29 basquecenter.com

Head to Boise’s Basque Block and let the Basques show you how to party with plenty of food, music and drinks.

SOUL FOOD EXTRAVAGANZA Saturday, Aug. 4 boisesoulfoodfestival.com

Thousands come out to Julia Davis Park each year for the chance to get their fill of some true Southern-style comfort food.

DELI DAYS Thursday, June 21-Friday, June 22 ahavathbethisrael.org

Get in line to get your fix of traditional Jewish deli-style favorites. Come hungr y.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

A SUMMER OF MUSIC ALIVE AFTER FIVE downtownboise.org

Ever y Wednesday evening throughout the summer, Grove Plaza is filled with live music and after-work crowds looking to relax at the free concert series.

BOISE MUSIC FESTIVAL

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE CONCERT SERIES idahobotanicalgarden.org

Every Thursday night throughout the summer, Idaho Botanical Garden hosts intimate outdoor concerts, where picnics are encouraged.

MUSIC FROM STANLEY

Saturday, July 7 boisemusicfestival.com

musicfromstanley.com

Tens of thousands turn out for this free day of music in Ann Morrison Park. This year’s lineup includes LL Cool J, Kellie Pickler and Smashmouth.

Spend Saturdays throughout the summer at Redfish Lake listening to live music that is later aired on Boise State Radio.

BRAUN BROTHERS REUNION FESTIVAL Thursday, Aug. 9Saturday, Aug. 11 braunbrothersreunion.com

The tour de force that is the Bruan Family (Micky and the Motorcars, Reckless Kelly, The Braun Brothers) gather in Challis for a weekend of music and camping.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

OUTLAW SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

Boise Philharmonic gets outside for the first time with a concert series at the Eagle River Pavilion.

RANCHFEST If you get an official invite, consider yourself one of the cool kids.

SAWTOOTH MUSIC FESTIVAL Friday, July 27Saturday, July 28 sawtoothmusicfestival. com/2012/

Two days of music in Stanley with a lineup that includes The Cave Singers, Langhorne Slim, and Shovels and Rope as well as Lucy Michelle and Velvet Lapelles.

idahobotanicalgarden.org

Some of the biggest names in music turn up to play outdoor shows at Idaho Botanical Garden.

PICNIC AT THE POPS Saturdays, Aug. 18, Aug. 25 and Sept. 1 summeratthepops.com

YELLOWPINE HARMONICA FESTIVAL Friday, Aug. 3Sunday, Aug. 5 yellowpinemusicandharmonicafestival.org

A small mountain town becomes the center of the harmonica world.

BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2012 | 17

SUMMER FOR THE KIDS MOVIES IN THE PARK Boise, cityofboise.org/departments/parks Meridian, meridiancity.org/ movienight

Gather the kids for a free family friendly outdoor movie on the third Saturday of the month June to August in Julia Davis Park or ever y Friday night through the summer in Settlers Park in Meridian.

SWIM AT THE NATATORIUM POOL AND HYDROTUBE cityofboise.org/departments/ parks

One of Boise’s oldest public pools has generations of fans.

RIDE THE SLIDES AT ROARING SPRINGS WATERPARK roaringsprings.com

Let the kids fling themselves down massive waterslides while you tr y to avoid a sunburn.

PLAY MINI GOLF AT WAHOOZ FAMILY FUN ZONE wahoozfunzone.com

One of the two outdoor courses ends with a giant flame-throwing tiki head. If that’s not your thing, there are go-carts, laser tag and bumper boats, too.

McMillan Skatepark, West Boise Pipe Dreams Skatepark, Caldwell Rhoades Skatepark, Downtown Boise Stampede Skatepark, Nampa Tully Skatepark, Meridian

The per fect place when childhood involves a set of wheels, a giant concrete bowl and a really good helmet.

RIDE THE RIDES AT THE WESTERN IDAHO FAIR idahofair.com

Spinning around until you think you’re going to throw up is a rite of passage.

VISIT THE DISCOVERY CENTER OF IDAHO scidaho.org

Hands-on science exhibits are education in disguise. The famous Bodies exhibit will fill the museum starting in September.

RIDE THE PADDLEBOATS IN JULIA DAVIS PARK cityofboise.org

See if you can paddle hard enough to make a wake.

VISIT THE MK NATURE CENTER fishgame.idaho.gov

HIT THE SKATEPARK Eagle Skatepark, Eagle

An urban escape the adults will like as much as the kids.

Fort Boise Skatepark, Boise Gem Island Skatepark, Emmett Kuna Skatepark, Kuna

18 | MAY 23–29, 2012 | BOISEweekly

VISIT ZOO BOISE zooboise.org

Watch for cool camps, educational programs and even the chance to stay in the zoo overnight.

SWIMMING BEACH AT EAGLE ISLAND STATE PARK parksandrecreation. idaho.gov

Can say anyone say “sandcastles”?

WET WILD PARADE IN EAGLE Saturday, June 9 eaglechamber.com

Be prepared to get soaked at this signature Eagle Fun Days event.

DAIRY DAYS PARADE Friday, June 15 dairydays.org

Old-fashioned family entertainment with lots of cows.

SUN VALLEY SUMMER ICE SHOWS sunvalley.com

Some of the top skaters in the world show up to per form on the tiny outdoor rink in the mountains.

WAGON DAYS Saturday, Sept. 1Monday, Sept. 3 visitsunvalley.com

Labor Day weekend is filled with antique fairs, barbecue, a Western shootout and the famous Big Hitch Parade.

PLAY IN THE SPRINKLERS Because childhood requires it. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

A SUMMER OF RECREATION EXPLORE THE BOISE FOOTHILLS

PLAY A GAME OF KICKBALL

CANOE ON REDFISH LAKE

ridgetorivers.cityofboise.org

gamedayboise.com

redfishlake.com

By bike or on foot, such easy access to outdoor recreation is one of the prime perks of living in the Boise area. Take in the awesome views or tr y out some of the more technical bike trails.

kickballboise.com

Get out of Boise’s heat with a trip north to the stunning mountain lake for some camping and canoeing.

HIT THE CLIMBING GYM The Front Climbing Club, frontboise.com Urban Ascent, urbanascent.com

Sure, rock walls are great to stay in shape all winter, but they’re also a great airconditioned escape when it’s too damned hot outside in the summer.

LEARN TO LONGBOARD The Boardroom, boardroomboise.com Newt and Harold’s, newtandharolds.com Prestige Skate Shop, prestigeskateboards.com

’Cause you know you want to.

ULTIMATE FRISBEE boiseultimate.com

Turning a game into a hardcore sport is never a bad thing.

It was fun when you were 10, imagine it now that you’re old enough to have a beer after the game.

MOONLIGHT HIKE FLOAT THE PAYETTE OR NORTH FORK OF THE BOISE Cascade Raft & Kayak, cascaderaft.com

A mouthful of river water seems way more acceptable when you’re in the middle of a rapid. Besides, Idaho’s whitewater is world-class.

CHECK OUT BOISE’S NEW RIVER RECREATION PARK boiseriverpark.com

A kayaking playground in the middle of the city.

MOUNTAIN BIKE THE TRAILS AT BOGUS BASIN MOUNTAIN RECREATION AREA

With long summer evenings and a full moon, a late start is no reason not to hike.

BARS AND STRIPES ALLEY CAT RACE Saturday, July 7 boiseweekly.com

Combining beer and bikes for an all-American kind of race.

WATERSKI LUCKY PEAK parksandrecreation. idaho.gov

Whether chilling on the boat or plowing through the water, it’s all good when you’re on the reser voir.

FISH THE BOISE RIVER

bogusbasin.org

fishandgame.idaho.gov

Without snow, the ski area boasts tons of trails and even a disc golf course.

You just have to love being able to go fishing on your lunch break.

RIDE THE TRAILS AT THE EAGLE BIKE PARK eaglebikepark.org

It’s where you can combine mountain bike trails with a BMX track, a jump track and even downhill racing. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

ridgetorivers.cityofboise.org

TWILIGHT CRITERIUM Saturday, July 14 boisetwilightcriterium.com

Boise’s signature summer road cycling race brings the crowds downtown.

BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2012 | 19

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events THURSDAY-SUNDAY MAY 24-27 ANIME OASIS DOUBLE ONE anime

JAS

Manga, anime, costumes, tea parties, games and oh so much more make up Idaho’s anime convention, and this year’s installment is no exception. Anime Oasis Double One is the program’s 11th annual iteration, and it all begins Thursday, May 24, with opening ceremonies at 5 p.m. at the Grove Hotel in downtown Boise. The four-day event pulls in talent from special guests like anime artists and voice actors, including Caitlin Glass, Sonny Strait, Chris Rager and Michael Coleman, who will lead discussion panels and events to explore the wide world of Japanese cartooning. Organizer Jeremy Lopett said the 2011 event attracted almost 1,200 participants. “I moved here from out of state, and there just wasn’t anything exciting,” said Lopett. “Really, there wasn’t anything to do here in Idaho. We had 56 paid attendants the first time, and last year, we had 1,120.” Nailing down the specifics of the event’s biggest draw isn’t easy. Some participants come to cosplay, which involves dressing up in costume like a favorite character. Others come for the social atmosphere, workshops on drawing cartoons or to meet a like-minded mate. While adults and children can register for the convention, specific events are for the 18-andolder set, like the Yaoi and Yuri showings, Glitterati Gals Burlesque show and dating games. Lopett said attendees come from far and wide to join Idaho’s convention. “We get people from 15 different states or so,” he said. With loads of activities, ranging from Wiffle ball battles, battle karaoke, arcade game competitions, dance offs, photo ops and cosplay chess matches, the program provides an event to match almost any interest. Various times, $7-$43. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., 208333-8000, animeoasis.org. MIN

H E P

ARR

20 | MAY 23–29, 2012 | BOISEweekly

It’s fun with front loaders at the Meridian Public Works Expo.

THURSDAY MAY 24 how stuff works MERIDIAN PUBLIC WORKS EXPO Want to see big construction guys channel their inner child and maneuver mini front loaders to pick up soccer balls from the tops of traffic cones and dump them into trash cans? You’re in luck because that’s exactly what the Mini Heavy Equipment Rodeo at this year’s Meridian Public Works Expo is all about. The expo takes place Thursday, May 24, at the Meridian City Hall Plaza, and is part of the Meridian Public Works Week, which kicked off May 19. You may have never given much thought to what happens before you turn on the faucet, or after you flush the toilet, but you can have some fun, meet the Public Works staff, have a free hotdog and enjoy interactive displays while learning what it takes to keep the water flowing. In addition to dazzling spectators with their equipment-handling skills, participants in the week’s events will also flush a fire hydrant and hold a live sewer pipe-cleaning demonstration (don’t worry, you won’t need hold your nose; the pipe will be sewage-free). “We’ll bring out the vacuum truck with a big hose, which has a funky-looking head on it,” said Kyle Radek, assistant city engineer for water. “It’s pretty neat equipment, actually.” Radek hopes this year’s event will spark positive customer interaction, noting that, usually, “most customer interaction begins because there’s something wrong with the service.” 4-7 p.m., FREE. Meridian City Hall Plaza, 33 E. Broadway at Main St. 208-898-5500, meridiancity.org.

SATURDAY MAY 26 grooving HILLBILLLY RIOT STREET DANCE All right, you anti-social closet dance fanatic, turn off your Xbox Kinect and stop with the Dance Dance Revolution—it’s time to get out, enjoy some fresh air and the company of friendly folks. The second annual Hillbilly Riot Street Dance will fill the Idaho City’s

Main Street Saturday, May 26. Last year’s event was more Gene Kelly than Jed Clampett on account of the dreary weather, but throngs of people were still singin’— and of course dancin’—in the rain. What exactly is a street dance, you may ask? Pretty much exactly what the name implies: a chance to dance in the street without having to be completely intoxicated, and sans the threat of getting taken out by a car. This year’s event will feature music by Dakota Mad Band, Last Man Stand-

ing and the Juke Daddys. In addition to tunes and stellar moves, the street dance will also feature vendors selling wares like blown glass, massage products and jewelry. Give-aways and drink specials will add to your hill-billy riotous good time. All ages are welcome, so throw your kids and dancing shoes in the car and head out on a mini, less-than-anhour road trip with some pretty scenery. Noon-10 p.m., FREE. Main Street, Idaho City, Highway 21, 40 miles past Boise. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FIND

B OIS E LITTLE THEATER

Get your fill of tats, tunes and classic cars at 208 Tat2Fest.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY MAY 25-27 tats 208 TAT2FEST

The Pink Panther will be on the prowl at Boise Little Theater.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY MAY 24-27 theater THE PINK PANTHER STRIKES AGAIN The troupe at Boise Little Theater brings to the stage the tale of famed French investigator Jacques Clouseau in a battle against the world’s best assassins as he tries to stop a maniacal villain. The company’s presentation of The Pink Panther Strikes Again is led by Brad Ooley in his directorial debut. “I’ve got a cast of 20 playing 50 different parts,” said Ooley. “It’s a lot of costume changes, a lot of weird, bad facial hair, wigs and costume changes. We have different panthers that run around the theater throughout. Anybody who’s a fan of the movies is going to love this.” After the bumbling French detective made his appearance in the earliest of the Pink Panther series, actor Peter Sellers developed the character and his battles of wits with crooks while investigating capers worldwide. Dedicated fans have followed the series through all 11 films created since 1963, though many discount the 2006 Steve Martin reboot. The 1976 sequel The Pink Panther Strikes Again pits the hapless Clouseau against former boss and Chief Inspector Paul Dreyfus, who has gone mad. Writer William Gleason adapted the scenes and dialogue into the script BLT will stage. “It’s Clouseau against Dreyfus, who has spent the last three years in an asylum,” said Ooley. “He has stolen Dr. Fassbender’s doomsday machine, makes the United Nations building disappear and extorts the world into trying to kill Clouseau. The entire world sends their best assassins to try to kill him and hilarity ensues.” The Pink Panther Strikes Again opened May 18 and continues its run through Saturday, June 2. Thursday, May 24, 7:30 p.m.; Friday, May 25-Saturday, May 26, 8 p.m.; Sunday, May 27, 2 p.m.; $12.50, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

S U B M I T

Get ready to see all sorts of dragons, Chinese symbols, nautical-themed designs and inked pledges to ex-lovers—the inaugural 208 Tat2Fest is going down in Boise Friday, May 25, through Sunday, May 27. The ink-fest gets started May 25 with a kick-off party at Fatty’s, and the rest of the weekend’s festivities take place at Expo Idaho. More than 70 tattoo artists from across the country will be featured, along with a dizzying number of live music and events, including a skate jam and competition, as well as a street bike stunt show by Fallen Angel Stunters. According to event organizer and founder Kay Lee McGoldrick, Boise seemed like a great place to host an unconventional tattoo convention. “I was surprised there wasn’t an annual convention in Boise because of the number of tattoo studios here, and the amount of support for tattoos here,” McGoldrick said. The 208 Tat2Fest has all the skin-art goodness of a regular convention, but according to McGoldrick, it’ll be more like a festival, with music and entertainment that caters to a variety of interests. McGoldrick said organizers wanted the festival to include a broad spectrum of events because “tattoos aren’t for one kind of person anymore.” The fest will feature winners from the custom bike and car competitions, which concluded April 30. The 14 finalists will be on display at the convention. You can vote for your favorite in the people’s choice award category, with expert advice from Von Hotrod, an internationally known pinstriper. You can also vote for your favorite pin-up and get a calendar, featuring 12 ladies striking Betty Page-esque poses at Boise-area landmarks such as the Capitol Building and Egyptian Theatre. The convention will also feature tattoo contests, with winners in myriad categories. One best-of-show artist will take home a 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass. A Pin-up Poker Run will be held Saturday, May 26, and custom motorcycle and car owners can participate in the allages event, which is a sort of poker scavenger hunt. Tickets are available at venues throughout the Treasure Valley and online. Visit the event’s website for more info on vendors or to purchase tickets electronically. Kick-off party: Friday, May 25, 7 p.m., FREE. Fatty’s Bar, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, 208-514-2531. Fest: Saturday, May 26, noon-10 p.m., and Sunday, May 27, noon-8 p.m., $15 day, $25 weekend pass adv., $18 day, $30 weekend pass at the door. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., 208tat2fest.com.

THE BEER GUYS You know you’ve been there: The sun is shining down on a backyard barbecue as you sway to the tunes of your favorite song, wax nostalgic with your best friends and catch the eye of that guy/girl you’ve been hoping to talk to all afternoon. You make your way over, amazed at the witty line you’ve somehow managed to thebeerguys.biz 208-939-7118 open with and reach into the cooler to grab a couple brews. But it’s empty. Instead of panicking, reach for your phone and dazzle your co-partiers by calling The Beer Guys, veritable booze superheroes. Matt Blazek is the man behind the business, which started delivering debaucherous supplies to doors on New Year’s Eve, thereby keeping people from being dumb drunk drivers. Be it wine, tobacco or beer, Blazek will bring it, as long as said door is in the greater Treasure Valley area. But he’s also pretty accommodating and said that with a little notice, he may be able to replace the keg at your in-themiddle-of-nowhere wedding. Visit thebeerguys.biz and check out the products available for purchase, then call up The Beer Guys to make your purchase with a credit/debit card (no cash or checks are accepted) and ready your ID. All transactions must be completed by 2 a.m., and IDs must match with credit cards. And under-agers or overly intoxicated patrons beware— Blazek knows his Idaho booze rules, so don’t try any funny business. —Sheree Whiteley

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2012 | 21

8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY MAY 23 Festivals & Events EAGLE FIELD OF HONOR—The sixth annual Field of Honor displays 600 full-size American flags flying in rows and representing those who have served our country, past and present. FREE. Merrill Park, 637 E. Shore Drive, Eagle River Development, Eagle. FESTIVAL MODERNO, A NEORENAISSANCE FAIRE—Enjoy a variety of neo-Renaissance activities like an invention station, collaborative art murals, poi spinning and a tessellation station, alongside traditional fair activities like a cake walk, silent auction, costume contest, games, music and performances by magicians. Proceeds go to the school’s future facility. 5-8 p.m. DaVinci Charter School, 5655 N. Glenwood St., Boise, 208-3770011, davincicharterschools.org.

Workshops & Classes BUSINESS BUILDER DAY—This event is built around energizing the business community by getting businesses motivated, educated, talking and networking. For more info, log onto idahobusinessleague.com. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. The Boise Hotel and Conference Center, 3300 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208343-4900. WHAT IS FOSTER PARENTING ALL ABOUT?—Join the informal discussion for all families interested in becoming a foster or adoptive parent. RSVP to Frank Sesek at 208-310-0158 or fsesek@ewu.edu. 6:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-570-6900, boisepubliclibrary.com. COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY COACHING—Do computers make you anxious? You can get free one-on-one help through the library’s computer volunteer technology coach program. Coaches can help with questions about email, the Internet and Microsoft Office products, including Word, Excel and Publisher. Call 208-570-6900 to schedule a free one-hour session with a volunteer coach. MondaysSaturdays. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-570-6900, boisepubliclibrary.com. FIT AND FALL PROOF CLASS— Increase mobility and independence by improving lower body strength, endurance, flexibility and bone mass, which can help reduce the risk of falling. FREE$30. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org. MANDARIN 1 WEDNESDAYS— Full-immersion Mandarin with native speakers. All aspects of language covered, including comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. $145 per month. CR Languages, 720 W. Idaho St.., Ste. 32, Boise, 208-867-8011, crlanguages.com.

ARTS/BOOK REVIEW DRINKING WITH DEAD WOMEN WRITERS In Chapter 12 of Drinking With Dead Women Writers, longdead author Virginia Woolf says that she doesn’t know why people are so up in arms over self-publishing; it’s been around forever. Though it’s a savvy observation, it’s also slightly ironic, seeing as the book in which it is contained is exactly the type that makes people dubious of self-publishing. Penned by Boise writers Elaine Ambrose and A.K. Turner, this collection of short faux-interviews with a rogue’s gallery of late literary ladies arguably falls short of the bar that traditional publishing sets. For starters, the book clocks in at 100 pages— eight of them are blank spacers, nine are dedicated to title pages and contents, and 16 of them bibliographies of the ladies interviewed. The 60-odd pages of actual prose left are more of a leaflet than a book—though faux-Woolf would probably dispute that, as well. But the real struggle in Drinking With Dead Women Writers is the premise. The introduction says that Ambrose and Turner hatched the idea over drinks, but the text itself lacks any sort of driving reasons that the authors are being interviewed or answering questions from the grave. There is no George Carlin appearing in a time-traveling-phone-booth-to-aid-Turner-and-Ambrose-in-ahistory-assignment moment to make it all make sense. As a result, rather than building steam over the course of the book—or showing Ambrose and Turner’s personal evolution from performing the interviews with their deceased heroes— the pieces are disconnected from one another as literature and too brief to offer much about the authors interviewed. A few interesting factoids are thrown in, such as Erma Bombeck’s epitaph or Carson McCullers’ brushes with suicide, but readers genuinely interested in the authors would do better with a biography, and those not familiar with the writers’ works might struggle to find a reason to care. The most-interesting chapter by far was a meeting with legendary sass-mouth Dorothy Parker, which focused less on the question-and-answer format and offered a more abstract character study. Ambrose and Turner are both important members of Boise’s burgeoning literary scene. Turner hosts The Writer’s Block, an in-depth author interview program on Radio Boise, and Ambrose runs Mill Park Publishing, which, in addition to publishing her work, offers a series of classes and retreats for aspiring writers. While they deserve props for their local lit contributions, the nature of the book speaks to a certain literary fetishdom that can be present in such scenes. Unfortunately, meta appeals mostly to those already inside, not the casual reader. Drinking With Dead Women Writers would be an interesting blog. But as a book, it is difficult to understand its appeal. —Josh Gross

22 | MAY 23–29, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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8 DAYS OUT Citizen BOISE BONE MARROW DRIVE—Help save lives by becoming a registered bone marrow donor. It’s free and painless. Thousands of children and adults are awaiting bone marrow donations. 1-7 p.m. FREE. Idaho Athletic Club, 2999 N. Lakeharbour Lane, Boise, 208-8534181, idahoathleticclub.com. MENTOR HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUDENTS—Have extra time on your hands and like working with teenagers? Try being an area representative for a nonprofit high school exchange program. Students and host families need to have someone as their “go to” person. If you think that could be you, or if you prefer being a host parent, call Shelli at 866-360-0597.

Farmers Markets CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—Corner of 12th Avenue and Dearborn Street. Caldwell, caldwellchamber.org.

LIQUID LAUGHS OPEN MIC COMEDY—Try out your best comedy routine in front of a live audience. Sign-ups begin at 7 p.m. and the hilarity starts at 8 p.m. 7 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com. LIVE BAND KARAOKE—Sing your heart out alongside the stylings of a live band. 9-11 p.m. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. VINYL PRESERVATION SOCIETY OF IDAHO—Buy, sell, trade and listen to vinyl records with other analog musical enthusiasts. 7-10 p.m. FREE. Modern Hotel and Bar, 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-424-8244, vpsidaho.org.

THURSDAY MAY 24 Festivals & Events EAGLE FIELD OF HONOR—See Wednesday. Merrill Park, 637 E. Shore Drive, Eagle River Development, Eagle.

Odds & Ends KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Quinn’s Restaurant and Lounge, 1005 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208345-0135.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

GRAND OPENING GARDEN PARTY—The Boise Oasis Paradise Gardens are ready for any event, formal or informal. Check it out during the grand opening garden party’s free tours. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Oasis Paradise Gardens, 2480 Table Rock Road in the Northridge Subdivision, Boise, 208-440-5810, boiseoasispartygardens.com. MERIDIAN’S PUBLIC WORKS EXPO—Celebrate National Public Works Week at Meridian City Hall’s outdoor plaza. This all-ages event will feature a heavy equipment rodeo, fire hydrant flushing, live demonstrations, kid-friendly interactive displays, large equipment, food, giveaways and more. For info, visit the city’s website at meridiancity.org/public_works. aspx or call the Public Works Department at 208-898-5500. See Picks, Page 20. 4-7 p.m. FREE. Meridian City Hall, 33 E. Idaho St., Meridian. POSITIVELY BOB DYLAN’S 71ST BIRTHDAY BASH—Enjoy live Dylan covers by local musicians, beer from Payette Brewing Company for those 21 and older with ID as well as storewide sales on Dylan CDs, vinyl and DVDs at the second-annual Dylan birthday bash. 5 p.m. FREE. The Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8010, therecordexchange.com. SUN VALLEY WELLNESS FESTIVAL—The 15th annual festival will feature the theme Own Your Own Energy, and include more than 50 presentations and workshops addressing various modalities of body, mind, spirit and environmental wellness, and a Next Generation Wellness educational tract for children. The keynote speaker will be Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor. For a full schedule and tickets, visit sunvalleywellness.org. Sun Valley Resort, 1 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208-622-4111 or 1-800-7868259, sunvalley.com.

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: HEATH HARMISON—Catch the comedic stylings of this funny man. Visit heathharmison.sm4. biz for more info. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: GABRIEL RUTLEDGE— This installment of Liquid Laughs also features Owen Straw. Purchase tickets at liquidlaughs. com, by callling 208-941-2459 or at Liquid or Solid. 8 p.m. $8. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

| EASY | MEDIUM

| HARD |

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

NOT NOW, DARLING—This British farce about two unlikely partners in a fur salon involves girlfriends in fur, mistaken identities, hurriedly closed closets, a lot of suspicion and intrigue resulting in nonstop laughter. All dinner-show tickets must be purchased at least one day in advance online at kedproductions. org. Show-only tickets may be purchased at the door or online. For more info and menu, visit the website. 7 p.m. $15-$20 show only, $39 dinner and show. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-3850021, kedproductions.org.

BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2012 | 23

8 DAYS OUT WEEK IN REVIEW ANDR EW C R IS P

THE PINK PANTHER STRIKES AGAIN—Chief Inspector Jacques Clouseau fights for his life and for the future of all mankind in the most bizarre and dangerous caper of his brilliantly successful and utterly clumsy career in this comedy fit for all audiences. See Picks, Page 21. 7:30 p.m. $12.50, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Kids & Teens PRESCHOOL STORYTIME—Stories and fun for preschoolers. 10-11 a.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, gardencity.lili.org. TEEN MATINEE—Teens ages 1218 can enjoy a hot new release on the library’s giant screen. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib.org.

Workshops & Classes ART CLASSES FOR ADULTS— Ginger’s Fine Art Studio offers lessons in charcoal, pastel and/ or oil graphite. Call 208-4666879 or email gdlantz@gmail. com for more information. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $25. Hasbrouck House, 1403 12th Ave. S., Nampa. PRACTICE AQUI—Spice up your bilingual aptitude during this weekly gathering. Designed for ages 13 and older. Attendees should have an understanding of English and Spanish. 6 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208472-2941, gardencity.lili.org.

Concerts PHIL WICKHAM—Phil Wickham will perform along with special guest Jordan Shaft. Proceeds go toward building a school in Uganda. Tickets are available at The Pursuit, Red Letter Cafe and Attendstar.com. Visit thepursuit. org for more info. 7 p.m. $15 adv., $24 door. The Pursuit, 6151 N. Discovery Way, Boise.

Citizen THE TREASURE VALLEY IN 2040: OPEN HOUSE—What do you see when you look to the future? The Community Planning Association of Idaho is looking for your help in defining what the future of the Treasure Valley should look like. Your input will help COMPASS select a vision for the future that will be the basis for Communities in Motion 2040, the regional long-range transportation and sustainability plan for Ada and Canyon counties. Join COMPASS at an open house to learn about the process, review different scenarios for growth and submit your comments. Or comment online at compassidaho.org. Comments accepted through Sunday, June 17. 3:30-8 p.m. FREE. Hispanic Cultural Center of Idaho, 315 Stampede Drive, Nampa, 208-442-0823, hccidaho.org.

24 | MAY 23–29, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Meat fans porked out at Pigapalooza on May 19.

BIKES, BREAKFAST FOOD, BORSHT AND BACON May 17 was an epic night in Boise—a night so packed with art, fashion, cycling, comedy and rock ’n’ roll that it trumped even the rowdiest First Thursday. The Boise Bike Week Block Party kicked the evening off in laid-back style at the Linen Building parking lot. According to Boise Weekly intern Jessica Murri, in addition to New Belgium beer and food-truck fare, the rally boasted bike-oriented booths and live music from Jonathan Warren and the Billygoats. At the Powerhouse Event Center, revelers traded their bike shorts for cocktail attire at the inaugural Boise RAW: Natural Born Artists event, one in a series of evenings that will highlight local up-and-coming visual artists, filmmakers, musicians, comedians, dancers, fashion designers and performers. Freelancer Trevor Villagrana enjoyed the show’s opening act— Kirsten Strough’s short film, STZ, which he called “a hilarious rendering of zombies as sexually transmitted diseases”—but said the audience’s inattentiveness hurt other acts like musician Shari Olivieri and comedian Aaron Sheehan. “Sheehan’s act, although hilarious and gritty at times, was lost on the crowd, whose focus was much more on the bottoms of their glasses than the show,” Villagrana wrote. While Villagrana was watching leggy models tear up the Powerhouse runway in combat boots with frilly skirts, BW New Media Czar Josh Gross was watching comedian Jerry Seinfeld tear up the Morrison Center stage in a trim blue suit while spouting bits about breakfast foods. According to Gross, Seinfeld ended the evening with an audience Q&A, during which someone asked if he had ever slept with Elaine. Find out Seinfeld’s answer in the full review on Page 26. And over in the bowels of the cave-like Neurolux, BW Staff Writer Andrew Crisp rocked out with Margot & the Nuclear So and So’s. According to Crisp, “the sextet incorporated three guitarists, keyboards, drums, vocals and a tambourine, filling out the live iterations of tracks from the 2012 Rot Gut, Domestic. The result was big, brassy vocals and rock refrains.” But while Crisp said the band mostly kept a frenetic pace, he added that “Margot and Co. fell flat only with their encore, which belabored through a final track played far too slowly.” With May 17 officially conquered, BW staffers set out to replenish. Crisp and Gross hit up the Russian Food Festival on May 18, which featured “giant trays full of rich stroganoff, mountains of fresh baked pirogi and so much borsht, no one even could even say how many it would serve.” For a more indepth look inside the event, visit boiseweekly.com. And after letting the meat pies settle, Crisp made the trek out to Meridian on May 19 for Brewforia’s second-annual Pigapalooza. Though Crisp said that pork-fest suffered from permitting woes and a cooking gaff that “cost the event two whole roast pigs, ‘burnt to a crisp,’” there was still ample grub for the more than 400 attendees and cold beer to wash it all down. Get the whole story at boiseweekly.com. —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT Religious/Spiritual

Citizen

Religious/Spiritual

TEACHINGS OF ABRAHAM MEET-UP GROUP—Join in this co-creative Law Of Attraction experience and be an active part of focusing on experiencing the joyous grandeur of life. Facilitated by Thomas O’Rourke. 6:30 p.m. Spirit at Work Sanctuary, 4948 Kootenai St., Boise, 208-388-3884.

NEW REPUBLICAN CLUB (TREASURE VALLEY PACHYDERMS)—Guest speakers and an open forum over dinner for local Republicans. For more information, email treasurevalleypachyderms@ yahoo.com. 6 p.m. $5 members, $6.99 nonmembers, donations accepted. ArtsWest School for the Performing and Visual Arts, 3415 Flint Drive, Eagle, 208-938-5410, artswestschool.org.

ONE VOICE: FRIDAY NIGHT PRAYER—Weekly gathering of high-school, college-age and post-college young adults who have a heart to pray for our city and each other. FREE. The District Coffee House, 110 S. Fifth St., boise, 208-343-1089, districtcoffeehouse.com.

Odds & Ends ANIME OASIS DOUBLE ONE—The four-day event features special guests and voice actors Caitlin Glass, Sonny Strait, Chris Rager and Micheal Coleman. Nonstop events all day, all four days, including costume contests, karaoke, formal ballroom dance, roller disco, drawing classes and much more. For more info, email creamyjeremy@yahoo.com. See Picks, Page 20. Four days: $43 adult, $15 youth; one-day passes also available. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-333-8000.

TIBETAN BUDDHIST MASTER COMES TO BOISE— Hear Tulku Orgyen Zangpo Rinpoche, a recognized reincarnate Buddhist master and the head of four monasteries in Tibet, who oversees the spiritual lives of 400 monks, nuns and yogis. He will tell “Dakini Heart Stories,” and teach about the wisdom of the enlightened feminine principal in Vajrayana Buddhism. 7-9 p.m. $15-$20 suggested donation; no

one turned away. Prajna Meditation Center, Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Ste. 329, Boise, 208629-4264, heartofdharma.org.

Farmers Markets STAGE STOP MARKET—Includes a farmers market, flea market and craft fair. Located halfway between Boise and Mountain Home. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Boise Stage Stop, 23801 S. Orchard Access Road, I-84 off Exit 71, 208-343-1367, boisestagestop.net.

ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Old Chicago-Downtown, 730 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208363-0037, oldchicago.com. CHIP AND A CHAIR POKER—Practice your poker skills for free while earning points toward prizes and glory. 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. FREE. Eastside Tavern, 610 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-345-3878. KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Quinn’s Restaurant and Lounge, 1005 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-345-0135. POKER—Play for fun and prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208321-1811.

FRIDAY MAY 25 Festivals & Events EAGLE FIELD OF HONOR—See Wednesday. FREE. Merrill Park, 637 E. Shore Drive, Eagle River Development, Eagle. SUN VALLEY WELLNESS FESTIVAL—See Thursday. Sun Valley Resort, 1 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208-622-4111 or 1-800-786-8259, sunvalley. com. 208 TAT2FEST KICKOFF PARTY—Kick off a weekend filled with ink and events by attending this kickoff party for the inaugural 208 Tat2Fest, featuring a raffle with prizes from local artists, glass items from Boise Art Glass and music. Former Sprockets drummer and current 51 Fifty collaborator Dustin J will be the evening’s emcee. See 208tat2fest.com for more info. See Picks, Page 21. 8 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s Bar, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, 208-514-2531, drinkfattys.com.

On Stage COCKEYED—This play by William Missouri Downs and directed by Jeff Thomson tells the story of an average nice guy in love with a beautiful woman who has a glass eye. Student, senior and military discounts available for Thursday and Sunday performances. 8:15 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: HEATH HARMISON— See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian. com. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: GABRIEL RUTLEDGE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. NOT NOW, DARLING—See Thursday. 6:15 p.m. $15-$20 show only, $39 dinner and show. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org. THE PINK PANTHER STRIKES AGAIN—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12.50, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

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8 DAYS OUT

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Workshops & Classes

REVIEW/SHOW

ART CLASSES FOR ADULTS— See Thursday. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $25. Hasbrouck House, 1403 12th Ave. S., Nampa.

JERRY SEINFELD, MORRISON CENTER

INTERCAMBIO: SPANISH-ENGLISH—English speakers have the opportunity to practice their Spanish with hispanohablentes, native Spanish-speakers. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Puentes Language Programs, 4720 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-344-4270, puentes.biz. WALK-IN GLASS STUDIO HOURS—Create your own fused glass artwork with the help of a studio artist. No experience necessary, and all ages are welcome. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. $15$35. Fusions Glass Studio, 347 S. Edgewood Lane, Ste. 120, Eagle, 208-938-1055, fusionsidaho.com.

Odds & Ends ANIME OASIS DOUBLE ONE—See Thursday. Four days: $43 adult, $15 youth; one-day passes also available. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-333-8000. BOISE CAFE LATIN NIGHTS— Get a basic Latin dance lesson at 9 p.m. and then commence salsa-ing it up to music from a live DJ until 2 a.m. while enjoying drinks and snacks. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $5. Boise Cafe, 219 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-343-3397.

SATURDAY MAY 26 Festivals & Events 208 TAT2FEST—See Friday. Visit 208tat2fest. com for more info. See Picks, Page 21. Noon-10 p.m. $25. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, expoidaho.com. CONTRA DANCE—Monthly dance series featuring a live contra band and local callers. April’s dance music provided by The Bru, with calling by Pat Blatter. Couples are welcome, but neither partners nor experience are required. The dances are smoke- and alcohol-free. For more information, email boisecontradance@fastem.com. 8 p.m. $4-$8. Broadway Dance Center, 893 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208794-6843.

It’s been a few years since legendary comic Jerry Seinfeld performed in Boise, and he opened his act at the Morrison Center on May 17 with his observations on how it has changed since his last visit. “Boise is getting cool,” he pandered to a near-capacity crowd. “You all have drinks and phones.” After that, he spent nearly a half hour dissecting the various types of breakfast foods. “When I was a kid and they introduced the Pop Tart, it nearly blew my brain out the back of my head,” Seinfeld said. “Back then, all we had was toast.” Seinfeld is from another era, and I don’t mean the 1990s. The longtime comic’s act is the sort that is rooted in the classic style before Lenny Bruce came along and smashed comedy into a thousand little sub-genres. Seinfeld wore a trim blue suit and stood in front of his signature red curtain, his only on-stage companion a stool and a bottle of water. The closest thing to a swear word that came from his mouth was when he said cookies should be called “chocolate sons of bitches.” Several years after the finale of his sitcom, Seinfeld made the decision to toss out all the material he had accumulated over decades of doing stand-up and to start from scratch. His material at the Morrison Center was a good cross-section of contemporary, yet classic issues, though it betrayed hints of the comic curmudgeon sneaking in at the corners. “Marriage is like a game of chess, but the board is made of flowing water and the pieces are made of smoke,” he said. “I just hope I live long enough to see them turn 50,” he said of the Facebook generation. “Because the moment you blow out the candles on your 50th birthday cake, you immediately think: The less people in my life, the better.” There’s an old joke that comedy is all about the delivery, and if you want to learn how to do it, don’t go to college, just get a job at Dominos. It’s true. Seinfeld’s book, Sein Language, is painfully unfunny. But Seinfeld’s delivery is as smooth as it ever has been; he never stutters or babbles and there was nary an “um” in the whole act. After the conclusion of his set, Seinfeld tossed the smoothly rehearsed script aside and stuck around to take a few questions from the audience, like will he please shoot another episode of the show. “Why would you want that?” he fired back. “Just so you can say, ‘Wow, they got old!’” Then the evening’s closer: “Did you ever sleep with Elaine?” someone shouted from the balcony. He grinned a sly grin and let the awkwardness sit for a moment. “No, because I’m not that stupid,” he eventually said. “Here I have this TV show, why would I go and mess that up by screwing my co-workers?” Seinfeld went out on top and made the choice to go back to the bottom and work his way back to the top again. Viva la old school. —Josh Gross

EAGLE FIELD OF HONOR—See Wednesday. FREE. Merrill Park, 637 E. Shore Drive, Eagle River Development, Eagle.

JERRYSE INF ELD.CO M

HILLBILLY RIOT STREET DANCE—Three bands will play throughout the day and street vendors will offer great deals at this second-annual dance. All ages welcome. See Picks, Page 20. Noon-10 p.m. FREE. Idaho City, Hwy. 21, 40 miles past Boise, Idaho City, 208-3924159, myidahocity.com. SUN VALLEY WELLNESS FESTIVAL—See Thursday. Sun Valley Resort, 1 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208-622-4111 or 1-800786-8259, sunvalley.com.

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8 DAYS OUT On Stage

Religious/Spiritual

COCKEYED—See Friday. 8:15 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

TIBETAN BUDDHIST RETREAT— Tulku Orgyen Zangpo Rinpoche will offer a two-day Yeshe Tsogyal retreat. Yeshe Tsogyal was a fully enlightened female Buddha who lived in the 8th century. Rinpoche is a recognized reincarnate Buddhist master. He is the head of four monasteries in Tibet and oversees the spiritual lives of 400 monks, nuns and yogis. Rinpoche will give instructions on the meditation practice, which merges ordinary mind with Yeshe Tsogyal’s wisdom mind. This retreat is suitable for those who are new to the Tibetan Buddhist tradition and for those who are longtime practitioners. 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2-4:30 p.m. $35-$150. Prajna Meditation Center, Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Ste. 329, 208629-4264, heartofdharma.org.

COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: HEATH HARMISON—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: GABRIEL RUTLEDGE— See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. NOT NOW, DARLING—See Thursday. 6:15 p.m. $15-$20 show only, $39 dinner and show. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions. org. THE PINK PANTHER STRIKES AGAIN—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12.50, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Kids & Teens THERAPY DOGS—Each month children can enjoy a story session with therapy dogs. 2 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3844200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Farmers Markets

Workshops & Classes

CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—Eighth Street from Bannock Street to Grove Plaza and Idaho Street between Capital Boulevard and Ninth Street. 208-345-9287, capitalcitypublicmarket.com.

WALK-IN GLASS STUDIO HOURS—See Friday. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $15-$35. Fusions Glass Studio, 347 S. Edgewood Lane, Ste. 120, Eagle, 208-938-1055, fusions-idaho.com.

STAGE STOP MARKET—See Friday. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Boise Stage Stop, 23801 S. Orchard Access Road, I-84 off Exit 71, 208-3431367, boisestagestop.net.

Citizen WINE DINNER SILENT AUCTION BENEFIT—Attend this annual benefit for the IPOA-Officer Down fund. Great silent auction items, something for everyone to bid on. 4 p.m. $20. Helina Marie’s Wine and Gift Shop, 11053 Highway 44, Star, 208286-7960, helinamaries.com.

Odds & Ends ANIME OASIS DOUBLE ONE—See Thursday. Four days: $43 adult, $15 youth; one-day passes also available. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-333-8000. BOISE CAFE LATIN NIGHTS— See Friday. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $5. Boise Cafe, 219 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-343-3397. KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Quinn’s Restaurant and Lounge, 1005 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208345-0135.

SINGING AND SIP’N ON SATURDAY NIGHTS—Enjoy $5 pours and tastings, then show off your singing skills at this karaoke/ open mic night. 8 p.m. $10 wine tastings. Helina Marie’s Wine and Gift Shop, 11053 Highway 44, Star, 208-286-7960, helinamaries.com.

SUNDAY MAY 27 Festivals & Events 208 TAT2FEST—See Saturday. Noon-8 p.m. $25. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, expoidaho.com. EAGLE FIELD OF HONOR—See Wednesday. Merrill Park, 637 E. Shore Drive, Eagle River Development, Eagle. FRANDREW BARBECUE AND MUSIC FEST—Enjoy a day outdoors at the Donnelly boat docks at this fundraiser for the Donnelly Public Library. Music will be provided by Muzzie Braun, Jeff Crosby and the Refugees, B4 Zero, Fast and Burning, Hat Shop Band, Sloppy Hogg Trio and DJ Bleu. Bring your own grub and beverages, or enjoy Salmon River Brewing’s brews and barbecue with homemade side dishes provided by Friends of the Library. 1-10 p.m. $10 suggested donation, FREE for children younger than 12. SUN VALLEY WELLNESS FESTIVAL—See Thursday. Sun Valley Resort, 1 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208-622-4111 or 1-800786-8259, sunvalley.com.

On Stage LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: GABRIEL RUTLEDGE— See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. THE PINK PANTHER STRIKES AGAIN—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $12.50, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Auditions DAISY’S MADHOUSE: BENGAL TIGER AT THE BAGHDAD ZOO—Surreal and darkly humorous, this play by Rajiv Joseph has roles for five men and two women ages 18-60. Rehearsals begin Monday, June 11 and the show will be performed Fridays and Saturdays, July 27-28, Aug 3-4 and 10-11. If you are unable to make this audition and would like to make other arrangements, call director Liam Tain at 208-890-5040. 1 p.m. FREE. Idaho Outdoor Association Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise, idahooutdoorassn.org.

Farmers Markets EAST END MARKET—10 a.m.-2 p.m. Bown Crossing, Bown Street, end of Parkcenter Boulevard, Boise.

KARAOKE—Unleash your inner rock star. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

MONDAY MAY 28 Festivals & Events EAGLE FIELD OF HONOR—See Wednesday. Merrill Park, 637 E. Shore Drive, Eagle River Development, Eagle. SUN VALLEY WELLNESS FESTIVAL—See Thursday. Sun Valley Resort, 1 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208-622-4111 or 1-800786-8259, sunvalley.com.

MARSING FARMERS MARKET—Marsing Island Park, Hwy. 55, south side of Snake River bridge, Marsing. STAGE STOP MARKET—See Friday. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Boise Stage Stop, 23801 S. Orchard Access Road, I-84 off Exit 71, 208-3431367, boisestagestop.net.

Food & Drink WISHES AND WINE—This benefit for the Wish Granters, who grant wishes to adults with terminal illnesses, features music by Chicken Dinner Road and A Tasty Jamm with Robin Scott. Wine tasting from Indian Creek, Vale Wine Company, Parma Ridge, Fujishin Family Cellars and Bitner Vineyards will be available, along with food from Rice Works, B29 Streatery and Cutters Grand BBQ. Call 208-377-9029 or visit wishgranters.org for more info. 1:30-6 p.m. $10, $25 car load. Indian Creek Winery, 1000 N. McDermott Road, Kuna, 208-9224791, indiancreekwinery.com.

Literature STORY STORY NIGHT—The popular story event continues with Legends: Stories of Heroes and Epics. Visit storystorynight.org for more info. 7 p.m. $7 adv., $5 door. Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-381-0483, parklaneco.com/roseroom.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Religious/Spiritual TIBETAN BUDDHIST RETREAT— See Saturday. 1-3:30 p.m. and 4-6:30 p.m. $35-$150. Prajna Meditation Center, Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Ste. 329, Boise, 208-629-4264, heartofdharma.org.

Odds & Ends ANIME OASIS DOUBLE ONE—See Friday. Four days: $43 adult, $15 youth; one-day passes also available. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-333-8000. DANCE LESSONS—Learn some new steps from members of the High Desert Swing Dance Club. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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8 DAYS OUT STORY STORY NIGHT AFTERPARTY—Official StoryStory Night Afterparty immediately following conclusion of the event at the Rose Room. Complimentary appetizers and a special drink based on this month’s theme. Featuring live music by Thomas Paul and Dan Costello. 8 p.m. FREE. Red Feather Lounge, 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-4296340, bcrfl.com/redfeather.

Workshops & Classes EXPLORING GODDESS—For women who are interested in exploring themselves as the energies of the Goddess. RSVP is required. 6:30 p.m. $25. Facets of Healing Wellness Emporium, 717 Vista Ave., Boise, 208-4299999, facetsofhealing.com. FIT AND FALL PROOF CLASS— See Wednesday. FREE-$30. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Calls to Artists BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART SUBMISSIONS—Each week’s cover of Boise Weekly is a piece of work from a local artist. BW pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction

in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded. For more information contact Art Director Leila Rader at leila@boiseweekly.com or 208344-2055. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, 208-344-2055, boiseweekly.com.

Odds & Ends BEER PONG—Play for prizes and bar tabs while drinking $5 pitchers. 9 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s Saloon, 5467 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-6699. BOISE OPEN MIC MONDAY— Musicians, poets and comedians are welcome to take their turn on stage. Featuring $2 well drinks, $2.25 PBR pints and $7.50 PBR pitchers. 8 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny Irish Pub and Grill, 855 Broad St., Ste. 250, Boise, 208-3435568, hapennybridgepub.com. BOISE UKULELE GROUP—This ukulele group offers instruction and a chance to jam. All levels welcome with no age limit and

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no membership fees. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Meadow Lakes Village Senior Center, 650 Arbor Circle, Meridian. CHOIR PRACTICE FOR COMMON GROUND CHOIR—The community choir welcomes new voices. Come and listen, meet the director and join the choir. Use west entrance or the front door, signs inside the church indicate practice room. 6:45 p.m. FREE. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 2201 Woodlawn Ave., Boise, 208-3445731, commongroundboise.org. FERTILITY YOGA—RESOLVE, the National Infertility Association, Meridian Peer-Led Support Group and Yoga for Wellness are hosting a free fertility yoga class in recognition of National Infertility Awareness Week. Class size will be limited, register by calling Loni Wood at 208-258-3113. 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. FREE. Yoga for Wellness Studio, 1175 Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-484-1053, yogaforwellnesspro.com. KARAOKE—7 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s Saloon, 5467 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-6699. TRIVIA NIGHT—The previous week’s losing team gets to pick the new theme every week. Hosted by Matt Bragg. 8 p.m. FREE. Pitchers and Pints, 1108 W. Front St., Boise, 208-9061355.

TUESDAY MAY 29 Festivals & Events EAGLE FIELD OF HONOR—See Wednesday. Merrill Park, 637 E. Shore Drive, Eagle River Development, Eagle. SUN VALLEY WELLNESS FESTIVAL—See Thursday. Sun Valley Resort, 1 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208-622-4111 or 1-800786-8259, sunvalley.com.

Food & Drink BIKE NIGHT AT HELINA MARIE’S—Ride in for wine and beer specials, food, music and karaoke after 9 p.m. Huge outdoor patio with fire pit, tiki bar and dance pole. Must be 21 or older with ID. $5 glass pours, $2 domestic beers. Helina Marie’s Wine and Gift Shop, 11053 Highway 44, Star, 208-286-7960, helinamaries.com. TUESDAY NIGHT BEER AND WINE TASTINGS—Enjoy appetizers and selections from a different Idaho brewer or winemaker every week. 6 p.m. $5. Salt Tears Coffeehouse & Noshery, 4714 W. State St., Boise, 208275-0017, salttears.com.

Citizen

St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, gardencity.lili.org.

GARDENTEERING—Get your volunteering on every Tuesday. Everyone is welcome whether you know a lot, a little or want to know more about gardening. For more information, email volunteer@aseedplanted.com. FREE. Hattie Howerton Memorial Garden, 2257 W. Targee St., Boise, 208-703-1050, aseedplanted.org.

FIT AND FALL PROOF—See Wednesday. 11 a.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, gardencity.lili.org.

Workshops & Classes ITALIAN INTRO COURSE—FullImmersion Italian course for beginners with a native speaker. Maximum group size of six students. All aspects of language covered, including comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. $145 per month. CR Languages, 720 W. Idaho St.., Ste. 32, Boise, 208-867-8011, crlanguages.com. RIVER FRIENDLY LAWNS AND HOMES—Even if we live miles from the Boise River, our homes and gardens are directly connected to the river through the water we use. Learn about caring for your lawn without washing fertilizer into the storm drain or into groundwater, about growing great food with less water and about using home cleaning products that don’t send pollutants down the drain. 6 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood

GUIDED MEDITATION CLASS— Spend part of your lunch hour on Tuesdays developing inner peace and discover how to increase health, success and confidence through meditation with Jessica Hixson from River Valley Hypnotherapy. Noon-12:30 p.m. sliding scale. Muse Building, 1317 W. Jefferson, Boise, 208-342-3316, musebuilding.com. INTRO TO AMERICAN BUDDHISM—Sessions will be held each Tuesday evening and are open to the public. Children are welcome. Practice is very simple and entirely compatible with daily American life. For more info, call 208-707-2021. 7:30-9 p.m. FREE, donations accepted. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 2201 Woodlawn Ave., Boise, 208-344-5731, boisefirstucc.org. SPANISH INTRO COURSE— Full-immersion Spanish with native speakers. All aspects of language covered, including comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. $145 per month. CR Languages, 720 W. Idaho St.., Ste. 32, Boise, 208-867-8011, crlanguages.com.

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8 DAYS OUT WALK-IN GLASS STUDIO HOURS—See Friday. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. $15-$35. Fusions Glass Studio, 347 S. Edgewood Lane, Ste. 120, Eagle, 208-938-1055, fusions-idaho.com.

Kids & Teens CHILDREN’S ART EDUCATION—Children will be encouraged to use their imagination while working with various media and techniques, focusing on the experience rather than the end product in this four-session class. Dress for fun and a mess. For ages 7-12. $45-$50. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

WEDNESDAY MAY 30 Talks & Lectures DEAN KARNAZES—Time magazine named him as one of the “Top 100 Most Influential People in the World.” Men’s Fitness hailed him as the fittest man on the planet. An internationally recognized endurance athlete and New York Times bestselling author, Dean Karnazes has pushed his body and mind the limit. Hear his stories. RSVP to leone@idahorunningcompany.com. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City.

Calls to Artists

Literature

EXPOSURE A.L.P.H.A. INTERCHANGE—Artists working in all mediums and at any stage in their careers are encouraged to submit their portfolios for consideration to Exposure A.L.P.H.A. Interchange, an Idaho based nonprofit organization with a focus on creating a compassionate community for those impacted by HIV and AIDS. Group or solo exhibition proposals welcome. No rental fee, but the organization will retain a portion of sales. Contact rick.ramos@alphaidaho.org for more info. Exposure A.L.P.H.A. Interchange, 1009 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-424-8158, exposureidaho.org.

BLIP PLAY READING SERIES—Featuring local actors from HomeGrown Theater, BLiP is an exciting live monthly reading of new work by Idaho playwrights. May’s selection is Might Be Funny, featuring Travis Swartz and E.J. Pettinger. 7 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-429-8220, hydeparkbookstore. com.

OPEN GYM FOR PRESCHOOLERS AND TODDLERS—Children can enjoy slides, plastic cars, balls and hula hoops in the gym with their parents. 9-11 a.m. $1 per child. Fort Boise Community Center, 700 Robbins Road, Boise, 208-384-4486, cityofboise.org/parks. SOCCER CAMPS BEGINNING SESSION 1—Led by the staff of Nampa’s Soccer Xpress, these fun-filled camps are designed to build fundamentals of soccer and prepare young players for team play. Youth will sharpen their soccer skills while making new friends. All camps will be held at Liberty Park. Session I: Tuesdays and Thursdays through Thursday, June 7. Ages 6-7, 5:30-7 p.m.; ages 8-10, 7-8:30 p.m. $35. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation. org.

Talks & Lectures ISLAM AND THE WEST—The Boise State Muslim Student Association presents this lecture by Imran Ahmad, author of The Perfect Gentleman: A Muslim Boy Meets the West, which was ranked No.1 on O Magazine’s Ten Titles to Pick Up Now list. Visit perfect-gent.com for more info. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union, Simplot Grand Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu.

Odds & Ends ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Eastside Tavern, 610 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-3453878. BEER PONG TOURNEY—Eight tables set up for play, $4 pitchers and a $300 cash prize. What more could you ask for? 10 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-514-2531, drinkfattys.com. BOOZE CLUES—Trivia and prizes with the one and only E.J. Pettinger. 9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s, 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344. KARAOKE—Unleash your inner rock star. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. NAMI SUPPORT GROUP—Share your experiences, coping strategies and offer support and encouragement to others living with mental illness. Call 208-376-4304 for more info. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, www.flyingmcoffee.com. NETWORKING HAPPY HOUR—Bring your business cards or flyers and mingle with other like-minded people. There is a guest speaker each week to assist and inspire you. 5-7 p.m. FREE. Her Spirit Center for Growth, 5181 Overland Road, Boise, 208-345-3588. OPEN MIC WITH ZACK AND BILL—Zack Quintana and Bill Waugh will host an acoustic open mic every Tuesday. If you have an acoustic guitar, bring it and join the music making. 7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s Saloon, 12505 Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-331-5666, willibs.com. POKER—See Thursday. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-3211811. POKER NIGHT—Prizes for first and second places. 6:30 and 9 p.m. Montego Bay, 3000 N. Lakeharbor Lane, Boise, 208-853-5070, montegobayidaho.com

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NEWS/NOISE NOISE

GIRL TALK Indiana Americana-slayers Murder by Death headlines new Radio Boise series.

DEATH, DOGS AND HITCHHIKING We all knew that MCA had a license to ill, but what came out after his recent death from cancer was that said license was issued by the New York State Senate. The political body honored the late Adam Yauch with a senate resolution introduced by State Sen. Daniel Squadron last week. “WHEREAS, The Beastie Boys became well known in the innovative music scene in Manhattan’s East Village and Lower East Side with a sound and a style all their own ...” The entire statement featuring many other whereases can be read at open. nysenate.gov. In local news, Eric Gilbert, captain of Treefort and Finn Riggins, is launching a new Tuesday night concert series to replace the Uber Tuesdays series he ran last year at Visual Arts Collective. The new Radio Boise Tuesdays series will be hosted at Neurolux and feature a selection of touring headliners and local openers, with 20 percent of drink sales those nights benefitting KRBX 89.9. Announced headliners for the series include Indiana Americana-slayers Murder by Death on Tuesday, Aug. 14, San Francisco mod-gods The Soft White Sixties on Tuesday, July 17, punk legend Mike Watt on Tuesday, Oct. 2, and the almighty Red Fang on Tuesday, June 12. Boise band Youth Lagoon will also play a rare local show on Tuesday, July 3, as part of the series, though that show will be at Reef instead of Neurolux so it can be 18-and-older. Prices for the series will range depending on the night. But for the tightwads and the unemployed, there will still be the Red Room’s free Atypical Tuesday series just a few blocks away. One band not booked as part of either series is long-running punk act and pork rectum enthusiast Hot Dog Sandwich. But that’s fine with the band, because it has opened a new store, Hot Dog Sandwich Headquarters, at 3115 W. State St. The store is a teen boy’s dream, packed to the gills with comic books and used records but sadly, no hot dogs. And finally, Brooklyn band Here We Go Magic, which will motor into Boise on Thursday, May 24, apparently picked up infamous film director John Waters while on the road. The band’s bassist Jen Turner tweeted out a photo of Waters in its van after the band scooped him up hitchhiking on the side of the freeway in Ohio and later discussed it with a variety of media. As Waters told an Australian magazine in August 2011: “I do still hitchhike—it’s a great way to meet people and to have sex.” —Josh Gross

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Gregg Gillis’ mashups give the industry something to talk about JOSH GROSS Gregg Gillis is a bona fide rock star with hit albums, sold-out shows, a documentary about his music, and even a day named after him: Dec. 7, 2010, was dubbed “Gregg Gillis Day” in his home city of Pittsburgh. This level of success is an achievement for anyone, but particularly for a man who doesn’t play any instruments and whose stated musical goals are rooted in pissing people off. And it all started by being broke. “If I’d had money to buy a guitar, I would have,” said Gillis. “But I didn’t.” Girl Talk’s Gregg Gillis is known for his ground-breaking mash-ups. Instead Gillis—who was fascinated by experimental and noise artists—collected old electronics and toy keyboards cheaply from he just doesn’t ask. There are hundreds of to a furiously danceable beat. Though it may flea markets and thrift stores, squeezing as samples on his most recent album, All Day, be difficult to see all the action on-stage, Gillis many alien sounds out of them as possible unactually cuts, pastes and mixes his samples live, with total estimated licensing fees in excess of til their inevitable and often deliberate demise. choosing from more than 25,000 clips of audio $4 million, fees he has no plans of paying, Gillis was fond of smashing old computers on “2006 was the first album I put out that stored on his computer. He even picked a name stage and shooting fireworks at audiences in a that he thought would embarrass other acts to kind of got national recognition,” said Gillis. blatant attempt to shake up what he saw as a “And with that album, it felt like all press was share a bill with: Girl Talk. stuffy, pretentious music scene with a near-inlike, ‘Here’s this fun album with samples, and “There would be a flyer for the show and finite supply of boring performers. Sometimes by the way, this guy is probably going to be it would look like someone misbooked, like a he brought out dancers to bump and grind to Disney group got on the bill by accident,” said sued by 300 artists.’” music that was the opposite of danceable. He Gillis doesn’t see copyright as an issue for Gillis. didn’t want to entertain the audience so much him, and not just because he believes that his But the epic dance parties Gillis now comas spit in its face. sampling of other artists falls within fair use mands didn’t immediately ensue. “I liked stuff that was challenging what laws. Gillis views samples the way most musi“A lot of [performances] were more conmusic could be, maybe not to the world, but to cians view notes or chords. frontational than most shows I’ve ever seen,” my 15-year-old mind,” Gillis said. “As we’re moving into the future of music, When Gillis went to college, he upgraded to said Gillis. “People were unplugging things, or the majority of music is going to be electronic, people getting on stage, or fights. This would a laptop computer and decided to take a new and the majority of those sounds are preexistupset people.” tack with his assault on the audience’s pretenFor Gillis—whose shows are now so dance- ing,” said Gillis. “And whether it’s a drum sions: pop. So he crammed his music full of so machine sample or someone was in a studio packed that he often leaves the stage bruised much sugary-sweetness it would give people’s and bloodied—it’s a huge and fascinating shift. and recorded a kick drum, that’s the same ears diabetes. “The majority of people can’t really imagine thing to me. “A lot of time, there was a division like, “To me, it’s always been at the foundation what those first five years were like, what ‘we’re doing smart music and the music on of all art and music to borrow, to build—not world this came out of,” said Gillis. “To me, the radio is stupid,’ or something. That was even just art and music: science, everything. I that’s the most fascinating part.” kind of the mentality,” said Gillis. “So I really don’t think original content has ever existed.” But some of the reason Gillis finds those liked the idea of performing in those settings, And for now, the industry seems to agree. beginnings so fascinatin those art galleries, ing is that so few others Gillis has yet to be sued and said that when he those spaces in the With Spac3man. Monday, May 28, 7:30 p.m. meets artists he’s sampled, he receives nothing do. Instead they have experimental electronic doors, 8:30 p.m. show, $25-$50. but positive feedback. But Gillis is also quick a tendency to focus on music community and KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE to note that the world is rapidly changing its the myriad questions embracing pop, and 416 S. Ninth St. about law, politics, phi- stance on sampling. sampling pop openly.” 208-367-1212 “In the last six years since that record came losophy and the nature Gillis began isolatbo.knittingfactory.com out, the world has become such a remixed of art that Girl Talk’s ing passages of pop place, even compared to five years ago—the mash-ups beg. songs and layering amount of unsolicited remixes. Everything “That would be a great exam question for them together to create complex and nuanced is a fanmade video made into an animated a copyright law class,” said Marybeth Peters, artistic collaborations. On one track, for gif,” said Gillis. Even though Gillis admitted register of copyrights for the United States example, Ludacris raps over Black Sabbath, sampling isn’t as revolutionary as it once was, which runs into a Ramone’s turbo-charged ver- of America, after listening to one of Gillis’ he has no intention of stopping. He likes the Frankentunes as part of an interview in the sion of Missy “Misdemeanor” Elliott, which confrontation too much. documentary Rip! A Remix Manifesto, which bleeds into bits and pieces from U2, Peter Ga“I’m invited sometimes into this world of used Girl Talk’s music as the launching point briel, Sir Mix-a-Lot, Rihanna, Spacehog and things that are critically well respected, and I’m to examine copyright issues in the digital age. more. Gillis mashes up every song you might embracing all these things they’ve shit on for The reason it’s a great question is because belt out when driving solo on the freeway but Gillis doesn’t cut first and ask permission later, their whole career,” he added, chuckling. never admit to liking publicly—and sets it all WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2012 | 31

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY MAY 23 BRANDON PRITCHETT—9 p.m. FREE. Reef CONFESSIONS—With Acrotomoans and Piranahs. 9 p.m. $5. Shredder THE COUNTRY CLUB—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

HERE WE GO MAGIC, MAY 24, REEF Brooklyn, N.Y., band Here We Go Magic told Boise fans “It’s not you, it’s me,” opting for a TV opportunity rather than playing its set at the Linen Building Thursday, May 24. Then the IFC network rescheduled, and the band jumped back on the bill. Organizers have added Yeah Great Fine to the lineup, which already included Hospitality and Tartufi, and relocated the show to Reef. Indie rock quartet Here We Go brings percussive, colorful treats, most recently with its 2012 release A Different Ship. Portland, Ore., natives Yeah Great Fine blend soulful harmonizing with percussive syncopation. Brooklyn three-piece Hospitality is fronted by the pipes and guitar prowess of Amber Papini. Lastly, San Francisco, Calif., natives Lynne Angel, Brian Gorman and Ben Thorne make up the caterwauling experimental band Tartufi. —Andrew Crisp With Yeah Great Fine, Hospitality and Tartufi, 9 p.m., $9 adv., $12 door. Reef, 105 S. Sixth St., 208-287-9200, reefboise.com.

32 | MAY 23–29, 2012 | BOISEweekly

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers GROUPLOVE—8 p.m. $15. Knitting Factory JEFF THE BROTHERHOOD— With Finn Riggins and Art Fad. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow KATIE MORELL—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown PAUSE FOR THE CAUSE—10 p.m. FREE. Graineys RACHEL PLATTEN—With Madi Diaz, Hollow-Wood and Grandma Kelsey. 6 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Venue RICO WEISMAN AND REX MILLER—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian THE RINGTONES—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye STEADY RUSH—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

OLIVER THOMPSON AND THE UKELADYS—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

SUMMER BEACH BLAST—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s

ROGER CLYNE AND THE PEACEMAKERS—8 p.m. $15. Knitting Factory

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m., FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club

RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Twig’s Cellar

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

THE SHAUN BRAZELL QUARTET—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THURSDAY MAY 24 BRONCHO—With Dirty Moogs. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux COLD WORLD—With Backtrack, Expire, Dead End Path, Focused Minds and Compromised. 6 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Venue DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s HERE WE GO MAGIC—With Yeah Great Fine, Hospitality and Tartufi. See Listen Here, this page. 9 p.m. $9 adv., $12 door. Reef THE JACKS—7 p.m. FREE. Buster’s JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KIDS ON FIRE—With Kard Zero. 9 p.m. $5. Shredder LIKE A ROCKET—10 p.m. FREE. Graineys

STEVE EATON—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper Lounge

FRIDAY MAY 25

SYNRGY—9 p.m. $5. Reef

5 GEARS IN REVERSE—10 p.m. $5. Graineys

THE WELL SUITED—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

BLAZE AND KELLY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub THE BODY—With Low Sky, Reverie and Downsided. 8 p.m. $5. Shredder CHUCK SMITH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SATURDAY MAY 26 5 GEARS IN REVERSE—10 p.m. $5. Graineys

FAULT PARADOX—With Ripchain, Grindsole and Fallen Idols. 7 p.m. $8. Knitting Factory

ANDY BYRON—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

HEKTOR PECTOR—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

BODEANS—8:30 p.m. $20 adv., $22 door. Knitting Factory

JIMMY BIVENS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE DARK HARLEQUIN—With Mortal Ashes, 22nd Legion and Passengers. 6 p.m. $7. Venue

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE DC3—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid LIKE A ROCKET—9:30 p.m. FREE. The Crux LO-PAN—With Capgun Suicide and Trikata. 9 p.m. $5. Shredder MARINADE—10 p.m. $5. Reef ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m., FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club SOUL SERENE—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub STEVE EATON—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper Lounge

GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TUESDAY MAY 29

LIVE SUNDAY UNDERGROUND—With Social Fallout, Trikata and Fetish 37. 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TERRI EBERLEIN—10:30 a.m. FREE. Berryhill

FEIST—See Listen Here, this page. 6 p.m. $25 adv., $30 day of show. Idaho Botanical Garden

THEORIES—With Gernika. 7 p.m. $3. Shredder

JIMMY BIVENS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

TRAVIS WARD—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Moon’s

THE WORKING DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Graineys

THE MIGHTY SEQUOYAH—10 p.m. FREE. Graineys NATHAN MOODY—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

MONDAY MAY 28

WINNIE COOPER—9 p.m. FREE. Woody’s

GIRL TALK—See Noise, Page 30. 8:30 p.m. $25-$50. Knitting

WORKING DJS—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

Factory

ZACK QUINTANA—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

SUNDAY MAY 27 BEN BURDICK—Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

SHAUN BRAZELL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SHAUN BRAZELL AND SAM STROTHER—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers VANITY THEFT—With Enemies. 8 p.m. $5. Shredder

TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WEDNESDAY MAY 30

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid JONATHAN RICHMAN—8 p.m. $15. Neurolux LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La NEW TRANSIT—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s PAMELA DEMARCHE—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La PAUSE FOR THE CAUSE—10 p.m. FREE. Graineys STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW—6 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadDowntown TEEPH—With Faus, Straight to Your Enemies and Downsided. 6 p.m. $7. Venue

BAND OF BUSKERS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

TERRY JONES AND BILL LILES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

BEN BURDICK—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

WENDY MATSON—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

BRANDON PRITCHETT—9 p.m. FREE. Reef

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

FEIST, MAY 29, IDAHO BOTANICAL GARDEN One of the special releases that sold out fastest at this year’s Record Store Day was a split 7-inch between metal Goliath Mastodon and the decidedly more petite Feist. After meeting on a U.K. TV show, the two acts decided to cover each other, with Feist choosing the song “Black Tongue” from Mastodon’s latest album, The Hunter, and Mastodon opting for “A Commotion” off Metals, Feist’s new album. This collaboration might seem an odd choice for Feist, a longtime member of indie supergroup Broken Social Scene. But a closer examination of Feist’s resume makes it seem like an almost natural fit. She opened for The Ramones at age 15 as part of the punk act Placebo and later roomed with Merrill Nisker, better known as electro slut-rock superstar Peaches. It only takes a single listen to her version of “Black Tongue,” with percussion like drunken footfalls on a creaky staircase, to know it was another in a long series of good decisions. —Josh Gross 6 p.m. $25 adv., $30 day of show. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Old Penitentiary Road, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2012 | 33

NEWS/ARTS S U MM E R GUID E 2012 | ART S

SUMMER ART CAMPS Where your kid can shred, swirl paint and recite Shakespeare this summer BY TARA MO RGA N

Nampa’s yarn fest will spin you right ’round.

GET ON THE FUNNY FIBER TRAIN In August 2011, Hyde Park Books collaborated with Homegrown Theater to host BLIP, an informal play reading to showcase the work of some local playwrights. But the event generated so much interest, Hyde Park Books owner Jem Wierenga decided to make it a monthly event. This month, the event is called Might by Funny and boasts Travis Swartz and Boise Weekly contributor E.J. Pettinger on Wednesday, May 30, from 7-9:30 p.m The reading will feature a collection of short comedy pieces, including letters to celebrities and scripts for commercials. “The letter I wrote is to Oprah, and we have a commercial script for Frisky’s Cat Food,” Pettinger said. “But I don’t want to give too much away.” Pettinger explained that he’s excited to see what the audience thinks of his work and likes the casual feel of the event, which typically brings out anywhere from 10 to 30 people every month. “And they’re from all walks of life— students, theater people, literary-minded people, North End regulars,” added Wierenga. “It’s friendly and low key, and we like to keep it that way.” In Nampa, craft store Puffy Mondaes has taken what was once an intimate pursuit—knitting and crocheting—and turned it into a public festival. Puffy Mondaes will host the inaugural Fiber Train Festival Sunday, May 27-Monday, May 28. The Fiber Train Festival will celebrate all things knitted, spun or crocheted with workshops, classes, food venders and shopping. Crafters from around the Northwest will hold demonstrations on everything from blacksmithing to Navajo spinning. The Fiber Train Festival has even booked some swanky guests, including Lucy Neatby, with her hot-pink and spotted-purple hair, who will visit from Nova Scotia and teach classes on fixing up old projects and spiffing up socks. Brenda Dayne, host of the popular podcast Cast On, is traveling to Nampa from Wales. She will teach classes on how to make wrist-warmers, as well as give a lecture on “A Memorable Yarn,” comparing the muscle memory of the brain with the memories knitting creates. Fiber Train will also hold a competition called Fiber Flaunt, which is a chance to show off your best hand-spun, handdyed yarns in categories like Sumptuous Socks, Lovely Lace, Color Explosion and Free Form Fun. The community event is FREE to the public and will take place in Lloyd Square on Memorial Day weekend. —Jessica Murri

34 | MAY 23–29, 2012 | BOISEweekly

ADAM ROSENLUND

A

ccording to a 2010 study released by the Idaho Commission on the Arts, the visual art specialist-to-student ratio in Idaho elementary schools is 1 to 2,335. That means there’s only one trained artist per approximately six schools—if they’re even invited into the classroom. The same study also revealed that only 28 percent of school principals in Idaho districts consider the arts a part of the core curriculum. Which is why many parents turn to extracurricular arts programs and summer camps to provide a well rounded arts education for their children. “The whole reason we do what we do is to fill the gap in the school system by providing quality arts education,” explained Jon Swarthout, founder of the Treasure Valley Institute for Children’s Arts. “They have a hard time doing that, so where they leave off, that’s where TRICA picks up.” TRICA’s 2012 summer camps cover an eclectic array of topics, including everything from breakdancing and yoga to African drumming and musical theater. “Every year, it changes,” Swarthout said.

“We keep ones that really work and there is a niche for them in the community, and we add ones where they’ve gone well, like for instance the Jug Band Camp, that actually stemmed out of another program we have this year, the Re-Art program.” Boise Rock School also offers summer camps that engage kids in more eclectic artistic disciplines. In addition to learning how to shred the bass or pummel the drums, kids also can select a band name, make a poster and give a concert at the end of the camp. “We always partner with the Shakespeare festival. They have what is called an apprentice program and we collaborate throughout the summer,” explained Boise Rock School co-founder Ryan Peck. “They come up with an original play and then we write the music for it, which is kind of cool.” But not all parents can afford to provide their kids with these kinds of multi-faceted artistic experiences. Which is why both TRICA and Boise Rock School offer scholarships. “Our policy is that no child is ever turned away for inability to pay. … We simply say, ‘Normally, that class is $159, what portion

of that can you afford?’ … We go by honesty, and if people are wanting their children to [take a class] and asking for help, then we will do it,” explained Swarthout. Peck echoed those sentiments but added that it can sometimes be a struggle to accommodate every child who needs assistance. “Thirty to 40 percent of our kids come at a discount or for free. … It’s part of our philosophy as far as making music accessible, but we’ve got to go pay the rent and the electric bills and stuff,” said Peck. “So it’s definitely a bridge that we’re crossing as an organization.” But financial issues aside, both Swarthout and Peck agree that childhood arts education is invaluable. “Arts education has a unique power to inspire children with a sense of expression. … By creating something that they’re a part of, they tap into their own creative nature and get something out of that. They create something. They contribute something to those around them,” said Swarthout. Turn to Page 35 for a list of upcoming arts-oriented summer camps. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

A RT S | SUMME R GUID E 2012

TREASURE VALLEY INSTITUTE FOR CHILDREN’S ARTS

MORRISON CENTER SUMMER PERFORMANCE CAMP

TRICA’s week-long, two-hour-per-day summer camps include African Drumming and Dance, Ballerina Princess, Breakdancing, Broadway Splash, Girls Rock with Wild Thyme Studio, Hillbilly Jug Band with Travis and Alison Ward of Hillfolk Noir, Rock Band Camp with Ryan Peck and Jared Goodpaster of Boise Rock School, The Art and Play of Yoga with Brittany McConnell and The Art of Hula Hooping. All camps except for Rock Band Camp and Girls Rock are located at the Linen Building at 1402 W. Grove St. and cost $159 for the first camp, $139 for the second camp and $99 for every subsequent camp. Call 208-344-2220 to register and visit trica.org/summer-camps for more info.

Students learn acting, singing and dancing while rehearsing Twinderella, the Musical, the story of Cinderella and her long-lost twin brother Bob, at the Morrison Center. These week-long, all-day camps begin Monday, July 9; Monday, July 16; Monday, July 23; and Monday, July 30. Camps cost $195 and include a final performance at the Danny Peterson Theatre. For more information, email cwhitele@ boisestate.edu or call 208-426-1034.

IDAHO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL Camp Shakespeare options include Shakespeare and Me! (ages 3-5, $80), in which players learn lines from some of Shakespeare’s most famous scenes; Shakespeare Shenanigans (ages 6-8, $225), in which campers explore characters from Shakespeare’s most-popular plays; Short Shakespeare (ages 9-11, $225), in which students work to create a shortened, original version of a selected work; Shakespeare Intensive I (ages 12-14, $415), in which students work on a play they will produce at the end of camp; Advanced Shakespeare Intensive (ages 15-18, $415), a springboard to the ISF Apprentice Program, in which students work in depth on a play they will produce. Two sessions are offered of each class—one in June and one in July—with a final performance at the end of each camp. Other options include Camp Improv (ages 10-18, $165), which teaches basic improv skills and Camp Musical (ages 10-18, $165), in which students learn the joys of musical theater. Classes take place at Boise Contemporary Theater at 854 Fulton St. For more info, call 208-429-9908, ext. 206, or visit idahoshakespeare.org/summer-camps.

BOISE ROCK SCHOOL Boise Rock School’s week-long summer camps are two-and-a-half hours a day and divided by age group (6-8, 9-12, 13-17) and skill level. Beginner, intermediate and advanced camps are offered during every session, with the first camp starting Monday, June 4, and the final camp beginning Monday, Aug. 13. The Idaho Shakespeare Festival Apprentice Program will start Wednesday, June 13, and run every week as a regular class for 10 weeks. Camps are located at 1404 W. Idaho St. and cost $150 a pop. Sibling and multi-camp discounts are available. For more info, call 208-559-0065 or visit boiserockschool.com.

SCHOOL OF ROCK EAGLE These week-long summer boot camps include studio/band rehearsal time and music appreciation. Classes run 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and some experience on the student’s instrument of choice is required. Sessions start Monday, June 4; Monday, June 18; Monday, July 9; and Monday, July 23. Classes cost $175 each and take place at 539 S. Fitness Place, Ste. 150, in Eagle. For more info, call 208-939-2229 or visit eagle.schoolofrock.com/local-camps. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISE ART MUSEUM Boise Art Museum is offering three weeklong summer camps for kids ages 4-12, which are divided into morning sessions from 10 a.m.-noon and afternoon sessions from 1-3 p.m. and cost $50 for members and $60 for nonmembers. Beginning Monday, June 11, Art From Asia will explore old and new techniques from China and Japan for making paintings, prints and ceramics. Starting Monday, June 18, Sounds Like Art will explore dance, movement and sound in the work of artist Nick Cave. And beginning Monday, Aug. 13, Suits and Sculptures will look into Cave’s wearable sculptures called Soundsuits, and students will design sculptures and works of art with found objects. To register, visit boiseartmuseum.org/education/classes.php.

BALLET IDAHO Ballet Idaho offers week-long, two-hour-aday Storybook Ballet Camps for kids ages 3-5 from 10 a.m.-noon, and kids ages 5-7 from 1-3 p.m. Camps teach technique, craft, story and etiquette, and conclude with a performance. Cinderella runs Monday, June 11-Friday, June 15; Swan Lake runs Monday, July 16-Friday, July 20; and The Sleeping Beauty runs Monday, Aug. 13-Friday, Aug. 17. Camps cost $175 and take place at Ballet Idaho. For more info, call 208-343-0556 or visit balletidaho.org/ summer-programs.

THE CABIN The Cabin offers Idaho Writing Camps for students in grades 3-12. The week-long camps run from either 9 a.m.-noon or from 1-4 p.m. at The Cabin, located at 801 S. Capitol Blvd. Satellite locations include the College of Southern Idaho in Twin Falls and The Center in Hailey. Camps cost $145 each and include publication. Topics are Word Play (grades 3-4), in which students craft imaginative poems and stories; Cabin Writers (grades 5-6), in which students discover how art, music and nature can help them uncover their inner voices; Urban Ink (grades 7-9), in which campers explore cityscapes, coffeeshops and public art and learn to create unique characters; Writing Wild (grades 4-6 and 7-9), in which students explore the natural world and craft stories outdoors (drop-off is at the Foothills Learning Center); and Picture This (grades 5-6 and 7-9), in which campers explore the connection between visual art and the written word with collage, comics, poems, stories, paintings and pictures. There are also two-week workshops for more experienced writers (grades 10-12) that cost $210 and challenge writers to draft, critique and revise their poetry and fiction. For more info or to register, call 208-331-8000 or visit register.thecabinidaho.org.

BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2012 | 35

LISTINGS/SCREEN Special Screenings THE ENLIGHTENED FEMININE IN TIBET—Lama Dechen Yeshe Wangmo, the producer of In the Minds of All Beings, will host a double-feature film presentation, with special guest Tulku Orgyen Zangpo Rinpoche. Discussion will follow. Proceeds to benefit the nuns of Tsogyal Latso. Saturday, May 26, 7:30 p.m. $15. Prajna Meditation Center, Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Ste. 329, Boise, 208-629-4264, heartofdharma.org.

Opening

S U MME R GUID E 2012 | SCR E EN

SIZZLE OR FIZZLE?

Consumer alert: Film fireworks require caution GE O RGE P RE NT ICE

T

his summer it’s all about Charlize. As in Theron. As in the Oscar winning blonde goddess. Sure there are plenty of movies featuring guys in capes, a potty-mouthed teddy bear, vampires and Woody Allen, but I’m betting that this is the summer of Charlize. No fewer than 100 films will open before Labor Day, each competing for your $12 ticket. But Theron has my attention with a one-two punch of Snow White and the Huntsman and Prometheus opening over two consecutive June weekends. Our summer preview has all the elements of a Fourth of July extravaganza: blockbusters to fill the big screen with firepower (The Dark Knight Rises and The Amazing Spider-Man), bottle rockets that are certain to bring some flash without a nine-digit budget (Moonrise Kingdom, Rock of Ages) and a few sparklers that are child approved and family friendly (Brave, ParaNorman). But beware of the duds that offer no bang for your buck (G.I. Joe, That’s My Boy).

BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL—John Madden directs this comedy based on the book These Foolish Things by Deborah Moggach. Maggie Smith, Judi Dench, Tom Wilkinson and Bill Nighy star as seniors whose excitement about retiring fades when their accommodations are not as nice as advertised. (PG-13) The Flicks

CHERNOBYL DIARIES—Paranormal Activity’s Oren Peli presents this film about six young tourists whose guide takes them to the former home of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. (R) Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22 FIRST POSITION—This documentary follows six young ballet dancers as they prepare for the Youth America Grand Prix competition. (PG) The Flicks

BLOCKBUSTERS

BOTTLE ROCKETS

Sit back and enjoy the show

Plenty of fun (but less noise)

Snow White and the Huntsman Friday, June 1

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Friday, June 22

36 | MAY 23–29, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Madagascar 3 Friday, June 8

That’s My Boy Friday, June 15

Brave Friday, June 22

G.I. Joe: Retaliation Friday, June 29

Ice Age: Continental Drift Friday, July 13

Rock of Ages Friday, June 15

For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code.

DUDS Need we say more?

Seeking a Friend for the End of the World Friday, June 22

Prometheus Friday, June 8

MEN IN BLACK III—Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones return in this third installment of the Men In Black series. Agent J (Smith) must travel back in time to save the universe. (PG-13) Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22

SPARKLERS Family approved

The Amazing Spider-Man Friday, July 3

Moonrise Kingdom Friday, June 29

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days Friday, Aug. 3

Katy Perry: Part of Me Friday, July 4

ParaNorman Friday, Aug. 17

The Expendables 2 Friday, Aug. 17

To Rome With Love Friday, July 6

The Dark Knight Rises Friday, July 20

Magic Mike Friday, June 29

Ted Friday, July 13 WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEweekly | MAY 23–29, 2012 | 37

SCREEN/DVD BOISE’S FAVORITE DVD RENTALS THIS WEEK

SCREEN/THE TUBE

1. THE GREY First week in release.

2. ONE FOR THE MONEY First week in release.

These four aren’t your average Girls next door.

GIRLS JUST WANT TO HAVE ANGST: HBO SERIES IS SO GOOD, IT’S BAD

3. CHRONICLE First week in release.

4. CONTRABAND Dropped from No. 2 on May 23.

5. HAYWIRE Dropped from No. 1 on May 23. —Source: Video Memories, 4504 Overland Road, Boise, 208-385-0113

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So many things are wrong with how the characters behave on Girls, HBO’s newest breakthrough series, that I’ve lost count of how many things are right about the show. But for all of its cringe-inducing, humiliating moments, Girls is the most original mainstream entertainment currently being pushed out by a network that had already set its quality bar quite high (Six Feet Under, The Sopranos, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Game of Thrones and the delicious Veep). Nothing, and I mean n-o-t-h-i-n-g, is out of bounds in Girls— good sex, bad sex, misogyny, abortion and even the HPV virus all become punchlines—but the comedy is more than just outrageous. Girls is outrageously funny with a splash of sincerity, a rare cocktail considering how much R-rated material drifts in First-run episodes of Girls air and out of popular culture and Sunday nights at 8:30 p.m. on HBO and are repeated offers not much more than its across HBO’s numerous initial shock value. platforms. Comparing Girls to Sex and the City should really start and end with the fact that the two shows share a location and a network. In Girls, four girlfriends forage the unfriendly canyons of New York City in search of satisfaction—sexual and otherwise. But they’re shackled by their own inhibitions, desires and raw emotions, which makes their quest so refreshing. Girls offers no romanticism of youth; instead it showcases awkward, fleshy, glare-of-day realism. The star of the show, and quite possibly entertainer of the year, is 25-year-old Lena Dunham, who writes, produces and most impressively directs each episode. She is 2012’s atypical “it” girl, unlike any other current female star and miles away from anyone on commercial television. There is such verite in the performances of Dunham and her co-stars that watching them borders on voyeurism but is entirely addictive. —George Prentice WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

REC/NEWS R E C | SUMME R GUI DE 2012

RACE DAY

Summer racing season is here BY P ET ER B U F F I N GT O N

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with limited aid stations and you have, in rition some cases, major elevation gains, nutrition needs and physical needs.” Most recently, Brian and Tiedji ran the arch, Yakima River Canyon Marathon in March, April Oregon’s Vernonia Marathon in mid-April mpa and the Lake Lowell Marathon in Nampa early this month, in which Brian took rs second place. According to him, runners are a certain breed of people. The sportt has in. certain psychological effects on the brain. d, Most runners are happy people, he said, ed especially after a big race—usually called the runner’s high. Looking for your own runner’s high?? Register for an upcoming race.

SUN VALLEY HALF MARATHON Saturday, June 2. Half marathon and twoperson relay along the valley’s paved path system. Info at sunvalleyhalfmarathon.com.

I RUN FOR CHOCOLATE Saturday, June 16. Greenbelt run with half marathon, as well as 5K and kids one-mile fun run distances. Info at seejanerun.com.

SILVER CITY ENDURANCE RUNS Saturday, June 23. Distances of 100K, 50K or 30K starting just outside historic Silver City. Info at pickledfeetultras.com.

DYNAMITE HALF MARATHON AND 5K Saturday, June 30. The inaugural event will be held in Eastern Idaho in Preston, the setting for the film Napoleon Dynamite. Info at dynamitehalf.com.

PONDEROSA PINE RELAY Friday, July 20 and Saturday, July 21. Teams race either a long and slow 190 miles from Weiser to Cascade or sprint 60 miles from McCall to Cascade. Info at ponderosapinerelay.com.

MCCALL TRAIL RUNNING CLASSIC Saturday, July 14. Race 10, 20 or 40 miles on the trails outside of McCall. Info at mccalltrailrunningclassic.com.

WILD IDAHO ENDURANCE RUNS Saturday, Aug. 4. Start at Boiling Springs Campground north of Crouch and race 50 miles or 50K with 16,000, and 10,200 feet of elevation gain respectively. Info at runwildidaho.com.

A DAM ROSEN LUN D

oise couple Brian and Tiedji Baker are running toward the number 12—12 marathons in 12 months. And Brian Baker is not just trying to run the races but win them. “I have won four marathons before, so I hope the stars align this year and I notch one more,” said Brian, 44. The annual Race to Robie Creek, dubbed “the toughest race in the Northwest,” unofficially kicked off the warmerweather racing season, and this year, runners certainly dealt with warmer weather as temperatures climbed into the 80s. But for those who missed the opportunity to sweat it out over Adalpe Summit—or those who missed the Famous Idaho Potato Marathon with full- or half-marathon, 10K and 4K options on May 19—there are still plenty of races coming up. In fact, Shu’s Idaho Running Company’s website shows nearly 150 more events left this year. Though many local runners race year round—the popularity of the YMCA Christmas Run and this year’s new Wilson Creek 50K in January prove there’s no lack of pavement pounders willing to layer up—the fairweather running season is just getting under way in Idaho. One local elite runner who put in the miles despite the rain, snow or heat is Ryan Lund. “In the Treasure Valley, you can generally train outside year round, and there is always a race of some sort that is being offered,” he said. Lund has already competed in more than five races this year, including the Boston Marathon. He is also one of the local runners taking advantage of the newly established year-round Idaho Trail Ultra Series, which includes not only the Wilson Creek 50K but also the Silver City Endurance Run in June and Foothills 50K Frenzy in October—both of which are on his racing schedule. “I am just breaking into ultramarathons and love it,” said Lund. “Having competed in 20 marathons and a couple of Ironmans and Half Ironmans, it is time to break into the ultra races.” Lund will also travel to California for the Tahoe Tim Trail Endurance Run in July, the race that has him most excited. “I think if you have a good physical base, you can probably fake a marathon,” said Lund, explaining the difference in intensity between marathons and the lengthier ultramarathons. “I am not sure that it is very easy to fake an ultramarathon when you are out in the wilderness

EXERGY IS ICUMEN Memorial Day weekend is looming, and that means two things: No. 1, It’s time to start thinking about barbecues, and No. 2, the Exergy Tour is upon us. The inaugural Exergy Tour—a multistage professional women’s bike race— will have its official kick-off on Wednesday, May 23, when the 17 participating teams from around the world will be formally introduced at a celebration at The Grove, beginning at 7 p.m. Racing will begin Thursday, May 24, when the teams compete on a stage that will have them in the heart of downtown Boise. The Prologue stage ser ves as the overall start and will close Capitol Boulevard from Julia Davis Park to the Boise Train Depot. Teams will race a time trial-style leg that will lead them around the depot and back to the park for a total of two miles. The public is invited not only to watch the action but also to join in the fun with activities and entertainment in the park. Opening ceremonies will begin at 5:30 p.m. in Julia Davis Park, with racing beginning at 6:30 p.m. The park will also be home to the Expo and Finish Festival, which will include music, food, merchandise and concessions. The Expo will be located at the finish line of each day’s stage and will ser ve as a gathering point for fans to take advantage of entertainment, activities and food throughout the day. Day 2 (Friday, May 25) will cover nearly 75 miles in the area south of Nampa, with racing beginning at 11 a.m. Racers will travel along Lake Lowell then to the Snake River Canyon before heading back to downtown Nampa. The worldclass racers will compete in time For more info—including trials in Kuna suggested locations to check out the action— Saturday, May visit exergytour.com. 26, with racing action beginning at 11 a.m. Fans can take advantage of a special offer from St. Luke’s Sports Medicine at the Expo when they will be giving away free bike helmets to kids age 15 and younger (quantities are limited). Things head uphill on Sunday, May 27, when the teams race through the mountains between Crouch and Idaho City. A community breakfast will kick things off at 10 a.m. in Crouch, with racing beginning at noon. The race weekend will wrap up on Monday, May 28, back in Boise, with a final 46.6-mile segment that begins and ends in Hyde Park, where there will be activities, entertainment and booths to check out, and the overall champion trophy will be awarded. —Deanna Darr

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REC/LISTINGS Events & Workshops

REC/PLAY

MELANGE INTENSIVE WORKSHOP—“Melange,” French for “mix,” is a dance class inspired by the idea that the root of the body’s natural movement style is in personal interpretation. With influences from multiple Afrostyles of dance, this high-energy, 90-minute workshop is meant to build heat and strength. Shoes are encouraged; no experience necessary. Saturday, May 26, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. $12. Heatherwood Retirement Community, 5277 Kootenai St., Boise, 208345-2150. WALK TO LONDON 2012—Celebrate the Olympic spirit, inspire youth, and join Olympians and Paralympians for a 1.13-mile walk. Starting at Shoreline Boulevard and 13th Avenue on the Boise River Greenbelt, the walk travels to the Anne Frank Memorial, turns north on Eighth Street through BODO and finishes in Grove Plaza for the Exergy Tour Team Presentation. Free registration for the walk the day of the event from 5-5:30 p.m., or you can sign up online at walktolondon2012.org. First 500 participants will receive a commemorative T-shirt. For additional Walk To London information, visit Facebook: walktolondon2012 or follow on Twitter @walk2london2012. Wednesday, May 23, 5:30 p.m. FREE. YOUTH INSTRUCTIONAL HOCKEY CLINICS—Improve your skating, stick handling, passing and other skills in one-hour clinics with a different emphasis each session. Clinics are open to boys and girls ages 7-18 and limited to 30 participants per session. Full hockey equipment is required. The clinics include a one-hour on-ice session with an emphasis on game-type situational drills, as well as position and form. Tuesday, May 29, 5:15-6:15 p.m. Clinics held through Aug. 21. $10, purchase five and receive one free. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-331-0044, idahoiceworld.com.

Register BOISE TO IDAHO CITY MOUNTAIN BIKE TOUR—Annual mountain bike tour, which will take place Saturday, June 16-Sunday, June 17, and departs from Fort Boise. Camping at Idaho City is encouraged, and the registration fee includes camping fees. Trudy’s Kitchen will provide dinner and breakfast, and Ninkasi Brewery will supply tasty brews. $80-$100. Register at spondoro. com. HIGH DESERT TRAIL RUN— Register at bluecirclesports.com for this half marathon or 10K to be held Saturday, June 30, in Pearl. Visit cityoftreesmarathon.com 41 for more info.

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ANDR EW M ENTZ ER

BOXING: BATTLE BY THE LAKE—The inaugural McCall Boxing Classic will feature Golden Glove-style amateur boxing. Doors open at 7 p.m. with ringside, floor and bleacher seating available. Order advance tickets at 208-634-3570, ext. 201. Saturday, May 26, 7:30 p.m. $6-$18. Manchester Ice and Event Centre, McCall, 208634-3570.

BW reporter Andrew Mentzer bungee jumps from a top secret location in Idaho.

THE LONG DROP Pupils dilated. Head pounding with the rush of vehicles whirring across the pavement directly above. Five ... four ... three ... two ... one ... The dark catalog rears its ugly head as I prepare to leap. All that comes to the forefront of the conscious mind are the most morose associations. The suicide documentary The Bridge seems a good fit. I leap out toward the western horizon with little more than shaky faith in the elastic and Velcro apparatus that binds my ankles. Even the folks around me who have done this dozens of times have the same intense look on their mugs. We are collectively hard-wired for adrenaline on this particular afternoon. One-hundred-twenty mph comes quickly. I drop within a body length of the rushing water beneath, when the recoil stops me in place for a fraction of a For more information visit second before launching me Over the Edge on Facebook. diagonally back toward the sky. A disorienting but invigorating feeling comes on strong. Little do I know that the drive over was perhaps more dangerous. Perspective settles in five hours later, once I’m off the bridge and safely sitting on my quiet perch above a scenic canyon backdrop. Recently I joined a group from Stanley’s Over the Edge Bungee to careen headlong off of a 155-foot bridge. We agreed not to share the location of our jump so as not ruffle any administrative feathers with the authorities, but I can note that it was somewhere within two hours of Boise and from a completely legal platform. Over the Edge Bungee is one of the most-prominent outfits in the United States with 20-plus jumps every year statewide. Owner-operator Eric Lyman has been hucking himself off of bridges for more than 22 years and still gets a rush every time he takes the plunge. Over the Edge has jumped from countless bridges in the Northwest, as well as Grand Canyon, Ariz.; Taos, N.M.; Costa Rica, Argentina, Chile, Royal Gorge Bridge in Canon City, Colo. (the highest in the United States at 1,053 feet), and Canada. In addition to bridges, Lyman has also bungee jumped from helicopters, hot-air balloons, cranes and cliffs. “Bungee jumping is empowering and liberating,” said Lyman. Along with a close-knit group of friends and family, he has established a cult following of thrill-seekers in search of a safe alternative to cliff jumping and sky diving—although the experience is entirely unique. “There exists in the world an unlimited supply of suitable platforms, and lots of people who need an honest thrill,” said Lyman. —Andrew Mentzer

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LISTINGS/REC PLAY/REC

IDAHO BOCCE BALL CHAMPIONSHIPS—The Idaho Bocce Ball Club will host the championship games for men’s and women’s singles Sunday, June 17, at 10 a.m. Idaho residents may register by filling out the application at idahobocceballclub.com. Contact Lou at 208-375-5228, Mike at 208-376-3171 or Judy at 208890-4178 for more info. Proof of residency is required. $10. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Boulevard, Boise. 40

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IDAHO PATRIOT THUNDER RIDE—This third annual motorcycle ride benefits Operation Warmheart, the Idaho National Guard Family Support Fund and the Boise VA Medical Center. The ride starts at High Desert Harley Davidson at 11 a.m., heads to Mountain Home’s Carl Miller Park, where guest speakers will say a few words before riders head back to the Air Warhawk Museum. $25, $30 day of. idahopatriotthunder.com.

Now that the snow is melted, it’s time to take a walk in the mountains.

A PAIR OF HIKES JUST IN TIME FOR SUMMER The Payette National Forest contains an abundance of high mountain lakes, and by any reckoning, the two Grass Mountain Lakes should be counted among the best. These two gems, located in the Grass Mountains—a subrange of the Salmon River Mountains—are simply stunning. Appropriately named, the two lakes are a quarter-mile apart and are bordered on their northern perimeters by pockets of tall green grass and dense forest. To the south, an unnamed peak rises more than 600 feet to an 8,156-foot summit. Green fir trees, gray talus and a kaleidoscope of wildflowers make this an excellent destination in July and August. Backpackers will find plenty of flat spots to call home for the night. Families will find this hike enticing with the outstanding scenery, low elevation gain (750 feet) and short hike distance (3.8 miles out and back). To find the trailhead from downtown McCall, drive west on Hwy. 55 for 5.5 miles and turn right onto the paved Brundage Mountain–Goose Lake Road. Proceed 18.2 miles (the road turns to gravel after 3.8 miles) to the large parking area on the right side of the road. The trailScott Marchant is the author head is located on the opposite of four hiking guidebooks, inside of the road. cluding the recently released From the trailhead, make an The Hiker’s Guide Greater Boise. For more information, easy climb to a signed junction visit hikingidaho.com. at two-tenths of a mile. Turn left, ascending an open hillside with inspiring views and colorful wildflowers. The trail passes beneath dense forest and eventually reaches an unsigned junction at 1.4 miles. The left fork travels another quarter mile to the eastern lake. To find the lake that lies to the west, take the right fork and enter a lush meadow painted with yellow composites and purple shooting stars. At the next unsigned junction, turn left and follow the footpath to the lake. Those looking for additional adventure and scenery can take the right fork at the second unsigned junction and ascend 400 feet to a divide with sensational views. Continue west a half mile to a signed junction for Coffee Cup Lake, which glistens 400 feet below. Here, you can follow the trail down to Coffee Cup or continue west another 2.5 miles to Morgan Lake.

REDFISH LAKE LODGE MEMORIAL RUN—Register at imathlete.com for this half marathon, 10K or 5K to be held Saturday, May 26, at 10 a.m. Participants registered by Wednesday, May 23, will receive a T-shirt. For more info., call 208-774-3536. $30-$50. Redfish Lake Lodge, Hwy. 75 to Redfish Lake Road, Stanley, 208-774-3536, redfishlake.com. VELOPARK TWILIGHT TRAIL RUN 10K AND MTB FESTIVAL— Register through race day for the second trail run in the Wild Rockies series, featuring off-road XC, dual slalom, super D and downhill bike races and a free kids race. Event will be held Saturday, May 26-Monday, May 29, at the Eagle bike park. Register at spondoro.com. $20-$40.

Recurring AERIAL YOGA—Stretch out in wraps of silk suspended from the ceiling for a fun, de-stressing workout. Mondays, 8 p.m.; Thursdays 7 p.m.; Saturdays, 10 a.m. $15. Ophidia Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd., Ste. A, Garden City, 208-409-2403, ophidiastudio.com. LADIES DAY AT RIDGECREST GOLF CLUB—Every Thursday is ladies day on the Wee-9 at Ridgecrest Golf Club. Enjoy discounted green fees through Sept. 27. $10. Ridgecrest Golf Club, 3730 Ridgecrest Drive, Nampa, 208-468-9073. THURSDAY NIGHT RUN/ WALKS—Join the group for three-, four- or five-mile fun run/ walks year round, every Thursday night. All abilities are welcome. The group meets regardless of rain, snow, sleet or hail. It is a great way to meet new running or walking buddies. The run/ walk starts at 5:30 p.m. sharp. First timers should come a few minutes early to sign up. Join the mileage club to earn points for free rewards. Thursdays, 5:30 p.m. FREE, 208-344-6604. Shu’s Idaho Running Company, 1758 W. State St., Boise, idahorunningcompany.com.

—Scott Marchant

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NEWS/FOOD S U MM E R GUID E 2012 | FO O D

WILL BIKE FOR BREWS A guide to destination beer-swilling spots TARA MO RGAN

Bring on the booze, Boise.

NOTHING TO WINE ABOUT

LUCKY 13 3662 S. Eckert Road, 208-344-6967, lucky13pizza.com

Though Lucky 13 long ago packed its pies and moved from Hyde Park to Harris Ranch, the pizza and sandwich stop has kept a twinkle of its North End charm with specials like the Rogue of Resseguie sandwich, with hot pastrami, swiss and sauerkraut, and the Camel’s Back Pork pizza, with Basque chorizo and Canadian bacon. BIKE ROUTE: Take a ride along the north side of the river and when you cross under Parkcenter Boulevard, get on the new stretch of the Greenbelt and head Northeast on Eckert Road.

BEN’S CROW INN 6781 Warm Springs Ave., 208-342-9669

Ben’s Crow Inn’s bucket of clams has become local legend. Though the dusty shack seems like the last place on Earth you’d want to suck down bivalves, it is a favorite among the sporty set for patio drinking, horseshoes and patriotic sing-a-longs. The microbrew list is micro, but you’d be better off with an ice-cold PBR anyway. BIKE ROUTE: Follow the directions to Lucky 13 but stay on the Greenbelt for an additional 1.6 miles.

THE LIFT 4091 W. State St., 208-342-3250, theliftboise.com

While most folks laud The Lift for its pineapple salsa-topped fish tacos and 50 cent Olympia beers on Tuesday nights, this State Street dive also features a banging back patio to sip micros on. If you haven’t been by The Lift in a while, you might be surprised to notice that it now boasts a gussied up interior and menu. In addition to standard burgersand-nachos fare, you can get a skewered Caprice salad or pulled pork sliders. BIKE ROUTE: Get on the Greenbelt on the north side of the river heading west. Go under Veteran’s Parkway and get off the Greenbelt at Lander Street (just past the stench of the waste treatment plant but before you’ve come to Willow Lane Athletic Complex). The Lift is at the end of Lander Street.

MCCLEARY’S PUB 9155 W. State St., 208-853-9910, mcclearys.net

If you’re down for some serious daydrinking, McCleary’s Pub offers a morning happy hour from 9 to 10 a.m., when patrons can bid on the Price is Right’s Showcase Showdown and win a free beer. Or if you need more than cold beer and Drew Carey to keep you entertained, McCleary’s offers ample bar games, including horseshoes, sand volleyball, pool and darts. The space also serves up bar grub like burritos, nachos and oh-so-old-school pickled eggs. BIKE ROUTE: Ride west on the north side of the river on the Greenbelt. After Glenwood Street, wind your way to W. Riverside Drive, which brings you through a nice neighborhood. The route is winding, but there are bike lanes the 43 whole way. From Riverside Drive, turn north on to Arney Lane and make your way to State Street.

BIER:THIRTY BOTTLE AND BISTRO 3073 S. Bown Way 208-342-1916, bierthirty.com

AD

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This simple Bown bar is El Dorado for fancy brew enthusiasts. Whether you snag a seat at a long communal patio table to sip a Belgian farmhouse ale or snuggle up in an

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inside spot with a barrel-aged stout to watch a European soccer match, Bier:Thirty will help you tap into your inner beer nerd. But don’t skip out on the snacks: Bier:Thirty also serves up a small, meat-centric menu with options like currywurst and Northwest bangers and mash. BIKE ROUTE: Ride along the south side of the Greenbelt and exit at The Cottonwoods. Ride to Parkcenter and follow the paved path on the left. Take a left at Pennsylvania Avenue and ride past Baggley Park. Continue down the sidewalk past Riverside Elementary to Bown Crossing.

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After 10 p.m., when most restaurant kitchens close downtown, food options start to get pretty limited. But Red Feather Lounge and Bittercreek Ale House have a new plan to combat that. Red Feather has launched a new Late-Night Happy Hour starting at 10 p.m., when folks can enjoy cheap drinks and good food. Rae Willey, front of house manager at Red Feather, said she hopes this will save people from “greasy bar food.” “We wanted to offer to the community a place where they can enjoy a drink and a full menu,” Willey said. Red Feather’s Late-Night Happy Hour will borrow Bittercreek’s kitchen to pump out a limited food menu Wednesday through Saturday until midnight, and Sunday through Tuesday until 11 p.m. The Late-Night Happy Hour menu offers several special items like pressed ham with homemade mustard, pickled apples and crackers, and poutine with local, organic fries, Ballard cheese curds and smoked turkey gravy. “Late night brings in a great crowd,” Willey said. “People are sitting down and picking up menus and saying, ‘Oh my God, it’s happy hour right now?’” Red Feather also plans to bottle five of its happy hour cocktails in 12-ounce bottles and sell them pre-made. This includes the Hello Kitty, a vanilla-infused vodka with lemonade, lemon juice and cranberry, as well as the Overnighter, made with rosemary vodka, housemade Grenadine and honeycomb. And in other booze news, Pacific Rim Wine Stop will soon open in the former Amigo’s restaurant location at 2870 W. State St. in Boise. Though the shop is a reincarnation of the similarly named restaurant housed in Hyde Park 14 years ago, owners Janet and Rob Weston are calling it a “totally different concept.” They plan to sell wine and grab-and-go food, including picnic baskets for boating, Idaho Shakespeare Festival or a day skiing at Bogus Basin. The menu will feature fusion cuisine, including Pacific Rim favorites like Sonoran egg rolls. The family-owned and run shop also plans to cater weddings and will host wine dinners, featuring winemakers from Washington and North Idaho paired with a five-course dinner. The shop will also offer bottled craft beer, and owners hope to open in early June. —Jessica Murri

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very summer, Boise patios overflow with spandex-clad bikers who penguin waddle between tables in their cleats, hoisting a frothing beer in one hand and a dripping slice of pizza in the other. While some hardbodies might scoff at this calorie-neutral “will bike for beer” mentality, most others see it as pure genius. If you’d like to join your buzzed biking brethren, here are a few primo beer-swilling destinations with biking directions from downtown Boise that will assuage some of your suds and fried spuds guilt. (Spandex bodysuits optional.)

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FO O D C O N T ’ D | SUMME R GUID E 2012

BARDENAY, EAGLE

WINESIPPER/FOOD 42

UPSCALE PORTUGUESE REDS Portugal is rightfully famous for its outstanding dessert wines. Whether you prefer tawny or ruby style ports, those fortified sweet red blends are the perfect close to a sumptuous meal. More than 82 different grape varieties are allowed in port, though about a half-dozen dominate. More recently, Portugal’s native grapes have found their way into dry red table wines, and over the past 10 years or so they have cracked the U.S. market. Typically priced less than $10, these wines provide a lot of bang for the buck. This week, though, we decided to explore more upscale Portuguese reds. Here are the panel’s top three: 2008 CAVES BONIFACIO ALICANTE BOUSCHET, $12.99 Alicante bouschet is a French hybrid grape that has found a home in Portugal. It opens with lovely floral aromas of rose petal, sweet cherry, strawberry and plum, backed by intriguing notes of kalamata olive. That olive comes through on the palate, coloring the ripe berry flavors. This is an elegantly complex wine with notes of vanilla, leather and mint that linger nicely on the finish. JOSE MARIA DA FONSECA, PERIQUITA RESERVA, $14.99 The predominant grape in this pick is periquita, also known as castelao, and it produces a wine with big, ripe fruit aromas. Luscious cherry liqueur melds beautifully with notes of earthy strawberry, currant, coffee, tobacco and cinnamon. Sweet plum and blackberry flavors lead off in this fruit-forward, wellbalanced wine with a velvety finish. 2009 MONTE CASCAS, $15.99 This wine is a more traditional blend of touriga nacional, touriga franca, tinta barroca and sousa. The lively aromas are subdued at first, but build with time in the glass, revealing plum, dusty cherry, raspberry, touches of spice and mineral. Round and ripe in the mouth, the flavors in this wine echo all those fruit aromas with panache. Silky smooth tannins come through on the finish. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

155 E. Riverside Drive, Eagle, 208-938-5093, bardenay.com

Whereas Boise’s Bardenay is known for its primo people watching, Eagle’s Bardenay is all about the patio. The Boise River runs by the wraparound seating area, where Eagle elites sip house-distilled gin and vodka cocktails. BIKE ROUTE: Follow directions to McCleary’s but go left on Stoneham Drive from Arney Lane. Follow the signs to the Greenbelt, heading south on Ulmer Lane and west on Heceta Head Drive. The Greenbelt is in flux in these parts and there are some portions where if you have fatter tires, you can ride a Greenbelt path that is unpaved and will go all the way to Bardenay. If you have skinny tires, travel north to State Street and stay on that road to get to Riverside Street, where you can make your way to Bardenay.

PAYETTE BREWERY 111 W. 33rd St., Garden City 208-867-6691, payettebrewing.com

Though this 1-year-old brewery isn’t a restaurant, it does feature a rotating line-up of food trucks most weekend nights, so you can wash back a grilled cheese from B29 Streatery with a Mutton Buster Brown or a Boise cheesesteak from St. Lawrence Gridiron with an Outlaw IPA. Payette’s tasting room is open Thursday through Monday. BIKE ROUTE: Head west on the north side of the Greenbelt, go under Fairview Avenue and continue on the north side of the river. Cruise past the new river recreation park and cross the 36th Street pedestrian bridge, which will put you on 36th Street. Cross Chinden Boulevard and head to 33rd Street. Special thanks to veteran alley cat racer and beer enthusiast Stephanie Clarkson for help with biking directions.

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FOOD/IN THE KITCHEN LAU R IE PEAR M AN

And Michael Sommer would’ve gotten away with it, too, if it weren’t for SCOBY and those meddling herbs.

THE KOMBUCHA KID Michael Sommer brews organic fermented tea ANNE HENDERSON every day more and more that we had all Pulling out what looked like a hunk of these herbs that were great for making tea. I decaying beef from a large glass jar, Michael started making small batches of herbal teas Sommer of Purple Sage Farms smiled like a and experimented with combining the plants proud parent and said, “Look at this monon the farm and the kombucha,” Sommer ster.” What he held was actually a chunk said. of yeast measuring about 6 inches long, 3 For Sommer, who studied botany at the to 4 inches wide and 1 or 2 inches thick. University of Montana, brewing kombucha The “monster” is really a symbiotic colony is fascinating and something anyone can try of bacteria and yeast, or a SCOBY. It’s mainly cellulose and because of the SCOBY’s if they have a mind to. “It’s like a big science experiment. I fill up branching cell structure, it’s extremely tough. books with experiments with It actually feels like a thick results. I’m really striving to slab of calamari. Sommer’s kombucha is understand what’s going on,” available under the Purple This mass is the key to Sage Farms label at Boise he said. brewing kombucha, a teaCo-Op, on Saturdays by way Sommer said there are based fermented beverage of the Purple Sage Farms many well known kombucha with an army of devotees that booth at Capital City Public starters available online for claim the drink has elixir-like Market and in area grocery stores soon. purchase, and unless you qualities, can detoxify the know someone willing to give body and energize the mind. you a start, ordering your own Sommer said he doesn’t like is the best option. to talk about the health benefits, though he “It’s an amazing relationship between agrees there are many, but instead focuses his bacteria, yeast, plants and humans. It takes efforts on brewing “an interesting and tasty all four of those groups of organisms to make beverage.” this. It’s really unique and it’s something to Sommer brews and sells several different promote in all ranges of life, to promote symvarieties of kombucha, including Holy Basil biosis, things working together,” he said. and Lemongrass, using the organic herbs grown at Purple Sage Farms. Sommer said he began developing his first SCOBY and brewing kombucha because his RECIPE: Sommer explains sister gave him one while he was living in how to make your own kombucha at boiseweekly.com. Glacier National Park. “I brought it all the way back to Idaho and started working on the farm and realized

44 | MAY 23–29, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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Meridian Arts Festival. July 14 & 15 at Story Park. Email wayne@ deadbirdgallery.com for more details. MARKET AT THE WATERFRONT AT LAKE HARBOR Our goal is to represent many cultures, booth space now available. Accepting vendors: food, clothing, produce, crafts, jewelry, art. Saturday 9-3, in July. Contact: The Waterfront at Lake Harbor, 3050 N Lake Harbor blvd. Suite 120, 208-639-1441. *NATIVE AMERICAN FOOD* Mist’Delish food truck is open & serves excellent Native American Food. Indian Taco’s, Fry Bread, Enchilada’s & more. So come on down & try her food. Located at 4386 W. State St. right across from Burger n’ Brew.

BW LOST LOST CD CASE NW BOISE Black and flame zip case with 20 cds/dvds, possibly lost in NW Boise/Hillside Jr. High area. Reward for return! 368-9718.

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1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. New website massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio.

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FREE Head & Should Massage with 1 hr. Chinese Reflexology Foot Massage at VIP Massage. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

SERVICES BW CHILD LITTLE RASCALS Date Nights, Drop-ins, and overnights Welcome! Call me @ 208412-2545 Located in Star Idaho! PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois). SUMMER HORSE CAMPS Day Camps 9am-1pm. Overnight Camps 4-days & 3-nights. 208602-3265. www.SHEtherapy.org THERE ARE NEW KIDS IN TOWN Kootenia Kids Preschool - NOW ENROLLING!! Open House Saturday May 19th, 10-2 & May 23rd, 6-9. 4802 W Kootenai St. just 1 Block East of Orchard. Come One! Come All! Every ones talking ‘bout the new kids in town..... Get more information on our website!

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Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/ Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. RELAXATION MASSAGE Call Ami at 208-697-6231. ULM 340-8377. Hrs. 8:30AM8PM.

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BW MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS FABULOUS IBANEZ SEMIHOLLOW (AS73-TCR) semihollow electric guitar. Cherry translucent finish. Barely used & in close to perfect physical condition aside from some barely noticeable finish swirling, but in perfect working condition. Sounds fantastic! Super low action! Comes with brand new hardshell Ibanez case. $575 OBO! Call 343-5290.

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BW VOLUNTEERS HANDYMAN/FURNITURE REPAIR CATCH, Inc. (Charitable Assistance to Community’s Homeless) provides housing to families with children who are currently living in homeless shelters & helps them become established in our community in homes & become self-sufficient within six mo. We are in need of a volunteer to do minor furniture repairs on the furniture donated to our families. If this sounds like the right opportunity for you, please contact Blenda Davis, Office & Resource Manager, 246-8830. VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR CATCH, Inc. (Charitable Assistance to Community’s Homeless) provides housing to families with children who are currently living in homeless shelters & helps them become established in our community in homes & become self-sufficient within six months. We are in need of a volunteer who will work closely with the Office & Resource Manager on a variety of tasks, use Excel, Outlook and Word, identify community opportunities to promote CATCH & solicit volunteers, run ads & further assist where needed. If this sounds like the right opportunity for you, please contact Blenda Davis, Office & Resource Manager, at 246-8830.

PET SITTER Hello! My name is Lucretia, & I am an experienced animal caretaker. Whatever your dog/cat/rodent/ reptile/bird needs, I am capable of giving! I will charge based on your animals & where you live. If you need a Pet Sitter, or have questions, please reply to this ad via e-mail (hi_maesi@rocketmail. com), giving your name & number. I will be sure to get back to you as soon as I can.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW COUNSELING

BW MASSAGE A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas.

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**LOCAL HONEY** We are a local beekeeping family & have honey to sell. Our honey is produced organically, all natural, & unfiltered. It tastes great!

$10/pint, $15/quart. Sorry, at this time we do not sell by the gallon. If interested, please call Alex at 208-921-1503 or Katie at 208409-9473. Thank you!

FREE KITTENS/CATS Free Feral Kittens/Cats. Some litterbox trained. All unique. Call 208-286-6154. Ask for Cheryl!

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Fussy about your beef? Want half of this one? Grass fat & totally “green” ; we’re eatting the other half. Price way less than supermarket. 337-3821 YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 3442055.

BW FOR SALE COUCH & LOVESEAT FOR SALE $100 for set, or $75 for love seat & $50 for couch. Decorative pillows included. Couch has three nickel sized, small tears in the flap at the very bottom. 949-3244.

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These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

SHOP HERE

RIXY: 8-year-old female short-hair tabby. Large, sweet and very loving. Litterbox-trained. Reduced adoption fee due to age. (#105633574)

RUSTY: 2-year-old male rottweiler mix. Friendly and loving with good energy. Knows some commands. Appears crate- and housetrained. (#16127162)

ANGEL: 1-year-old female Chihuahua/dachshund mix. Good with other dogs, active and playful. Loving, gentle and extremely food motivated. (#15954878)

SNOOKIE: 3-year-old male short-hair. Sweet big boy with lovely gold eyes. Shy at first but enjoys being petted and handled. Litterboxtrained. (#16086872)

HERSCHEL: 3-year-old male chocolate Lab. Large (80 pounds), playful and strong. Some training started. Active family dog potential. (#16137196)

BIG: 1-year-old male Akbash/Lab mix. Big boy (95 pounds). Good with adults and children, but not other dogs. Housetrained and obedience started. (#15990540)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

ROARKE: Need a barn TIANA: Tiny, outgoing cat? Adopt me, I’m free. girl will stay kitten-sized forever.

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NIA: Come stroke my curly fur to see why I’m one cool cat.

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CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com

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A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on June 14, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: APR 23 2012

NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA Asa Tyrell Wonderful Chelsea Lynn Wonderful Asynn John Wonderful Case No. CV NC 1206292 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGES

SERVICES - HOME

A Petition to change the name of Asa Tyrell Wonderful, Chelsea Lynn Wonderful and Asynn John Wonderful, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Asa Tyrell Gentry, Chelsea Lynn Gentry and Asynn John Gentry. The reason for the change in name is: because that is the name given to Asa Tyrell at birth and the family wishes to conform.

CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. May 2, 9, 16 & 23, 2012. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please. YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

NYT CROSSWORD | INDIES BY BEN TAUSIG / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 21 “… there ___ square” 22 Maximum 23 Slogan for medical marijuana activists? 26 Portuguese “she” 27 Tattoos, slangily 28 More than a quarter of academic circles? 29 Alias 30 “No surprise to me” 32 Like unworn tires

ACROSS 1 One waiting in France 7 “Who’s there?” response 12 Hank Aaron led the N.L. in them four times 16 British pols 19 Mark who won the 1998 Masters 20 Alternative energy option 1

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36 Persians who protect their feet? 40 Took a break around one, say 42 Was halting 43 Plant, of a sort 44 Author 45 Not straight 48 “___ Beso” (Paul Anka hit) 49 Big twit? 11

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31

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50 Entitlement to cross the stream first? 54 Conductor Toscanini 56 Singer DiFranco 57 Start of a “White Album” title 58 Pod-based entity 59 People who avoid social networking, maybe 63 Mixologist’s measure

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65 My ___, Vietnam 66 It was published four years before “MobyDick” 68 “Snowy” bird 69 “If you can’t behave on this tour, I swear you’ll be sorry!”? 75 Forerunner of euchre 76 Smack 77 ___ culpa 78 State for which a Springsteen album is named: Abbr. 79 Hunt’s co-star on “Mad About You” 81 Error indicator 82 Largest campus of Long Island Univ. 85 The title of this puzzle, e.g. 86 One + one? 88 Big part of the dairy business? 90 Like much of Pindar’s work 93 [Smack!] 94 Revolver 95 Tragic E.R. status 96 Cartoon pet of note 97 Melodic 99 Play double Dutch, say 104 Lost subject of a hit Beatles song? 108 Working as a store clerk 109 Disney princess 110 Part of a newspaper: Abbr. 111 Jobs creation 113 OBs, e.g. 114 Vietnam Veterans Memorial designer 115 Clothing-free version of the national pastime? 122 Dark meat piece 123 Feminine suffix 124 Pitch 125 Simplified language form 126 Pompous person 127 “I’ll have what ___ having” 128 Itching

129 City near Clearwater, informally

DOWN 1 Chaperon 2 Supreme Egyptian god 3 Offended the nose 4 “Dog” 5 Choice words? 6 “I don’t think so” 7 Part of a chain, maybe 8 Studio sign 9 Trudge through wet snow, say 10 Dallas pro baller 11 “We’ll teach you to drink deep ___ you depart”: Hamlet 12 “Tommy,” e.g. 13 Most inclusive 14 It has many servers 15 “___ I care!” 16 Famously temperamental court figure 17 Stout alternative 18 Salmon, at times 24 Powered in either of two ways 25 Chicago mayor Emanuel 31 World leader beginning December 2011 33 “Kubla Khan” river 34 On account of 35 Make magnificent 37 French “she” 38 Take a load off 39 Two-time N.L. batting champ Lefty 41 Obama’s birthplace 46 Whit 47 Hardly sharp 50 Josh of “How I Met Your Mother” 51 Where to conform, per an expression 52 Jason who’s a five-time baseball All-Star 53 Deception 54 Ages and ages

55 Director Nicolas 58 Car in “Gone in 60 Seconds” 60 City down the lake from Buffalo, N.Y. 61 Oklahoma state tree 62 “Tristram Shandy” novelist 64 Something you might tap in 67 Mayo, e.g. 70 Projectionist’s unit 71 Scrape 72 Drives 73 Big suits 74 Entered slowly 80 Steel support for concrete 81 People with reservations in Florida 83 Minute 84 Some Camaro roofs 87 Swollen, as veins 88 Dynasty for Confucius 89 ___ avis 90 Big maker of smoothies and energy bars 91 Accounts with keys? 92 Extra ones might be dramatic L A S T E M A I L

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P B A C A L L P H O E E N A T V A V E E A P R I S E A S T E S L A W A H A D E E F O R M T R O T S E N S

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94 News Corp. paper 98 Look like a creep? 100 Grammy-winning Radiohead album of 2000 101 Prime years for rocking? 102 Consent form 103 Dead Sea Scrolls writer 105 Cary of “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” 106 Made whoopee 107 Some blades 112 With a sure hand 116 “You mean … what?” 117 Surveillance org. 118 “Star Trek: Voyager” airer 119 D.J.’s purchases 120 Tanked 121 Economic stat Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S F O R G A V E J O N E S

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A N D R E E A A N M O I N N E T I R L O S A L V O A G T A A N R S

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P E A C U T E R T A S E L O P P P E E S E L A N L I Q U E T U R A M L E V I O R I C O T C U S A G S E I T A S T R A M E D I O L E N S I L E T T E

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Jessica Audrey Marchewka Case No. CV NC 1205764 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Jessica Audrey Marchewka, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in ADA County, Idaho. The name will change to Jessica Audrey Trent. The reason for the change in name is: because I divorced my spouse. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on June 7, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: APR 03 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Nichelaus Eugene Huffaker Case No. CV NC 1207335 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Nichelaus Eugene Huffaker, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Nichelaus Eugene Mack. The reason for the change in name is: Stepfather raised me and I want his last name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on June 28, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: May 04 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. May 16, 23, 30 & June 6, 2012.

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | MAY 23–29, 2012 | 49

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “My soul is a fire that suffers if it doesn’t burn,” said Jean Prevost, a writer and hero of the French Resistance during World War II. “I need three or four cubic feet of new ideas every day, as a steamboat needs coal.” Your soul may not be quite as blazing as his, Aries, and you may normally be able to get along fine with just a few cubic inches of new ideas per day. But I expect that in the next three to four weeks, you will both need and yearn to generate Prevost-type levels of heat and light. Please make sure you’re getting a steady supply of the necessary fuel.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): It’s OK with me if you want to keep the lion as your symbolic animal, Leo. But I’d like to tell you why I’m proposing that you switch over to the tiger, at least for now. People who work with big cats say that lions tend to be obnoxious and grouchy, whereas tigers are more affable and easy to get along with. And I think that in the coming weeks, it’ll be important for you to be like the tiger. During this time, you will have an enhanced power to cultivate friendships and influence people. Networking opportunities will be excellent. Your web of connections should expand.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Here’s a great question to pose on a regular basis during the next three weeks: “What’s the best use of my time right now?” Whenever you ask, be sure to answer with an open mind. Don’t assume that the correct response is always, “working with white-hot intensity on churning out the masterpiece that will fulfill my dreams and cement my legacy.” On some occasions, the best use of your time may be doing the laundry or sitting quietly and doing nothing more than watching the world go by. Here’s a reminder from philosopher Jonathan Zap: “Meaning and purpose are not merely to be found in the glamorous, dramatic moments of life.”

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1977, the first Apple computers were built in a garage that Steve Jobs’ father provided for his son and Steve Wozniak to work in. (You can see a photo of the holy shrine here: tinyurl. com/AppleGarage.) I suggest you think about setting up your own version of that magic place sometime soon: a basement, kitchen, garage, warehouse, or corner of your bedroom that will be the spot where you fine-tune your master plan for the coming years—and maybe even where you begin working in earnest on a labor of love that will change everything for the better.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Sometimes I think and other times I am,” said French poet Paul Valery. Most of us could say the same thing. From what I can tell, Gemini, you are now entering an intensely “I am” phase of your long-term cycle—a time when it will be more important for you to exclaim “woohoo!” than to mutter “hmmm;” a time to tune in extra strong to the nonverbal wisdom of your body and to the sudden flashes of your intuition; a time when you’ll generate more good fortune by getting gleefully lost in the curious mystery of the moment than by sitting back and trying to figure out what it all means. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t pretend you can’t see the darkness. Admit its presence. Accept its reality. And then, dear Cancerian, walk nonchalantly away from it, refusing to fight it or be afraid of it. In other words, face up to the difficulty without becoming all tangled up in it. Gaze into the abyss so as to educate yourself about its nature, but don’t get stuck there or become entranced by its supposedly hypnotic power. I think you’ll be amazed at how much safety and security you can generate for yourself simply by being an objective, poised observer free of melodramatic reactions.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I have a head’s up for you, Libra. Do your best to avoid getting enmeshed in any sort of “he said/she said” controversy. Gossip is not your friend in the week ahead. Trying to serve as a mediator is not your strong suit. Becoming embroiled in personal disputes is not your destiny. In my opinion, you should soar free of all the chatter and clatter. It’s time for you to seek out big pictures and vast perspectives. Where you belong is meditating on a mountaintop, flying in your dreams and charging up your psychic batteries in a sanctuary that’s both soothing and thrilling. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In some Australian aborigine cultures, a newborn infant gets two names from the tribal elders. The first is the name everybody knows. The second is sacred and is kept secret. Even the child isn’t told. Only when he or she comes of age and is initiated into adulthood is it revealed. I wish we had a tradition similar to this. It might be quite meaningful for you, because you’re currently navigating your way through a rite of passage that would make you eligible to receive your sacred, secret name. I suggest we begin a new custom: When you’ve completed your transformation, pick a new name for yourself, and use it only when you’re conversing with your ancestors, your teachers or yourself.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Please raise your hand if you have ever sought out a romantic connection with someone mostly because of the way he or she looked. You shouldn’t feel bad if you have; it’s pretty common. But I hope you won’t indulge in this behavior any time soon. In the coming weeks, it’s crucial for you to base your decisions on deeper understandings—not just in regard to potential partners and lovers but for everything. As you evaluate your options, don’t allow physical appearance and superficial attractiveness to be the dominant factors. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The 21st flight of the 4.5-billionpound Space Shuttle Discovery was supposed to happen on June 8, 1995. But about a week before its scheduled departure, workers discovered an unforeseen problem. Northern Flicker Woodpeckers had made a mess of the insulation on the outer fuel tank; they’d pecked a couple of hundred holes, some quite deep. To allow for necessary repairs, launch was postponed for more than a month. I’m choosing this scenario to serve as a useful metaphor for you, Capricorn. Regard it as your notice not to ignore a seemingly tiny adversary or trivial obstacle. Take that almost-insignificant pest seriously. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s official: Dancing increases your intelligence. So says a report in the New England Journal of Medicine. Unfortunately, research found that swimming, bicycling and playing golf are not at all effective in rewiring the brain’s neural pathways. Doing crossword puzzles is somewhat helpful, though, and so is reading books. But one of the single best things you can do to enhance your cognitive functioning is to move your body around in creative and coordinated rhythm with music. Lucky you: This is a phase of your astrological cycle when you’re likely to have more impulses and opportunities to dance. Take advantage. Get smarter. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your animal totem for the next phase of your astrological cycle is a creature called a hero shrew. Of all the mammals in the world, it has the strongest and heaviest spine proportionate to its size. This exceptional attribute makes the tiny animal so robust that a person could stand on it without causing serious harm. You will need to have a backbone like that in the coming weeks, Pisces. Luckily, the universe will be conspiring to help you. I expect to see you stand up to the full weight of the pressures coming to bear on you—and do it with exceptional charisma.

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Boise Weekly Vo. 20 Issue 48