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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 22 NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011

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TAK EE E ON E! INSIDE

GIFT GUIDE Ready, set, shop

NEWS 10

WHAT’S NEXT FOR OCCUPY With evictions and winter weather, Occupiers think beyond the camp FIND 17

BLOWIN’ UP Nothing says Christmas like a shiny grenade REC 28

GAME ON It’s video game season and we have the top gift picks

“The last three days before Thanksgiving, we’ll sell 7,000 pumpkin pies ...”

CITIZEN 12

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporters: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Stephen Foster Stephen@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Zach Hagadone, Randy King, David Kirkpatrick, Andrew Mentzer, Ted Rall Interns: Talyn Brumley, Garrett Horstmeyer, Kat Thornton ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Conner Coughlin, Derf, Guy Hand, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE STARING DOWN THE BARREL This is where the year starts to get pretty interesting at Boise Weekly. We’re putting two issues together at once this week so that we can take a few days to stuff ourselves and work off the subsequent food-and-booze coma. At the same time, we’re staring down what we call the trifecta. Every year over Christmas and New Year’s, we shut down the office to force ourselves into hibernation for a few days. In order to accomplish that task, we, once again, put together a few issues at once. What does that mean for you? Nothing, unless you’re planning an event you’d like us to list in our event or music listings. Papers will still hit stands every Wednesday, blogs will still have fresh content every day. But event listings are the tricky part. If you have a meeting/festival/concert/fundraiser before Wednesday, Jan. 4, and you want to get the word out, send us word before Wednesday, Dec. 14, to calendar@boiseweekly.com. In the coming weeks, we’ll publish a few of our mostpopular issues, including Bad Cartoon on Wednesday, Nov. 30, and Fiction 101 in the first edition of the new year. We’ll also be tackling some heavy-hitting issues between now and then in the main feature section—the subjects of which I’ll keep quiet for another week or so. At least one of those stories, though, should provide you with excellent holiday dinner conversation fodder, especially if you enjoy a rousing debate with your in-laws. And if you decide to pull the ol’ “So I read something interesting the other day” at your turkey day feast this week, I’ll recommend using the stories on Pages 9, 10 or 12. With any of those, you can spur a discussion on the death penalty, the separation (or apparent lack of) faith and matters of the state, the Occupy movement or the fact that the art of at-home pie making appears to be lost given the fact that Costco makes more than 9,000 pies for Thanksgiving tables in the valley. If all that is too heady for your bunch, just turn to Page 38 and start reading horoscopes. We at Boise Weekly wish you a Happy Thanksgiving. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Mark Hardy TITLE: African Sky MEDIUM: Giclee, pigment inks ARTIST STATEMENT: I often see imaginary landscapes and anectodes within mineral specimens. While my titles suggest what I see, other people commonly see something entirely different. Such specimens are a few of the many examples of rock and water interactions that we commonly encounter. See more at the Boise State Student Union Art Gallery through Jan. 2, 2012.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 3

WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. S TEPHEN FOS TER

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Faith and the execution of Paul Rhoades The future of Occupy CITYDESK

SMILE AND SAY CHEESE It was slideshow mania at Cobweb this week, with photos of the gingerbread gala at Boise State, roving reporter Andrew Mentzer’s three-week Grand Canyon float and the Pussycat Ball at Rose Room.

SECOND DEATH AT IDAHO MINE SINCE APRIL A second worker has been killed in Mullan at Hecla’s Lucky Mine. In April, Larry Marek was killed at the same mine when the roof of a tunnel collapsed.

THIS WEEK AT OCCUPY Members of OccupyBoise marched to Boise City Hall, demanding an audience with Mayor Dave Bieter—who wasn’t in town— and airing grievances against everything from war to banking to Boise Weekly.

GAMERS GO CRAZY It’s video-game season, kids, and one of the year’s biggest releases just shattered entertainment records. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare broke its own sales record by $125 million.

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9 10 9

CITIZEN

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FEATURE The Right (Wing) Stuff

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE Thee Oh Sees

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MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN J. Edgar and My Week with Marilyn

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REC Holiday video games

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FOOD Finding your inner hunter-gatherer

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WINE SIPPER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

36

FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 5

OPINION/BILL COPE

ASK BILL Does it take a plot to make these guys look dumb? Cope you maggoty cat puke, This is the third time I’ve written you a letter but don’t get to thinking we are amigos or something. Because we are not. I have decided I hate your ilk even more than I hate musicals and NPR. I ask myself every day why lame stream medium ilks like you and Rachel Maddow won’t just admit how Barack Hussein Obama is the worse thing that ever took a squat in the White House, then I have to remind myself every day how libtard freaks like you and Maddow don’t care what happens to the U.S. of A., not as long as you can get a lesbian or a homo or a Muslin or a black person another job in the government telling us white guys what to do. You probably won’t be happy until you get a black Muslin lesbian elected president, will you? That’s just how sick you are. You and Rosie O’Donnell. I agree with Ann Coulter. Somewhere or other, she said, “We have better black people on our side than their black people,” or something like that. She was talking about what a great black dude that Herman Cain is, and about how to become a conservative black dude, he and the other conservative blacks had to go against all the rest of his family and neighbors and the whole black bunch of libtards that always think they should be Democrats instead of being patriotic to our country that gave their kind a home when they needed one. And then what do you lame stream cow pies do but find some sleazoid women who say Herman got a little sexual harrassy back once upon a time before he knew he would be running for the president job. That makes me so mad, I feel like doing some wheelies on a sissy soccer field. And I would if my truck was running. What I want to know, Cope, is why won’t you lame stream medium ilks leave our president runners alone? You don’t hear Sean Hannity or Bill O’Reilly saying any nasty stuff about your precious Hussein Obama, do you? But no, soon as one of our runners looks like he’s gonna take off and get ahead of that LDSer, out comes the smear tackles. You use those lame stream tricks and now you got Rick Perry so flustered he can’t remember how to talk, and you made Donald Trump look like he’s even dumber than Rick Perry, and here you got Newt Gingrich trying to explain how he loves this country so much that God told him it was OK to cheat on one wife after another until he found one who appreciates the value of a Tiffany’s charge card, and now you got those sleazoid women calling Herman Cain a woman grabber. I am beginning to think there is a plot going on, so that you and Rachel Maddow and all the rest are scrambling up our runners one by one until there’s no one left but that LDSer, which I will vote for if there is no one else, but goddamn I sure hope there is some one else. So Cope, you wart on Airy Annie Huffingpuff’s ass, do you have the guts to admit there is a plot or not? —Signed: No Friend Of Yours, Dick from Homedale Dear Dick, Goodness, your letter has given me so much to think about. For instance, I would love to explore that “brother from another mother” relationship Herman Cain claims to have with the Koch brothers, especially since Justice Clarence Thomas seems to have close ties to the Kochs as well. Odd coincidence, wouldn’t you agree … for a man whose entire legacy can be summed up in two words: “Anita” and “Hill.” Given the fact that both men have a peculiar way with the ladies that, shall we say, leaves them vulnerable to accusations if not cash settlements, one wonders what it is that the Kochs look for in their friends, black or otherwise. Also, at some future time, perhaps we can explore Ann Coulter’s reasoning that conservative blacks have better values and stronger characters than liberal blacks, having had to endure such torments as telling their mommas that they were thinking of voting Republican. And here all that those brainwashed Democratic blacks had to put up with were voter suppression, Jim Crow segregation, fire hoses, attack dogs, vicious mobs, the Klan, beatings, bombings and murder. Good thing Cain and Thomas stayed away from all that civil-rights folderol, eh? ... even if they weren’t shy about taking advantage of the gains their lefty counterparts accomplished. But my first duty is to answer your question, which is (if I have it straight) why are we media people picking on your candidates until they come apart like cheap toilet paper in a triple flush? The answer is quite simple, Dick. We don’t want to see any of them become president. It is patently obvious—at least to us “lame stream medium ilks”—that with one possible exception (that being the “LDSer” you mentioned, and believe me, we don’t like him any better than you do), there’s not a one of them either intellectually or temperamentally qualified to lead a band booster’s club, let alone the free world. And yes, if you must know, there is a plot. Rachel and I got the whole gang together—Keith Olbermann, Katie Couric, Dan Rather, all the libtard columnists and commentators, all the news people from all the news sources except for that one you listen to—and we hatched a plot. I can’t remember who came up with our primary tactic, but essentially, it is this: “Show the American people that these candidates are so stupid they don’t even understand they are too stupid to be president.” So far, it’s working. And as to the LDSer, we’ll have plenty of time later to work on him. You know, after he’s the only one left.

6 | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 7

OPINION/TED RALL

OUR F-YOU GOVERNMENT

Anti-Occupy crackdowns highlight lack of services Governments are supposed to fulfill the basic needs of their citizens. Ours doesn’t pretend to try. Got a problem? The U.S. government has an all-purpose response to whatever ails you: f-you. During the ’80s, I drove a taxi in New York. Then, as now, there were no public restrooms. At 4 a.m., the coffee I drank to stay awake posed a significant challenge. Yet the City of New York didn’t provide public restrooms. So I did what all taxi drivers did: I found a side street. It went OK until a cop caught me peeing under the old elevated West Side Highway. In the middle of the night on Nov. 15, NYPD goons stormed into Zuccotti Park in lower Manhattan. They beat and peppersprayed members of Occupy Wall Street and destroyed the books in their library. Citing “unsanitary conditions,” New York billionaire Mayor Michael Bloomberg, then told reporters: “I have become increasingly concerned … that the occupation was coming to pose a health and fire safety hazard to the protestors and to the surrounding community.” Four days earlier, The New York Times quoted a city health department statement about the possible spread of norovirus, vomiting, diarrhea and tuberculosis: “It should go without saying that lots of people sleeping outside in a park as we head toward winter is not an ideal situation for anyone’s health.” According to the Times: “Damp laundry and cardboard signs, left in the rain, have provided fertile ground for mold. Some protesters urinate in bottles, or occasionally a water-cooler jug, to avoid the lines at [the

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few] public restrooms.” Of course, there’s an obvious solution: provide bathroom facilities—not just for Occupy but for all New Yorkers. Doctors noted a new phenomenon called “Zuccotti cough,” with symptoms similar to those of “Ground Zero cough” suffered by 9/11 first responders. Could Occupiers be suffering the results of sleeping in a should-have-been-Superfund site for two months? We’ll never know. As under George W. Bush, President Barack Obama’s EPA still won’t conduct a 9/11 environmental impact study. One of the most ironic complaints about the Occupations is that they attract the mentally ill, drug users and habitually homeless. To listen to the mayors of Portland, Ore., Denver and New York, you’d think the Occupiers beamed in bums and nutcases from outer space. When mentally disabled people seek help from their government, they get the usual answer: f-you. When people addicted to drugs ask their government for help, they are turned away. Fyou again. When people who lost their homes because their government said “f-you” rather than help turn to the same government to look for safe shelter, again they are told: “f-you.” And then, after days and years and decades shirking their responsibility to provide such staples of survival as places to urinate and sleep, food and medical care, our “f-you” government has the amazing audacity to blame us, victims of their negligence and corruption and violence, for messing things up. Which is why we are finally, at long last, starting to say “f-you” to them.

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NEWS/CITYDESK GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

NEWS GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

A PRAYER FOR THE LIVING, A PRAYER FOR THE DEAD

411 S. Fifth St. is being leased as office space

THE PAST AND PRESENT OF SOUTH FIFTH STREET

How faith permeated the execution of Paul Ezra Rhoades GEORGE PRENTICE Brent Reinke, director of the Idaho Department of Correction, is a man of faith. On his desk at the Boise headquarters of IDOC, among the stacks of legal briefings and operational procedures that detailed the Nov. 18 execution of Paul Ezra Rhoades, stood a framed prayer, culled from the 1662 Book of Common Prayer. “Lord Jesus, for our sake you were condemned as a criminal: visit our jails and prisons with your pity and judgment,” reads the prayer. “Bring the guilty to repentance and amendment of life according to your will, and give them hope for their future.” In the final days leading up to Rhoades’ death, Reinke was asked countless questions about the execution chamber and chemicals to be used in the lethal injection. But when BW asked Reinke about how he reconciled his faith with his ultimate responsibility of putting a condemned prisoner to death, he was a bit surprised but nonplussed. “That’s a great question,” said Reinke, pausing to think for a moment. “Where I come from—as a spiritual standpoint and a personal standpoint—I’m comfortable with this, mainly because it’s the policy of the State of Idaho.” It was policy and, more precisely, the directions from judges and juries that decided Rhoades’ fate—that he would be put to death for his crimes. Idaho’s judicial system determined that Rhoades was responsible for terrorizing Eastern Idaho in 1987, when three people were murdered in three weeks. Rhoades was sentenced to death for the kidnappings, tortures and murders of Stacy Baldwin and Susan Michelbacher. He received two additional life sentences for the murder of Nolan Haddon. The prayer that sits on Reinke’s desk was only one faith-based plea that would be offered in the days, hours and minutes leading up to Rhoades’ death. In spite of the oftenreferenced separation of church and state, spiritual guidance was continually interjected into the string of events. No less than Pope Benedict XVI begged for a stay of execution, WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Protesters outside the Idaho State Correctional Institution pleaded for justice, mercy and a stay of execution in the minutes prior to the lethal injection of Paul Ezra Rhoades.

appealing to Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s faith (following high school, Otter briefly studied for the Catholic priesthood at St. Martin’s Abbey in Lacey, Wash.). “I reiterate the commitment of the Holy Father to uphold the sacredness and dignity of all human life,” wrote Monsignor JeanFrancois Lantheaume, charge d’affaires on behalf of the Pope. “I hope that you will give heed to his petition.” The Rev. Michael Driscoll, bishop of the Idaho Catholic Diocese, made a similar plea. “Other ways are available to punish criminals and to protect society that are more respectful of human life,” wrote Driscoll. Otter’s office received hundreds of letters, emails and posts to his official Facebook page, most pleading for a stay of execution and many appealing to the governor as a man of faith. Meanwhile, Rhoades’ faith was reportedly becoming more important to him as well. Spending his final days in F Block of the Idaho Maximum Security Institute, Rhoades met frequently with an unidentified spiritual adviser. In fact, the adviser was one of only four individuals who met with Rhoades every day leading up to his execution—the others being his attorney (Oliver Loewy), his mother (Pauline Rhoades) and a sister. “He has been doing a lot of reading of the Bible,” Reinke told BW two days before the execution. “He has been spending a lot of time with the Bible and an additional book, which is scripture-based.” Several hours before his execution, Rhoades was allowed to keep one spiritual item, the Bible, when the rest of his personal belongings were taken away and inventoried. Meanwhile outside the gates of the prison, prayer was the order of the day as approximately 50 members of Idahoans Against the

Death Penalty stood in sub-freezing temperatures, shrouded by charcoal-black clouds with prayers for Rhoades, his family and even his executioners. “As citizens of this state, we are appalled that this killing is being done in our name,” said Mia Crosthwaite, a member of the group. Crosthwaite led a string of prayers. circled by a few dozen others holding signs, like “What Would Jesus Do?” and “Life in Prison=Justice. Killing=Vengeance.” She also offered prayers for Rhoades’ victims. “Stacy Baldwin was only 21 when she was murdered,” said Crosthwaite. “Today’s execution is one more pain of so many that Stacy’s family never deserved. We remember her family, all those who loved her, and all those who will still feel her loss.” The prayers continued right up until the minute of Rhoades’ execution. “There are about 20 employees of the Department of Correction serving on the execution team,” said Crosthwaite. “They will carry memories of what they did today for the rest of their lives. Today the entire prison is mobilized around this execution. Every prisoner, every guard, every prison official knows what is happening. Some will be haunted by it.” With a precise dosage of chemicals coursing through his veins, Rhoades died at 9:15 a.m. on Nov. 18. Within 90 minutes, Otter offered a final statement of faith. “My thoughts and prayers are with the victims, their loved ones, the mother of Paul Ezra Rhoades and everyone who has been impacted by these crimes,” wrote Otter. “The State of Idaho has done its best to fulfill this most solemn responsibility with respect, professionalism and most of all dignity for everyone involved.”

Boise won’t have a new gravel parking lot in its Central Addition District anytime soon, but neighbors and preservationists aren’t celebrating just yet. In fact, they’re still a bit wary of the motives of Trilogy Development of Meridian. “I’m happy that [Trilogy] may be listening to people in the neighborhood a bit more,” said Noel Weber Jr., who owns Classic Design on South Sixth Street, one block from the properties. “But I’m a little hesitant to believe that they’re really doing that.” Last summer, Trilogy announced that it had purchased two historic homes at 411 and 413 S. Fifth St. and planned to clear the property for a gravel parking lot. But the Meridian-based developer ran into pushback from the neighborhood and historians, who, instead of a parking lot, envisioned bringing new life into the homes, both built more than a century ago. As a compromise, Trilogy offered the homes to anyone who was willing to move them away from their foundations. “The agreement that Trilogy offered was that Preservation Idaho was free to find takers for the homes,” said Sheri Freemuth, program officer of the Western Office of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. But Freemuth said when someone stepped for ward to move the home at 411 S. Fifth St., Trilogy reneged on its original offer. “They said, ‘No, we don’t want you to take that house. We want to rent it out now,’” said Freemuth. Indeed a new “For Lease” sign has been posted outside of 411 S. Fifth St. Citydesk made several attempts to talk to Trilogy regarding its plans but our calls weren’t returned. “I just received a letter from [Trilogy] that they’re withdrawing their application for a temporary gravel parking lot,” confirmed David Moser, planner with the City of Boise’s Planning and Development Services. Freemuth isn’t optimistic for future plans to preserve the past. “I don’t think they intended to preserve and use those homes,” said Freemuth. “Of course, that would have been my hope, but I’m not that much of a Pollyanna, really.” —George Prentice

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 9

NEWS GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

nov. 22 thru dec. 17, 2011

World Premiere

a permanent image by Samuel D. Hunter directed by kip fagan

Opening We e k !

tickets: start at $15 $10 if you are under 30 phone: 331-9224 x205 online: BCTheater.org 854 Fulton St. Downtown Boise, ID

The Occupy Boise encampment, outside of the Old Ada County Courthouse, is now in its third week.

OCCUPY AT CROSSROADS As the movement matures, Occupiers debate how to move forward STEPHEN FOSTER Just more than two months after a modest group of protesters first pitched tents in New York City’s Zuccotti Park, the Occupy Wall Street movement has managed to, at the very least, capture the nation’s attention and, at most, alter the rhetoric of American politics. But the movement has also suffered a series of setbacks. In the past few weeks, protesters have clashed with law enforcement in New York, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Oakland, Calif., and Portland, Ore. Municipal police forces throughout the nation have shown that they’re not afraid to use weapons including tear gas and pepper spray to clear protesters. But while the movement may be a bit shaken, activists said they’re strategizing new ways to move forward. “With the impending cold and the evictions, there have been discussions that we’re moving into a phase two,” said Warren Hatton, a member of Occupy Boise, in front of the Old Ada County Courthouse. “Where I want to see it go is less focus on the encampments but more on networking with other cities and long-term planning—planning what we’re going to be doing for the spring and summer and thinking about new ways to have a presence that’s not just a camp.” Nationally some Occupiers may have concluded that the encampments might not be as permanent as originally hoped. However members of Occupy Boise said their encampment has “an important role to play,” and as long as relations with the local police remain on good footing, they intend to continue camping out in the cold. “One of the things that’s super important about the encampment is that it’s a headquar-

10 | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | BOISEweekly

ters,” said Shavone Hasse, a member of Occupy Boise. “People think we’re just camping out for free, but this is not luxurious. We are exercising our right to peaceably assemble, and in order to do that, you must have a place to assemble. We’re also providing services to the community. Anyone can stop by and get involved.” Regardless of whether other cities’ encampments continued to exist, Boise Occupiers said they were confident that with each new eviction, fuel is added to the fire. “I don’t think the evictions have, or will, affect us negatively,” said Occupy Boise protester Jackie Beale. “If anything, they’ve made us more committed. It made it clear that this is a precarious thing, but it makes us want to fight for it that much more.” Michael Looney, who has called the Boise encampment “home” from day one, said if anything, the crackdowns make the movement stronger. “For one, the police have done these big raids with a lot of unnecessary violence,” said Looney. “In the eyes of the average observer, they wonder ‘what’s going on?’ And if we get them to that point, we can try and get them to look at what we’re about.” As Occupiers continue to discuss the evolution of the movement, they are also looking for ways to coordinate with other movements across the United States. “There’s definitely an attempt to have some kind of national coordination,” said Hasse. “But at the same time, there’s recognition that this movement is going to take shape based on local needs and the local landscape. That’s one of the things this movement is about: recognizing the need for diversity of tactics.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

Tis the season...

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BRING YOUR HOLIDAY GIFT LIST!

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 11

CITIZEN

DANI JENSEN Boise’s busiest baker GEORGE PRENTICE traditional items? We do bring in some holiday items like maple cupcakes and pumpkin cheese loaf, but we focus on about 30 core items and do much, much more of those.

How many bakery employees do you have? Twenty. About half are full time, half part time. The week before Thanksgiving, we accumulate a lot of people from other departments in the store, and we go up to about 45 people in bakery.

Three ovens take care of everything? We work around the clock the week before Thanksgiving—24 hours. Plus, keep in mind that we can’t freeze any of our products that we bake. We have a very narrow shelf life because we don’t use preservatives. We have to orchestrate everything very closely.

What are your top sellers? Definitely muffins. We have a lot of vendors come in to buy our muffins. Plus croissants, bagels and cheesecakes. We run No. 1 in the nation for cheesecake. Are you saying the Boise location sells more cheesecakes than any other Costco in the United States? Yes. The Treasure Valley adores our cheesecakes. It’s pretty amazing. Is Thanksgiving your tent-pole holiday? It’s definitely our biggest holiday. Thanksgiving builds to a huge crescendo. Christmas drags on for a couple of weeks. Do you change your menu for Thanksgiving or do you just make a lot more of your

12 | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Let’s talk pies. It’s pumpkin, pecan and apple. The last three days before Thanksgiving, we’ll see 7,000 pumpkin pies, 1,100 pecan and about 1,100 apple. We have three huge ovens, and of course all those pies take a little more than an hour to bake. So we’re talking about baking 9,200 pies, plus all of our breads, rolls, bagels and everything else.

So there has to be an art and a science to scheduling all of this? I feel like I’m running a ballet, a really well choreographed ballet. Every minute has to be scheduled for each oven. They can’t be sitting still. But your pies are judged individually. They’re going to be stacked up against one pie that someone may work on for hours. We have to taste like homemade. It’s very similar, but of course, we’re making 90 pies in each batch. What makes a good crust? We use trans-fat-free shortening. The biggest key is the blending and how well you work a cutter into the mix so it gets to the

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Thanksgiving Day has its parade in New York City, but there’s another holiday spectacle that plays out each morning of the three days prior to Turkey Day. According to Dani (pronounced Donny) Jensen, the bakery manager at the Boise Costco since 1998, as many as 800 customers line up outside the door of the mega-wholesaler the week leading up to Thanksgiving. “It’s like an army,” said Jensen. “And they’re all coming down the aisle straight for the pumpkin pies.” Jensen and her bakery team love the parade. “It’s so exciting,” she said. “I have everybody come out and watch.”

right consistency. It has to be fluffy and flaky. How big are your coolers? We have huge pallets of eggs and sour cream. It’s pretty huge. For those 7,000 pumpkin pies, we’ll use 2,700 pounds of eggs and 1,400 No. 10 cans of pumpkin. And again, that’s just for three days. Are many of your staff premium bakers? Yes. A lot of them have been here as long as 20 years. Nobody ever leaves. When you have to hire someone new, what are you looking for? Personality. We like to train them for what they’ll be doing, but we’re looking for initiative and a positive personality. We’re back in the bakery like a little family. So what will be on your family’s Thanksgiving table? We’ll have 12 for dinner. Two pumpkin, one apple, one pecan. I never get tired of pastries. Plain or whipped cream? Whipped cream. And come Friday morning, you start looking toward Christmas. We have one week where we’re back to normal, and then all of the holiday parties start coming in.

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THE RIGHT (WING)

STUFF

Property Rights Council joins fight against government intrusion Z ACH H AG ADO N E

B

attle lines are being drawn in Northern Idaho, where two sets of Priest Lake-area landowners are mired in fights with federal regulators that may result in sweeping changes to the Clean Water Act. While one case heads to the U.S. Supreme Court this winter, another is just heating up. Both are being seen by libertarians as key fronts in a general war on land-use regulation, and now Bonner County has a vehicle for stepping into the fray with its newly minted— and controversial—Property Rights Council. Established by the Bonner County Board of Commissioners, the group will research and advise on a sweeping array of property-rights issues—potentially everything from minor land squabbles to complaints about state and federal agencies—but do so from a mandated libertarian point of view, a fact that is raising eyebrows across the state. Just one of its inaugural causes and a good example of how wide the council is willing cast its net: The case of Jack and Jill. When Jack and Jill Barron started clearing land and dumping fill on their property near Priest Lake, it was with the thought of building a home in the peaceful wilderness outside the small town of Nordman. Instead they got slapped with a compliance order from the Environmental Protection Agency. According to regulators, the Barrons had placed rock and other fill into four acres of wetlands and stream channels near Lamb Creek—a tributary of Priest Lake—without getting the necessary permits from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. That was in 2009, and the couple has since gone to criminal court and been acquitted. They’re still liable for the civil compliance order, however, which could cost them more than $32,000 per day if unmet. It’s a plight not unlike that of their more famous neighbors, Mike and Chantell Sackett, who were hit with an almost identical order for the same alleged offense near the exact same creek. While the Sacketts’ 2007 case has progressed to the U.S. Supreme Court and become a national cause celebre among libertarians—including Kentucky GOP Sen. Rand Paul—the Barrons are looking to their local government for help. Riding (maybe) to the rescue: the Bonner County Property Rights Council.

SUPPORT OF LAST RESORT According to Bonner County Commissioner Cornel Rasor, the Barrons’ issue is a prime example of why the Property Rights Council was formed in the first place. Indeed, whether to get involved in the matter is one of only two items currently being considered by the seven-member advisory group—the other being a proposed county watershed ordinance. “The Property Rights Council provides opportunities for the county to interpose to protect property owners from financial ruin from super-governmental agencies,” Rasor told members of the Association of Bonner County Employees on Nov. 14. A request for a follow-up interview went unanswered. “[In the Barrons’ case] essentially what you’ve got is a federal government agency that is going to destroy a family using what seems to be specious claims. ... If the county becomes the support of last resort, then this gives the county an opportunity to step in.” A lifelong Bonner County resident, Rasor serves as both chairman of the Bonner County Board of Commissioners and the Bonner County Republican Central Committee. If Northern Idaho is known for its strong libertarian streak, then Rasor is one of its leading lights. Though only making news in the past month or so, the Property Rights Council is an idea that Rasor has been working on since his election in 2008 and a concept he’s been talking about for the past 25 years. According to an email sent to a constituent, and obtained through a public records request, Rasor put his goal simply: “I now see that we must use other ways to shrink government than simply surgery. I want to create the possibility that what is removed is permanent.” In its infancy, the advisory council is only now establishing its bylaws. Its exact scope and operations are in flux. From available documents, it is clear that the council has no policy powers and can only make recommendations to commissioners. Its primary role is research, and its stated goal is to find ways to unburden property owners from as much regulation, taxation WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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or other impositions as legally and statutorily possible. Much of the communications surrounding its formation are, according to Bonner County officials, protected by attorney-client and work privilege, but what is really raising some eyebrows is the group’s overt allegiance to conservative libertarian political ideology—an ideology that Rasor unequivocally adheres to. “I’m not good at lying, so I don’t do it,” he told county employees. “People know where I am with property. It’s one of the three things that government is supposed to protect: life, freedom and property. And without it we don’t have a free country.”

ANTI-GOVERNMENT BUREAUCRACY A group like the one now operating in

Bonner County has never been seen in Idaho. All-volunteer and strictly advisory, the Bonner County Property Rights Council begins its meetings with an invocation, the Pledge of Allegiance and enshrines a number of libertarian-minded principles under the broad umbrella of “free-market policy.” It makes its case using jargon like “public choice theory,” “public interest” and “government failure theory”—libertarian ideas that suggest, among many other things, that privatization of public services is usually more beneficial, and funding should more often than not be shifted from tax dollars to user fees. The council’s draft bylaws include a complex process for collecting, researching and advising on property-rights questions, as well as institute a pyramidal structure of certifications

that are achieved by completing various levels of training in free-market policymaking. One of the few membership requirements, other than residency in Bonner County, is that, “Members must commit to focus their efforts principally on promoting and protecting private property rights in the manner set forth in these bylaws.” As it turns out, the “manner set forth in these bylaws” is based on policy research and texts produced or approved by libertarian think tanks The Cato Institute and State Policy Network, the latter being a national partner of the Idaho Freedom Foundation. To earn the PRC “constituent” certification—which is the first of four gradations— members must spend no less than 20 hours completing one of two State Policy Network

endorsed books: Beyond Politics: The Roots of Government Failure, produced by The Independent Institute and available online in soft cover for $19.50, and Government Failure, A Primer in Public Choice, a Catopublished work available for free on the organization’s website. Once completed, the prospective constituent must schedule two separate one-hour book discussion interviews to ensure a proper understanding of “public choice theory.” All of this must be completed within three months of the first PRC meeting, followed by attainment of “friend” status—which requires 110 hours of study—within 12 months. The final levels include “policy analyst,” which certifies members to become full-fledged PRC research analysts and “legal policy analyst,” qualifying the recipient to integrate legal research with free-market policy. Who decides when members have sufficient grasp of the concepts? None other than Pam Stout, the grandmotherly leader of the Sandpoint Patriots Tea Party, who became a national figure after the publication of a 2010 New York Times article on the movement and a subsequent appearance on Late Night with David Letterman. Though not involved solely with the Property Rights Council, Stout was hired by the county prior to the council’s establishment to serve as a “paralegal program manager” and help get the council off the ground. Stout’s job, though not a paralegal herself, is to assemble a team of paralegal trainees who can be schooled and farmed out to other departments and groups—including the PRC— to perform legal research. She is paid $25,000 per year—a good wage in Bonner County, especially since her position is listed for just 19 hours per week. According to documents on the voluminous Property Rights Council page of the Bonner County website, the paralegal program is even open to participation from local schools in the hopes that it will “help immunize students from academic biases favoring government intervention.” For regional watchdog Terry Harris, executive director of the Kootenai Environmental Alliance, the whole project is nothing more than an attempt by hard-right conservatives to set up some kind of libertarian policy institute under the aegis of Bonner County government. “These are big national forces at work,” he said. “I think it’s an ideological thing— that somebody is telling them that land-use regulation is bad and they should go after it. ... I think they think of themselves as a think tank, though I’m not sure how much thinking is going on.”

MUCH ADO ABOUT SOMETHING Local reaction to the establishment of the Property Rights Council has been a mix between puzzlement, skepticism, suspicion and boosterism. Rasor referred to an October Associated Press article on the council as a “hit piece,” though added that it had “backfired” by getting other communities around the country interested in setting up similar councils. The Idaho Attorney General’s Office was asked to comment on the legality of the council in a query filed by Sen. Shawn Keough on behalf of a concerned constituent. The response, copies of which were handed out at the Nov. 7 PRC meeting, supported the legal

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I T H I N K T H E Y T H IN K O F THE MSE L VE S A S A T H I N K T A N K , T H O U G H I’M NO T S UR E H O W M U C H T H IN K IN G I S GO ING O N. ” —TERRY HARRIS, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE KOOTENAI ENVIRONMENTAL ALLIANCE

right of the county to establish such a council and called it “an innovative solution to an ever-present tension.” However, the AG warned that it should take care to obey open-meeting and publicrecords laws and “care should be exercised to ensure that the free market of ideas is not corrupted by requirements to adhere to a single source of information.” Penned by Assistant Chief Deputy Brian Kane, the assessment also raised concern over seeming “loyalty oath” language. The attorney general’s recommendations were incorporated into the draft bylaws at the PRC meeting. According to Keough: “I asked for the AG’s opinion on the Property Rights Council because I had a constituent request I do so and I agreed that the questions asked merited an outside legal review. ... As a state senator, I don’t have an opinion as to whether the commission should have set up the council or not as it is, again, within their authority to do so.” Finally, earlier this month, Clark Forkbased news magazine The River Journal ran a lengthy, blazing condemnation of the project, saying it “looks much like an amoeba” and casting a critical eye on the partisan nature of those involved. For Rasor, and county Prosecuting Attorney Scott Bauer, the brouhaha is unwarranted. Referring to the 13 other advisory groups currently working with the county, Rasor wondered aloud why there were so many questions about the PRC and none regarding groups like the airport or animal advisory boards. “No one seemed to question the staff time that was used to support them,” he said at the county employee meeting. “I have no problem with the questions, but I’ll be frank with you, they seem a little disingenuous.” For Bauer, who has taken the lead in the Prosecutor’s Office for setting up the PRC, the “vitriolic” response has been based on a lack of understanding. “Some environmental groups, they believe that respecting property rights is going to automatically lead to environmental degradation,” he said. “I think that’s an assumption that’s not borne out at all by the State Policy Network research. ... The Property Rights Council needs to be given a chance before it’s rejected out of hand.” Wayne Hoffman, founder and intellectual engine behind the Idaho Freedom Foundation, gave a presentation to the group via video and said he’s had an ongoing conversation with Rasor and Bauer on how best to establish the council and set its prerogatives. “We provide information to a lot of different groups across the state—try to get them to embrace free-market ideas and educate people about the proper role of government and what can happen when the private sector is really allowed to develop and engage without the WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

intervention of the government,” he said. “I applaud them for working with government officials to seek free-market solutions wherever possible, to look at private-property rights and give them the attention they deserve. It sounds like they’re off to a good start.” Where some Bonner County employees seem to be leery relates to just how the PRC defines “property rights.” Christine Quayle, a jury commissioner who heads the Association of Bonner County Employees, raised one point of concern by noting that part of the PRC’s purview is to look at county insurance and risk management—areas that go well beyond land use. “If this is a property-rights council, why is it investigating employee insurance?” she asked. Rasor’s response: “Property taxes pay for those benefits.” Pressing on, Quayle asked whether that meant that “pretty much everything is up for investigation,” and Rasor confirmed: “It is, as it is for all citizens. ... If it has any impact on your property it can be investigated by a property rights council. Any impact, even economic.” Bauer confirmed that understanding of the council’s scope in a subsequent interview. “It’s not limited to real property,” he said. “Anything with county activities that might affect property rights is fair game for us to mission.” Admitting he hadn’t heard “a whole heckuva lot” about the Bonner County PRC, Tony Poinelli, Idaho Association of Counties deputy director, said a scope that broad is “actually getting beyond what I think of as property rights. ... Whenever I think of property rights, I think of planning and zoning.” According to Bauer, the PRC fills a need that county planning and zoning doesn’t—and can’t—meet. “The Planning and Zoning Commission looks at property rights among about nine or 10 other goals that it’s pursuing. It’s very normal for planning and zoning to subordinate property rights in favor of other goals,” he said. “The purpose of the council is to take a real solid, deep look at those issues. ... The idea here is, ‘Let’s just get the information from reliable, academic-level sources and get it in front of the commissioners.’ It’s not to dictate a decision.” Still, the injection of political philosophy into a county advisory group doesn’t sit well with Harris—nor does the idea of creating another deliberative body square with its stated purpose of limiting bureaucracy and stripping away government regulation. “Procedurally, it’s just bad government,” he said. “Some of the stuff doesn’t make any sense; it seems like a layer of bureaucracy. ... It’s also just very exclusionary. It’s a one-sided ideological program that just seems out of place in county government.”

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WELCOME TO

b TRADITION. BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 15

C OLLAPS E THEATER

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

And you thought Married With Children was twisted.

See the light at the Trans-Siberian Orchestra.

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY NOV. 23-NOV. 26 bizarre

WEDNESDAY NOV. 23

COLLAPSE THEATER’S OUTSIDE

lasers TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA Nothing says Christmas like tinny old recordings on repeat in the mall and tired sleigh bells, right? Wrong. At least where Trans-Siberian Orchestra is concerned. These long hair-tossing, chord-jamming fiends are best known for their reinvention of Christmas music, turning it into rock operas and incorporating laser light shows and pyrotechnics. Trans-Siberian Orchestra, aka TSO, has been wowing audiences around the world since 1999, and is one of Billboard’s Top 25 Touring Artists of the last decade. With a touring lineup of 17 vocalists, five keyboardists, four guitarists, two bassists, two drummers, two violinists and one narrator, the group sounds like a recitation of the “Twelve Days of Christmas.” But rest assured that if TSO performed that song, it would include thrashing guitars. TSO will perform Christmas Eve and Other Stories, in Boise on Wednesday, Nov. 23, in its entirety with narration. Christmas Eve and Other Stories mixes holiday classics like “O Come All Ye Faithful,” “O Holy Night” and “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen” with original compositions. It will also include excerpts from Gutter Ballet and The New York Blues Express, an upcoming rock musical. Even if you’re a grinch and Christmas music isn’t your thing, don’t count TSO out. The mix of classical, progressive-rock and heavy-metal elements appeals to a wide audience. TransSiberian Orchestra’s version of Christmas is hardly another grown woman croaking through, “I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus,” and it’s hardly cutesy. 4 p.m. and 8 p.m., $29-$57.75 plus service fees. Taco Bell Arena, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-1766, tacobellarena.com.

THURSDAY NOV. 24 gobble hobble TURKEY DAY 5K Before you dig into your savory turkey—or tofurkey— dinner this Thanksgiving, steel yourself to endure

those less-savory relatives and hit the streets with other Boiseans looking to “earn the bird.” The Turkey Day 5K offers your metabolism a running start and getting out there on Thanksgiving morning may just enable you to gobble a few extra helpings when you sit down for dinner. Starting on Main Street

16 | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | BOISEweekly

and Capital Boulevard, the race works its way to Fort Street, through the North End and back downtown to Eighth Street. This flat course is intended for participants of all paces and abilities—even parents pushing strollers. Walkers, joggers and runners are all welcome to pace themselves and enjoy the

Collapse Theater’s productions may be the most messed-up thing coming out of Idaho. But in a good way. Picture a stubble-faced Kelly Broich rearing a litter of baby squirrels, kissing them lovingly before a mock birth scene. While gut-jerking, the production value is so high, and the acting so spot-on that you can’t help but be engrossed. And maybe a little grossed out. To call this anything but art would discount how shamelessly the stories are told. On Wednesday, Nov. 23, Collapse brings you the next installment in its nigh dadaist exhibitions, in the form of Outside, on-stage and live. If Outside is even half as ass-hat crazy as its YouTube vignettes or previous productions, you’re in for a treat. The cryptic press release calls the play a tale about the world’s most dysfunctional family. Stars Anne McDonald, John F. Edsall, Autumn Kersey, Phil Tygret and Thomas Newby comprise an agoraphobic, entertainment-addicted family of four. The brave father struggles to keep his family safe from the dangers outside their home. The troupe’s acting has a Tim and Eric Awesome Show quality—schizophrenic and hilarious in its absurdity. But Collapse and Broich are doing that scatterbrained mess one better, and while sometimes crass, there’s a lot to be said about stripping film and theater of its typical glossy veneer and whitewashed subject matter. If that offends, the Collapse folk are too busy pushing boundaries to care. Performances continue through Saturday, Dec. 3. Wednesday, Nov. 23-Saturday, Nov. 26, 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show, $10, available at brownpapertickets.com. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, facebook.com/collapsetheater.

scenery. If you really want to get into the spirit, don a costume—the best Thanksgiving-themed attire wins a prize. There are also prizes for the top 10 male and female finishers in the race. But beyond burning some calories, you can help those in need by donating nonperishable food items on race day or packet pick-up the day before the run. All food contributions go to the Boise Rescue Mission. As a bonus, you’ll receive a raffle ticket for each food item you donate for a chance

to win prizes from local businesses. Give the Turkey Day 5K a shot, help the Boise Rescue Mission, and give yourself a jumpstart before the tryptophan kicks in. 6-7:30 a.m. registration, 8 a.m. race, $35 adults, $20 youth 17 and younger. Main Street and Capitol Boulevard, turkeyday-5k.com.

SATURDAY NOV. 26 bikes BBP BENEFIT WITH STEVE MEYERS Boise loves bikes, and that fact is demonstrated best by Boise Bicycle Project, Boise’s nonprofit bicycle cooperative. Instead of just fixing and selling bikes, BBP believes in educating folks on bike maintenance, as well as giving bikes to underprivileged WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

LAU R IE PEAR M AN

FIND LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

The Festival of Trees wishes you a Mariachi Christmas.

CHRISTMAS TREE GRENADES

WEDNESDAY-MONDAY NOV. 23-28 trees

You’ll be bowled over by all the options at the foodbank’s fundraiser.

SAINT ALPHONSUS FESTIVAL OF TREES Maybe you remember the wonder you felt looking at your Christmas tree as a child. Or maybe you’ve never understood the special connection some folks feel to those symbolic evergreens. Whether you’re a believer or a skeptic of the spirit of Christmas, the Saint Alphonsus Festival of Trees is something to behold. Stroll through rows of locally sponsored and decorated trees decked out in glittering lights and every kind of ornament you can imagine. You can also enjoy live music and performances from local dance groups including Irish Dance Idaho, Nejwah’s Mid-Eastern Dance Troupe and Ballet Idaho Academy. Students from local schools will also perform, including St. Mary’s School Choir, Borah High School Chamber Orchestra and Riverside Honor Choir. There’s plenty for kids to do on Family Day, Saturday, Nov. 26. And if you bring a toy donation for the Salvation Army that day, you’ll earn $1 off adult admission. Also on Family Night, don’t miss the tree lighting in the Grove Plaza with caroling, candles and more. But Family Day isn’t the only day to bring the kids and get into the spirit. Throughout the festival, kids can enjoy a special breakfast with Santa and participate in an interactive dance program called Holiday Magic Through Dance. The Festival of Trees has been wowing kids and adults for more than 25 years. With countless holiday activities and even some that aren’t directly Christmas-related, like a visit from the Idaho 501s Star Wars costumers on Saturday, it’s easy to fill a whole day at the festival. Help brighten your spirits—and the season—with a dose of cheer at the Festival of Trees. Wednesday, Nov. 23-Sunday, Nov. 27; 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Festival Fashion Show and Luncheon, Monday, Nov. 28, 11 a.m.; $30 family pass, $7 adults, $4 children 3-12 and seniors, FREE children 2 and younger. Separate tickets required for some events. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., saintalphonsus. org/festival.

BBP have been promoting green-commuting, giving bikes to kids who wouldn’t normally have that luxury and running important community programs. They are a very important part of our community,” said Mentzer. If you’re a bike-lover, or wannabe one, then mount

kids and refugees. Andrew Mentzer, Idahostel owner and BW contributor, was so inspired by BBP that he organized a benefit concert for the nonprofit, featuring local singer-songwriter-multi-instrumentalist Steve Meyers. “The good folks down at

S U B M I T

FRIDAY NOV. 25 bowling for soup EMPTY BOWLS The typical Friday after Thanksgiving is about filling your shopping bags, not your stomach. It’s about beating the crowds at the crack of dawn and jostling to get those sales. The Idaho Foodbank, in partnership with Moxie Java and countless local artists and restaurants, offers an alternative—the 13th annual Empty Bowls fundraiser. Rather than fighting for the deals, or perhaps as a break from the Black Friday furor, consider visiting the Grove Plaza for a delicious bowl of hot soup. Attendees select an empty bowl from thousands of ceramic, glass, wood or even steel bowls, and every one is handcrafted by a local artist. For $10, you can walk away with a bowl and a serving of soup from local chefs at restaurants including Locavore, Shaka Shak, Asiago’s, Cottonwood Grille and Westside Drive In. While you’re warming your stomach, local musicians will help warm your spirits. Singers and songwriters who have contributed to the Idaho Foodbank’s holiday CD, Idaho Ho Ho, will perform throughout the event. You can pick up a copy of the CD as well, and all proceeds go to the Idaho Foodbank. Or, if you miss your chance, you can pick up the CD at any local Moxie Java. The $10 you pay for a bowl provides 30 meals to hungry neighbors around Idaho. The Idaho Foodbank hopes to raise $30,000 to help those less fortunate. So instead of raising your blood pressure at Black Friday sales, try raising money for a good cause and get a great meal at the same time. 11 a.m.-3 p.m., $10. The Grove Plaza, idahofoodbank.org.

up and cruise down to the historic Rose Room for a concert with Steve Meyers on Saturday, Nov. 26. Meyers, who describes his sounds as “reggae-inflected rock and psychedelic folk,” is known for guitar tapping layering loops during his live

Christmas decorating is a competitive sport. Take, for example, the exterior-light junkies who make the Boise Foothills glow brighter than a wildfire. Or that one Christmas crazy in every neighborhood, who thinks an inflatable lawn snowman is the pinnacle of good taste. If you’re a less-is-more holiday decorator, Flying M’s shiny faux-grenades are the perfect thing to hang on the tabletop tree you bought half-off at Walgreens last year. Pick up a box of six But before you get all gaspy ornaments for $22 at at the thought of weapons of Flying M Coffehouse and Flying M Coffeegarage, violence associated with the or order them online at season of peace and love, calm suck.uk.com. down. Every purchase includes a contribution to Ctrl.Alt.Shift, an experimental initiative working for the admittedly broad ideas of social justice and global change through art and music. The grenades serve as a reminder of global conflict and those victimized by it, which is what Ctrl.Alt.Shift works to fight against. So, yes, these ornaments are funny, a little kitschy and slightly shocking. But just like that aunt who gives the most thoughtful gifts before burying her nose in eggnog and crooning Neil Diamond karaoke renditions, there’s a good intention behind the silliness. —Sheree Whiteley

sets. All proceeds will benefit BBP, and there will be a nohost bar. 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show; $5. The Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., 208381-0483, facebook.com/ idahostel.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 17

8 DAYS OUT

McCall Artist Connection presents:

Holiday Art Show

Friday & Saturday November 25th & 26th 11:00am to 6:00pm

Shore Lodge Upper Pavilion

301 West Lake St, McCall FINE ART SHOW & SALE

FREE ADMISSION NO HOST WINE BAR

OUTSIDE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

WEDNESDAY NOV. 23

FRIDAY NOV. 25

On Stage

Festivals & Events

A PERMANENT IMAGE—The newest work from Samuel D. Hunter, commissioned specifically for the BCT stage. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

BLACK FRIDAY BATTLEPROV— Improvisational comedy troupes Improvolution and White Tie Improv have an all-out comedy battle. 7:30 p.m. $7. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

Food & Drink

On Stage

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE AND BARREL TASTING—Enjoy music, wine tasting and food from Weiser Classic Candy, Brown Shuga–Piece of Cake, Rollingstone Chevre, Zeppole Baking Company and more. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $10 general, $8 members, FREE children 14 and younger. Ste. Chapelle Winery, 19348 Lowell Road, Caldwell, 208-4537843, stechapelle.com.

OUTSIDE—Collapse Theater presents Outside, the story of an entertainment-addicted family of four, that finds the outdoors frightening. Tickets available at brownpapertickets.com. See Picks, Page 16. 8 p.m. $10. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Kids & Teens THANKSGIVING MINI CAMP— Take your Thanksgiving break at the Wings Center’s Club Kid. For kindergarten through ninthgraders. Visit the website or call for details and registration. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. $34. Wings Center of Boise, 1875 Century Way, Boise, 208-376-3641, wingscenter.com. WATERSHED THANKSGIVING BREAK PROGRAM—Drop in to create beautiful fall and Thanksgiving crafts. For all ages. No pre-registration required. 10 a.m.-noon. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-489-1284, cityofboise.org/bee/watershed.

THURSDAY NOV. 24 On Stage OUTSIDE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

DINNER AND LIVE MUSIC FRIDAY—Enjoy a glass of wine and tasty dinner selection with music from Gayle Chapman. 6-9 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars, 3705 N. Hwy. 16, Eagle, 208-2869463, woodrivercellars.com.

A PERMANENT IMAGE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3319224, bctheater.org. BEST CHRISTMAS PAGEANT EVER—The Herdman kids steal, lie, bully and generally create havoc in their town. But when they learn about the true meaning of Christmas, they’ll have the best pageant ever. 6:15 p.m. $39 dinner/show or $20 show. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions. org.

THANKSGIVING RELEASE AND BARREL TASTING—Taste the new 2009 Couloir Cuvee and a sneak-preview barrel tasting. Tasting fee refundable with purchase. 1-6 p.m. $5. Fraser Vineyard, 1004 LaPointe St., Boise, 208-345-9607, fraservineyard.com.

A CANDLE IN THE WINDOW—A small group of weary travelers learn about the magic of the holiday season while trapped in a train station on Christmas Eve. 8 p.m. $12.50, $9 seniors and students. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org.

Citizen IDAHO FOODBANK’S EMPTY BOWLS—Purchase a unique, hand-crafted bowl filled with soup from a local restaurant and help combat hunger in Idaho. Proceeds benefit the Idaho Foodbank. See Picks, page 17. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. $10 and up per bowl. The Grove, downtown, Boise.

A DICKENS CHRISTMAS CAROL—Hilarious drama ensues when the diva of the Styckes-Upon-Thump Repertory Theatre Company, a traveling troupe embarking on its farewell tour of the Dickens’ tale, decides to play sick and is maddened her understudy is thrust into the limelight. 8:15 p.m. $15. 710 N. Orchard St., Boise. 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Sports & Fitness PRE-BIRD INFORMAL GROUP RIDE—All riders are invited to attend this 10th annual informal group ride and bring a donation for the Idaho Foodbank. Most rides are approximately two hours. Presented by St. Luke’s Sports Medicine Cycling and Lost River Cycling Club. 11 a.m. FREE. Boise Co-op, 888 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-472-4500, boisecoop.com. TURKEY DAY 5K—Build up an appetite with this flat 5K course, open to runners, joggers and walkers. Bring at least one nonperishable food item to benefit local food banks. For more info, go to turkeyday-5k.com. See Picks, page 16. 6:30 a.m. $20-$30. Main Street at Capitol Boulevard, Boise.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

18 | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | BOISEweekly

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8 DAYS OUT SATURDAY NOV. 26 Festivals & Events BOISE WEEKLY/44 NORTH TAILGATE PARTY—Pre-funk before every Boise State home game with BW and 44 North. 10 a.m. FREE. End Zone, 1010 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-3840613. OLD BOISE N-SCALE MODEL RAILROADERS AND SANTA— Take a look at model railroad villages and trains and have your picture taken with Santa. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. The Pioneer Building, 106 N. Sixth St. (third oor), Boise. TEA AND CAKE MONDAES— Your choice of a handmade porcelain tea cup by local potter Keren Brown or paint a tea cup in our ceramic studio. Grab a plate of cake or cookies, and taste one of many new loose-leaf teas. Live acoustic music will begin at 7 p.m. and proceeds go toward the purchase of an on-site kiln, and will help keep studio fees low. 9 a.m.-10 p.m. $10 advance, $15 door. Puffy Mondaes, 200 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-407-3359, puffymondaes.com. COUNTRY WESTERN DANCE— The ďŹ rst hour consists of lessons in dances like the two-step, country swing, waltz, cha cha, triple-step, West Coast swing

and more on a large wooden dance oor in a smoke-free environment. Discounts for students and active military. 7:30 p.m. $5-$7. Boise Valley Square and Round Dance Center, 6534 Diamond St., Boise, 208-342-0890, treasurevalleycwda.org.

Food & Drink

On Stage

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE AND BARREL TASTING—See Friday. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $10 general, $8 members, FREE children 14 and younger. Ste. Chapelle Winery, 19348 Lowell Road, Caldwell, 208-453-7843, stechapelle.com.

A CANDLE IN THE WINDOW— See Friday. 8 p.m. $12.50, $9 seniors and students. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. A DICKENS CHRISTMAS CAROL—See Friday. 8:15 p.m. 710 N. Orchard St., Boise, 208342-2000, stagecoachtheatre. com. A PERMANENT IMAGE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3319224, bctheater.org. BEST CHRISTMAS PAGEANT EVER—See Friday. 6:15 p.m. $39 dinner/show or $20 show. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions. org. OUTSIDE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

DINNER AND LIVE MUSIC SATURDAY—Enjoy dinner and a glass of wine with music from Blind Driver. 6-9 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars, 3705 N. Hwy. 16, Eagle, 208-286-9463, woodrivercellars.com.

THANKSGIVING RELEASE AND BARREL TASTING—See Friday. 1-6 p.m. $5. Fraser Vineyard, 1004 LaPointe St., Boise, 208345-9607, fraservineyard.com.

Odds & Ends ROAST OF OLECK SZEWCZYK—Comedians Chad Heft, Mikey Pullman and others poke well-intentioned fun at Oleck Szewczyk. 8 p.m. $5. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

SUNDAY NOV. 27 On Stage CHILDREN’S READING SERIES—Hear actors bring life to the best in contemporary children’s literature and favorite classics during this series of three plays designed for children. 2 p.m. $8-$12 single tickets, $18.75-$30 for the series of three. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. OUTSIDE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Concerts

   # !#

SCOTTISH NIGHT—Members of the Scottish band Bru will perform at a Scottish night in honor of Saint Andrew. A handmade Scottish wedding blanket will be auctioned off and proceeds will beneďŹ t Interfaith Sanctuary Homeless Shelter. 7 p.m. By donation. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 2201 Woodlawn Ave., Boise, 208-3445731, boiseďŹ rstucc.org.

Odds & Ends | EASY

| MEDIUM |

HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. Š 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

RED ROOM RAUGHTER—Local comedians perform, also featuring music by The Northend Snuggler, Hopeless Jack and the Handsome Devils and Piranhas. 9 p.m. $3. The Red Room Tavern, 1519 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-0956, redroomboise. com.

DecEmber 11 "   

DecEmber 12 & 13 "!"  $  $

 !! #! BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 19

8 DAYS OUT ID and children younger than 12. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu.

MONDAY NOV. 28 On Stage

Workshops & Classes

OUTSIDE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Workshops & Classes DRUMWORKS—This four-week workshop will instruct on the basics of traditional West African drumming, including dembe and dundun. All levels welcome. Extra drums available. Please contact Dayo Ayodele with Global Lounge at 208-559-4566, or dayoayodele@globallounge.org. 7-8:15 p.m. $20 YMCA members, $35 nonmembers. YMCA, 1050 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-5501, ymcaboise.org.

Literature

PET EDUCATION CLASS—Featuring Nampa veterinarian Dr. Shauna Ault. Companion Animal Partners in Education seminars are designed to help anyone who wants to learn more about animals. For more information or to RSVP, call 208-577-2900. 5:30-7 p.m. FREE. Broadview University, 750 E. Gala Court, Meridian, 1-866-253-7744, broadviewuniversity.edu. IMAGE TRANSFER—Katarzyna Cepek will share new techniques for image transfers with ink jet and laser on multiple surfaces. Bring images, the rest will be provided. 6-9 p.m. $35. Wingtip Press, 6940 Butte Court, Boise, wingtippress.com.

POSTER CLASS—Set type and print a poster during your first session. Weekly phone or email reservations requested. Limited to six students per night. 5:308:30 p.m. $50. Idaho Poster and Letterpress, 280 N. Eighth St., Ste. 118, Boise, 208-761-9538, EARLY DEADLINES idahoposterandAll events through letterpress.com. Jan. 4, 2012, due to BW by Wednesday, Dec. 14. Email calendar@boiseweekly.com.

STORY STORY NIGHT—Listen to authors tell stories on the topic of Full Plate: Stories of Biting Off More Than You Can Chew. Then try your hand at storytelling during the open story slam. 7 p.m. $5. Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-381-0483, parklaneco.com/ roseroom.

Ongoing

CITY SANTA— Children may tell Santa their Christmas wishes and have their photos taken. Proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society. For more information, visit downtownboise.org. Through Saturday, Dec. 17, 11 a.m.-4

p.m., and Thursday, Dec. 1, 5-8 p.m. By donation. D.L. Evans Bank, 213 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-331-1399. CENTENNIAL BASEBALL CHRISTMAS TREE SALE—Beautiful trees at a great price. The Centennial High School baseball team will also be collecting nonperishable food items for the Idaho Foodbank. Donate two cans of food for $2 off any tree. For more info, go to centennialbaseballgroup@live.com. Saturdays, Sundays, noon-6 p.m. and Mondays-Fridays, 5-8 p.m. Centennial High School, 12400 W. McMillan Road, Boise, 208-939-1404, chs.meridianschools.org. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—Idaho Botanical Garden will once again be transformed into a majestic holiday wonderland with more than 250,000 lights. Thursday, Nov. 24-Sunday, Nov. 27, and Friday, Dec. 2-Sunday, Jan. 8. 6-9 p.m. FREE children younger than 3, $4 members and children ages 4-12, $8 general. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. SAINT ALPHONSUS FESTIVAL OF TREES—For more than 25 years, this collection of exquisitely decorated trees has brought holiday spirit to Boise. Different events occur daily, so visit saintalphonsus.org for a complete calendar. See Picks, Page 17. Wednesday, Nov. 23-Sunday, Nov. 27, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Adults $7, children and seniors $4, children 2 and younger FREE. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-3368900, boisecentre.com.

TUESDAY NOV. 29 On Stage OUTSIDE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

WEDNESDAY NOV. 30 On Stage A PERMANENT IMAGE—See Wednesday. 8:15 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3319224, bctheater.org. OUTSIDE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Concerts WINTER JAZZ BASH—Boise State’s vocal and instrumental jazz ensembles will perform. 7:30 p.m. $5 general, $3 seniors, free to all students with

20 | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Skeleton Blues by Connor Coughlin was the 1st place winner in the 9th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 21

NEWS/NOISE NOISE

OH SAY CAN YOU SEES Brett Netson crafts complex work for the living.

MR. BIEBS UP IN YOUR TREEFORT Last week, we told you about an allBoise showcase at SXSW. This week, we get to tell you about equally exciting plans for the week after SXSW. After staging a SXSW mini-fest last year at Visual Arts Collective, Finn Riggins keyboardist Eric Gilbert decided to go all the way and stage a macrofest: the Treefort Music Festival. Treefort will be a multi-day, multi-venue festival in Boise, held the weekend after SXSW to catch bands on their way home from Austin. Expect BW to keep you posted as acts, venues and sponsors are confirmed. Until then, you’ll just have to get by with some juicy celeb gossip. A few weeks back, a paternity suit was filed against Justin Bieber (17), alleging that after a backstage encounter, he fathered the spawn of one Mariah Yeater, aged too old for him (20). J-Bizzle denied the charges, saying that he’d never even met the woman, and that he always goes immediately to his car after performances, leaving no time for groupie-groping. Well it looks like the good name of Mr. Biebs is once again squeaky clean, because Yeater’s lawyers dropped the suit (possibly because Bieber’s balls haven’t?). According to US Magazine, Bieber has agreed to take a paternity test regardless. Bieber’s opposite—in both sonic and facial hair preferences—is Boise’s own Brett Netson. The Built to Spill bassist and architect of Caustic Resin has been kicking holes in reality onstage with his new psychedelic doom group, The Brett Netson Band, for the last few months. And this week, that schizzle hit wax. The Brett Netson Band’s debut LP, Simple Work for the Dead, was released Tuesday, Nov. 22, and features a grip of songs and ideas Netson has been working on for years. Netson plays most of the instruments on the album himself. Fellow hair-enthusiast Ozzy Osbourne is in the news this week because he and the other members of Black Sabbath announced that they will be making a new album together for the first time since 1978. The album will be produced by Rick Rubin and should be available in fall of 2012. And finally, some upstart company called Google launched a music service this week. Google Music is making a play for the Apple iTunes Store’s share of Don McLean’s “American Pie.” Google Music will offer downloads, cloud storage of up to 20,000 songs and tie-ins to the Google + social-networking platform. —Josh Gross

22 | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | BOISEweekly

San Francisco garage rockers Thee Oh Sees channel monsters and dreams STEPHEN FOSTER Thee Oh Sees emerged from the San Francisco underground nearly a decade ago with a gritty, psychedelic garage rock sound. The band’s music is fast, fuzzy, informal, colored with clever and humorous lyrics, inundated with reverb and rough around the edges. But it has a soft, gooey center. And at that center is Brigid Dawson, the band’s keyboard player, who tempers raucous frontman John Dwyer’s distorted guitars and The Oh Sees hope not to make a spectacle of themselves at Flying M Coffeegarage. intense antics with her smooth piano and organ melodies. the Sierra Nevadas, the amazing produce … It’s a really great place.” The band’s impressive history includes Carrion Crawler/The Dream is not a douall the history, the Beat poets and the entire countless shows, 20 or so full-lengths and ble LP, and it’s not two EPs packaged in one EPs, and performances atop some of the larg- psychedelic-drug-taking-anarchist-rebel hissleeve—it’s one album with two names. The est festival stages in the country. On Monday, tory that’s there. That kind of shapes every first half of the album’s name was inspired band that’s from our town.” Nov. 28, Thee Oh Sees will add Flying M by a monster, which fits well with Thee Oh This anarchistic, free-for-all mentality Coffeegarage in Nampa to that list. Dawson recently spoke with Boise Week- informs Thee Oh Sees’ approach to its craft. Sees’ uncanny, often-spooky low-fi vibes. “When we were kids, we played DunIn the studio, everything is off the cuff. ly and elaborated on some of that history. “We record really quickly, and we record geons and Dragons, and there’s a book “About 10 years ago or more, John called the Fiend Folio, which is amazing,” almost everything totally live,” said Dawstarted doing this band, OCS, as kind of Dawson said. “It’s this illustrated book that son. “There might be, like, the occasional a home-recording project,” said Dawson. flute overdub or something like that, but the describes all of the monsters you can use in “And so you have the first two albums, the game, which is like a role-playing game process is really quick for us.” which are purely him really, and then you basically, pre-video games and all of that And this approach pays off. In the last have albums three and four, which is where shit. And Carrion Crawler is a monster from six months, Thee Oh Sees has released two our old drummer and saw player, Patrick albums—Castlemania and Carrion Crawler/ the Fiend Folio.” Mullins, joins the band. I joined six years Aside from its enchantment with DunThe Dream. Both albums contain the band’s ago when I was playing with Patrick. We geons and Dragons, Thee Oh Sees is known hallmarks: retro pop, low-fi haze, distorted changed the name to Thee Oh Sees when vocal harmonies, crunchy guitars and abra- for its monstrous live shows. The band’s [guitarist Petey Dammit] joined the band, chunky riffs and dirty guitar solos are delivsive solos. which was about a year after I did.” ered loud and clear, with Dawson’s superb “[Castlemania] is mostly just John San Francisco plays an integral role in the keyboard playing and backup vocal duties writing at home and quintet’s history and providing an additional layer of charm to playing all the instruaesthetic. The city ments. Then he took it the quintet’s lofty, in-your-face performance has a storied musical style. The group recently added an extra to the studio to overpast, no doubt. From With Total Control and Art Fad, Monday, Nov. 28, 8 p.m., $5 dub, master and mix it drummer, giving more weight to its chugquintessential ’60s ging backbeat. there,” said Dawson. psych bands like The FLYING M COFFEEGARAGE When asked about the band’s live “Stylistically it’s softer, Grateful Dead and 1314 Second Street South, Nampa 208-467-5533 performances, Dawson was overly modest, it’s janglier. And then Carlos Santana, to flyingmcoffee.com saying only, “I just hope we don’t embarrass [Carrion Crawler/The the early punk rock ourselves.” Dream] is definitely of The Dead KenWhether it’s thrilling live shows, D&D, clearly a full band nedys and Alternative the wide-open Pacific Ocean or the musialbum that’s harder Tentacles, the Bay but still really melodic, which is something I cal history of San Francisco, Thee Oh Sees Area’s laid-back vibe and openness toward makes art by absorbing its surroundings and diversity has always provided a fertile milieu like about the album.” interpreting them with sound. The band recorded the entirety of Carrifor budding artists. This hallowed ground is “Music is such a product of everything on Crawler/The Dream in less than a week. where Thee Oh Sees forged its sound. that you are,” said Dawson. “I don’t even “I think we had five days to record, “There’s such a great live music scene know if you can be that clinical about it. which is the longest we’ve ever had to and so many good musicians in San FranLittle things that you love will just come record,” said Dawson. “We slept there. cisco—lots of people trying new stuff,” out—the things that you are fascinated by There’s a kitchen there, so we made a said Dawson. “There’s also the great wide right now. I think it’s a natural process, a couple of really great meals. … The studio open vista of the Pacific Ocean right there, has tons of old organs and beautiful guitars. pretty organic thing.” beautiful Redwood forests behind you and WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 23

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE ADAM S TOC K S TILL

GUIDE

CHUCK SMITH—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA—See Picks, Page 17. Visit promo.boiseweekly.com for a chance to win tickets. 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. $29-$57.75. Taco Bell Arena

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WILSON ROBERTS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

WEDNESDAY NOV. 23

DANNY BEAL—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

BLUES AT BREAKFAST—10 a.m. FREE. Blue Door Cafe

DEE HISEL—7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s

DAN COSTELLO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

DUDE BRO MAN AND THE FUNK YEAHS—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

DEVISED DECEPTION—With Dedicated Servers. 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

JAMES LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Dry Creek Merchantile JIMMY BIVENS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

GIRL IN A COMA—With The Black Box Revelation. See Listen Here, this page. 7 p.m. $10 advance, $12 door. Neurolux

BEN BURDICK—3:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

JIMMY BIVENS—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

CAMDEN HUGHES—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MONOPHONICS—10 p.m. $5. Reef

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club

REX AND BEVERLY—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

OLD DEATH WHISPER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid

REVOLT REVOLT—With Jumping Sharks. 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

FRIDAY NOV. 25

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club

REX AND BEVERLY—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

BIG WOW—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

SATURDAY NOV. 26

DYLAN SUNDSTROM TRIO—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown GOBBLE IT UP—Featuring Bassdrop Music and Dark Psyence. 9 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

GIRL IN A COMA, NEUROLUX, NOV. 26 San Antonio, Texas’ Girl in a Coma formed in a junior-high art class. A few years later, still ineligible to saddle up to a bar, the power trio signed to Joan Jett’s Blackheart Records and released its first full-length album, Both Before I’m Gone (2007). To date, the band has released four records and toured with the likes of Morrissey (Girl in a Coma took its name from The Smiths’ popular song of the same name), Frank Black, Tegan and Sara, and Social Distortion. Girl in a Coma released its latest album, Exits & All the Rest, in October. Here, the band refines its signature classic rockabilly, rock- and punk-infused riffs with a set of 11 solid pop songs. NPR called it “Sharper than ever [with] a spirit of rock ’n’ roll abandon,” and labeled it the band’s best album yet. —Stephen Foster With Black Box Revelation. 7 p.m., $10 advance, $12 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

24 | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | BOISEweekly

JIMMY BIVENS—7 p.m. FREE. Curb Bar JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THURSDAY NOV. 24

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri La THE NAUGHTIES—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel RICHARD SOLIZ UNPLUGGED JAM—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge STEVE EATON AND PHIL GAROZNIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 5:30 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadMeridian

BRANDON PRITCHETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub CAMDEN HUGHES—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE CLUMSY LOVERS—8:30 p.m. $13. Knitting Factory

ROBIN SCOTT—7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s

6 DOWN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid THE BEST OF ALL THREE WORLDS—Featuring CEFM, The Useless and Krystos. 9 p.m. FREE. Red Room

RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO— 7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers STEVE MEYERS—7 p.m. See Picks, Page 17. $5. Rose Room

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE C . JOHNS ON

GUIDE SUNDAY NOV. 27 6 DOWN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid A DOUG BROWN COLLECTIVE—1 p.m. FREE. Solid BEN BURDICK—Noon. FREE. Grape Escape GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JIMMY BIVENS—7 p.m. FREE. Crusty’s Gourmet Pizza LARRY CONKLIN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s ROBY WYNIA—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

LISTENER—6:30 p.m. $12. The Venue

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Moon’s

JAMES LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Boise

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid

ORGONE—10 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Reef

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

ROB FALER—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

JIMMY BIVENS—7 p.m. FREE. Curb

SLOW TRUCKS—With Dark Swallows. 9 p.m. $3. Red Room

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

SHAUN BRAZELL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

EARLY DEADLINES All music events through Jan. 4, 2012, due to BW by Wednesday, Dec. 14. Email calendar@boiseweekly.com.

THEE OH SEES— With Total Control and Art Fad. See Noise, Page 22. 8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage

TUESDAY NOV. 29

BLUES JAM WITH RICHARD SOLIZ—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge BROCK BARTEL—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid DANNY BEAL—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BEN BURDICK—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME—With Animals As Leaders and Tesseract. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $18-$40. Knitting Factory

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri La OLD DOGS AND PUPPIES—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel RICO WEISMAN—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

WEDNESDAY NOV. 30

SUNDERGROUND—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

MONDAY NOV. 28

TERRI EBERLEIN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GAROZNIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill VANPAPAEGHEM TRIO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

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V E N U E S

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME, KFCH, NOV. 29 Metal isn’t the most palatable of genres to the general masses. But as the herd thins, the craft elevates. And Raleigh, N.C.’s heavy metal fivesome Between the Buried and Me demonstrates that perfectly. Since the group’s grungy, 2002 self-titled debut, which nabbed BTBAM a deal with Victory Records, the band has progressed considerably. The band boasts five studio albums under its belt and a new EP, The Parallax: Hypersleep Dialogues EP, which was released on Metal Blade records in April. “Obfuscation,” off of 2009’s The Great Misdirect, features guitar reminiscent of the seminal Dragonforce. But on the new album, synth on the song “White Walls” and vocal stints that hearken back to ’80s glam metal, mark the band’s new sound. BTBAM is experimenting, but it doesn’t skimp on the drum and fret work that keeps fans firmly in its grasp. —Andrew Crisp With Animals As Leaders and Tesseract. 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show, $18-$40. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-3671212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

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Since 2002 BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 25

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

AN UNLIKELY PAIR J. Edgar and My Week With Marilyn offer superb lead performances GEORGE PRENTICE J. Edgar and My Week With Marilyn, two major studio releases that peer into the very private lives of two very public people, are stark examples of why biopics require fancy footwork while negotiating the red carpet toward an Oscar. One movie sweeps the screen with grandiose themes, while the other offers a peek at a snapshot in time, but both provide bravura Leonardo DiCaprio and Michelle Williams give star turns as J. Edgar Hoover and Marilyn Monroe. performances. Though Leonardo DiCaprio’s Hoover forcibly fills every frame of J. Edgar, been watching the real Monroe. Williams’ from Franklin Roosevelt to Richard Nixon, Michelle Williams’ Monroe teases and makes performance is a complete transformation. and you easily have the material for a halfus want more. My Week With Marilyn is based on two A brief scene in director Clint Eastwood’s J. dozen films. Instead of a straightforward memoirs by Colin Clark, who claimed to have Edgar (and there are too many to count in this narrative, Eastwood’s J. Edgar is more of a had a brief fling with the actress when she travcollage, quickly ricocheting through history. fast-paced, tightly edited film), shows Hoover eled to Britain to co-star with Laurence Olivier Sometimes the dots connect but quite often, quizzing a series of FBI underlings. they miss the mark. But J. Edgar is worth the in 1956’s The Prince and the Showgirl. Clark’s “Who do you consider the most famous price of admission for memoirs have been routinely challenged over man of the 20th centhe years, tagged as “flawed” and “halfone reason: Leonardo tury?” he asks. DiCaprio. His Hoover, truths” by critics. Presuming that few of the Of course, it’s a J. EDGAR (R) events portrayed in the film are true, director whether accurate or trick question. The Directed by Clint Eastwood Simon Curtis wisely treats the source material not, is not to answer could readStarring Leonardo DiCaprio, Naomi Watts Playing at The Flicks, Edwards 22 with comedic flair. be missed. ily be Hoover (or at Kenneth Branagh, long absent from the big DiCaprio portrays least a short list that screen, turns in an outstanding performance the all-powerful Gmight include Herbert MY WEEK WITH MARILYN (R) as Olivier. And the supporting cast is stellar, as Man as someone posHoover, Winston Directed by Simon Curtis well: Judi Dench, Emma Watson, Derek Jacobi sessed by power and Churchill, Albert Starring Michelle Williams, Kenneth Branagh Opens Friday at The Flicks and Julia Ormond. haunted by inferiority. Einstein, FDR and But it is Williams who is a wonder. ConsidUnfortunately, his perAdolf Hitler). And formance is clouded by er, for a moment, her performances of just the there you have the past few years—Meek’s Cutoff, Blue Valentine, terrible, wax-museum-like makeup. film’s weakness—any valid attempt to map Wendy and Lucy. She’s at the top of her game In My Week With Marilyn, Michelle Wilout the life of a man whose career bumped at the young age of 31. liams looks nothing like Monroe. In the first up against two world wars and eight U.S. If pressed, I heartily recommend Marilyn few frames of the film, I struggled to reconcile presidents is a fool’s errand. Add in the conover J. Edgar. But for master classes in acting, the actress with the role. However, by the end troversies surrounding Hoover’s secret files, visit both. of the film, I was convinced that I had indeed which allegedly contained dirt on everyone

SCREEN/THE TUBE TV’S STOCKING STUFFERS Once the Thanksgiving dishes are cleared and the relatives have left, we can get down to a real holiday tradition—turning on the television. Turkey Day kicks off a month-long marathon of kitschy, heart-warming and down-right-ridiculous programming. Christmas-themed episodes are already planned for Community, Modern Family and The Simpsons, but let’s face it: We want the classics. How the Grinch Stole Christmas will air twice this year: Monday, Nov. 28, on ABC and again on Wednesday, Dec. 7, on the

26 | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Get your post-Turkey Day fill of Charlie Brown.

Cartoon Network. ABC will broadcast A Charlie Brown Christmas twice, on Monday, Dec. 5, and Thursday, Dec. 15. Rudolph shines on CBS this year, airing Tuesday, Nov. 29. On Friday, Dec. 9, Frosty comes to town on CBS. Jimmy Stewart reminds us, once again, that It’s a Wonderful Life on Saturday, Dec. 3, and Saturday, Dec. 24, on NBC. Bing croons White Christmas on Monday, Dec. 12, airing on AMC. Miracle on 34th Street airs Christmas Eve on TCM while TBS broadcasts its annual marathon of A Christmas Story, also on Christmas Eve. —George Prentice WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

LISTINGS/SCREEN NEW DVD RELEASE/SCREEN

Opening ARTHUR CHRISTMAS—James McAvoy and Hugh Laurie star in this animated story of an unlikely hero who answers the oft-asked question, “How does Santa deliver all those presents in one night?” (PG) Opens Wednesday, Nov. 23. Edwards 9, Edwards 14, Edwards 21 HUGO—Martin Scorsese’s rendition of Brian Selznick’s bestseller tells the story of a young boy living in the walls of a Paris train station. The star-studded cast includes Sacha Baron Cohen and Jude Law. (PG) Opens Wednesday, Nov. 23. Edwards 9, Edwards 14, Edwards 21

Throw your hands in the air if you’re a disgruntled employee.

GETTING DOWN TO BUSINESS Horrible Bosses is one of those comedies that’s so funny, in par t, because it’s so wicked and, in par t, because deep down we’ve all wished we could off a par ticularly terrible boss. Which is probably what put it in the top spot for Redbox rentals in the Treasure Valley and the nation for the week ending Nov. 13. On its heels in second- and third-place, respectively, were Green Lantern and Fast Five. The four thplace flick for the valley was Captain America, while the rest of America clamored for Cameron Diaz, with Bad Teacher nabbing the fifth spot. Horrible Bosses follows Nick, Dale and Kur t (played by Jason Bateman, Charlie Day and Jason Sudeikis) as they are tormented by evil bosses. Nick’s boss, por trayed by Kevin Spacey, is plain psycho, convincing Nick to drink a toast to a promised promotion and then announcing in a staff meeting that Nick is a drunk. Dale is being sexually harassed and blackmailed by his boss, por trayed by Jennifer Aniston, and Kur t’s boss is a downright ass hole, played by Colin Farrell. Over too many drinks, the trio considers that maybe their lives could improve if their bosses ceased to exist. The black comedy unfolds as the three tr y to kill their bosses. If you can’t get Get a concentrated dose of Jason your mitts on Horrible Bateman in Extract. Bosses, you can see Jason Bateman in Extract, an excellent film from Mike Judge (King of the Hill) and the creators of Office Space. The film stars Bateman as Joel, the owner and operator of a successful flavor-extract company, and the problems that crop up as he prepares to unload the factor y for a for tune. Kristen Wiig and Mila Kunis also star. Yet another option is Going the Distance, a rambunctious romantic comedy about long-distance love. It co-stars Horrible Bosses’ Charlie Day, who is hilarious as Dan, the awkward roommate of lead character Garrett. Justin Long, Drew Barr ymore and Christina Applegate also star. —Kat Thornton WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

THE MUPPETS—Jason Segel and Amy Adams star alongside a cast of puppets. When the Muppet Theatre is slated to be razed by an evil oil tycoon, the muppets are reunited. (PG) Opens Wednesday, Nov. 23. Edwards 9, Edwards 14, Edwards 21

Special Screenings MOVIE NIGHT: THE TRIALS OF LAW SCHOOL—Join Concordia Law and the Boise State Pre-Law Society for The Trials of Law School: A Journey in Law. Follow eight law students as they navigate their way through the first semester of law school. RSVP at concordialaw.com/movie. Tuesday, Nov. 29, 6-8 p.m. FREE. Concordia University School of Law, 501 W. Front St., Boise, 208-955-1001, concordialaw. com.

For movie times, visit boiseweekly. com or scan this QR code.

Celebrate the holiday

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See it on PLUS-2 SATURDAY, NOV 26 at 6:00 pm BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 27

NEWS/REC MERRY WINTER While retailers have been jamming Christmas down our throats since, well, July, now that we’ve hit late November, it’s OK to get serious about it. Along those lines, the Boise and Payette national forests are selling Christmas-tree permits. The $10 permits allow the holder to cut one tree (no taller than 12 feet) with a limit of three permits per family. But before you go rushing out to cut down ye old tannenbaum, know the area you’re heading to—pay attention to area closures on public land and stay off private land. Handy maps and tips are available wherever tree permits are sold. It’s also a good idea to call ahead to check on road conditions—forest roads are not plowed. Permits are valid through Saturday, Dec. 24. Permits are available at ranger district offices on both forests, as well as numerous private vendors. For a full list and locations, visit fs.usda.gov/boise. If you need some ideas of what to stick under your newly cut tree for the outdoor recreationist/athlete in your life, check out the Boise Weekly Holiday Gift Guide inserted in this edition of Boise Weekly and available at boiseweekly.com. If all this talk of winter holidays has you thinking skiing, you’re in luck. Several regional ski areas have slated Thanksgiving holiday weekend openings, including Sun Valley, which is still offering some impressive early season deals—check out the preholiday package, which will score you a lift ticket and a room at the Sun Valley Resort for $79 per person, double occupancy. Get the details at sunvalley.com. If you’re willing to travel a little farther, Grand Targhee Resort (grandtarghee.com) will open on Friday, Nov. 25, and Jackson Hole Mountain Resort in Jackson, Wyo., will open on Saturday, Nov. 26. Schweitzer Mountain in Sandpoint already opened on Nov. 19 and Alta Resort in Utah opened Nov. 18. Local resorts, including Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area and Brundage Mountain have yet to set opening dates, but with the amount of snow building up in the central Idaho mountains, expect to see Brundage open sooner than later. If you want to track the openings and conditions as they happen, check out skiidaho.us, where you can sign up for Twitter and Facebook alerts to keep you on top of the ski season and special deals. —Deanna Darr

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GET MAD GAME Gaming pros give up gift-giving ideas MICHAEL LAFFERTY ’Tis the season ... well, almost. Retailers are ramping up the eye candy, reminding everyone that Christmas is upon us and trying to coerce money from tight wallets while guilting people into spending more than they can. It’s a holiday tradition, just as much as giving gifts. So you’ve bought the tie for that uncle you never see, your sister has the latest and greatest home coffee-brewing system ... the list could go on. But what are you going to get that gamer in your family? We decided to go to the people in the industry and ask a few of the folks who work for gaming companies (either as in-house public relations or with PR firms that handle gaming clients) for a list of the games on their wish lists for Christmas. Those that answered will remain unnamed simply because some of the games they picked were not being released by the companies they work for. Without further ado, or any ho-ho-hos to muddy the situation, here is the list:

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SKYLANDERS: SPYRO’S ADVENTURE (WII/360/PS3/3DS, ADVENTURE, RELEASED OCT. 16)—I didn’t see this one coming, but the industry person who recommended this game said: “Watching a 6-year-old put a toy on the ‘magic’ portal and having it come to life on a screen is pure joy. The game is lots of fun for kids and adults, much like the experience of going to a Pixar movie.” So this is the game that appeals to the child in us all. It was also critically acclaimed. BATMAN: ARKHAM CITY (360/PS3, ACTION GAME, RELEASED OCT. 18)—This one has Game of the Year written all over it, and even though it may not win that coveted title, it’s definitely in the running. It was a critical and commercial success, and many significant others lost valuable “me” time with the gamer in their lives thanks to this title. Dark, gritty, actiondriven with great graphics—this game has it all. UNCHARTERED 3: DRAKE’S DECEPTION (PS3, THIRD-PERSON ACTION/ADVENTURE, RELEASED NOV. 1)—If you have followed this series, you know that it’s sort of like the adventures of the offspring of Indiana Jones and Lara Croft. Drake is brash and finds trouble (which usually is toting guns and high-tech weaponry), and

character you create), and the world teeters on the brink of total chaos. OK, the theme may seem a bit cliche by now, but this is part of the Elder Scroll series from Bethesda Softworks and that means an expansive world, great RPG gaming and a great time suck.

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STAR WARS: KNIGHTS OF THE OLD REPUBLIC (PC/360, MASSIVELY MULTIPLAYER ONLINE GAME, RELEASED NOV. 18)—Hailed as one of the best interactive Star Wars experiences and one that truly captures the essence of the franchise, this has been anticipated for a long, long time. Just remember, though, that with any MMO, there is a monthly subscription fee making it the gift that keeps on giving ... to the publisher.

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KINGDOM OF AMALUR: RECKONING (PC/360/PS3, A MASSIVELY MULTIPLAYER ONLINE GAME, LAUNCHES FEB. 7, 2012)—The studio, 38 Studios, was founded by Curt Schilling (the baseball player), and the story for the game was written by R.A. Salvatore (known for the fantasy novels of the dark elf character, Drizzt) with the artwork under the watchful eye of Todd McFarlane. Big Huge Games, headed by some of the folks that worked on the epic fantasy game Morrowind, is behind the game. If that’s not a pedigree, then nothing qualifies. Will they make a great game? Who knows, but it will be interesting to find out.

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JUST DANCE 3 (WII/360/PS3, MUSIC AND INTERACTIVE GAMING, RELEASED OCT. 7)—This was submitted from a woman I know who has been in the media biz for a long time. Her reasons? “Great game to play with the kids, and I won’t suck at it. And it’s a great way to burn those extra holiday pounds!”

the series itself is not afraid to drop in a line totally poking fun at itself. Developer Naughty Dog has the formula down for this one, and the third in the franchise is sure to warm up someone’s winter nights with high-end adventure.

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CALL OF DUTY: MODERN WARFARE 3 (PC/360/PS3, FIRST-PERSON SHOOTER, RELEASED NOV. 8)—Come on, this is Call of Duty. Sure, it seems that only Infinity Ward can put out a good CoD game (Treyarch gets ragged on a bit but the last one wasn’t bad), but this is from Infinity Ward. Some folks disdain CoD for the Battlefield series, but there is a reason that CoD is annually one of the top-selling (if not the top) games of the year and on the list of all-time top-sellers.

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CAVE STORY 3D (3DS, PLATFORMER, RELEASED NOV. 8)—This one was another surprise on the list, but it’s a solid game-on-the-go title. The first game was a 2D side-scrolling platformer and the developer went back in, expanded the graphics and rendered it out in 3D.

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SKYRIM: THE ELDER SCROLLS V (PC/360/PS3, ROLE-PLAYING FANTASY GAME, RELEASED NOV. 11)—Dragons are on the loose, a prophetic warrior is supposedly coming (that would be the

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

LISTINGS/REC PLAY/REC

Register 906 Main Street (corner of 9th & Main in downtown Boise) Boise, ID 83702 208-258-2091 Store Hours: Monday-Saturday: 10 am - 7 pm Sunday: 11 am - 5 pm

HEATHER S TOLZ

TURKEY DAY 5K—Build up an appetite with this flat 5K course, open to runners, joggers and walkers. Bring at least one nonperishable food item to benefit local food banks. For more info, go to turkeyday-5k.com. See Picks, page 16. Thursday, Nov. 24, 6:30 a.m. $20-$30. Main Street at Capitol Boulevard, Boise.

The Grand Canyon is No. 1 on the bucket list of most rafters.

PRE-BIRD INFORMAL GROUP RIDE—All riders are invited to attend this 10th annual informal group ride and bring a donation for the Idaho Foodbank. Most rides are approximately two hours. Presented by St. Luke’s Sports Medicine Cycling and Lost River Cycling Club. Thursday, Nov. 24,11 a.m. FREE. Boise Co-op, 888 W. Fort St., 208-472-4500, boisecoop.com.

Events SURVIVING THE BIG DITCH: A GRAND CANYON ODYSSEY As I scouted from atop a neatly formed pile of 1-billion-yearold lava rock on river right with my heart in my throat, I knew that this was going to get interesting. There was no clean line—just a complex series of massive ledge holes, rocks, erratic haystack waves and dangerous pour overs—one after another. Lava Falls was either going to eat my lunch, or I was going to row a superman line that would surely find its way onto my “most daring attempts” list. The Grand Canyon is the crown jewel of river rafting in North America, and the world, depending on who you ask. Its generally temperate climate and relatively low elevation make it a popular destination for expert Idaho rafters looking to do a private trip in the off-season. I lucked out when I stumbled upon an invite last spring to join a seasoned group of river legends from Idaho, Washington and Alabama for a late-fall run. The trip leaders were the good folks from Cambridge Welding—custom raft frame and box manufacturers. In total, they had well more than 100 combined trips down the Grand Canyon, and 167 years of professional guiding experience. I was in good hands. The three-week pilgrimage—covering 280 miles—took us from Lees Ferry near Page, Ariz., to the takeout at Pierce Ferry near Las Vegas. In between, we found myriad slot canyon hikes, waterfalls, various scenic tributaries, countless historical sites, Anasazi and Hualapi ruins, snakes, scorpions, tarantulas and about a million other things that can kill you. A Big Ditch flotilla is a bit different from VIDEO: Scan a weekend trip in Idaho. We packed 50 dozen this QR code eggs, 15 pounds of coffee, and six 10-gallon to watch Mentzer’s groover canisters (poo buckets). Our gear fit video. on three full-size trucks (two with trailers) and included eight rafts. The Grand Canyon boasts a rapid rating system of 1-10, with some of the biggest runnable lines in North America. Traditional rating systems classify rapids as 1-6, but the Colorado River has an expanded scale to account for its huge water volume and dramatic variations seen with changing river flows. We ran it at 16,000 cfs—a fairly straightforward rate, although historical highs have reached well over 120,000 cfs. The hydraulics in the Grand Canyon are second to none, as are many other attributes of this legendary stretch. I now understand why it is so damned difficult to get a permit to run the Big Ditch—prior to the recent implementation of a lottery system, the waiting list was more than a decade. As for Lava Falls, I made it. I threaded the needle and lived to row another day. Check out video of my roller coaster run between two deadly, boat eater, son-of-a-bitch holes at boiseweekly.com. —Andrew Mentzer WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISE STATE FOOTBALL—Vs. Wyoming. Saturday, Nov. 26. Noon. $40-$75. Bronco Stadium, Boise State campus, Boise, 208426-1000, boisestate.edu. DISTRICT III HIGH SCHOOL SHRINE ALL-STAR FOOTBALL GAME—The standout players from area high schools will play eight- and 11-man games and showcase their mad footballin’ skills. Proceeds benefit Shriners Hospitals for Children and the El Korah Patient Travel Fund. Call 208-343-0571 for more info. Friday, Nov. 25, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. $12 adults, $6 students and children younger than 12. Eagle High School, 574 N. Park Lane, Eagle, 208-939-2189, ehsmeridianschools.org.

Santa’s bag is too heavy.

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Workshops & Classes SNOWSHOES.COM GET-GOING WORKSHOP—This workshop will teach you all the essential tools and tricks from how to choose the right snowshoe to what to wear, how to plan your trip and where to find trails near you. Learn the basics of reading maps and tracking your adventures. Learn tips and techniques for getting started snowshoeing, and find out about resources, events and trails. All ages and experience levels. Wednesday, Nov. 30, 5:30 and 7 p.m. FREE. REI, 8300 W. Emerald St., Boise, 208-322-1141, rei.com.

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SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE CLASSES—Beginners and those with more experience are welcome to attend any of these classes offered by Thistle and Ghillies. No partner is required. Wear comfy clothes and shoes. Mondays, 7:15-9:15 p.m. $5. Eagle Performing Arts Center, 1125 E. State St., Eagle, 208338-4633, epacdance.com.

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Recurring BOMBB SQUAD—The Boise Off-Road Mountain Bike Babes is a biking group for women of all ages in the Boise area who enjoy mountain biking. Activities include group rides, maintenance clinics, riding clinics and monthly potlucks. Schedule varies. For more information, email joycefabre@cableone.net or call 208-921-5026. FREE. groups. yahoo.com/group/bombb.

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 29

NEWS/FOOD APLU S R ANC H.C OM

FOOD/YEAR OF IDAHO FOOD HOLLY A. HEYS ER

BIRDS OF A FEATHER Free-range turkeys strut their stuff at A+ Ranch.

HOME ON THE FREE-RANGE According to the National Turkey Federation, more than 244 million turkeys were raised in the United States in 2010. While only 98,653 of those were certified organic according to the USDA, the trend toward free-range and organic birds is on the rise. “I think people are starting to become more educated on where their food is coming from, and they want to ensure a quality product is on their table at Thanksgiving,” said Mitch Lucero of A+ Ranch in Richfield. Mitch and his wife Acee took over the operation from Acee’s father in 2008, and their certified organic, free-range turkey business has grown exponentially since. “We plant crops in our field especially for them to graze on, such as wheat and alfalfa and grass pasture,” said Mitch. The Luceros raised 650 turkeys in 2010, and that number grew to 1,000 this year. While most A+ Ranch birds are distributed around the Magic Valley, you can also snag one at Boise Co-op or through Mary Rohlfing at Morning Owl Farm. Another local, free-range option is Vogel Farms Countr y Market in Kuna. The farm grows all natural beef, pork, chicken and turkey. The turkeys are raised in Cabalo’s Apple Orchards, where they roam, freely snacking on apples, wheat, barley and melons. “Our sales have increased over 50 percent,” said co-owner Debi Vogel. “We started turkeys—our first year was three years ago, and we sold 70—and this year I’m over 400.” Though all of Vogel’s turkeys sold out a couple weeks ago, she said you can easily snag one next year if you plan ahead. “We give some early options. We will start posting on Facebook and our website about May, when we buy the chicks,” said Vogel. “You can reserve a turkey for $30 down, and then you’ll get locked into a lower price.” While free-range or organic turkeys can cost a pretty penny—around $3.25 to $3.50 a pound—Vogel said an increasing number of customers are willing to splurge. “For the most part, once people have a fresh bird, they will never go back,” said Vogel. “It is really good.” Boise Co-op has also ramped up its freerange, organic turkey selection this year. In addition to birds from A+ Ranch, you can also find free-range Robins Family Farms turkeys from Melba and free-range organic and non-organic birds from Shelton’s Turkey Ranch in California. “We’re trying to make sure that we’ve just got enough on the shelves that everybody that wants one can get a turkey,” said co-op Media Director Michael Boss.

A conversation with hunting-and-gathering enthusiast Hank Shaw RANDY KING For many, it is a dream to live off the land—eat the wild greens that grow in the back yard, fish the local streams for food, hunt if you want to. But this dream is unrealistic, right? There’s no way that a person can get all the food they eat, or even a majority of it, off the land. Well, it’s possible if you’re Hank Shaw. Shaw is at the top of an ever-growing list of those who make a career living off the land. Call it hyper-localism if you want, but Shaw is the real deal—he hunts, fishes and gathers the majority of his calories. Hank has chronicled this culinary journey is his new book, Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast. Honestly I would expect a book like this to be written by a guy in a cabin in Montana, not a gent living in California. How do you square city-living with your desire to be outside hunting and gathering? I live outside Sacramento, [Calif.,] which has some of the best waterfowl hunting in North America. Most people don’t know that, nor do they know that northern California has a very strong hunting culture, at least once you leave the Bay Area. So there really isn’t anything to square. What is the day job for a guy who published a book called Hunt, Gather, Cook? I was a political reporter for 18 years before I took a leap of faith to do this full-time. I mostly covered state capitals, and I covered Congress for a little while. Most of that time I worked for newspapers, but I finished up at an insider-y political newsletter called the Capitol Morning Report, which is something of a hot-sheet for everyone who is in-the-know in California politics.

James Beard nominee Hank Shaw is an avid hunter, angler gardener and cook.

I don’t go a week or two without getting an email or message from a chef or foodie asking me about getting into hunting or fishing. I think there is a long way to go before this group of folks has anything like the kind of numbers as the traditional community, but they are becoming a prominent minority. My book is geared at both groups: It is intended to help food people get into the world of wild food, and my hope is that those who already hunt, fish or forage can pick up new tips and tricks on how to prepare their catch. I’ve been really pleased with how many hunters I’ve heard from who have said they are planning on expanding their foraging after they’ve read the book.

I noticed that you roast game birds whole in one recipe in the book. I have been preaching for years that since game birds actually Visit Hank Shaw’s blog, use the their legs, unlike factory Hunter Angler Gardener chicken, that the legs should be Cook, at honest-food.net. removed and cooked separately. How do the legs turn out? Depends on the bird. Ducks don’t run around that much, nor do doves. In my experience, partridges, quail and most grouse can be roasted whole with no probIn your book, you call the hunting world lem. Pheasants and turkeys, however, can “largely male, rural, agrarian, white and conbe an issue. An old pheasant or any turkey servative.” Do you see that dynamic shifting will have so much sinew in its legs that you across the country? do want to take the bird apart. But a young I am seeing more and more food people pheasant, especially if you hunt at a game enter the traditional hook-and-bullet world. Did you gather your way cross-country testing recipes? I did. It was very important that my book not be regional in scope. I’ve lived in the West, Midwest, the South and the Northeast, so I have that background already. I wanted the book to reflect that.

preserve, will still be tender enough to roast whole. Hanging game meat with its intestines still in place has always freaked me out. You recommend it for game birds, however. Can you tell me what is going on and how this helps me make my dinner taste better? The “bug” issue is really over-hyped. We all have bacteria in our innards and most are not harmful. Temperature is the key. What happens when you hang game is that you are controlling rot in the same way you do with dry-aged beef. At the proper temperature, around 55 degrees, certain bugs and enzymes can do their thing within the carcass, but the bad bugs cannot; they need higher temperatures. Those bugs and enzymes work on the meat and break it down, loosening the connective tissue and tenderizing the meat, giving it a more concentrated flavor in the process. Mind you, this will give your game more flavor—gamey in a good way. This will alarm many people who are used to eating plastic-wrapped domestic meats, which, in my opinion, have little flavor. So if you have those people in your house, experiment with hanging gradually. I often find myself with a lot of “random” cuts of meat in the freezer from my hunting escapades. Do you have a good way to get rid of the odds and ends 32 that might be piling up in the hunter’s

—Tara Morgan

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FOOD/YOIF CON’T freezer? Depends on the cut. I have lots and lots of recipes on [honest-food.net] for odd bits of anything from elk to upland birds to waterfowl. Dirty rice is a great recipe for bird giblets, and everyone loves a longbraised venison shank. I am a huge fan of pounding out cutlets of venison hearts and cooking them like jaeger schnitzel. There are endless possibilities for the rest of the animal. 30

Do you consider hunting/ fishing/gathering and addiction? My wife does. Yeah, pretty much. There is something about the process that is so deeply satisfying, you want more and more of it. Mushroom hunting is a treasure hunt— literally, as some varieties can fetch $30 a pound. Fishing is an exercise in mystery and patience—is there really a fish down there? And hunting occupies all of the senses. Hunting is the activity that really makes me feel most alive. I can lose myself in the marsh or woods and totally focus on the hunt. It is a liberating feeling.

GEWURZTRAMINER

November, high desert, freezing temperatures: Best edible wild plant living outside my apartment window? Huh. Juniper berries, maybe? November in the high desert can be tough. Foraging season ends in colder climates sometime in October. You should be out hunting now.

2010 CH. STE. MICHELLE GEWURZTRAMINER, $7.99 When it comes to Northwest wineries, Ste. Michelle is the 800-pound gorilla in the room, but with that size comes a well-earned reputation for quality and value. This exceptional bargain leads off with honeysuckle, green apple and spice, along with an enticing touch of tarragon. Made in an appealing off-dry style, the wine’s ripe pear and peach flavors are balanced by bright citrus. This wine finishes clean and lightly sweet with an intriguing layer of creamy hazelnut.

When are you coming to Idaho? Hopefully in late spring, when the blue camas is in flower. Camas is one of my favorite edible bulbs, and I’ve heard there are huge meadows full of it. If I miss that, there’s always salmon, trout, elk, deer, grouse. How many times have people told you that you have “written the book I have always wanted to write”? Because, honestly, that is how I feel. Never, but thank you.

32 | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | BOISEweekly

FOOD/WINE SIPPER

“Gewurz” means “spicy” in German, so it’s not surprising that the adjective finds its way into most descriptions of wines made from this grape. It’s also that quality that makes Gewurztraminer a great choice for your holiday table, helping it pair well with and complement the wide mix of dishes that make the meal. And while the Alsace region of France is the best-known source for the variety, this tasting showed that other regions can prove equally worthy. Here are the panel’s top picks:

2010 SLIGHT OF HAND, THE MAGICIAN, $15.99 An entry from Washington, this winery adds 15 percent riesling to the blend. The aromas are light but lovely, highlighted by soft peach and pear, which are backed by basil and spice. Honeyed-fruit flavors of apricot and blood orange play against the lively acidity more characteristic of the riesling grape. The wine’s finish is crisp and dry, colored by lemon zest and spice. 2010 VALCKENBURG GEWURZTRAMINER, $12.99 This wine opens with a beautiful mix of aromas, including white peach, green apple, tropical fruit, spice, thyme and lychee nut. There’s a definite richness on the palate with ripe stone fruit up front, followed by mango, papaya and tangy citrus. Supple spice and lemon zest come through on the round and refreshing finish. This is a very versatile style from this German winery. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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R E A L ES TAT E BW ROOMMATES Looking for a responsible M/F roommate in Meridian. Easy access to freeway & shopping. Available November 1st. New 3BR, 2.5BA home. $350/mo. Must have steady income. No pets or drugs. Garage storage & off-street parking available. Quiet neighborhood. Call Haleigh 7210810 or email hal.2009@live.com.

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CA REERS BW HELP WANTED Shop and earn $275 - $380/wk. This is a freelance job which will not disturb your present job if you have any. JOB REQUIREMENTS: *Good business skills *Honest, responsible and industrious *PC, e-mail and internet skills *No starting fee required. For further info contact: debrapletchersh@gmail.com

FIRE SPRINKLER FITTERS Looking for an experienced fire sprinkler fitter. Must have experience in sprinkler & pipe fitting for fire sprinkler installations & inspections. Contact 208-232-3640 for more information. $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-greatpay.com Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net Temporary Farm Labor: Wyoming Premium Farms, Wheatland, WY, has 10 positions for hay, corn, silage & swine; 3 mos. experience required for job duties listed, able to obtain clean DL; tools, equipment, housing & daily trans. provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $9.90/hr; work period guaranteed from 11/11/11 – 9/11/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order 2490836.

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BW CAREER EDUCATION/TRAINING NEED YOUR GED® DIPLOMA? We offer no-cost tutoring! For details, call 855-591-2920. STEVENS-HENAGER COLLEGE. GEDprepClasses.com FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

BW ANNOUNCEMENTS IMPROV WORKSHOPS Improvolution, Idaho’s premiere source for improv is now taking new students for their upcoming workshops. Go to boiselaughs. com and click on the workshops page, fill out the short form & you’re on your way to becoming better versed in the language of improv. For more info: 208-4753125. workshops@boiselaughs. com or booiselaughs.com VOLUNTEERS FOR COMMED Boise Schools Community Education is seeking volunteer instructors for our WINTER 2012 Session! Our instructors teach a variety of courses at area schools. You can share your passion, hobby, cause or skills with us and give back to the community! If you’d like to learn more, please contact us at 854-4047!

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E-MAIL BOISE 1BD house, fenced yd, pets ok. $450/mo. Studio space. 562-9150. Charming 1BD, 1BR in Nampa near NNU off Powerline. Clean and bright. Includes W/D. No lease, no application fee, no credit check. $495/mo. Call 333-0066. WALK TO BSU! 3BD, 1.5BA duplex, walk or bike to BSU. 1800 sq. ft., W/D, DW, large living area. All util. paid, only $1100/mo. Available December 1st. Please contact us if interested! 208-761-5890. Spectacular 2BD, 1.5BA. Duplex Close to BSU- Newly remolded. 1000 sq.ft., grg. Only $750/mo. Chelsea 921-5442.

BW FOR SALE NORTH END STYLE This is the house you never thought you could afford. 2112 sq. ft., 3BD, 2BA, 2 car grg., 1932 historic home. Updated, maintained, completely move-in ready! This is on the Bench. Check out the website for info and photos. www.2011arcadia.com NORTH END HOME 4 SALE! Bungalow with real historic charm. The house has a wonderful wrap around porch outside and many mature trees. Prime location just blocks from downtown, Hyde Park & foothills. Sold AS-IS. $165,000. ASCENT Boise Real Estate/Katie Rosenberg 208-841-6281.

BW COMMERCIAL RETAIL SPACE FOR SALE Retail Store front property for sale at 6521 Ustick Rd. Boise, Id. Great buy! Easy Parking, all Glass Store Front, Next to established businesses. Call Dave Bohecker at 208-947-1081. Click on link below for more info! http:// www.loopnet.com/lid/16372493

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LOST CHILDS HAT Joann’s Fabric Store on Milwaukee. Black hat with strip of red with black polka dots, black & white bow on front hat. Made by Bonnie Baby. Very important contact outaboutphotography@ gmail.com

FOUND MEMORY CARD At Chili’s on Franklin Road. Tell me what pictures are on it and it’s all yours. 539-0048. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

SWAPCAFE.COM Come join us! Trade your stuff, your skills, your inventory. Submit via SwapCafe.Net for personal swaps or SwapCafe.Com for B2B. Good luck trading! Questions Info@SwapCafe.Net

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Accepting Knickknacks for in store trade at A Thrift Store with a Twist. Jewelry, DVD’s, Clothes. 4610 W. State St. 429-1226.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW BEAUTY HAIRLINES 409 S. 8th St. Boise. Stop in and talk with Lui The Hair Whisperer Get a new style for the Holidays! 383-9009.

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boise’s organic skincare Facials and waxing By appointment only Gift certificates available Éminence organic skincare products 729 N. 15th St. 208 344 5883 remedyskincareboise.com

BW CHIROPRACTIC INJURY PREVENTION WORKSHOP We are holding an injury prevention workshop Thursday the 17th of November from 6-7pm. Those who attend will get a free therapeutic foam roller! Learn to identify musculature in need of myofascial release and learn to use the foam roller to relieve the tension. Freeing up dysfunctional tissue tension can prevent injuries and improve performance. To attend please go to our website and use the contact page to RSVP your spot. Only 20 available. trailheadclinic@gmail.com

VENDORS WANTED. NOT MLM! Topical, homeopathic, great smelling, pain relief lotion is seeking vendors to spread the word about our mission to help people suffering from the pain of fibermyolgia, back pain, arthritis, bursitis, and any other “ITIS.” NOT MLM! Please review the following: www. rtpr.com/a/cb9d9179 then call 208-412-7036 to get started.

RELAXATION MASSAGE Call Ami at 208-697-6231. ULM 340-8377.

BW SPIRITUAL Check Out: eckankar-idaho.org

BW MASSAGE A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas. A full body, hot oil massage. In home studio/shower. $45 flat hr. 841-1320. Terrance.

*AMATEUR MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. New website massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383.

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Free Foot Bath for Body Detox with 1 hr. foot massage. Treatments for acute and chronic cold hands & feet. Body Massage with special techniques. Pain Relief. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

PETS BW PETS DOMESTIC BIRDS FOR ADOPTION Idaho Domestic Bird Rescue and Sanctuary, Inc. currently have several domestic birds in need of loving, safe homes. info@idahobirdrescue.com PET MEMORIALS Cat memorial made of cast stone. “I came, I purred, I conquered.” TROPICAL FISH Live Tropical Aquarium Fish in Boise & Nampa Locations. www. exoticafricancichlids.com

SERVICES BW CHILD Nanny for Hire Retired LPN seeking position. North End area. Infant to Preschool age. Salary/ hours neg. Very flexible, resume ref. avail. at interview. 333-0217. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois). FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

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BW PROFESSIONAL BOISE WEBMASTER Specializing in Advanced web-design with custom graphics. Cost effective solutions will generate money and increase your online presence. We are versatile, flexible, easy to work with and always there for your web design needs. kalae@boisewebmaster.com CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com CUTTIN LOOSE HAIR SALON Stylists needed! Leasers preferred. We are a full service salon call Vickie 463-4422! Come join our team! DIRECT AUTO REPAIR LLC Mobile Service | 1/2 Shop Rate | ASE Master Certified | Visit: DirectAutoRepair.com | Call:477-1059.

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Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $425! 888-1464.

GRASS FED LOWLINE ANGUS! Only 1/2 a beef left. www.boguscreeklowlines.com is offering 1/2 steer. All-natural beef. Angus taste, smaller cuts, Omega 3’s. $4/lbs. & wrapped by a reputable local butcher. You give the butcher your specific cut and wrap instructions as far as cuts, package sizes and thickness. No hormones, antibiotics, chemicals used. This is the healthiest beef choice you could make for your family. Available in 2 wks. Please contact 208-869-8016 or 208869-8006. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643.

ADOPT-A-PET

BW HOME PAINTING SERVICES Fair & competitive rates. Phone 463-7771. ACI WINDOW CLEANING At Cleaner Image, we bring you 19 yrs. of window cleaning experience. We wash everything by hand, not with a hose. Cleaning residential and commercial windows in the Treasure Valley. Visit us today: aciwindowcleaning.com A’S IN HOME HOUSEKEEPING Housekeeping & move-out services for your rental properties, office space, or personal homes. Move-outs for $20/hr. Bonded & insured, background checked by Idaho State Police. Start immediately. laylow2009@live.com HEALTH CARE ADVOCATES Have you or a family member had a recent hospitalization or are facing an upcoming one? Are you having trouble navigating the overwhelming health care maze? “Care for Living” can help. At “Care for Living” our health care professionals will use their expertise and experience to provide support ranging from advocacy during hospitalization, continuing through discharge and transition back home. We’ll help you understand medications, communicate with physicians and direct you to appropriate resources to ensure the transition home is successful, decreasing the likelihood of complications including re-hospitalization. We will be there with you every step of the way ensuring the best possible care is achieved. We have RN’s, LPN’s, Assisted Living professionals, as well as Long Term Care professionals, all ready to help you through the process. For more information, call Victoria at 208-365-8256 or email at victorias@care-forliving.com YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

TIAGO: 4-year-old male doberman pinscher and Lab mix. Large, very handsome dog. Athletic, puppy-like and happy-go-lucky. (Kennel 424- #14239410)

SANCHA: 1-year-old female Lab mix. Stuffed toy fanatic with a high energy level. Would do best as an only dog in an adult home. (Kennel 422-#12262867)

TOBY: 3-year-old male Siamese cat. Petite male with handsome blue eyes. Quiet, unassuming personality. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 06- #14510474)

KAIJA: 6-month-old female Siamese mix. Loves being held and cuddled. Friendly, curious and playful kitten. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 17- #14538038)

ANYA: 6-month-old female border collie mix. Outgoing and good with other dogs. Needs some structure and obedience work. (Kennel 323- #14310527)

PIXIE: 7-year-old female manx. Unique-looking fluffy, short tailed mature cat. A little reserved but warms up quickly. (Kennel 15#14486583)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

MISTY: I have stunning blue eyes. Come meet me today.

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CIDER: Staff pick for November. Only $20 takes me home.

ANNIE: Senior Maine coon seeks home for her golden years.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 35

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B O I S E W E E K LY ONLINE PERFUME SHOPPING Your perfumes are your identity, especially when you are to mark your presence. A sensuous, yet classy appeal is what a perfume is capable of implementing to your personality. www.rightperfumes.com QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

AUTUMN TIERRA ART Local, Handmade Jewelry, Crochet, Photography, Fused Glass, Pottery, Drawing, & Painting. For sale online at autumntierra.artfire.com FUN CHAIR & OTTOMAN Fun multi-color chair, ottoman & throw pillow. A bit older but the chair upholstery is in decent condition, ottoman a bit more worn. $80. 208-320-1990.

RETRO DINING TABLE Hey I have a table I need to part with, not using it & can use the money for school. Call or txt 4129677. $350 obo. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

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18 Twosomes 19 Partner of raised 21 Who said “Learn from the masses, and then teach them” 22 Students err? 24 Bonus reel fodder 26 Punk offshoot 27 Pistil complement 28 “10” in a bikini 29 Oklahoma city 31 Medusa killer takes his agent to court?

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ATOMIC TREASURES Atomic Treasures 409 S. 8th St. Boise. Celebrate The Holidays and Reuse with an eclectic mix of vintage, retro, art and found objects. Decorative and unique treasures for home, jewelry, books, collectibles. Unusual and Unforgettable Gifts! 208-344-0811. QUE PASA Thousands of handcrafts from Mexico’s Master Craftsmen. Steel sculptures for the wall at home or office. Sterling silver jewelry, Black pottery, Blown glass, Dragons, Fairies, Mermaids, Furniture and more. 409 S. 8th St. Between Broad & Myrtle Boise.

NYT CROSSWORD | EITHER WAY BY JEREMY NEWTON AND TONY ORBACH ACROSS

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BEST THRIFT STORE IN TOWN! The Shop, WCA’s boutique thrift store, is the most unique thrift store in town. It is located in the basement of the WCA building at 720 W. Washington Street. Great deals on women’s, men’s & children’s clothing, housewares, books, shoes, holiday & furniture! Amazing stuff...even more amazing prices! Open M-F, 9-4:30 pm. Donations welcome during these hours. All proceeds from sales go directly to the WCA. YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

2001 FORD EXPLORER XLT Dealers are free to come & look but I will not accept any lowball offers. I am willing to negotiate. Selling for $5950 O.B.O. Contact Justin 208-275-9759 with any questions.

BW AUTO SERVICES CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com

/ EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

33 Feel that one’s had enough, say 37 Temptation 38 Singsong syllable 39 Part of N.C.A.A.: Abbr. 40 Rig 41 Foreign tender? 44 Open hearings in courts 46 Reinforced ice cream container? 51 What Eng. majors pursue 52 Kay of “Rich Man, Poor Man” 53 “That’s it!” 54 Info on modern business cards 56 Just sort, supposedly 58 Inferior tour vehicle for Snoop Dogg? 63 One side in a bullfight 66 Em and Bee, e.g. 67 Up 68 Recollection from a winter tourist in Poland? 71 Cut, in a way 73 It serves a duel purpose 74 Flip of a flop 75 Bit of progress 76 One encountered in a close encounter 79 Disparaging Argentine leader badly injured? 87 Ads 88 Perks 89 “Shucks!” 90 Actress Thurman 93 With 65-Down, stuck 94 The old man 95 “We totally should!” 97 One-on-one job for a ladies’ man? 102 Spin meas. 103 Place to buy stage props 104 Stanza alternative 106 Former J.F.K. line 109 Rug type 110 “Son of Darius, please confirm my dog is male”? 113 Hip-hop’s ___ Def 114 Rein in 115 Denizens: Suffix

116 Risk 117 Approx. 118 Guitar great Paul 119 Emergency broadcast 120 “Do it”

DOWN 1 “Don’t think so!” 2 Ooplasm locale 3 Take back 4 Picture of health, for short? 5 Best effort 6 Long Island county west of Suffolk 7 Part of GPS: Abbr. 8 1970 #1 R&B hit for James Brown 9 Not be spoken aloud 10 Rx qty. 11 French clergymen 12 Way passé 13 One who gets things 14 1998 Masters champion Mark 15 It may be settled over beers 16 Nativity figure 18 Stopping point? 20 A lack of compassion 23 Come full circle? 25 “Reading Rainbow” network 28 “That … can’t be …” 29 Busy 30 Send out press releases, e.g. 32 The Auld Sod 33 Former N.B.A. star Spud 34 A pastel 35 “Shoot!” 36 It’s stunning 42 Pres. Carter’s alma mater 43 Candy company whose first flavor was Pfefferminz 44 Federal org. with inspectors 45 Cry with a forehead slap, maybe 47 Pipe fitting 48 Drains 49 Cities, informally

50 Down in the dumps 55 Dashed fig. 56 They may be sore after a game 57 Nest egg option, briefly 58 Big ___ 59 Italian article 60 Start of an aside, to tweeters 61 Jah worshiper 62 Total 63 Hampshire mother 64 SoCal squad 65 See 93-Across 66 Italian vineyard region 69 “Too bad!” 70 River islands 71 Whom Han Solo calls “Your Worship” 72 Constantly shifting 75 TiVo, for one 76 Press 77 They may be metric … or not 78 Dedicated offerings 80 Deluxe 81 Completely flip 82 Scaloppine, usually 83 Show, as something new 84 Curio displayers L A S T T R O H S

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85 Sound dumbfounded 86 Their necks can turn 270 degrees 90 Repulsive 91 Skirts smaller than minis 92 Having a policy of reverse seniority? 94 Top 40 fare 96 Lead’s counterpart 98 Wedded 99 Producers of scuff marks 100 “New Sensation” band, 1988 101 Former telco giant 105 Get back to 106 “That’s a fact” 107 “#1” follows it 108 Given the heave-ho 110 Sorority letters 111 Roxy Music co-founder 112 A street drug, for short Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

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NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Jonathan Cory Newell Case no. CV NC 1119904 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult)

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A Petition to change the name Jonathan Cory Newell, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in ADA County, Idaho. The name will change to Cory Breaux. The reason for the change in name is: because my step-parent raised me. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on Dec. 15, 2011 at the ADA County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change.

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Date: Oct. 24, 2011. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. Nov. 16, 23, 30 & Dec. 7, 2011. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Julie Layne Long CASE NO. CV NC 1119469 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (adult) A Petition to change the name of Julie Layne Long, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Julie Layne Collins. The reason for the change in name is : I am divorced. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on Dec. 8, 2011 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Oct. 24, 2011. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. Nov. 23, 30 Dec. 7, 14 2011.

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BW I SAW U SPARKS FLEW AT WINCO Saw you at downtown Winco on Monday, Nov. 14 about 10:30am. I feel like I am sleepless in Boise here. You were the tall dark handsome dude in Northface & running gear. Super friendly at the checkout line, so wish I would have found the opportunity & guts to give you my number. Hoping this finds you & you are single. Let’s meet again!

Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates. Looking for pen pals/friends. I’m 6’3”, 215 lbs. with hazel eyes. I enjoy everything from working out to poetry. I would like to pursue music. I should be getting out in 9 months. Will consider everyone who writes. Zane Robertson #89968 ICC P-3-44B PO Box 70010 Boise, ID 83707. Hello, I am currently in Ada County Jail. I was hoping to write SF 18-25. Michael May C/O Ada County Jail 7210 Barrister Dr. Boise, ID 83704 To anyone out there looking for companionship/pen pal. My name is Christina. I’m 27 yrs. Old, WSF, I am looking for a man or woman to develop new friendships or more. I’m 4’9”, reddish long curly hair and blue eyes. I’m outgoing, friendly, playful, openminded, good sense of humor and adventurous. If you would like to know more, please write. Your missing out if you don’t. Christina Newman #94228 SBWCC 13200 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. Kuna, ID 83634. SWF, 24 yrs. Old, ISO long term relationship/pen pal. I am energetic, outgoing, funny, caring and I like to live to the fullest. I’m 5’5”, green eyes, long curly brown hair. If you like what you heard and want to know more about me, please write. Tia Lunen #95031 SBWCC 13200 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. Kuna, ID 83634. What’s inside your head? 27, 5’9”, 155 lbs., long curly brown hair and hazel eyes. Incarcerated until 2013. Bored and looking for a pen pal. I want to know how you think, what you dream of and the way your mind works. Elisabeth Crossley #99971 PWCC 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. 36 yr. old S lesbian ISO other S lesbians for long-term communication. Touch pen to paper and take a chance, you might be surprised what you find. One things for sure, it will definitely be fun. 5’1”, 140 lbs., brown hair and eyes. Sexy butch with a great sense of humor. Lucero Mitchell #53204 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. Prison babe looking for someone exciting to help pass the time. Looking forward to hearing from you. 44, SWF, 5’4”, 135 lbs., brown hair and eyes. Tammy Young #81860 PWCC 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 37

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Basic research is what I am doing when I don’t know what I am doing,” said rocket scientist Werner von Braun. I think it’s an excellent time for you to plunge into that kind of basic research, Aries. You’re overdue to wander around frontiers you didn’t even realize you needed to investigate. You’re ready to soak up insights from outside the boundaries of your understanding. In fact, I think it’s your sacred duty to expose yourself to raw truths and unexpected vistas that have been beyond your imagination’s power to envision. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In Woody Allen’s film Midnight in Paris, the Ernest Hemingway character says, “All cowardice comes from not loving or not loving well enough.” Given the state of your current astrological omens, Taurus, that is an excellent piece of advice. I suspect you are going to be asked to call on previously untapped reserves of courage in the coming weeks—not because you’ll have to face physical danger but rather because you will have a chance to get to the bottom of mysteries that can only be explored if you have more courage than you’ve had up until now. And the single best way to summon the valor you’ll need is to love like a god or goddess loves. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “When I see your face, the stones start spinning!” wrote the poet Rumi, as translated by Coleman Barks. “Water turns pearly. Fire dies down and doesn’t destroy. In your presence, I don’t want what I thought I wanted.” I think you need to be in the presence of a face like that, Gemini. You’ve got to get your fixations scrambled by an arresting vision of soulful authenticity. You need your colors transposed and your fire and water reconfigured. Most of all, it’s crucial that you get nudged into transforming your ideas about what you really want. So go find that healingly disruptive prod, please. It’s not necessarily the face of a gorgeous icon. It could be the face of a whisperer in the darkness or of a humble hero who’s skilled in the art of surrender. Do you know where to look? CANCER (June 21-July 22): “All my life I have longed to be loved by a woman who was melancholy, thin and an actress,” wrote 19th century French author Stendhal in his diary. “Now I have been, and I am not happy.” I myself had a similar experience—craving a particular type of woman who, when she finally showed up in the flesh, disappointed me. But it turned out to be a liberating experience. Relieved of my delusory fantasy, I was able to draw more joy from what life was actually giving me. As you contemplate your

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own loss, Cancerian, I hope you will find the release and deliverance I did. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you traveled 300 million years back in time, you might freak out in abject fear as you encountered dragonflies as big as eagles and cockroaches the size of dogs. But since you’re quite safe from those monsters here in the present, there’s no need to worry yourself sick about them. Similarly, if you managed to locate a time machine and return to an earlier phase of your current life, you’d come upon certain events that upset you and derailed you way back then. And yet the odds are very high that you’re not going to find a time machine. Maybe you could relinquish all the anxiety you’re still carrying from those experiences that can no longer upset and derail you. Now would be an excellent moment to do so. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): To prepare for her role in the film The Help, actress Jessica Chastain forced herself to gain 15 pounds. It was tough, because she normally follows a very healthy diet. The strategy that worked best was to ingest a lot of calorie-heavy, estrogen-rich ice cream made from soybeans. To be in alignment with current cosmic rhythms, it would make sense for you to fatten yourself up, too, Virgo—metaphorically speaking, that is. I think you’d benefit from having more ballast, more gravitas. You need to be sure you’re well-anchored and not easy to push around. It’s nearly time to take an unshakable stand for what you care about most. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In a famous Monty Python sketch, a Hungarian tourist goes into a British tobacconist’s store to buy cigarettes. Since he doesn’t speak English, he consults a phrase book to find the right words. “My hovercraft is full of eels,” he tells the clerk. The tourist tries again: “Do you want to come back to my place, bouncy bouncy?” In the coming week, Libra, I foresee you having to deal with communications that are equally askew. Be patient, please. Try your best to figure out the intentions and meanings behind the odd messages you’re presented with. Your translating skills are at a peak, fortunately, as are your abilities to understand what other people-—even fuzzy thinkers-—are saying. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): There are modern Chinese painters who use oil paints on canvas to create near-perfect replicas of famous European masterpieces. So while the genuine copy of Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” is worth more than $100 million, you can buy an excellent copy on the

Internet for less than $100. If you’re faced with a comparable choice in the coming week, I suggest you take the latter. For your current purposes, you just need what works, not what gives you prestige or bragging rights. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “It is a tremendous act of violence to begin anything,” said Sagittarian poet Rainer Maria Rilke. “I am not able to begin. I simply skip what should be the beginning.” I urge you to consider trying that approach, Sagittarius. Instead of worrying about how to launch your rebirth, maybe you should just dive into the middle of the new life you want for yourself. Avoid stewing interminably in the frustrating mysteries of the primal chaos so you can leap into the fun in full swing. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The Golden Gate Bridge spans the place where San Francisco Bay meets the Pacific Ocean. It wasn’t easy to build. The water below is deep, wind-swept, beset with swirling currents, and on occasion, shrouded with blinding fog. Recognizing its magnificence, the American Society of Civil Engineers calls the bridge one of the modern Wonders of the World. Strange to think, then, that the bridge was constructed between 1933 and 1937, during the height of the Great Depression. I suggest you make it your symbol of power for the coming weeks, Capricorn. Formulate a plan to begin working toward a triumph in the least successful part of your life. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s an excellent time for you to get an entourage-—or if you already have one, to expand it. For that matter, it’s a perfect moment for you to recruit more soldiers to help you carry out your plot to overthrow the status quo. Or to round up more allies for your plans to change the course of local history. Or to gather more accomplices as you seek to boldly go where you have never gone before. So beef up your support system. Boost the likelihood that your conspiracy will succeed. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): If you expand your concept of what you’re capable of, you will receive a specific offer to move up a notch. If you perform your duties with intensified care and grace, you will be given new responsibilities that catalyze your sleeping potential. The universe doesn’t always act with so much karmic precision, but that’s how it’s working in your vicinity right now. Here’s one more example of how reasonable the fates are behaving: If you resolve to compete against no one but yourself, you will be shown new secrets about how to express your idiosyncratic genius.

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 23–29, 2011 | 39

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