Issuu on Google+

LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 09 AUGUST 24–30, 2011

FR

TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 8

SUPPLIES AND DEMAND The high cost of being a student or teacher FEATURE 12

DO THE MATH How local schools stack up ARTS 28

TIME FOR TEACHERS Boise State profs hang work at biennial exhibit FOOD 31

THE SCHOOL LUNCH MENU In Idaho, it’s fresh local produce

“Boise is kind of a rough town.”

NOISE 25

2 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Heather Lile Heather@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreaders: Jay Vail, Sheree Whiteley Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Michael Lafferty, Ted Rall, Sheree Whiteley Interns: Lizzy Duffy, Shelby Soule ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Conner Coughlin, Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow Photography Interns: Will Jones, John Winn CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE DEFENDING THE DAILY Last week, Idaho Business Review reported that the Idaho Statesman made deep cuts in its newsroom. BW’s Deanna Darr wrote a short Citydesk post about IBR’s report, and at boiseweekly.com a reader using the handle “Griffster” left the following comment: “Maybe if they try to report news that is more inline [sic] with the political view of their audience this might help with their circulation drop. Note to the new editor we are a conservative state!” Dear Griffster: Let me set the record straight. The “new editor” is actually a new publisher, and that, Griffster, is a very big difference. It also indicates that your level of knowledge about the news business is limited. So, second, let me give you a quick Journalism 101 lesson: It’s not the job of journalists to reflect the predominant political views of their readers. News is news, independent of ideological bias, and as someone whose job it is to push those boundaries, I can say that any perceived liberal bias in the Statesman’s coverage is nothing more than defensiveness on a reader’s part. I know a few BW readers are likely surprised about the fact that I’m coming to the Statesman’s defense here. I also know the prevailing assumption in town is that when the Statesman falters BW rejoices. When it comes to money, yes, you bet your ass our sales department considers the daily’s sales department competition. Newsroom to newsroom, however, I can tell you that the competition is hardly cutthroat. BW’s editorial staffers have social and professional relationships with a number of people in the Statesman’s newsroom. Several past and current Statesman reporters did time at BW before going daily—one of them, in fact, taught me the business. Though our newsrooms have distinctly different methods, our missions are not far off. And when their newsroom loses reporters, the entire community loses. We lose the accountability that good journalism provides. We lose the stories of the voiceless that good journalism gives voice to. We lose the starting points of robust social dialogue—dialogue that’s vital to an intellectually healthy society. At BW, we certainly strive to do all of that, but we can’t do it alone. Boise needs a strong daily paper with experienced reporters. I only have 400 words of space here, and this discussion deserves far more than the space allows. I’d invite you to continue the discussion with me at facebook. com/rachaeldaigle. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Kelly Packer TITLE: Lost in the lower cases of thought MEDIUM: Mixed media on paper.

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

ARTIST STATEMENT: Mounds of happy skulls and vertebrae piled to the sky. See new work/big paintings at the VAC through September or view more at kellypacker.com.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 3

WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE

VIDEO REPORT: JOSH RITTER Idaho native singer-songwriter Josh Ritter was in town recently to read from his new book and play a set at The RX. BW sat down with Ritter to get the scoop on his turn as a novelist.

SNEAK PEAK AT AVENGERS LEAKED The big screen has been inundated by comic book superheroes as Hollywood lays the groundwork for The Avengers. A fan sneaked a peek during filming and leaked footage for the rest of us. Watch Thor and Captain America battle it out in the streets in Ohio.

PAYETTE P&Z VOTES ON NEXT STEP IN FRACKING CASE In the ongoing Payette County energy saga—a drama revolving around the big bad wolves of nuke power and fracking—the P&Z commishes voted last week on the next key phase of a natural gas drilling project. The outcome at Citydesk.

4 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

EDITOR’S NOTE BILL COPE TED RALL NEWS The high cost of being a student—and a teacher CITYDESK CITIZEN FEATURE Education by the Numbers BW PICKS FIND 8 DAYS OUT SUDOKU NOISE Teen rockers Workin’ On Fire MUSIC GUIDE ARTS Boise State art profs show their skills with biennial exhibit SCREEN Summer’s winners and losers SCREEN APP Stop teen driving and texting in its tracks FOOD Boise School District ups the ante with school lunch FOOD REVIEW B29 Steatery CLASSIFIEDS NYT CROSSWORD FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

3 5 6

8 8 10

12 18 19 20 22

25 26

28

29

30

31 32 33 36 38

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

BILL COPE/OPINION

JANIE’S OWN JAZZ Finally

It’s still a mystery to me how I came to prefer jazz over all other music. It wasn’t early exposure. As far back as memory takes me, my big sister was serving up Bach and Brahms on the family upright. On Mom’s radio stations, if there was any music at all between the sermons, it was stern hymns and the sort of soft, meandering fluff that funeral parlors always have playing in the background. Dad’s radio always seemed to be tuned to a Hank Williams song. I don’t remember even hearing jazz until my early teens. An odd cousin from Iowa visited and brought his Dave Brubeck albums with him. I believe he intended to show my sister some of the things living people were doing with the piano, but I was the one who got hooked the hardest. Not long after, Mr. Cherry—the lone band man for the entire 1962 Meridian School District—started what I believe was the first high school jazz band in this corner of Idaho. (The first tune we learned was “Little Brown Jug,” and to this day, I think that tune is one of the funkiest ever.) Today, after half a century of listening to jazz, playing jazz, obsessing with jazz, worshipping at the altar of the old jazz gods and the new, Louis Armstrong and Art Tatum, Brubeck and Stan Getz, Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk and Maynard Ferguson right up through Wynton Marsalis, I am still intrigued by how an Idaho farm boy could fall so heavy for a musical expression birthed among Southern blacks and reared in big cities. Twenty-five years ago or so, I asked Janie Harris, another born-and-bred local like myself, why she thought people like us could come to love jazz in a place so remote from the origins. “I see jazz as the language old souls use to reach one another,” she said, or something like that. “It’s not about different backgrounds or where we live. It’s about sharing something universal within us.” Janie looked at everything through an intensely spiritual lens. To her, it was only natural that her life-long love of the music would lead her to the love of her life, Gene Harris. U Janie died in May. By then, she had been battling cancer for more than three years. Almost two years ago, I wrote about the vile injustice that had been done to her by the insurance company that had dropped her coverage and also about a fund-raising concert organized by Paul Tillotson (BW, Opinion, “Cancerous,” Aug. 19, 2009). At the time of the concert her cancer was in remission. It came back. By May this spiritual, kind and loving woman who had traveled the world at the side of one of the greatest jazz musicians to have ever strode a piano was losing her home to foreclosure. There wasn’t enough money left to throw a funeral or pay for an obituary in the paper. I have struggled since then to find a way to write one last time about Janie Harris, my WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

friend. I couldn’t do it. I’d written about her husband several times over the years, but somehow, especially when he died in 2000, I always knew what I wanted to say about him. Over the years since I’d met him and Janie, Gene had shared his stage with me and several of the luckiest musicians to have ever called Boise home. Maybe I could write so freely about Gene because during all those nights down at Peter Schott’s and all those summer afternoons out at St. Chapelle, during all those sweet Gene tunes we played together, that Janie was right—that he and I had “shared something universal within us.” Except for those times she came to the stage to sing her duet with Gene on “Life is Just a Bowl of Cherries,” Janie and I never made music together. Perhaps that’s why I was stuck … blocked … left dry with what to write about her when she died. I’d known her, to the minute, as long as I’d known Gene. The two of them had dined in our home several times, and if there is one thing Janie wasn’t, it was a shrinking violet. The two of them were grand talkers and always seemed to be speaking in the same key. They were in tune with one another like few couples I have met. I knew her as well as I knew Gene and probably better on many levels because we had grown up within a 10mile circle of one another. Still I couldn’t find the words I wanted to say of her. I was angry over the injustice surrounding her dying—the insurance company dropping her, the loss of everything she and Gene had earned, the ignobleness of what this noble woman had gone through in her last years—and maybe I didn’t want the last thing I would probably say to her memory to be angry. So I put it off. And put it off. I just didn’t know what to say. U Then, on Aug. 9, I stumbled across her belated obituary. I was relieved to see it, that this final record of Janie Harris’ passing had shown up. I was so relieved, evidently, that I neglected to read the whole thing and didn’t see the most relevant part—the part about the memorial celebration set for a few days later. And we missed it, my wife and I. Only then, when I learned I had missed this last bow to such an elegant old soul, did I know what I had to say. First I must tell Cherie Buckner-Webb (another elegant old soul, believe you me) that you are a wondrous person for arranging for the memorial and not letting Janie go so unsung, and I am so sorry for not being there. And to Janie’s family, again, sorry. Rebecca and I should have been there. But in lieu of changing that which can’t be changed, let me say that we loved your mother, sister, grandmother, aunt, and that we will miss her forever. Or until that day we’re there to hear her and Gene again sing “Life is Just a Bowl of Cherries.”

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 5

OPINION/TED RALL

OBAMA DOESN’T GET IT He doesn’t care about the economy

As a pundit, it’s my job to explain why politicians do what they do. Every now and then, however, a pol behaves so irrationally that I have to ask: What the hell is this guy thinking? That’s what President Barack Obama has me doing. Why isn’t he worried about unemployment? Americans vote their pocketbooks. No president has ever been re-elected with an unemployment rate over 7.2 percent. Right now, it’s 9.1 percent. Economists surveyed by USA Today predict that the jobless rate will be pretty much the same, 8.8 percent, at this time next year. Goldman Sachs is more pessimistic: 9.25 percent by the end of 2012—with a “meaningful downside risk” that it will be even worse. Polls indicate that economic insecurity, specifically high unemployment, has been the biggest issue on voters’ minds since Obama took office. Seventy-seven percent of Americans tell Gallup the economy is getting worse. That’s up from 62 percent a month ago. If Obama wants to get re-elected, he has to do something about jobs. But he hasn’t done squat so far. And his job approval rating, now at an all-time low of 39 percent, reflects that. I don’t like admitting this, but I’m mystified. Why isn’t Obama even trying to look like he cares about the one issue that could make or break his re-election chances? “Government doesn’t create jobs,” tweeted GOP candidate Herman Cain recently. “Businesses create jobs. Government needs to get out the way.” Obama and his fellow fake Democrats never challenge this right-wing framing. Maybe they believe it. “The White House

6 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

doesn’t create jobs,” Obama press secretary Jay Carney said Aug. 5. In the real world where flesh-and-blood American workers have been living since 2000, businesses haven’t created any jobs. Instead they’ve eliminated millions of them. And shipped millions more overseas. Those job-killing trends—eliminating workers, increased automation and globalization—won’t change soon. “Workers are getting more expensive while equipment is getting cheaper, and the combination is encouraging companies to spend on machines rather than people,” Catherine Rampell recently reported for The New York Times. There’s also a death-spiral effect. Alana Semuels of The Los Angeles Times sums it up: “Economists say the nation is stuck in a Catch-22 scenario: The economy won’t improve until businesses hire, but many won’t hire without consumer demand, which is weak because of the current state of the job market and concerns about the future.” On the other hand, government can and does create jobs. Indirectly it creates the veneer of law and order that permits commerce. Government can also employ people directly. FDR orchestrated the direct hiring of 9 million Americans as government employees for the WPA and other programs. The federal government even hired writers and artists. Adjusted for population growth, that’s the same as 22 million people today. Obama could have done something like that in early 2009. As you read this, Obama is off to Martha’s Vineyard, hanging out with millionaires. Really—what’s going on? Can Obama really be that stupid? Can anyone?

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 7

CITYDESK/NEWS

Of the 20,000 students returning to class at Boise State—which prides itself as having a large number of nontraditional students— it’s quite possible that a 31-year-old Boise woman is the most atypical. Start with the fact that she’s a single mother of three. Then consider that she’s an eighth-grade drop-out, who did not complete her GED until 2003, after having all of her children. Today she’s a year away from a bachelor’s degree in accounting and finance, and she’s already applying to law schools. What makes her truly nontraditional is how she pays for her tuition, books, food and the rest of her expenses—by taking her clothes off in front of strangers. Camy (who asked that we not use her last name) works at a Boise bikini bar with as many as 70 other female dancers, many of them students. “It helps pay the bills, and we have a flexible schedule,” said Camy. “As long as you work at least seven hours, you can go home when you want. That’s why there are so many dancers who are students.” Camy said she works one night a week as a dancer and that pays the month’s bills. In addition to raising three girls (she has full custody), her college tuition is more than $2,000 this fall, with books costing $600$1,000 per semester. Camy said she didn’t always want to be a lawyer, or a dancer, for that matter. In fact, she simply couldn’t pay her rent when she first walked into an Oregon strip joint in 2001, asking for a job. She started dancing in Boise in 2005 and shortly after that registered for courses at Treasure Valley Community College. This fall, she is taking 20 credit hours at Boise State, and she is on schedule to graduate in the summer of 2012. “Right after graduation, I’ll take the Certified Public Accountant exam, hopefully get an accounting job, and if all goes as planned, I’ll start law school in the spring of 2013,” she said. Camy admits that her workplace is anything but ordinary. “Honestly, you get 30 girls in one spot, and there’s going to be a lot of drama,” she said. “The girls are quite competitive. Some of them make serious money.” Camy said she depends on her “radar” to keep her out of any trouble. “Within the first couple of minutes, I can tell if a guy is going to be a problem,” she said. It helps that her boyfriend of five years is never more than several feet away, working security. Justin, who also didn’t want us to use his last name, said watching his girlfriend dance in front of other men is “just a job.” “I know it’s getting us to where we want to be,” he said. Justin is also heading back to school this fall, taking courses in finance at the College of Western Idaho. “But for now, we’re going to do this until we have, let’s say, real careers.” Camy and Justin talk about marriage often, with hopes to tie the knot in four years, “after law school.” “I want to do this for another year,” said Camy. “I’ll stop dancing when I graduate from Boise State. Then, hopefully, I’m off to law school.” —George Prentice

8 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

NEWS GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

APPEARING BEFORE THE BAR: A NON-TRADITIONAL STUDENT TACKLES TUITION IN A NON-TRADITIONAL WAY

SUPPLIES AND DEMAND The high cost of being a student and teacher GEORGE PRENTICE A 2011 back-to-school quiz: According to the National Retail Foundation, families with children in grades K-12 will spend more than $600 on apparel and school supplies this year. But facing tighter budgets or worse—unemployment— what are parents to do? A. shop smarter B. shop less C. ask for help D. all of the above The answer requires some economics and a bit of sociology. While Idaho’s school districts consider budgets in the tens of millions of dollars, families face a more basic challenge: whether to buy a new pair of sneakers or backpack, or simply do without for another year. Many of those families were among the more than 5,000 people who walked through the doors of the Garden City Walmart on Aug. 13. “We see a steady stream the two weeks before the start of school,” said Lori Speakman, store manager. “We actually have the lists from all the school districts, with the details of all the required supplies. The parents grab the lists as soon as they walk in.” Surrounded by Hello Kitty backpacks, Transformers folders and Selena Gomez notebooks, Stacey Wright and her 9-year-old daughter Elle studied an elementary school supply list, while toddler Rafe looked on, comfortably perched in the seat of a shopping cart. “We’re taking care of the basics,” said Wright, already filling the cart with red pens, paper and colorful folders. “I picked out the folders with puppies on the cover,” said Elle, who will be walking into Mrs. Wilson’s fourth-grade class at Shadow Hills Elementary on Wednesday Aug. 24. “I’m excited.” One aisle over, Boise State sophomore nursing student Chelsey Snider grabbed an armful of spiral notebooks. “I need a lot of these, plus a binder and some folders,“ said Snider. “I’m on a budget, about $30.” A 20-cent spiral notebook or 97-cent folder are on the low-end of most shopping lists. But add Crayolas, glue sticks, Sharpies, jump drives, hand sanitizer, a backpack and a new pair of sneakers and you’re talking serious money. Calculators, in particular, add quite a bit to the total.

Stacey Wright checks the Boise 4th grade school supply list as 9-year-old Elle and toddler Rafe look on.

“These are definitely not the calculators that you would have seen 10 years ago,” said Speakman. “Some of these are for physics and engineering.” She pointed to a stack of calculators, priced $100 or more. Less than a mile away from Walmart, two of the pricey calculators sat on a nearempty table in a back room of the Salvation Army’s Boise office. “These are so expensive,” said Amber Young of the Salvation Army, pointing to the calculators. “We have to wait for a specific request before we give one of these out.” Young, the Salvation Army’s social services coordinator, was coordinating an annual distribution of school supplies to the region’s underprivileged, whose numbers continue to swell in the shadow of a failing economy. “A number of these people have never been through our front door before,” she said. The tiny Salvation Army State Street lobby was packed, shoulder-to-shoulder, with parents and anxious children. The clamor for supplies was so intense, a volunteer had to command everyone’s attention with a shrill whistle. “Please, people, please,” a volunteer shouted. “We need you to keep it down, so we can try to help everyone.” “We’re anticipating at least 900 people will ask us for school supplies,” said Young. When asked how many families they hope to support, Young took a long breath. “I think we have enough for about 500. A lot of people showed up so early because they knew we could run out.” Pat St. Tourangeau has seen too many students show up on the first day of school without supplies, and said this year will be no exception—maybe a little worse. In 27 years as an educator, she said, she always tries to have some extra supplies on hand. St. Tourangeau taught for 20 years in the

northern Idaho town of Kamiah before moving to Boise with her husband Warren (a teacher at Centennial High School) and son Mark. On Sept. 24 she’ll begin her fifth year as the Boise High School librarian. “We have a large number of E.L.L. students here. That’s our English Language Learners,” said St. Tourangeau, referring to the school’s growing refugee population. “When I shop for my son, I usually pick up a couple extra notebooks for the E.L.L. students.” St. Tourangeau said there was a time when Idaho Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna distributed so-called “purchase” cards to teachers to help supplement supplies. “I think that’s how he won some loyalty from teachers,” she said. “But that’s gone now.” In fact, scaled back state education budgets have had a dramatic impact on St. Tourangeau: There is zero budget for the library. “This will be the second year without any new library books,” said St. Tourangeau. As a result, St. Tourangeau’s out-of-pocket expenses are constant. She regularly visits the Assistance League of Boise’s Thrift Shop. “I pick up books all the time,” she said. A slightly used paperback costs about $1.50 while a hard cover book could run $3-$4. “I’m always looking for books that our students use a lot and fall apart,” she said. “I stopped by the Assistance League a couple of weeks ago and bought some books for $25. I’m not going to get reimbursed for that.” St. Tourangeau said all of her colleagues make the same sacrifice. “So many of the kids don’t have the basics, like pens and notebooks,” she said. And if a stranger were to put $100 in her hands tomorrow, she said she would head straight for Rediscovered Books to buy some more titles for the school library. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NEWS GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

Hours:

We Offer Local

Monday - Saturday

Artists

10-8

Consignment

Sunday

Opportunities

11-6

While Gail May (foreground) Hy Kloc, Stephanie Astorquia (background left) and Judy Peavey-Derr (background right) were present at the Aug. 11 meeting, Mike Fitzgerald attended via phone.

HOME AWAY FROM HOME Where does GBAD board member Mike Fitzgerald live?

For All Your Tobacco Pipe Needs! Pipe Accessories Wood Pipes

Metal Pipes Glass Pipes

Tobacco Blends Organic Teas

apparel Local Art

www.bernenspipeshop.com 2232 W Main St Boise, Idaho 83702 208-297-7585

GEORGE PRENTICE The rumors started in July. Where was Greater Boise Auditorium District Board Member Mike Fitzgerald? He had already attended a few GBAD board meetings by phone, but on July 11, his physical absence was conspicuous, and by the Aug. 11 session, Fitzgerald had attended the majority of the year’s GBAD meetings via phone. “It’s not anything secret. Mike’s over in Eastern Idaho,” Pat Rice, general manager of Boise Centre told BW. “But you really have to bring that up with him.” BW attempted to contact Fitzgerald no fewer than six times regarding his absence before asking GBAD board Chairman Hy Kloc about the matter. “I heard that rumor,” said Kloc. “I asked Michael point blank, ‘Did you move to Idaho Falls?’ He told me he was on assignment for Johnny Carino’s.” Johnny Carino’s is an Italian restaurant. When asked why Fitzgerald had not responded to BW’s inquiries, Kloc said it was in Fitzgerald’s “best interest” to answer our questions. Fitzgerald called BW within an hour of our conversation with Kloc. “You need to understand this,” said Fitzgerald. “Right now, this [GBAD] board is complete mayhem. We have a couple of people on the board who will twist anything into what they want people to hear.” Fitzgerald was referring to board members Stephanie Astorquia and Judy Peavey-Derr, who have found themselves in the minority on most 2011 votes while Fitzgerald, Kloc and board member Gail WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

May have been in the majority. “Look, I was hired by an outfit out of Austin, Texas, to temporarily come to Idaho Falls and fix a restaurant for them,” said Fitzgerald. “Depending on how I do here, they may send me back to Boise. They may send me somewhere else, or they may simply thank me for my service.” Fitzgerald said that even though there was no definitive end-date to his stint in Idaho Falls, he sought legal counsel on the matter. After consulting with an attorney, Fitzgerald said that he was still technically a resident of the Greater Boise Auditorium District. He wouldn’t tell BW which attorney he consulted or whether the attorney had any formal relationship with the GBAD board. “It’s plain and simple. We’re still residents of the district,” said Fitzgerald, confirming that his wife had moved to Idaho Falls as well. “But we go back and forth to Boise.” BW learned that Kloc consulted an attorney with the Hawley Troxell law firm, which represents the GBAD board. “They said if three points were met, Mike was still considered a resident,” said Kloc. “No. 1, his car is still registered here. No. 2, he is still registered to vote here, and No. 3, he intends to move back here.” Fitzgerald was hired for his new job in March and sent to Eastern Idaho on July 1. “This is a 12-year-old restaurant that was underperforming,” said Fitzgerald. “I’m here to fix it. If they send me someplace else, we’ll see what happens.”

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 9

CITIZEN

AMY KOHLMEIER The legacy of Boise High School, student sit-ins and the family business GEORGE PRENTICE

Your husband, Gary, is also an educator. Is that how you met? We taught next door to each other. What brought you to Boise? Gary and I got our administrative certificates and started putting out feelers. We just fell in love with Boise. Gary became the principal of Saint Mary’s School. That was 20 years ago this month. And where does he work now? He is the principal of Eagle Elementary School of the Arts, a magnet elementary school. Education has become a family business. I have a son who is an English teacher at Mountain View High School, and another son who is going to be a senior at Boise State, so he’ll begin student-teaching this year. I also have a daughter who is going to be an engineer. I’m taking her to Wellesley College to begin her freshman year. Additionally, I have

10 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Amy Kohlmeier has a bit of coal miners’ blood running through her veins; both sides of her family worked the mines in Price, Utah. But her bloodlines also include education. Kohlmeier’s grandmother taught first grade to immigrant children living in Utah’s coal camps— Greek, Italian, Japanese and Slovenian. “I took such inspiration from her,” Kohlmeier said. “She was completely dedicated.” On Wednesday, Aug. 24, Kohlmeier begins a new school year as principal of Boise High School. Her challenge follows eight years as principal at Fairmount Junior High School and 12 years as a faculty member at several schools.

two stepchildren, a stepdaughter in Texas and a stepson here in Idaho. Given that your sons are now teachers, your family dinners must be pretty interesting. Oh my gosh. We have to be careful not to alienate people. Boise High is unique in that it draws from an affluent population in Boise’s North End but it also includes a number of students who live in the shadows of poverty. Someone gave me a book that quoted Alexander Moses [Idaho governor from 1915-1919] at the dedication of this school in 1903. He was mayor of Boise at the time. He said something to the effect that Boise High will be a temple of learning for the children of the rich and the poor. How amazing that he said that in 1903, and so much of that holds true right now. This past school year, we saw a number of Idahoans voice their concerns about wholesale changes to our public education system. Some teachers picketed. Some students walked out of class. But most educators struggled to find an appropriate balance of speaking up without compromising their jobs. It was a fascinating thing to be in the middle of. I know at Fairmount, when we started to hear rumors of walkouts, I decided to be proactive. The day before the walkout, I explained to the students what civil disobedience truly was, as envisioned by Thoreau. I said, “You express your discontent, but you’re willing to take the consequences.” I talked about Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr., and I said, “OK, guys. If you’re going to do this, you have to understand the consequence.

There’s going to be a major disciplinary violation.” We had a small sit-in group and they took the consequence. I went out and coached them about being quiet, and they were great. Some people might be averse to that and think we should haul them back into class. But in reality, I think the students learned a valuable lesson about making your voice heard and taking the consequences. I would be remiss if I didn’t ask you about the so-called Luna laws. They create challenges for us. What I’m seeing is that a couple of things are going to collide pretty quickly. Idaho has signed on to what are called “common core of state standards,” which, in my preliminary review, is going to change the way all teachers instruct and the way all kids are assessed. I’m just seeing a disconnect between implementing those standards while we’re facing requirements of online courses and having fewer teachers. I don’t see how those things are going to work in concert with each other. When school is in session, how early does you day begin and how late can it possibly go? In a high school, it will be quite early. I will be here at 7 in the morning and sometimes get home at 11 at night. Long, long days. Is there optimism every September? Always. The beginning of my year is not in January, it’s the first day of school.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 11

BY THE NUMBERS

AVERAGE MONEY SPENT PER STUDENT

HOW THE TREASURE VALLEY’S SCHOOL DISTRICTS ADD UP DEANNA DARR

R

ecently nonprofit investigative journalism group ProPublica

released an impressive set of searchable data that compares school

NATIONAL $10,849

STATEWIDE $6,300

BOISE $8,100

CALDWELL $5,266

MERIDIAN $4,529

KUNA $5,146 (2009-2010)

districts across the country, looking

NAMPA $8,632

at things like budget, ethnic makeup

(GENERAL FUND PLUS LEVY)

and the opportunities for students to take advanced classes. Using that data, BW decided to show how the Treasure Valley’s school districts compare not only on a national level but to each other. To break the comparison down further, we highlighted the traditional high schools in each district. For further comparison, including a look at individual schools within some of the state’s largest school districts, visit propublica.org and click on “Tools and Data.”

NATIONAL 18%

STATEWIDE 14%

BOISE 32%

CALDWELL 6%

KUNA 6%

MERIDIAN 16%

NAMPA 14%

PERCENT OF STUDENTS WHO TAKE AT LEAST ONE AP COURSE

PERCENT OF STUDENTS WHO TAKE CHEMISTRY NATIONAL 18%

PERCENT OF STUDENTS WHO GET FREE/ REDUCED-PRICE LUNCH

NATIONAL 45%

12 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

STATEWIDE 11%

STATEWIDE 39%

BOISE 16%

BOISE 33%

CALDWELL 10%

CALDWELL 69%

KUNA 12%

KUNA 33%

MERIDIAN 11%

MERIDIAN 23%

NAMPA 8%

NAMPA 53%

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

PERCENT OF STUDENTS WHO ARE IN GIFTED AND TALENTED PROGRAMS

PERCENT OF STUDENTS WHO TAKE ADVANCED MATH CLASSES

NATIONAL NATIONAL

STATEWIDE

15%

BOISE

12%

CALDWELL

15%

8%

STATEWIDE

BOISE

CALDWELL

MERIDIAN

KUNA

9%

NAMPA

14%

KUNA

5% MERIDIAN

NAMPA

1%

2%

3%

4%

5%

6%

7%

8%

9%

10%

PERCENT OF STUDENTS WHO TAKE PHYSICS

0% NATIONAL

1%

2%

3%

STATE AND MERIDIAN

18%

1% 15%

4%

3%

8%

9%

10%

KUNA AND NAMPA

BLACK 1% 1%

HISPANIC

2% 9%

1%

WHITE

1% 30%

55% 79%

82%

49%

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

7%

ASIAN

1%

7%

9%

25%

NATIONAL

1%

1%

6%

CALDWELL

AMERICAN INDIAN

Percentages have been rounded and do not reflect students who declined to answer.

1% 2%

5%

BOISE

STUDENT ETHNIC BREAKDOWN 1% 6%

4%

91%

83%

64%

KUNA

MERIDIAN

NAMPA

44%

STATEWIDE

BOISE

CALDWELL

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 13

NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN IDAHO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BOISE

25,260 (8.9%)

CALDWELL

6,281 (2.2%)

KUNA

3,903 (1.3%)

MERIDIAN

35,100 (12.4%)

ESTIMATED 2011-2012

NAMPA

15,000 (5.3%)

STATEWIDE

281,431

TOTAL STUDENTS 2005-2006:

261,907

TOTAL STUDENTS 2010-2011:

281,431

PERCENT CHANGE:

+7.45%

NUMBER OF TEACHERS AT IDAHO PUBLIC SCHOOLS BOISE

1,600 (16.8%)

CALDWELL

340 (3.5%)

KUNA

268 (2.8%)

MERIDIAN

1,065 (11.2%)

NAMPA

850 (8.9%)

OTHER

5,368 (56.5%)

STATEWIDE

9,491

STUDENT ETHNIC BREAKDOWN

1%

4%

4%

4%

4%

4%

8%

(BY HIGH SCHOOL) AMERICAN INDIAN

14 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

ASIAN

BLACK

HISPANIC

WHITE

88%

84%

BOISE HIGH

BORAH

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

TEACHER TO STUDENT RATIO (APPROXIMATE)

BOISE

KUNA

1 TEACHER PER 16 STUDENTS

1 TEACHER PER 15 STUDENTS

NAMPA

CALDWELL

1 TEACHER PER 18 STUDENTS

1 TEACHER PER 18 STUDENTS

MERIDIAN

1 TEACHER PER 33 STUDENTS

1% 3% 9%

4%

4%

2%

5%

1% 3%

4% 8%

1%

1% 8%

83%

86%

82%

85%

CAPITAL

TIMBERLINE

CENTENNIAL

EAGLE HIGH

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 15

BOISE DISTRICT BOISE

BORAH

CAPITAL

TIMBERLINE

1,466

1,378

1,391

1,134

Percent of teachers with two or less years of experience

5%

8%

4%

5%

Students who take at least one AP course

41%

21%

31%

36%

23

25

24

23

Students who take advanced math

21%

11%

6%

24%

Students who get free/ reduced-price lunch

16%

32%

27%

15%

Total students

SCHOOL LEVIES When the Boise School Board of Trustees meets on Monday, Sept. 12, it will be asked to approve a $14 million, five-year levy to put before voters on March 13, 2012. An extra burden to homeowners was not its first option. Before deciding to move forward with the levy, trustees asked district administration to cut as much as possible from the 2012-2013 budget. But Coby Dennis, secondary school director for the Timberline and Borah school areas, told trustees that any additional cuts could have a dire impact on “student programs, class size and the ability to manage the district.” “We have reached the critical point where we cannot continue to cut the district’s budget and, at the same time, continue the same high level of quality educational programs expected by our students and our community,” said Dennis. The proposed $14 million levy could cost the average homeowner approximately $7 per month (based on an average home value of $165,000). “We wouldn’t be asking for this without a complete understanding of what’s at stake,” said district spokesman Dan Hollar. “These are not scare tactics. These are the realities in which we live.” Administrators, teachers and parents in the Meridian School District, Idaho’s largest, know those realities all too well. On May 17, approximately 16,000 voters went to the polls in Meridian with more than 9,000 rejecting a two-year, $18.5 million levy. Less than a week later, Meridian administrators huddled and decided not to take the issue back to the polls this year. “The taxpayers have spoken,” Meridian Superintendent Linda Clark told BW. “They expect us to live within the means of state funds, and that’s what we’re going to do. The Meridian School District will average $3,900* in spending per student for the upcoming school year. “That would make Meridian the lowestfunded school district in the United States among districts with over 25,000 in enrollment,” said Clark. School levies have had mixed results across the Treasure Valley this year. Levies were also rejected in Fruitland, Mountain Home and Payette. Supplemental levies passed in Emmett, Melba, Parma and Wilder.

2011-2012 BUDGET: $185 MILLION

Average number of AP classes offered

MERIDIAN DISTRICT

2011-2012 BUDGET: $159 MILLION

CENTENNIAL

EAGLE

MERIDIAN

MTN VIEW

ROCKY MTN

1,752

1,526

1,457

2,121

2,100

Percent of teachers with two or less years of experience

4%

4%

8%

2%

26%

Students who take at least one AP course

24%

22%

11%

14%

10%

12

12

10

11

10

Students who take advanced math

14%

17%

11%

15%

13%

Students who get free/ reduced-price lunch

17%

10%

23%

18%

15%

2% 2% 1% 9%

1% 1%

Total students

Average number of AP classes offered

1% 2%

1% 12%

2%

2% 7%

80%

81%

86%

MERIDIAN

MTN VIEW

ROCKY MTN

28%

68%

—George Prentice *The per-student expentiture listed in the graph accompanying this story cites the amount for the 2010-2011 school year.

16 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

COLUMBIA

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NAMPA DISTRICT

2011-2012 BUDGET: $106 MILLION

COLUMBIA

NAMPA

SKYVIEW

1,315

1,290

1,215

Percent of teachers with two or less years of experience

2%

15%

13%

Students who take at least one AP course

14%

10%

20%

7

7

9

3%

6%

6%

46%

58%

44%

Total students

Average number of AP classes offered Students who take advanced math Students who get free/ reduced-price lunch

KUNA DISTRICT

CALDWELL DISTRICT

KUNA 1,300

Percent of teachers with two or less years of experience

10%

Students who take at least one AP course

6%

Average number of AP classes offered

6

Total students

7%

Students who take at least one AP course

6%

Average number of AP classes offered

9%

Students who take advanced math

Students who get free/ reduced-price lunch

29%

Students who get free/ reduced-price lunch

1% 1%

1%

2%

1%

35%

24%

59%

71%

1,250

Percent of teachers with two or less years of experience

Students who take advanced math

1% 1%

2011-2012 BUDGET: $46 MILLION

2011-2012 BUDGET: $36.5 MILLION

Total students

CALDWELL

7

8%

62%

1% 50%

1% 1%

1% 7%

90% 46%

NAMPA WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

SKYVIEW

CALDWELL

KUNA

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 17

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events DYLAN JOHN S INC LAIR

It’s inconceivable that you would miss an outdoor screening of The Princess Bride.

WEDNESDAY AUG. 24 film MOVIES FOR A CAUSE: THE PRINCESS BRIDE The “hundredth monkey effect” was a theory about shared consciousness that posited once a certain threshold percentage of a population learns a behavior or idea, the remaining percentage becomes aware of it without having to learn it directly. It was popularized in the non-fiction of the 1970s and gained new legs from New Agers trying to push pseudo-scientific theories of collective consciousness. Though the phenomenon has been long-debunked scientifically, it often re-emerges culturally. People may not have seen or read Moby Dick, but they understand references to it and can identify quotes. The Princess Bride is another example. It’s eminently quotable, with memorable catchphrases (“As you wiiiiiiiiiish”) from nearly all of its characters and a plot that stands strong more than 20 years after its release. The film—ranked No. 46 on Bravo’s list of the top comedy films and in the Top 100 of the American Film Institute’s love stories—deserves to be seen. This week you can do just that with an outdoor screening under the stars at Idaho Botanical Garden as part of the Movies for a Cause series. 6 p.m. gates, movie at dusk; $3 members, $5 nonmembers. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Act like the cock of the walk at the Western Idaho Fair.

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY AUG. 24-28 fair WESTERN IDAHO FAIR While fairs tend to be characterized as good places to gain a lot of weight and see bands that have done the same, the Western Idaho Fair has plenty more going for it than that. Events include Wild West shows, skillet-tossing competitions, aquatic animal shows with stingrays and sea lions, and food contests for everything from barbecuing to milking goats. You can make scarecrows, golf with onions and do your yarndest to knit in 60 seconds or less. But, for those who also like the aging acts of yesteryear, there are performances by Kool and the Gang on Wednesday, Aug. 24, Craig Morgan on Thursday, Aug. 25, and Cheap Trick on Friday, Aug. 26. Wednesday, Aug. 24-Saturday, Aug. 27, Noon-11 p.m.; Sunday, Aug. 28, Noon-9 p.m.; $3$5. Expo Idaho Fairgrounds, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, idahofair.com.

18 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

SATURDAY AUG. 27 fundraiser EVENING ON THE RIVER Where would we be as a society without the almighty auction and dinner benefit? We’d have a lot fewer opportunities to buy raffle tickets and make silent auctions increasingly competitive with each drink, that’s for sure. But in the case of the Idaho Conservation League’s Evening on the River on Saturday, Aug. 27, we’d have less clean water and good air quality.

ICL will host its annual fundraiser to help support the group’s efforts to champion causes like keeping an eye on new natural gas drilling regulations, fighting a proposed gold mine in Atlanta and promoting programs that help increase the use of clean energy. This year, the event will include an all-local dinner catered by Tapia’s Gourmet with produce and meats from local producers, including Peaceful Belly Farm, Purple Sage Farms, Rice Family Farms and M & M Heath Farms. Even the hooch will be local with wine form Frenchman’s Gulch and Cinder wineries and beer from Grand Teton Brewing.

The event will kick off at 5:30 p.m. with music by Mary Beth Whitaker and Josh Bogle, followed by Boise band Shaken Not Stirred. A silent auction will run throughout the night, with a live auction capping off the evening and giving attendees the chance to snag vacation getaways, jewelry, outdoor adventures and more. It will be on the lawn of the Boise Unitarian Universalist Church in Garden City. Tickets cost $75 each, and are available by calling ICL or visiting idahorivers.org. 5:30-8:30 p.m., $75. Bridge Event Center, 6200 N. Garrett St., Garden City, 208-345-6933, ext. 16, or idahoconservation.org/eor. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FIND TAPATIO-FLAVORED CHIPS

Heather Masse joins the Prairie Home Companion gang in Eagle.

FRIDAY AUG. 26 fireside chat A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION LIVE Let them eat pancakes.

THURSDAY AUG. 25 flapjacks UNITED WAY FLAPJACK FEED United Way of Treasure Valley is giving mamas everywhere a breather at the fourth annual Flapjack Feed. It’s pulling out all the syrupy stops to ensure everyone in attendance is provided a hearty meal. The pancakes will be piled high alongside eggs, bacon, hash browns and fruit, and the coffee and juice will keep flowing until you say stop. Local celebrities, community leaders and business executives will tie on aprons and work over sizzling skillets for the all-you-can-eat breakfast of pancakes and fixings. Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter and first lady Lori Otter will even make an appearance in the all-star flapjack flipper lineup. All this cooking will kick off another campaign year for the United Way. The proceeds of the event will benefit the group’s Community Fund, which will be used to help out local organizations and those in need. Live music and local youth performances will accompany breakfast, along with educational presentations to inform attendees about poverty in Idaho. 7:30-10 a.m., $5 adults, $2 kids. The Grove, 208-3361070, unitedwaytv.org.

SATURDAYSUNDAY AUG. 27-28 farms COMMUNITY GARDEN TOUR If you’ve driven down For t Street in the Nor th End, you’ve likely noticed veggie vines snaking across

S U B M I T

an open field at the Boise High Downtown Teaching Farm. But not all community gardens are so easy to spot. Some are hidden in residential neighborhoods or rest on the dusty outskirts of town, which is why the Idaho Foodbank has teamed up with a dozen or so local community gardens and farms for a self-guided Community Garden Tour on Saturday, Aug. 27, and

Even if you didn’t grow up in a public radio household— listening to Click and Clack’s East Coast chortle on Car Talk or Terry Gross probe guests on Fresh Air—A Prairie Home Companion feels nostalgic. Garrison Keillor’s soothing, grandfatherly voice has been bringing slow-paced country charm to the airwaves since 1974, and more than 4 million listeners now hear the radio show across the United States and Europe. A Prairie Home Companion even made its big screen debut in 2006 with Robert Altman’s movie of the same name, which featured Woody Harrelson, Tommy Lee Jones and Lindsay Lohan. On Friday, Aug. 26, as a part of its 20-city Summer of Love tour, A Prairie Home Companion will hitch its wagons up at the Eagle River Pavilion. The show exploring the “everlasting theme of romantic love will be jam-packed with tender duets and ballads, poetry and stories.” Though it won’t be a live show taping, the performance will feature favorites like Guy Noir Private Eye, Dusty and Lefty, The Guy’s All-Star Shoe Band, sound-effects man Fred Newman, and the news from Lake Wobegon. Singer Heather Masse, from the Canadian trio The Wailin’ Jennys, will be the evening’s featured guest duet partner. 7 p.m., $39.50-$99.50. Eagle River Pavilion, 827 E. Riverside Drive, Eagle, 208-938-2933, prairiehome.publicradio.org.

Sunday, Aug. 28. “It’s a promotion for the gardens to get them a little publicity. Some of these [gardens] are small and hard to find. If you didn’t know where they were, you might end up driving right past them,” said Idaho Foodbank spokesman David Proctor. From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day, the public can visit spots like Trinity Community Garden, Peaceful Belly Farms, Landing Community Center Garden, Downtown Teaching Garden, Borah Community Garden, Common Ground Refugee Garden and Boise Urban Garden School. You can download a map for $5 on-

One glance into the Tapatio Hat Man’s effeminate sparkling blues, and I was hooked. With cheekbones like that, I thought, this sauce must be smoking hot. But after I splashed a few fiery glugs onto a breakfast taco, I fell hard. Now, I keep a bottle close by at all times, ready to dash a zip of not-too-vinegary, peppery heat onto anything ensconced in a tortilla. Though some might claim to prefer the detached stare of the ruddy-cheeked Cholula wench, I’m not fooled by her good girl, Virgen de Guadalupe-esque pose. Cholula is a taco-wrecker, which is why I nearly leapt out of my zapatos when I saw the new line of Tapatio-flavored Frito fritolay.com Lay products. Hat-man flavored Doritos, Fritos and Ruffles hit shelves in April, aimed at “consumers looking to add a zesty kick to their snacking.” After tearing into a bag of the Tapatio Ruffles, I can confirm the presence of said zesty kick. Unlike all those garish “flamin’ hot” chip varieties, Tapatio Ruffles keep it classy with a smoldering heat that spins and dips your taste buds like the Hat Man would romance a lady on the dance floor. Add in a sour spritz of limon and that’s a chip I’ll tip my sombrero to. —Tara Morgan

line at idahofoodbank.org. “We have hopes that this is going to turn into a regular deal and by doing that, we’ll encourage more people to start doing gardens and get involved in current gardens and help them grow,” said Proctor. “The economy isn’t going to turn around by next year. I think this is going to be a real important part of the community.” Saturday, Aug. 27-Sunday, Aug. 28, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., $5. Various locations. To download a map, visit idahofoodbank.org. For more information, call 208-5772683 or email communitygardens@idahofoodbank.org.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 19

8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY AUG. 24

THURSDAY AUG. 25

Festivals & Events

On Stage

ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Unwind mid-week with friends, live music and a cold beverage during this family friendly concert series. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove, Boise, downtownboise.org.

TAMING OF THE SHREW—It’s a classic battle of the sexes in the Bard’s comic take on love and marriage. 8 p.m. $18-$65. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare. org.

Food & Drink FOOD AND FILM—A monthly fundraiser featuring a threecourse meal followed by a movie and discussion. Proceeds from the night go toward the growth and preservation of local foods. Held in the cellar room. Visit treasurevalleyfoodcoalition.org for info and tickets. 7 p.m. $25, includes a three-course meal. Red Feather Lounge, 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-429-6340, justeatlocal.com/ redfeather.

On Stage CABARET—Smash hit about love, war and a changing society. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Art GLASS, WHERE’S THE ART?— Join Patrick Blythe for a discussion on glass art. Noon-1 p.m. FREE. Fusions Glass Studio, 347 S. Edgewood Lane, Ste. 120, Eagle, 208-938-1055, fusionsidaho.com.

Literature AUTHOR READING AND SIGNING: ALEXANDER MAKSIK— Meet the author of You Deserve Nothing, listen to him read and get your copy of his book signed. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

Talks & Lectures RIVER LECTURE: HABITAT—Local experts will discuss restoring and enhancing trout and waterfowl habitat on the Boise River. Bring something to eat or purchase a boxed lunch. Visit idahorivers.org for more info. Noon-1 p.m. FREE, ($15 for a boxed lunch). Washington Group Plaza, 720 Park Blvd., Boise.

Sports & Fitness TOUCH THE TURF CHALLENGE—You’ve got one minute to complete 10 challenges. Prizes and bragging rights for the winners. Must present Boise State ID to participate. 5-7 p.m. FREE. Bronco Stadium, Boise State, Boise, 208-426-1000, boisestate.edu.

Farmers Markets CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—5-8 p.m. Located on the corner of 12th and Dearborn streets next to the library, Caldwell.

Odds & Ends VINYL PRESERVATION SOCIETY OF IDAHO— Buy, sell, trade and listen to vinyl records with other analog musical enthusiasts. 7-10 p.m. FREE, Modern Hotel and Bar, 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-424-8244, vpsidaho. org.

20 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

ARTS/BOOK REVIEW YEAH NO TOTALLY SOARS LIKE A LEAD BALLOON In her debut book, Yeah No Totally, Lisa Wells writes, “I did too much time in the purgatory of Portland [Ore.] dating.” She describes it as “an insidious hell of self-important small-talk, where one must pretend to care about things like ‘the blogosphere’ and ‘So-and-so’s European tour,’ and generally behave as if the apocalypse is not nigh.” It then stands as a shining example of great irony that Yeah No Totally could fit into that description so easily. The book is a collection of short pieces that meander back and forth from memoir to nihilistic philosophical treatises on the likes of dating, sightings of low-grade celebrities and living as a Portlandian. It could have been authored by MTV’s Daria, a thundering “meh” left on a park bench for someone to find, if, you know, they’re into that sort of thing. Or whatever. What’s frustrating is how good the book could be. Wells’ musings employ a brutally dry humor and phrases like “the marginal Gatsby” or “the vague threat of success hanging in the smokefree air” sing from the page. Wells’ off-kilter minutiae is spot on, but it is disconnected and random. And it doesn’t help that so many of Wells’ observations are similar to Wells’ condemnations: self-important small talk and the minor existential crisis of affluent white people. It’s infuriating to read such beautiful nothing. For those who know the people, places and scenarios Wells scoffs at, Yeah No Totally may carry more weight. But even then, the narcissism is palpable. The content is the sort one expects to see furiously scribbled in a moleskin, not cleanly laid out and perfect-bound. Paul Constant of the Seattle Stranger wrote, “A few of the essays here are weak, half-formed ideas that could have used some serious editorial meddling and encouragement.” One he describes as “at best, a very good blog post ... But, man, listen to this lively description of nature,” he adds. In the opening to one of the pieces, Knell of the Worried Well, Wells lashes out at her own creative process. “I am seven days into myself at this artist’s house and tired of my mind—of steeping in my own snark and gloomy mood,” she writes. Readers are likely to reach the same conclusion before even getting to that part of the book. —Josh Gross WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT UNITED WAY FLAPJACK FEED—Support the United Way Community Fund and enjoy all of the pancakes you can eat during its fourth annual Flapjack Feed fundraiser. See Picks, Page 19. 7:30-10 a.m. $5. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, boisecentre. com.

Workshops & Classes

issues. 7:30-9 p.m. FREE. The Cole Marr Gallery/Coffee House, 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 134, Boise, 208-336-7630.

Farmers Markets MERIDIAN URBAN MARKET—5-9 p.m. Downtown Meridian on Idaho Avenue between Main and Second streets, Meridian, 208-331-3400.

SEXY CHAIR DANCE WORKSHOP—Absinthia will teach you how to dance with attitude using a chair as a prop. The feather boa and gloves you use are yours to take home. Pre-register at clients.mindbodyonline.com. 8-9 p.m. $30. Ophidia Dance and Art Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd, Ste. A, Garden City, 208409-2403, ophidiastudio.com.

Odds & Ends

Art

Animals & Pets

GLASS, WHERE’S THE ART?— See Wednesday. 7-8 p.m. FREE. Fusions Glass Studio, 347 S. Edgewood Lane, Ste. 120, Eagle, 208-938-1055, fusionsidaho.com.

SEE SPOT SPLASH—Bring your pooch to the pool for this off-leash swim party. Call 208608-7680 for more info. 3-8 p.m. FREE, donations accepted. Natatorium and Hydrotube, 1811 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208345-9270.

CHUCK WAGON EXPRESS— Head out for dinner and a scenic train ride. 7 p.m. $99 for two adults and two children. Thunder Mountain Line Scenic Train Rides, 120 Mill Road, Horseshoe Bend, 877-IDA-RAIL or 208-7934425, thundermountainline.com.

Talks & Lectures A SLICE OF LIFE IN EXILE—Listen to native New Yorker Nicole Salgado speak abut her experiences in exile due to immigration

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

FRIDAY AUG. 26 Festivals & Events FREE FOOD 2 GO—Learn what you need to know about being prepared in case of an emergency. Visit freefood2go.com for more info and to register. Noon-9 p.m. $5-$7.50. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-4242200 or box office 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com.

On Stage THE FOREIGNER—This awardwinning comedy written by Larry Shue tells the tale of visitors to a rural Georgia fishing lodge and what happens when people plot behind one another’s backs. 8:15 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 5012 Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION: GARRISON KEILLOR— The host of A Prairie Home Companion’s Summer Love Tour 2011. See Picks, Page 19. To win tickets from Boise Weekly, visit boiseweekly.com and click on “promo.” 7 p.m. $39.50$99.50. Eagle River Pavilion, 827 E. Riverside Drive, Eagle, 208-938-2933. TAMING OF THE SHREW—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $18-$65. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org. TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT— Catch the TMP dance company in action. 7:30 p.m. $15-$129. Sun Valley Pavilion, Sun Valley Resort, Sun Valley, sunvalley.com.

Concerts BRING IT TO THE STAGE!—Fourpart music competition in which local musicians or bands will be judged on their music, lyrics, vocal ability, stage presence and originality. Visit bringittothestage. com for registration and more info. 7 p.m. $5. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, thelinenbuilding.com.

Food & Drink

| EASY

| MEDIUM |

HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

BEER VS. WINE—Two Life’s Kitchen chefs battle it out and compete to win over your taste buds. One chef will prepare a six-course meal paired with beer and the other will prepare a dinner to be paired with wine. For reservations, call 208-331-0199. 6-9 p.m. $40. Life’s Kitchen, 1025 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-0199, lifeskitchen.org.

Citizen DIVERSITY DAY DEFINED— Head to the patio to celebrate the diversity of Boise State students on campus with refreshments, entertainment and info about student groups. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, union.boisestate.edu.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 21

8 DAYS OUT Farmers Markets

Art

ARRIVE AFTER FIVE—5-9 p.m. Located in the Gateway Shopping Center near Sports Authority, Meridian, meridianfarmersmarket. com/arriveafterfive.html.

ART IN THE COURTYARD—Local artists will display their artwork in the courtyard. Visit mccallartistconnection.org for more info. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Hotel McCall, 1101 N. Third St., McCall, 208-634-8105, hotelmccall.com.

Odds & Ends

SUMMER SHOWCASE—Dress up and get down with live music by Marcus Eaton, Kevin Kirk and Onomatopoeia and more during this fundraiser for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Visit kunaperformingartscenter.org for more info and to purchase tickets. 7 p.m. $15. Kuna Performing Arts Center, 637 E. Deer Flat Road, Kuna, 208-955-0200, kunaperformingartscenter.org.

TIME CAPSULE INSTALLATION—Boise State’s student government will install a time capsule for 2011 and open one from 1967. Refreshments will be served. Visit broncowelcome. boisestate.edu for more info. 3-4 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, union.boisestate.edu.

Sports & Fitness COUNTRY WESTERN DANCE— The first hour consists of lessons in the two-step, country swing and more. 7:30 p.m. $5-$7. Boise Valley Square and Round Dance Center, 6534 Diamond St., Boise, 208-342-0890, treasurevalleycwda.org.

Farmers Markets

YOUNG SIERRA PUB NIGHT— Bring a friend and join the younger members of the Sierra Club for a brew. 5:30-7 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub & Grill, 150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3432444, thepiperpub.com.

SUN VALLEY ICE SHOW—Featuring Tanith Belbin and Ben Agosto. 8:45 p.m. $54-$102. Sun Valley Resort, 1 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208-622-4111, sunvalley.com.

EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle.

Citizen

SATURDAY AUG. 27 Festivals & Events BOISE STATE FAIR—Celebrate the end of the first week of classes with games, food, prizes and rides. For more info, visit broncowelcome.boisestate.edu. 5-8 p.m. FREE for students with ID, $5 for nonstudents. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, 208-426INFO, union.boisestate.edu.

AN EVENING ON THE RIVER 2011—Idaho Conservation League’s annual fundraiser to help protect clean water, clean air, wilderness and quality of life. Enjoy locally produced food, wine and beer, live music, live and silent auctions and conservation displays. Visit idahoconservation.org/eor for more info. See Picks, Page 18. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $75, Bridge Event Center, 6200 N. Garrett St., Garden City, 208-345-6933, ext. 16

CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, Boise, 208-345-9287, capitalcitypublicmarket.com.

KUNA FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-noon. Bernard Fisher Memorial Park, Swan Falls Road and Avalon Street, Kuna. MERIDIAN FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. Located in the Crossroads shopping center at Eagle and Fairview Roads, Meridian, meridianfarmersmarket.com. MIDDLETON FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. Located in Roadside Park at the corner of Highway 44 and S. Middleton Road, Middleton, middletonfarmersmarket.webs.com. NAMPA FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. Located on Front Street and 14th Avenue South in Lloyd’s Square, Nampa, nampafarmersmarket.com.

FREE FOOD 2 GO—See Friday. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. $5-$7.50. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, qwestarenaidaho.com.

On Stage CABARET—See Wednesday. Tonight is the closing night for this production. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare. org. CHUCKLES COMEDY CABARET—Featuring someone new each week, from hot young newbies to established stand-up comedians. 8 p.m. $12. China Blue, 100 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-9515. THE FOREIGNER—See Friday. 8:15 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 5012 Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Food & Drink COMMUNITY GARDEN TOUR—Take a self-guided tour of the various community gardens in the valley. See Picks, Page 19. Visit idahofoodbank.org for more info and to download a map. Aug. 27-28. $5.

Skeleton Blues by Connor Coughlin was the 1st place winner in the 9th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

22 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT Animals & Pets

Odds & Ends

POOCH PARTY STROLL AND SPLASH—Bring the family and your dogs for a one-mile stroll around the park, and then unleash the beasts for a dip in the pool. Visit nampaparksandrecreation.org for more info. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $25 first dog, $10 each additional dog. Lakeview Park, Garrity Boulevard and 16th Avenue North, Nampa.

LAST CALL TRIVIA—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. THAT’S WHAT SHE SAID SUNDAYS—Free pool tournament and karaoke. 8 p.m. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-322-3430.

MONDAY AUG. 29

SUNDAY AUG. 28

On Stage

On Stage

STORY STORY NIGHT: FIRE— The theme for this month’s Story Story Night is Fire. Storytellers will entertain you with personal stories while you enjoy a slice from Pie Hole or a drink from the bar. Followed by an open story slam. 7 p.m. $5. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

COMEDY AT THE BALCONY— Try your stand-up routine out and/or come watch local and professional comedians every Sunday night. Sign up at 6:30 p.m. for your chance to win a $50 bar tab. Hosted by Mikey Pullman. This is Mental Wes’ farewell show. 8 p.m. FREE. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 226, Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com.

Art

TAMING OF THE SHREW—See Thursday. Tonight is the closing night for this production. 8 p.m. $18-$65. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

PLEIN AIR PAINTERS—Come watch local artists paint the landscape around Redfish Lake. More that 20 painters will be working in the area over the course of four days. Enjoy live music and wine tasting while checking out the paintings on display and for sale at the lodge from 1-5 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 1. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake, south of Stanley.

Food & Drink COMMUNITY GARDEN TOUR—See Saturday. $5. idahofoodbank.org.

Odds & Ends

Farmers Markets

BEER PONG—Play for prizes and bar tabs while drinking $5 pitchers. 9 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s Saloon, 5467 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-6699.

EAST END MARKET—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Bown Crossing, Bown Street, end of Parkcenter Boulevard, Boise.

BOISE OPEN MIC MONDAY— Musicians, poets and comedians are welcome to take their turn on stage. Featuring $2 well drinks, $2.25 PBR pints and $7.50 PBR pitchers. Hosted by Larry Buttel. 8 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny Irish Pub and Grill, 855 Broad St., Ste. 250, Boise, 208-343-5568, hapennybridgepub.com. TRIVIA NIGHT—The previous week’s losing team gets to pick the new theme every week. Hosted by Matt Bragg. 8 p.m. FREE. Pitchers and Pints, 1108 W. Front St., Boise, 208-9061355.

TUESDAY AUG. 30 Workshops & Classes GUIDED MEDITATION CLASS— Spend part of your lunch hour on Tuesdays developing inner peace and discover how to increase health, success and confidence through meditation with Jessica Hixson from River Valley Hypnotherapy. Noon-12:30 p.m. sliding scale. Muse Building, 1317 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-3423316, musebuilding.com/ muse_building/muse.html.

Art PLEIN AIR PAINTERS—See Monday. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake, south of Stanley.

Sports & Fitness BOISE HAWKS BASEBALL—vs. Vancouver Canadians. 6:45 p.m. $7-$10. Hawks Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com.

Odds & Ends

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Eastside Tavern, 610 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-345-3878. BOOZE CLUES—Trivia and prizes with the one and only E.J. Pettinger. 9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s, 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344. STAND-UP COMEDY NIGHT— Test out your routine on patrons during open mic night, hosted by Danny Amspacher. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208322-3430. LAST CALL TRIVIA—8 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Wild Wings, 2101 N. Cassia St., Ste. 2111, Nampa, 208-463-9453; 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. PABST BINGO NIGHT—Play bingo for PBR, swag and other random stuff found at secondhand stores. 7 p.m. FREE. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-384-9008. POKER—Play for fun and prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 23

8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY AUG. 31 Festivals & Events ALIVE AFTER FIVE—See Wednesday, Aug. 24. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove, Boise, downtownboise.org. SPIRIT OF BOISE BALLOON CLASSIC—Head to the park early to see more than 30 hot air balloons inflate and take to Boise’s skies during this four-day festival. Don’t forget your camera. 7:10 a.m. FREE. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Boulevard, Boise.

Kids & Teens MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP— Young designers, inventors and engineers can bring their creations to life with Legos. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib. org.

WESTERN IDAHO FAIR—Everything a fair should be, wrapped up in 10 days of family fun—fair food, livestock, roller coasters and live entertainment. Visit idahofair.com for more info. See Picks, Page 19. Continues daily through Aug. 28. $3-$5 gate admission. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, expoidaho.com.

REC/PLAY

On Stage COMEDY NIGHT—Mundek Clement-Stein headlines, followed by an open mic. Hosted by Danny Amspacher. 8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill and Brewery, 3019 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-6581533, sockeyebrew.com.

Art PLEIN AIR PAINTERS—See Monday. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake, south of Stanley.

Talks & Lectures RIVER LECTURE: GEOMORPHOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY—Bring a lunch and listen to an expert speak about how dam construction, irrigation and settlement have changed the shape of the river. Visit idahorivers.org for more info. Noon-1 p.m. FREE. Washington Group Plaza, 720 Park Blvd., Boise.

Sports & Fitness BOISE HAWKS BASEBALL— See Tuesday. 6:45 p.m. $7-$10. Hawks Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks. com.

Citizen BOISE BICYCLE PROJECT VOLUNTEER NIGHT—Volunteers help build and repair bicycles for those in need. 6-8 p.m. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., Boise, 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org.

Farmers Markets CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—5-8 p.m. FREE. Located on the corner of 12th and Dearborn streets next to the library, Caldwell.

The Duke finally makes a comeback—unfortunately, it is just as school is back in session.

BACK TO SCHOOL, BACK TO VIDEO GAMES Alice Cooper didn’t celebrate going back to school, but video-game publishers may be happy that students are trading the diversions of summer for the forced indoor labors of homework. After all, staying inside means more opportunities to crank up gaming rigs, which is a good thing for the lagging videogame industry. Market research company NPD Group showed that retail sales were down 10 percent from a year ago, and July was the worst month in video-game sales since October 2006. To reverse the trend, some top-tier games will have to not only hit the market but really wow gaming fans to inject sales life into the industry. Duke Nukem Forever, slated for an endof-August release, might start the upward move, but the videogame companies need more ammunition than old Duke-ster can carry by himself. Fortunately, he may not have to shoulder the burden alone. Nintendo has been hyping its 3DS, and while the handheld does not yet had a bevy of big titles available for it, expect to see some well-established favorites roll out in September. These are rehashes of previously released games, but any dyed-in-the-wool gamer will be happy to hear the names like Donkey Kong, Super Mario Brothers or The Legend of Zelda. Between network hacking woes and low console sales, Sony has had its share of problems over the past months. But maybe shooter fans can hop onboard for Resistance 3, slated to hit retailers on Tuesday, Sept. 6. And Capcom will be giving Sony some gaming love mid-month with an exclusive PS3 release of Resident Evil 4 HD on Tuesday, Sept. 20. It’s a remake of an old title but with upgraded visuals. It might be tempting, but it will face serious competition from Gears of War 3, releasing at the same time. This summer, weather patterns were all over the place but video-game sales were positively chilly. Maybe with school back in session and gamers spending more time indoors, the outlook for the gaming industry will be a little more sunny. —Michael Lafferty

24 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NEWS/NOISE TYLER K OHLHOFF

NOISE LAU R IE PEAR M AN

WORKIN’ ON THE FUTURE Trio of teens heads into senior year, new challenges

Welcome back, Starfucker/Pyramiddd/STRFKR/ whatever the hell you call yourselves now.

IT’S CRAZY CLOWN TIME

AMY ATKINS In the 1990s, bluesman John “Fat John” Nemeth couldn’t belly up for a beer after a gig in downtown Boise—he wasn’t even old enough to vote. But he not only sounded like an adult, he had to act like one. He had to be a professional. Boise pop-punk trio Workin’ On Fire has also found that professionalism can be as important a virtue for success as musicality. Workin’ On Fire is hot on the trail of a full-length release, set to come out in September. Zach Bonaminio, Peter Naguire and Austin Williamson-—all 17 years old—have been Jason Ringelstetter, co-owner of Tonic answering their phones.” together since 2009 and seen the fruits of a Room, said that the trio was full of energy— “People don’t like over-promotion,” Wilseven-days-a-week rehearsal schedule. WOF and Red Bull—but they came in to the studio liamson said somberly. has received a slew of media attention and so well-prepared. And they revealed another adult That kind of insight spilled over into far this summer, has played 24 shows. But the trait: They listened. how the band approached its teens have also learned from “I could tell they had been rehearsing,” said music—WOF played acousmistakes that even seasoned Ringelstetter. “And when I offered critiques, tic shows whenever possible, musicians still make. Visit reverbnation.com/ they responded to my advice really well.” which allowed the teens to “[Our fan base] is made workinonfire to hear Workin’ On Fire. Before his 21st birthday, Nemeth, too, had refine their sound. And before up of mostly teen girls,” said grown, and he is now an award-winning musithey even stepped into Tonic Williamson, WOF’s vocalist, cian. As Bonaminio, Naguire and Williamson Room Studios to record their guitarist and songwriter, at head into their last year of high school, they first “real” full-length (it is technically WOF’s whom drummer Bonaminio and bassist Nathird release), Williamson began taking a more still want to play music but have other future guire chuckled before Naguire said that early plans, too. Williamson wants to be a writer, writerly approach to songwriting. WOF’s on, they went about cultivating that base the Naguire is interested in psychology and Bona12-track release Metaphoria (due out midwrong way. minio is keeping his options open. And they September) will include six acoustic songs and “In our first couple months, we called and have some sage advice for other young people showcase the band’s development. called [our friends] and told them, ‘Hey, we thinking of starting a band. “Having a lot of acoustic gigs has matured have a show. Do you want to come?’ We were “Be a gigging band, get out and play and our sound,” Williamson said. “We couldn’t basically asking for money because they had start a band with your friends.” have done this two years ago.” to pay for tickets. Eventually people stopped

SCHOOL OF HARD ROCK For a kid, band doesn’t necessarily mean learning the tuba AMY ATKINS If your kid is showing an interest in music, your first instinct might be to pick up a violin or clarinet and enroll him or her in band or orchestra at school. But maybe your youngster wants to be more like Eddie Van Halen than Itzhak Perlman. Organizations like School of Rock and Boise Rock School can give your burgeoning musician the skills to really rock. Boise Rock School, which currently has an enrollment of about 150 students, works with young people ages 6 to 16. Kids need no prior experience and can learn to play guitar, bass, drums or keyboard or learn to sing. They also learn how to work together in a band and, equally important, how to perform.

what they want to do.” Ryan Peck, co-founder of Boise Rock Tough though it may be in Boise, BRS will School, explained why he feels it’s difficult for the local youth who want to play—and hear— continue to turn out rockers. The organization is in the process of a move to 14th and rock ’n’ roll. Idaho streets and an upgrade to “Rock School “Boise is kind of a rough town,” Peck 2.0,” which will include imsaid. “You have The Venue provements to the curriculum, and The Knitting Factory and For more information, as well as a continued effort to during the summer, you have visit boiserockschool.com or bring in talented local musioutdoor shows, but other eagle.schoolofrock.com. cians to teach classes, such as than that, it’s not as easy current instructors Daniel Kerr, for kids to see music. This Ned Evett, Thomas Paul and more. is more of a bar culture. The fact that our BRS will celebrate the move and enhancekids can’t go to places like VAC makes me ments in September with a block party, so scratch my head. [Kids] want to hear music check Boise Weekly for updates. and be exposed to people who are doing

No longer content with confusing the bejeezus out of people visually, filmmaker David Lynch is set to release his debut album, Crazy Clown Time, on Tuesday, Nov. 8. Good Day Today, an advance single from Crazy Clown Time posted on Pitchfork, is a heavily effected, auto-tuned electro-pop dance song that could just as easily pass as the work of an up-andcoming indie act rather than an aging cinematic trickster. Lynch wrote and performed most of the material himself, but there are guest vocals from Karen O of The Yeah Yeah Yeahs. As for old recordings, The Daily Beast is reporting that Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, Loretta Lynn, Tom Waits and others have filed to reclaim their 1978 recorded works from the record companies that own them. They’re able to do so thanks to the Copyright Act of 1976, which says that contracts on audio recordings may be terminated after 35 years. One catch: Artists must apply two years in advance. In related news, Rolling Stone is reporting that Victor Willis, original singer for the Village People, has also filed to regain copyright credit for his work in the band. However, the publishing companies that own the material aren’t giving it up without a fight. They’re arguing that Willis was not an artist they sponsored but an employee hired as a member of a concept band, meaning he has no claim to the material. Katy “I-kissed-a-girl-and-then-marriedRussell-Brand” Perry just followed in the footsteps of Michael “I-kissed-a-boy-andthen-married-Elvis’-daughter” Jackson when she became the second artist after Jacko ever to have five singles from one album hit No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100. Recordings that aren’t lucky enough to be in the hands of Katy Perry or the Copyright Act of 1976 include those previously housed in a Sony/PIAS Distribution warehouse in London. We say previously because rioters burned the warehouse to the ground on Aug. 9. The fire is estimated to have destroyed 25 million CDs, decimating the stock of many small labels. Exactly how many cover versions of London’s Burning were destroyed in the fire they inspired may never be known. In touring news, dirty-namers-in-chief, Starfucker, are returning to Boise for a show at Reef on Sunday, Sept. 4. According to their Facebook page, they let you and none of your friends in for free. Volunteer as a member of their street team and you get a ticket to the show. But only one person per city, so get in there quick. —Josh Gross

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 25

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE ER IK JAC OB S

GUIDE WEDNESDAY AUG. 24

THURSDAY AUG. 25

FRIDAY AUG. 26

WARSAW—With Ben Clapp. 9 p.m. $3. Grainey’s

ALIVE AFTER FIVE: THE DUKE ROBILLARD BAND—With Dan Costello. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove

CRAIG MORGAN—7:30 p.m. FREE with Fair admission. Western Idaho Fair

ANDREW CORTENS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

BLAZE AND KELLY—7 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

THE DEADLIGHT EFFECT—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid

BASS DRUM OF DEATH—With Art Fad. 8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage

SATURDAY AUG. 27

BRANDON PRITCHETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Reef

DOWNTOWN NAMPA NIGHTS: COME TOGETHER—5:30 p.m. FREE. Lloyd Square

THE BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY WEBER—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BOSS HAWG AND THE SHORT BUS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

THE BRIAN BATEMAN BLEND— With Reckless Abandon and Amelia Hyde. 8 p.m. $6. Knitting Factory

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE: HOOCHIE COOCHIE MEN—6:30 p.m. $7 members, $10 general. IBG

BRANDON PRITCHETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

CHEAP TRICK—7:30 p.m. FREE with Fair admission. Western Idaho Fair

EILEN JEWEL—2 p.m. FREE. Record Exchange

GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

EILEN JEWELL, THE EGYPTIAN, AUG. 27 Though Idaho native Eilen Jewell shares a name—and wispy blonde hair—with the ’90s singer-songwriter, that’s where the similarities end. Jewell blends Americana, country and jazz into sultry ditties that would be at home booming from a jukebox in honky tonk or crooned from atop a grand piano in a speakeasy. NPR called Jewell’s voice “sweet and clear … with a killer instinct lurking beneath the shiny surface.” Her latest album, Queen of the Minor Key, features upbeat numbers, like the horn-filled “Warning Signs,” alongside slow jawdroppers like the ballad, “Over Again.” With a twinge of nostalgic remorse and a dash of head-held-high pride, Jewell sings: “You carved my initials on your truck / Big bold letters on the grill / I think you said it proved your love / I wonder if they’re legible still.” Jewell returns to the Gem State on Saturday, Aug. 27, with two performances. —Tara Morgan 2 p.m., FREE, Record Exchange, 1105 W. Idaho St., 208344-8010. 8 p.m., $19 adv., $22 door, Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

26 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

HARD FALL HEARTS—With Poke. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux JESSICA FULGHUM—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

KEVIN KIRK—With Steve Eaton. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

KNFDM—With Army of the Universe and Human Factors Lab. 8 p.m. $20-$40. Knitting Factory

KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

NOAH KADRE—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

KOOL AND THE GANG—7:30 p.m. FREE with Fair admission. Western Idaho Fair MARES OF THRACE—With Uzala and Raid. 8 p.m. $5. VAC NICHE—With Violet. 9 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement PAUL TILLOTSON TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel SOUL HONEY—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

PAUL TILLOTSON TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel RICO WEISMAN AND DANNY BEAL—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill SUGARWALL—8:30 p.m. $5. Bouquet THURSDAY THUNDER: REDEYE EMPIRE—6 p.m. FREE. Edwards Stadium 22 Plaza WHITE BUFFALO—9 p.m. $5. Reef

FLOATER—With Tallboy. 8 p.m. $15-$30. Knitting Factory HILLFOLK NOIR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s PAUL TILLOTSON TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel REDEYE EMPIRE—10 p.m. $5. Reef RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid SALLY TIBBS AND KEVIN KIRK—With John Jones, Mike Seifrit and Jon Hyneman. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SICWITH SOUND AND THC—8 p.m. $5. Liquid

ACTUAL DEPICTION—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

EILEN JEWELL—See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $19 adv., $22 door. Egyptian Theatre ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill HYDE PARK ’TIL DARK—Featuring Equaleyes and Gift of Gab. 5 p.m. $7-$10. 13th Street Pub JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Vista PAUL TILLOTSON TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel ROCK THE MULTIVERSE—Featuring Heatesca, Couph Drop, Ballistik, Solid State, Planewalker and VJ Snicklefritz. 6 p.m. $10. VAC

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid SALLY TIBBS AND KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers TAJ WEEKES—10 p.m. $5. Reef WARSAW—With Ben Clapp. 9 p.m. $3. Grainey’s

SUNDAY AUG. 28

VOLBEAT—With Cold and Anchored. 7:30 p.m. $21-$30. Knitting Factory

MATT THE ELECTRICIAN—9 p.m. FREE. Reef

GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

OLD TIME JAM SESSION—With the Hokum Flyers. 6 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JAM NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

MONDAY AUG. 29

RIZING TIDE—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

RUSS PFEIFER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

STEADY RUSH—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BRIGHT ARCHER (A.K.A. JOHANNA KUNIN)—With Grandma Kelsey and Antlion. 8 p.m. $5. VAC BROCK BARTEL—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES— Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

DOUGLAS CAMERON—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

BLUES BROTHERS—Noon. $10, $8 wine club members, FREE kids 14 and younger. Ste. Chapelle

LARRY BUTTEL—7 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

EMMURE—With Born of Osiris, Motionless in White, Attila and Memphis May Fire. 6:30 p.m. $15 adv., $18 door. The Venue END OF ALL FLESH—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers HAMBONES ON THE BEACH—4 p.m. FREE. Sun Ray Cafe MUSIC FROM STANLEY: DOUGLAS CAMERON—4 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge SANITARIUM—With DJ Bones. 10 p.m. FREE. Liquid

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid REX MILLER—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO— 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TUESDAY AUG. 30

TERRI EBERLEIN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill UBER TUESDAY: SONS OF GUNS—With Hillfolk Noir, Neo Tundra Cowboy, Larkspur and Alex Richards. 7 p.m. FREE. VAC

WEDNESDAY AUG. 31 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: SWAGGER—With Central City Music Co. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove BEN BURDICK—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

LEON RUSSELL—8 p.m. $25$60. Knitting Factory MAC LETHAL—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef MC FRONTALOT—With Brandon Patton. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux REBECCA SCOTT—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub RICO WEISMAN AND KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadBown THE TRUCKSTOP TRIO—7 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper THE VAN PAPAEGHEM TRIO— 6 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadMeridian

JEFF MOLL AND GUESTS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny KEVIN KIRK—With Phil Garonzik and Wendi Phelps. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

M.C. FRONTALOT, NEUROLUX, AUG. 31 Rap often manifests itself as an ego-fueled celebration of violence, both physical and emotional. It can make hip-hop unapproachable for people who dig the beat but not the beatings. MC Frontalot flips that on its head. Credited as the originator of “nerdcore hip-hop,” Frontalot raps about old-school text-only video games like Zork, first-world problems like dead batteries in a GPS, and a dream he had in which he fathered a genius baby that penned editorials decrying his lack of skills as a father. And he does so over beats every bit as good as what you’d hear from more traditional rappers. From a philosophical stance, this approach might seem shallow—an erosion of the gravitas that is hip-hop—however, the commentary of Frontalot’s lyrics are anything but. His rhymes give a credible voice to a subculture, exactly as traditional hip-hop does. Frontalot is a soldier for all things Zelda and is selfaware enough to place that into a larger context. —Josh Gross With Brandon Patton. 8 p.m., $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

! E D I R FREE

Kids Eat Free At Smoky’s* Throughout the Entire Fair August 19–28

5HTWH 4VZJV^

)VPZL 2L[JO\T

,HNSL 4V\U[HPU/VTL

4LYPKPHU :HUK`

* Dine in only. Not good with any other offer. Kids 12 and under. 1 free child's meal with each paid adult meal.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 27

NEWS/ARTS ARTS/VISUAL

PROFS ON DISPLAY Jonathan Franzen has freedom to read at SVCA.

LINEN DISTRICT SCULPTURES; SVCA SPEAKERS If you’ve strolled past the metal fence stretching between the Linen Building and Big City Coffee, you’ve seen a rotating selection of eye-catching local art. These temporary installations, funded by Capital City Development Corporation, have gone a long way in adding artistic flair to the industrial area. Now The Linen District is seeking something more permanent. A panel has chosen Eileen Gay of Reno, Nev., Joshua Wiener of Boulder, Colo., and Brown and Cole of San Francisco to create proposals for a sculptural installation. The public is invited to vote on their favorite. Gay’s proposal involves installing two oversized “bookend” sculptures: “In honor of the district’s signature historic anchor of the American Linen Supply Company building, I propose creating a whimsically oversize antique style iron resting upright upon a freshly pressed, white stack of linens.” Wiener’s proposal is more abstract: “This sculpture is based on creativity being a light. I wanted to create a work of art that was a beacon for what is happening in the Linen Arts District.” Finally artist team Brown and Cole plan to “build a trio of whimsical bicycles that when ridden, activate and play mechanical instruments contained within the columns to which the bikes are attached.” You can view the proposals online at artsandhistory.cityofboise.org/blog. They will also be on display at The Modern Hotel from Wednesday, Aug. 24, to Monday, Aug. 29, and the Boise City Hall lobby from Tuesday, Aug. 30, through Tuesday, Sept. 6. For more information, contact city Public Arts Manager Karen Bubb at 208-433-5677 or email kbubb@cityofboise.org. The Sun Valley Center for the Arts recently announced the big-name speakers for their 2011–2012 lecture series. Author Jonathan Franzen, who penned the novels The Corrections and Freedom, will read on Sunday, Oct. 9. Newberry Medal-winner Lois Lowry, author of The Giver, will speak on Thursday, Nov. 3. Non-fiction writer Gretel Ehrlich will speak on Thursday, Jan. 5. Photojournalist James Balog will appear on Thursday, Jan. 19. Reza Aslan, author of No God But God: The Origins, Evolution and Future of Islam, will speak on Thursday, Feb. 23. And Prairie Home Companion host Garrison Keillor (see Picks, Page 19) will close out the season on Monday, March 5. Series tickets go on sale Thursday, Aug. 25, and are $115 for SVCA members, $170 for nonmembers. Individual tickets go on sale to members on Thursday, Sept. 1, and to nonmembers on Friday, Sept. 9. Prices range from $15 to $40. —Tara Morgan

28 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Members of Boise State’s art faculty put their creativity where their mouths are SHEREE WHITELEY College students are accustomed to their work being reviewed by professors. No matter the discipline, endless, coffee-infused hours are dedicated to crafting work that hopefully will win a student that oft-elusive sign of approval: the A. But beginning Friday, Sept. 2, it’s the work of the grade issuers that will be on display. Left: Cheryl Shurtleff-Young, Cat Hair Doll, cat hair, found objects, 2011 The Boise State Art Department will hold Right: Lupe Galvan, Abject Intimacies, conte and gesso on mylar, 2011 its biennial faculty art exhibition in two galleries on campus—in the Liberal Arts One veteran faculty member making a The faculty show also serves as a way for Building and the Hemingway Western Studunique contribution to the upcoming exhibistudents to see how the pros do it and for ies Center—through Friday, Oct. 21. The community members to see what’s going on at tion is Cheryl K. Shurtleff-Young, who has exhibition will feature the work of 25 art taught drawing and painting courses at the university. faculty members, thereby providing students Boise State since 1978. However, her work “Faculty shows are important because they and community members a look at the work on display at the exhibition won’t have anygive the larger community a window into the of the talented people helping to shape the thing to do with canvas, paints or pencils. nature of research and creative activity being minds of young artists. pursued in the university,” Mandell explained. Small figures made entirely of cat hair that “Interest in visual arts is booming at Boise she has collected from grooming her beloved “I hope that the breadth of inquiry, united by State right now,” said Kirsten Furlong, Visual pets will fill shadow boxes and greet curious Arts Center gallery director. “The [Boise State] an overriding desire to communicate through visual form, will be evident. More importantly, art lovers. In a similar—yet very different— art department is the biggest in the state, and fashion, assistant printmaking professor Jill perhaps, the exhibition functions as a sort one of the biggest departments at BSU. People Fitterer will show off a 30-foot-long wall of ‘teaching by example’ for the students in are often surprised by that.” installation made chiefly of her own locks. the Department of Art, wherein students are Boise’s art scene is ever-changing. LongThe installation is one piece that Furlong is shown firsthand the level of craft and intelstanding galleries shutter their doors, new anxious to see. spaces pop up in often-surprising locations, lectual engagement necessary to operate at a “Sure, it may be kind of odd that we downtown alleyways get artistic makeovers. professional level.” Chad Erpelding is also new to the campus have two pieces made of hair,” Furlong said But no matter how the landscape changes, laughing. “But the faculty all do interesting, art scene and hopes that the faculty show curiosity about art is ever-present in the great work.” will broaden the community’s awareness of City of Trees. It’s especially evident at the Creative pieces add to an artistic commumulti-media artwork in particular. While city’s university. nity that Iowa-born, recent Texas-transplant Erpelding primarily teaches painting and With approximately 900 art majors endrawing, his piece for the faculty exhibit in- Erpelding calls “active and busy.” Having rolled at Boise State and 150 new art students already witnessed a great deal of talent comcorporates video that who attended orientaing from the students at Boise State during he shot while doing a tion over the sumhis first year as a professor, Erpelding said residency in France. mer, art department The opening reception for the 2011 Biennial Art Department Faculty Exhibition is Friday, he’d love to see more opportunities for art“I hope that the professors have their Sept. 2, 6-8 p.m., at the Liberal Arts Building ists in Boise. show can let us all hands full, which may and the Hemingway Western Studies “I’d love to see more spaces pop up in the know that to be a leave a limited amount Center at Boise State. future and provide a larger slice of what’s painter, you’re not of time for new work The reception is free and open to the public. For more information, call 208-426-3994. always only going to be happening in the world and in Boise,” he of their own—or to see said. “I hope that the upcoming exhibiworking with paint,” the fresh ideas of their tion shows the depth of interest among the Erpelding said. peers. Busy artist/teachfaculty, and the vibrancy that’s part of the Mixing media and ers can see what their [arts] program.” presenting ideas in contemporary ways will be counterparts are creating at the faculty show. Whether a student, art professor, curious art “I am very much looking forward to seeing a prevalent theme at the exhibition. enthusiast or just curious, the biennial faculty “There’s an ongoing shift that I think the newest work from my fellow faculty memexhibition is not only a chance to see the people will notice this year,” Furlong said. “In bers,” said Ryan Mandell, an assistant profescreative output of Boise State’s art faculty but past years, there were more traditional pieces, sor who works in the sculpture area at Boise an opportunity to see how they are an integral State and became a Boise State faculty member and now there are more video pieces, instalpart of Boise’s art scene. lations—more contemporary work. New and in 2010. “It’s very easy to get caught up in “Ultimately, it’s really just a great contemreturning faculty are doing new things, and your own studio practice and the work of porary art show,” Furlong said. “It’s nice just your students, to the point where you forget to there’s also a shift in student work, with the to come see what’s happening.” exposure to new media.” make time to visit the studios of your peers.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

THE BIG SCREEN/SCREEN

SUMMER’S WINNERS AND LOSERS A breakdown of the season’s hottest and coldest GEORGE PRENTICE Late August has its traditions: saying goodbye to baseball, shaved ice and sunscreen and saying hello to Bronco gear, sweaters and school backpacks. For moviegoers, August is all about transition. Most of the summer blockbusters have come and gone, and September clears the deck for what is traditionally Hollywood’s serious season. Most Oscar-worthy films are neatly packed into the calendar’s fourth quarter. But before we put away the summer of 2011, let’s examine a not-so-great and not-so-terrible season at the movies. The past is always present: Some of the most critically and commercially successful efforts this summer took us back in time. It was a surprise to learn that World War II was won single-handedly by Captain America. What a shock to discover that the Cuban Missile Crisis was averted by none other than the X Men. And it turns out that Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin kept a pretty big secret when they encountered Transformers while moonwalking in 1969. The most fun I had at the movies this summer was watching old-school Super 8, still my favorite film of the year thus far. And Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris turned out to be his most successful film in decades by having his hero—thank goodness it wasn’t him this time—step through a time portal, waltzing through the City of Lights with Cole Porter, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Pablo Picasso and Gertrude Stein. It was a total delight from a filmmaker whom I had given up on years ago.

Some of summertime’s silver-screen sizzlers and snoozers: Mightnight in Paris (top) and Friends with Benefits (bottom).

Pixar isn’t perfect: Cars wasn’t all that interesting, so it wasn’t surprising that no one was clamoring to see Cars 2. In the worstreviewed and lowest-grossing Pixar flick in decades, this clunker was instantly forgettable. What a lemon. A first-rate disappearing act: Harry Potter said goodbye with class in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2. The production values in the final installment of this modern classic were only surpassed by fine acting from these kids who grew up before our eyes. Raunch is still king (and sometimes queen): R-rated comedies reigned supreme with The Hangover Part II, Bad Teacher and Horrible Bosses making us cringe and laugh at the same time. But Bridesmaids was the best of the bunch. It was a hoot and a sequel can’t come soon enough. Not-so-super: Captain America wasn’t

half-bad. X Men: First Class was pretty entertaining if you could ignore January Jones’ acting. The other guys in capes were pretty lame—Green Lantern and Thor were laughably bad. And memo to Ryan Reynolds: take a break and stop making so many movies. Kid friendly? Really?: Kung Fu Panda 2, Judy Moody, Mr. Popper’s Penguins, Monte Carlo, The Smurfs, Glee Live. Ugh. In no particular order, I thought the best films of the summer of 2011 were Buck, Harry Potter, The Help, Midnight in Paris, Super 8, The Tree of Life and X Men: First Class. I thought the worst were those that came nowhere near expectations: Cowboys and Aliens, Friends With Benefits, Larry Crowne, Pirates of the Caribbean and Transformers. Overall grade for Summer 2011: C plus

EXTRA/SCREEN IT HAS BEEN A LONG TIME COMING FOR THE SHORTS In the Aug. 17 issue of Boise Weekly, we suggested that neither aspiring nor seasoned filmmakers need think that they must follow their passion to Hollywood. Resources—including grants, organizations like Idaho Media Professionals, and a community of like-minded movie makers—are available for those who would like to live and work in the Gem State. Add one more to the list: the Treasure Valley Film Series, which will run on three Thursdays in December at the Overland Park Cinemas. Local filmmaker Jeffrey Agosta decided to organize this series as a way for local filmmakers to get their short films seen. Planning is still in the early stages, but Agosta has outlined some of the specifics of the series. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Films will ideally be less than 20 minutes long. Not all films submitted will be screened due to time constraints. A small committee will determine which films are screened. There are no genre/rating restrictions, but the plan is to set aside one night for family-friendly films and one for more adult-appropriate films. Films do not have to have been made recently but preference will be given to those without prior public screening. And the best part for the younger filmmakers in our community is that one night of the series will be dedicated to screening short films made by junior high and high school students. If you are interested in submitting your film for consideration, e-mail Agosta at agosjeff@yahoo.com for more information. —Amy Atkins

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 29

SCREEN/LISTINGS Special Screenings CABLE ONE MOVIE NIGHT— Bring your lawn chairs, snacks, blankets and the entire family to watch a flick on an inflatable screen in the park every Friday night at dusk this summer. The movie this week is Megamind, rated PG. Friday, Aug. 26, FREE, Settlers Park, corner of Meridian and Ustick roads, Meridian, meridiancity.org/movienight. GOD BLESS OZZY OSBOURNE—Ozzy’s son Jack got the inside scoop and made a film about his dad’s life as a rock legend. The movie includes interviews with the Osbourne family, Paul McCartney and Tommy Lee, in addition to never-beforeseen Black Sabbath footage. Wednesday, Aug. 24, 7:30 p.m. $12.20. Edwards Boise Stadium 22 and IMAX, 7701 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-377-9603, regmovies.com. MOVIES FOR A CAUSE: THE PRINCESS BRIDE—Bring a picnic and a blanket and watch a movie under the stars. Gates open at 6 p.m. and the movie begins at dusk. Food and drink vendors will dish up food and snacks. Proceeds benefit the Holland and Hart Foundation. See Picks, Page 19. Wednesday, Aug. 24, 6 p.m. $3 members, $5 nonmembers. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

For movie times, visit boiseweekly. com or scan this QR code.

SCREEN/NEW DVD RELEASE

WIN WIN Mike Flaherty (Paul Giamatti) is stuck in a rut. He is a volunteer wrestling coach and a failing lawyer. When he happens upon an opportunity to make a little extra money off a client, he takes advantage but finds he has to put the demented man’s grandson (Alex Shaffer) on his wrestling team. When the kid turns out to be a star athlete, Mike thinks he has struck gold, receiving double pay and taking his team to the state wrestling match. However, even though he thinks no one could be the wiser, his scheme rips apart at the seams when everyone closest to him finds out he’s a double-crosser. Also starring Amy Ryan, Bobby Cannavale and Stephen Vigman, Win Win is a story about desperate times not requiring such desperate measures.

POM WONDERFUL PRESENTS: THE GREATEST MOVIE EVER SOLD We complain about pop-up ads and flashing billboards. We groan when our cell phones get telemarketing texts or junk e-mail, but these aren’t the only advertisements that are in our faces every day. Documentary filmmaker Morgan Spurlock uncovered the process of product placement in our everyday lives and how advertisement agencies are able to make it look effortless. By recruiting big brands to sponsor the spoof movie turned documentary, Spurlock found out how they keep consumers interested in their products. This behindthe-scenes look asks the viewer just how well that method of advertising works. —Lizzy Duffy

SCREEN/INTERNET MOBILE PEACE OF MIND: PHONEGUARD You are terrified. Your teenager just got his or her driver’s license. You need to know about PhoneGaurd Drive Safe, a free app for Android and Blackberry. The technology is complex, but the result is simple. The app disables the phone’s texting and keyboard functions when the phone is in a car moving faster than 10 mph. A parent can load the app onto a phone and set a password. The app is always on and it pings GPS ever y few seconds. If the owner of the phone (your kid) tries to text, the app sends a friendly reminder that the car is in motion. But say your teen is a passenger in the car and wants to text—the app can be temporarily disabled remotely. PhoneGuard was developed through a partnership with the Remember Alex Brown

30 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Texting while driving is responsible for more than 16,000 deaths.

Foundation, in honor of a young girl who lost her life texting while driving. Download it for free from phoneguard.com. —George Prentice WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FOOD/NEWS YEAR OF IDAHO FOOD

BYE BYE MYSTERY MEAT Farm to School program brings local produce to cafeterias TARA MORGAN low-fat dairy. ties of produce, the district contracted with If you grab a plastic tray and shuffle through But Gooding isn’t an anomaly. According to food distributor Grasmick Produce. an Idaho school lunch line this fall, things will Martin, the Gem State has some of the strictest “With having 48 sites, we’re not able to relook a bit different than you might remember. nutritional standards in ally coordinate nor are the farmers really able In addition to whole grain pasta and brown the country. to provide that tight level of service that they rice, you’re also likely to find a Healthy “Idaho has stronger could deliver to our back doors,” said Bodnar. Choices salad bar and bright posters advertisnutrition standards Local farmer Josie Erskine of Peaceful ing “incredible edible Idaho” grapes or honey. than the rest of the Belly Farms, a 70-acre ecologically sustain“More than 70 percent of our schools in United States. We able farm and CSA, said she can’t compete Idaho are serving locally grown food, but nohave 15 additional body knows about it,” said standards … We Heidi Martin, Idaho encourage schools State Department to serve whole grain of Education Child foods at least three Nutrition Programs days a week. And coordinator. we put limitations Last year, the on pre-fried foods Department of … We’re actually Agriculture’s seeing now that Idaho Preferred other states are program teamed emulating what up with the we impleISDE to bring mented,” said the USDA’s Martin. Farm to Other School initiastandards tive to five include Idaho pilot offering a districts. minimum Though of one fruit Farm to and one School non-fried isn’t vegetable funded, each day for the pilot lunch; the abolidistricts have tion of deep-fat made a pledge to Idaho schools now limit serving pre-fried foods—like fries or chicken nuggets—to three times or less per week. frying and trans serve locally grown fats; the eventual foods in their cafelimination of 2 eterias. percent and whole milk; and the removal of all price-wise with larger industrial farms. “Boise School District committed last year salt and sugar packets. “It gets pretty cheap out there ... [school to serve an Idaho food in every cafeteria, every But even with Idaho’s strict nutritional day in September,” explained Idaho Preferred’s districts] cannot take high bids if someone can standards—and a growing focus on local, give them lower bids, so I can’t even play in Leah Clark. “They did an incredible job. They seasonal produce through the Farm to School that world,” said Erskine. increased their sales of local food products … program—Clark said education is essential. But in some smaller Idaho school districts, That’s really important to our farmers that “When we talk Farm to School, the cafeteria the Farm to School connection is more direct. they’ve got this added market now for local component is one component, but Farm to “The director in Marsing, because she’s in produce.” School in our opinion is broader than that. It’s Because farming is such a booming industry a rural community, she was able to drive over also nutrition and agricultural information in and pick up food directly from the farmers,” in Idaho—in 2007, the market value of agrithe classroom,” said Clark. “It may include a said Martin. “We even have some schools that cultural products sold was $5.7 billion—this school garden as well.” actually talk to the farmers before they plant, turned out to be a relatively easy task. A handful of schools in the Boise School and there are some farmers that are growing “Considering we serve milk from Meadow District currently have gardens. By providing specifically for one school district.” Gold, which comes from Idaho farmers, and One of those schools is Gooding Elemen- hands-on gardening opportunities, the schools several other of our products are from either increase kids’ exposure to new foods. tary. Gooding was the first in the nation to the State of Idaho or regional—we serve “If we bring in a farmer that teaches how he receive the HealthierUS School Challenge Clear Springs trout—it was really easy to do,” grows pears, then students will eat more pears Gold Award. Gooding food service director explained Peggy Bodnar, Boise District food at lunch the next day … We definitely see a Anji Baumann was even name-dropped by and nutrition services supervisor. “Weekly, we first lady Michelle Obama in a speech to the major change just in the children’s willingness probably had four to five items throughout the School Nutrition Association. In addition to to eat fresh produce,” said Martin. “We see year that ... were locally produced.” that with our school gardens, too ... having a robust school garden and making In Boise, all school meals are planned and whole grain pastas and breads from scratch, They are so excited to eat vegetables if purchased at the district level. Because of the Gooding doesn’t allow fried foods, candy or they grew them themselves.” logistical pitfalls of partnering with individual 32 Bodnar said children are more soda in vending machines and only features farmers to procure and distribute large quanti-

It’s the time of year when home gardeners sneak zucchini into everything—they grate it into bread, toss a few coins onto a pizza or tuck strips into lasagna. Stealthy green thumbs even find ways to unload monstrous quantities of squash onto unsuspecting friends and co-workers. But when all creative zucchini–eradicating avenues have been exhausted, instead of letting your excess garden bounty go to waste, you can donate it to those in need. Because of the relatively small quantities of fresh produce that home gardeners have to donate, the Idaho Foodbank recommends folks drop off their fruits and veggies at local food pantries. You can look up the closest pantry to you on a map at idahofoodbank.org. The foodbank recommends you contact the pantry ahead of time to confirm drop-off hours. “It saves us cooler space, and it gets it directly to the people who are going to use it,” explained Idaho Foodbank spokesman David Proctor. In less perishable news, the franchise bakery Great Harvest has expanded its bready empire into the neighboring building formerly occupied by Deli George. The store, located on Fairview Avenue between Orchard Street and Curtis Road, offers fresh-baked whole grain breads, sandwiches, soup and pastries. Deli George has moved to 220 S. Broadway Ave. Speaking of bready empires, national chain Einstein Bros. Bagels—which has 500 locations scattered across the United States—is opening up its first Boise branch on the Boise State campus in the Interactive Learning Center at University Drive and Brady Street. To celebrate its grand opening on Thursday, Aug. 25, Einstein’s is offering the first 50 customers in line a coupon book for one free breakfast sandwich each week for an entire year. In kudos news, Lava Lake Lamb, located southeast of Sun Valley, is now featured at some fancy foodie spots in New York City. David Chang’s Momofuku offshoot Ma Peche is currently using Lava Lake lamb as is gastro pub The Spotted Pig. For more info on where you can get Lava Lake lamb, visit lavalakelamb.com/store-locator.php. On the downtown lunch front, Mai Thai will soon be offering a weekday lunch buffet featuring soups, salads, apps, sushi and traditional Thai dishes. The buffet fires up on Thursday, Sept. 1, and will cost $9.49 per person. —Tara Morgan

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 31

Instead of making more zucchini bread, donate your extra garden produce to those in need.

WHERE TO UNLOAD YOUR EXCESS ZUCCHINI

FOOD/CON’T

32 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

FOOD/DISH Restaurants get one chance to hit BW with their best shot. LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

willing to embrace new fresh foods when they are exposed to them repeatedly. “If they’re not exposed to it at home, it can take up to 10-14 times before a child will acquire a taste and a like for a product,” said Bodnar. According to Bodnar, the Farm to School program is about more than jumping on a growing trend, it’s a pressing health concern. “From a nutritional standpoint, if you can get a food that’s ripened on the vine and you’re able to harvest it and serve it in a short period of time, the nutrient content is going to be better and the flavor is going to be better so the kids are going to be eating more of it,” said Bodnar. And as more local families slip into poverty, those nutrients become vital for kids who aren’t getting them at home. Last school year, 43 percent of students in the Boise School District qualified as low income—which means out of 23,060 total students, 8,470 received free lunch and 1,486 qualified for reduced prices. For every free lunch, the USDA only reimburses schools $2.77. “Unfortunately, schools have to be very, very efficient because it’s hard to make a healthy meal for $2.70, especially when we require whole grains every day and fresh fruits and vegetables,” said Martin. Though Bodnar didn’t notice an overall rise in the amount of food consumed after implementing Farm to School, she has seen some of the old mystery meat misconceptions about school lunches begin to melt away. “I did notice a significant change in the perception of school lunch by participating in the program,” said Bodnar. “I couldn’t believe how many times I’d go into a cafeteria and have a principal or a student say, ‘Oh, it’s great, we’re all eating the fruit because it’s peaches or pears or pluots.’ Kids who had never heard of a pluot before were eating pluots.” 31

Deep-fried cheese, just like your Czech grandma used to make.

B29 STREATERY A friend of mine once said that at most, you could add tomato or bacon to a grilled cheese sandwich. Anything further and you’ve got a different sandwich. The grilled cheese at B29 Streatery, the new food truck from the folks at Brick 29 Bistro in Nampa, is another sandwich altogether. Beyond the cheese and bread, it is also loaded with pulled pork and dressed up in jalapeno aioli. But even the cheese ain’t yo mama’s grilled cheese, unless your mother is Czech. The half-inch-thick slice of jack is breaded and fried like smazeny syr, a traditional food available on most street corners in Prague. “We wanted to have something that was different from a standard grilled cheese,” Brick 29 chef Greg Lamm said. “But we also wanted something that could be cooked faster. A standard grilled cheese has to sit on a flat-top for awhile.” Lamm said they got there by a lot of experimentation. They’d heard about a food truck in Chicago that used battered cheese, so they decided to give it a shot, going through 10-12 B29 STREATERY versions before eventually setb29streatery.com tling on tempura batter. Piled high on white bread just barely too thin to qualify as Texas Toast, the sandwich is about as much a grilled cheese sandwich as it is a brick of lasagna. But putting sandwich theory aside, what matters here is taste. And strangely enough, for a sandwich so loaded with delicious-sounding goodies, the flavor of B29 Streatery’s grilled cheese is oddly neutral. Weighed down in breading, the jack cheese doesn’t stand out in the way the Streatery’s cheese fondues do. The pulled pork isn’t wet or bland, but the smoky flavor doesn’t pop on the white bread. The majority of the seasoning comes from the aioli, which is lightly spicy and creamy. But what really stands out about the sandwich is its heaviness. Mayo. Pork grease. Butter. Cheese. And the freshly fried potato chips it’s served with certainly don’t help much. Real meat-and-potatoes chaps and chapettes may not mind the Streatery’s grilled cheese, but this reporter felt a little queasy after such an intense gut bomb—though it might really hit the spot after a night of heavy boozing. Traditional grilled cheese or not, the Streatery’s sandwich is not for the faint of heart—nor those with a heart condition. But if you’re in the mood for a deep-fried adventure into the conceptual, then game on. —Josh Gross WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill OFFICE HOURS

R E A L ES TAT E BW ROOMMATES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com ROOM FOR RENT 3BD, 2BA. $450/mo., $300 dep. Plus 1/2 of electric & gas. Owner pays W/S/T, Wi-Fi. Great location in Hidden Springs Sub with view of surrounding Cart Wright Ranch! Work out facility, pools, hiking. Avail. month to month. 695-9155.

BW RENTAL LOG HOME - GARDEN VALLEY Lease a furnished log home in beautiful Garden Valley on 1 1/2 acres. Approx. 45 min. from West Boise. 3BD, 1.5BA. Over 1600 sq. ft. Large wrap around deck, great view. Close to snow mobile/ ATV trails. 1.5 acres to call your own! Lease terms available from 6 mo.-2 yrs. $895/mo. Call Krista 860-1650 for information. kristadeacon@gmail.com

NEAR BSU Nice, very clean 2BD, 1BA duplex. One block from Albertsons & four blocks to BSU. Approximately 800 sq. ft. with open floor plan. Do your laundry at home with washer & dryer included in rent. I pay W/S/T. Apartment has electric heat, stove, refrigerator, WD, off street parking & small yard. New carpet & ready now. No smoking/pets allowed please. Rent is $550/mo., $350 dep. Please respond to this ad or call Mike- 863-6855. I check references carefully, so please be honest. No application fee. AWESOME FOOTHILLS WITH VIEW Contemporary 2760 sq. ft. 3BD, 2.5BA home for rent with huge deck open plan & great neighborhood. Steps to trails, Hyde Park, downtown & restaurants. See Crestline home at ihelpurent.com CLOSE TO BSU! Darling & spacious. 2BD, 1BA duplex within easy bike ride to BSU/Downtown!! Cute patio area along with small grassy yard area. Utilities incl. FREE use of onsite shared laundry facilities. $675/ mo. Call Krista, 860-1650 www. eiprentals.com NAMPA Quiet, Safe, Affordable. This is a charming apartment on the lower level of a residential home w/separate entrance. Windows in every room, clean & bright. Off 12th Ave South. No lease. $375/mo. Call 208-333-0066

SUN VALLEY WINTER BARGAIN Beautifully decorated 3BD, 2BA home 1/2 block from free bus to lifts & town. Available January to June. $2,500/mo. includes util. plus $500 security deposit. 208- 622-4915.

BW FOR SALE BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAIN RETREAT THIS Extraordinary One Of A Kind Home On 3 Fenced Acres $184,900 Call David 208-342-3046 Idaho City Homes.com

C A RE E RS BW HELP WANTED ACLU of idaho is hiring! Are you passionate about civil liberties? Visit our website at www.acluidaho.org for full job descriptions and instructions on how to apply. Work From Home Online. PT/FT. Will train. Int’l Co. w/ A rating at BBB. www.iwork4me101.com

Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. homemailerprogram.net PLUMBER NEEDED Must have at least 15 yrs. experience & some boiler knowledge. Job is in Elko, Nevada. Call between 7AM & 5PM Monday-Friday. 775-738-2384.

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Out to Lunch 1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

EDUCATION

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly. com

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

DISCLAIMER

CAREERS

Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | AUGUST 17–23, 2011 | 33

PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY SUPERVISOR / WORKING LEAD “HIRING IMMEDIATLEY” The Supervisor / Working Lead is responsible for daily operations of a given district and/or district office. The qualified person will oversee training, job compliance, quality control, safety, and recruitment. Above managing day-to-day operations, the Supervisor/Working Lead will assist in the overall organization and administration of the District Office (to include): material inventory, maintenance, equipment, payroll, reports and documentation. The qualified candidate must be an expert on all forms of floor care (carpet and VCT maintenance) and window cleaning. Approximately half of the qualified candidates time will be spent supervising and the other half completing floor care and other cleaning requirement duties. He/ She must be bi-lingual (Spanish and English) and have the ability to proficiently communicate both verbally and in written form. EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO CECILIAD@CALICOWEB.COM STYLISTS/NAIL TECH TO LEASE If you are looking to start or continue being your own boss, this is the perfect salon for you! Our clients love the environment. Very trendy & fun, yet calm & relaxing to enjoy our time here. Rent is $100/wk. First 2 weeks are free!! Call 283-7186 if interested, and I so look forward to meeting great new people!

BW CAREER TRAINING NEED YOUR GED® DIPLOMA? We offer no-cost tutoring! For details, call 855-591-2920. STEVENS-HENAGER COLLEGE GEDprepClasses.com

BW MASSAGE

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

A awesome full body by Terrance. $45/hr. In home, studio/outcall. 841-1320. A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW YOGA I AM YOGA - JULY SPECIAL 10 classes - $50. iam-yoga.com

*AMATEUR MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, spa/showers, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio.

BW COUNSELING

PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR

Professional counseling integrating western psychology with intuitive/spiritual guidance. susanhill@portalcounseling.com INTUITIVE COUNSELING Wholistic professional counseling. Free phone consultation:Susan Hill 994-1576.portalcounseling. com

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. MYSTIC MOON MASSAGE August Special 90 min. for $40 & After Sun Massage, $15. 322 Lake Lowell, Nampa. 283-7830. Betty, CMT. Therapeutic Tantra Massage. By certified Tantrica. 440-4321. ULM 340-8377.

VIP MASSAGE

Free Foot Bath for Body Detox with 1 hr. foot massage. Treatments for acute and chronic cold hands & feet. Body Massage with special techniques. Pain Relief. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

BW SPIRITUAL BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383.

Work & Live Buddhist center, Northern CA. No exp. required or bring your skills Construction, maintenance, land & garden. Includes living allowance, housing, meals. No religious affiliation needed. 510-981-1987 volunteer@odiyan.org

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

FO R SA L E BW STUFF 9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 8881464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. PROPANE HEATER AND A.C. Big Buddy propane heater plus hose. $100. Used very little. Shop swamp cooler - on wheels - water hook up. Paid $325. Asking $175. 2 yrs. old. Never used this season. tbennic@mindspring.com

QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643. **BRAHMIN HANDBAG** Preowned never used Brahmin Satchel Handbag in Toasted Almond. Was $425 at Nordstroms. Must see to appreciate. Beautiful! Will sacrifice for $200. Please call 891-7607. LARGE, COMFY SECTIONAL SOFA We are moving & would like to sell our large sofa sectional. Bought in 2007, good condition. 12 ft. across the back, 8ft on one side, & 6ft on chaise side. Selling for $600 OBO. Cash only please. 319-721-7108. TOO HOT? AIR CONDITIONERS!! Window Air Conditioner Units for Sale Like NEW. Used only 2 seasons! Kenmore 6000 BTU View Saver Window Units $100 or 2 for $150. Cash and carry only 208630-3316. Ask for David. CAR SEAT RENTALS & MORE! Boise Baby Gear rents car seats, cribs, strollers & more! If you’re traveling to Boise — or hosting someone who is — let us do the heavy lifting for you! Incredible equipment at great prices. Delivery available. We can even meet you at the airport when your plane lands! Please see our web site for more information! www. boisebabygear.com

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

BW CLASSES CHAKRA/AURIC HEALING CLASS Learn to heal your 13 energy fields for the well-being of your mind, body & soul! Register online: www.boiselearns.org or 854-4047.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

BW ART & ANTIQUES ATOMIC TREASURES Celebrating reuse. 409 S.8th St. Stop in check it out we have it. Most items previously owned. Treasures from the Past, Present & Future. Clothing, art, books, records, bar ware, kitchenware, decor, jewelry, and more!

SARA’S FURNITURE

Will pay CASH for furniture. 607 N. Orchard St. Call 322-1622.

34 | AUGUST 17–23, 2011 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

BW WANT TO BUY CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS FIND COUPLE FRIENDS CouplesList is a free locally based bulletin board style site for married or dating couples to meet other like-minded couples for friendship. It is difficult to meet new people especially after college & this site was created to make meeting people easier.

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

NEW SECRET CLUB We are currently interviewing men who want to be in our new secret club. So if you’ve ever wanted to be a part of a secret club for men now is your chance. We meet twice a mo. for drinks & fun activities like poker, watching sports, & other activities that men love. For more information or to set up an interview feel free to contact me at bobm26@aol.com U-Pick No Spray Thornless Blackberries. Waterwheel Gardens Awesome Blackberry picking on Fri. & Sat. 7am-12pm. Come Visit our farm! See us at the Capital City Market or waterwheelgardens.com for pricing & directions.

BW VOLUNTEERS GUITAR INSTRUCTORS NEEDED!! Boise Schools Community Education is seeking volunteer guitar

instructors to teach basic/beginning guitar. Our classes run evenings at local Boise schools. Your commitment would be one evening for 4, 5 or 6 wks. for a few hours. Our students are lining up to take this class! If you would be willing to share your talents & your time, please call us today! 208-854-4047. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

COMMUNITY

BW LOST $100 REWARD- GLASSES I lost my prescription glasses sometime between 7/16 - 7/18. They are in a silvery mesh covered glasses case. A plain green cleaning cloth & a blue cleaning cloth with EPSON logo. The brand is OXO. I would really like to get these back as I don’t have a back-up pair! Please call me at 208-340-9709. Thanks!

BW FOUND FOUND VOLKSWAGEN KEY Found a Volkswagen laser cut hide a key on Milwaukee St. in front of Cost Plus parking lot. Would love to return it to rightful owner. Just prove it works in your car... email & will respond asap. ty359@msn.com

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

OLIVIA: 5-year-old female domestic longhair cat. Healthy, friendly girl who is litterbox-trained and easy-going. (Kennel 60- #13820559)

RODEO: 1-year-old male border collie. Extremely smart, high-energy dog. Good with other dogs. Needs a job and regular exercise. (Kennel 323#13774130)

GRACE: 8-month-old female Plott hound/pit bull terrier mix. Houseand crate-trained. Good with other dogs. Needs attentive owner. (Kennel 325- #13545623)

DUDLEY: 4-yearold male domestic longhair. Good with older children and cats. Litterbox-trained. Indoors cat (Kennel109#13543052)

BOOTS: 9-year-old female domestic longhair. Talkative and affectionate cat with a white mustache on her face. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 106- #13820774)

GABBY: 8-year-old female German shorthaired pointer. House-trained, good with kids and dogs. Loves attention. (Kennel 316- #13779615)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

PROSPERO: Young tab- ANNA: I’m a Staff Pick. by male desires friendly My adoption fee is only and loving home. $20.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

ARISTOTLE: Specialneeds big boy has personality to match.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | AUGUST 17–23, 2011 | 35

PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

BA RT E R BW HAVE SWAPCAFE.COM Come join us! Trade your stuff, your skills, your inventory. Submit via SwapCafe.Net for personal swaps or SwapCafe.Com for B2B. Good luck trading! Questions Info@SwapCafe.Net

EAT HERE

TRADE

Accepting Knick Knacks for in store trade at Thrift Store with a Twist. Jewelry, DVD’s, Clothes. 4610 W. State St. 570-7962.

ACROSS 1 Animal with a huge yawn 6 Garden support 10 ___ of roses

1

2

3

4

6

19

7

8

9

31

32

35

36

37

42 49

54

66 72

63

67

26

33

34 40

57

87 92

58

83

94

99

95

84

47

77

85

78

79

86

90

91

96

97

98

101

105 110

46

70 76

100

104

45

59

69

89

93

18

65

75

88

17

53

64

82

16

41

52

68

81

103

25

74

80

15 22

51

73

14

21

39

50

62

13

29

56

61

12

44

55

60

102

38

11

25 “Your Movie Sucks” writer 26 Billion: Prefix 27 “A penny saved is …” 30 “___ me anything” 32 Winery wood 33 Needle case 34 Like a black hole 35 “Where there’s a will, there’s …” 42 Mama Cass 43 Partner of 74-Across

28

43

48

71

10

24 27

30

20 Bandleader Puente 21 Religion founded in Iran 22 Dash 23 Reduces significantly

20

23

M US I C BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION/OTHER PIANO AND VOICE LESSONS. All ages. Teacher has a BM & MA in Music, 13+ years as a school & private piano instructor in Europe. Lessons are once a week. Weekends and afternoons available. Call 331-0278 or visit my website for more info www.HarmonyRoad.org

PE T S

TWO CATS FOR ADOPTION Yin & Yang are 5 yrs. old. They are brother & sister & have been together their whole life. I can no longer take care of them due to personal reasons. However, these cats are incredibly sweet, loving & fun. Email me if you are interested in more information or adoption. Thank you. b7owaliceup@gmail.com

HACK SAWS BY PAULA GAMACHE / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

15 “Swans Reflecting Elephants” artist 19 Formula One driver Prost

5

ESTHETICIAN/MASSEUSE Cosmetologist looking to trade haircut & color for facial or massage. Looking for ongoing trade. No money exchange or dollar for dollar...service for service only. Email to set up kristenl_sievers@ yahoo.com.

BW PETS

BW NEED

NYT CROSSWORD |

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

106 111

112

107

108

109

115

116

117

113

120

121

122

123

124

125

126

127

36 | AUGUST 17–23, 2011 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

114 118

119

44 Spread out 45 E-mail alternative 48 Effrontery 49 Entertainment providers at a sports bar 52 Pop’s ___ Tuesday 53 Fill 54 Perfect service 55 Certain commando 56 “Where there’s smoke, there’s …” 60 Founder of United We Stand America 62 Despicable 64 John who searched for the Northwest Passage 65 Buddhist teaching 66 “People who live in glass houses …” 71 Rhododendron cousin 74 Partner of 43-Across 75 Chinese “path” 76 Stinks to high heaven 80 “He who laughs last …” 84 Russian council 86 Land in a river 87 Some are queens 88 Part of a cul-desac address, maybe: Abbr. 89 Neighborhood east of SoHo 91 “This ___ You’re Talking To” (Trisha Yearwood song) 92 “Riddle me, riddle me ___” 93 Public respect 96 Managed 97 2, 3, 4 or 6, for 12 99 “If at first you don’t succeed …” 102 Revenue line 105 It can make a 10 a9 106 Alley ___ 107 Sante Fe-to-Denver dir. 108 “Don’t bite the hand …” 115 Legend of the Himalayas 116 Oldest von Trapp child in “The Sound of Music”

117 Protein building blocks 120 Reposed 121 Looped handles 122 Bone-dry 123 Sacred city of Lamaism 124 Mrs. Garrett on “The Facts of Life” 125 Places to live in the sticks? 126 Struck out 127 Stupid, in Sonora

DOWN 1 Is sick with 2 Sick 3 Analgesic 4 Boulevard where Fox Studios and the Los Angeles Convention Center are located 5 “Almost finished!” 6 Wasted 7 Former Yankee Martinez 8 Departing words? 9 Synthesizer designer Robert 10 Helped in a job 11 Middle Eastern salad 12 Area of Venice with a famous bridge 13 It has banks in Switzerland 14 Director Martin 15 Step 16 It’s out of this world 17 Port on the Gulf of Guinea 18 Silly 24 Western terminus of I-90 28 ___ Majesty 29 Contraction with two apostrophes 30 Relationship disparity, perhaps 31 Console 36 Naught 37 Rapscallion 38 New newt 39 Part of T.A.E. 40 Comet part 41 “That’s good enough”

45 C-worthy 46 Scintilla 47 TV warrior for good 50 It’s north of Baja, informally 51 Prime cut 53 A star may represent it 55 ___ blue 57 College cheer 58 Bog buildup 59 “Star Trek” role 61 Cooking pots 63 Baylor’s city 67 Applied some powder to 68 Wasted 69 Title girl in a 1964 Chuck Berry hit 70 Toe woe 71 Come from ___ 72 Fanboy’s reading 73 Stud money 77 Javanese or Malay 78 Ban ___ (Kofi Annan’s successor) 79 Laurence who wrote “Tristram Shandy” 81 “Good grief!” 82 Surly manner 83 Material for a suit? 85 Party of the underworld L A S T L A L A

E W E R

R A T E D

E T H N O

A P T E Y O U R A P L A D U L L A S A D T H E E R E N O I T S V E L M E R E C T O R S

S L O V E N E

L O P A S H U

G E T S A G R I P

A R I G A T O

S H E E S H

90 ___-di-dah 91 Suffix with robot 93 Hebrew letter after koph 94 Fights with 95 Permits 98 It might be on the road 99 One behind the lens 100 Farm mate 101 Didn’t suffer in silence 102 Flair 103 Forward 104 Exempli gratia, e.g. 109 Economist Greenspan 110 It has a period of 2Ÿ 111 No pressure 112 Its highest point is Wheeler Peak: Abbr. 113 Current carrier 114 Nymph spurned by Narcissus 118 August hrs. 119 ___ Tomé Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

T S E R T I M U D E O U S W A L O L L I N E S M A M A N U T E A O M N A N S B O O A O F F R T A M E I M I M I L I N S

O R E L S E P O R C

C U S A C K

O N T H E E G N O T E E R A S N T I E E R

A N S W E R S

A S E Y F F L E R O L L E L R Y E E P I A R O U P R D S E T R A D A R L I L S A A N E W S V I A L I N G I T S T E O S O M U C O T D E

F A B E R G E

B O N S A I G A E B L F H E I S T S A L F A E T S T T E

A T A L G O G O O W E R N N E E I D A S E A L S F E M U A N A K R O N R O W N A I R S N E W S E N A M D N A L E E R O E H I N G A N Z A R G E D

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

CONNECTIO N SECTIO N BW ENTERTAINMENT

BW MUSICIAN’S EXCHANGE Viva Las Vegas! Elvis impersonator for hire. Parties and Weddings. Located in Mtn. Home. John 598-2848. www.youtube.com/ watch?v=91x9Lfi9hQU

SE R VIC ES BW HOME FREEDOM APPLIANCE $40 Service Call in All of the Boise metro area. Never an extra charge for nights or weekends. Call today and save. 571-5362 or 994-3614. Get your appliance repair “DONE RIGHT THE FIRST TIME.” IKEA(R) DELIVERIES! Assembled in Boise is making runs to Ikea in Salt Lake, Utah. If you want your Ikea fix, visit our website for all of the details. www. assembledinboise.com or www. facebook.com/assembledinboise KITCHEN & BATHROOM REMODEL Bella Remodeling serving the Treasure Valley. We offer free estimates, licensed & insured. All our work is guaranteed. Our services include flooring, painting, granite, cabinets & much more. Please visit our web site for pictures and more services. www.bellaremodeling.com STEAMED CLEANCarpet, Upholstery, Tile & Grout. Residential & Commercial Over 15 yrs. exp. 3 rooms & hall $79. Other specials and services available, call for your free quote today! 30 day Guarantee – if spots come back, so do we. Locally Owned & Operated Proudly Serving Ada & Canyon County. 208392-5124.

ALL KINDS OF SINGLES. Browse & Respond FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7582, 18+. BUYER BEWARE Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services. EROTIC RAW CONVERSATION Arousing, Raw, Hot, Private Conversation. Any subject, anytime! Solo girl/Independent Operator, Intimate, Confidential, Discreet, 18+. Visa/MC, Credit, Debit, Prepaid, $1/min. www.jolenesbedroom.com. Call Jolene 1-800-5732995 or 1-602-283-3838. HOT GUYS! HOT CHAT! HOT FUN! Try Free! Call 208-489-2162 or 800777-8000. www.interactivemale. com MEET LOCAL SINGLES. Listen to Ads FREE! 208-345-8855. Use FREE Code 7584, 18+. SEEKING SEXY SINGLES? Reply to Ads FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7583. Visit MegaMates.com, 18+.

T R A NS P ORTATION BW 4-WHEELS 1970 CHEVROLET CHEVELLE Big Block SS, red with white stripes, Price $5700 use e-mail for pictures jimseart9@msn.com / 208-639-9820. Junk cars, trucks, vans. Paying up to $200. 208-963-0492.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BW I SAW U RED CORSET KATY PERRY GIRL Saw you at the Katy Perry concert. Amidst all the hot young thangs at the show you were by far the sexiest girl at the show. The red corset, ballerina skirt, and rainbow knee-highs was just amazing. It was a pleasure serving you drinks, you little minx, you! T. SW Flight #3161, Monday, 7/11. Celebrate your new job! Yeah! M.

BW I AM HERE

CON N EC T I ON S EC T I ON - ADULT

54 yr. old M with good stable job, Christian chaplain. Interests include Meridian Speedway & Firebird, long talks & drives, family time important, BBQ’s & time at the park. No alcohol or drugs. Looking for for W 45-55 with honesty, integrity & loyalty. PO Box 45434, Boise, 83711 or marktigerjames@yahoo.com

BW PEN PALS

BW PROFESSIONAL LIEN SALE 2002 mercury cougar AER Auto Repair. 7736 Lemhi St. Boise, ID 83709. August 29, 2011 at 10:00 a.m.

MOXIE ON MAIN Main St. Moxie says thank you to our valuable customers. We are elated to continue serving you. Don’t forget our Happy Hour M, T, Th, F 4 p.m. to close 25% off your favorite drinks! Main St. Moxie & Qwest Moxie.

BW CHAT LINES MEN SEEKING MEN 1-877-4098884 Gay hot phone chat, 24/7! Talk to or meet sexy guys in your area anytime you need it. Fulfill your wildest fantasy. Private & confidential. Guys always available. 1-877-409-8884 Free to try. 18+. REAL PEOPLE, REAL CHAT, REAL DISCREET Try Free! Call 208-287-0343 or 800210-1010. www.livelinks.com

BW KISSES TWINKLE P.J., you sparkle as starlight in my eyes.

Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates. My name is Martin Carrillo Jr. #87648. I’m 22 yrs. Old, 6’, 186 lbs., slender figure, golden brown eyes and black hair. I’m Hispanic and originally from CA. I enjoy writing poetry, working out and playing sports. I am seeking SW only ages 18-45 for pen pals and possibly more. I’m able to send photos to those interested. Martin Carrillo Jr. #87648 ICC PO Box 70010 Boise, ID 83707. Congratulations to myself! Won my appeal. Getting out soon. Black M, 40, intelligent, secure finances, seeking a Transgender, very feminine mate. Race and age unimportant. Christopher Smith #291523 WSP Bar-Units Baker B-204 1313 N. 13th Ave. Walla Walla, WA 99362. I’m 23 yrs. Old in prison for grand theft and burglary. I am looking for women ages 18-40 for pen pals and/or possibly more. I am athletic and enjoy sports, outdoor activities and trying new things. I am 5’10”, 160 lbs., brown hair and hazel eyes. When I get out I am going to go to college for culinary arts and business management at BSU. I would like to start my own business here in Boise and bring authentic German cuisine to the west coast. I am able to send pictures and purchase phone time. Paden Fleischer #85131 ICC P2-35A PO box 70010 Boise, ID 83707. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! No phone calls please.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | AUGUST 17–23, 2011 | 37

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): I predict that in the coming weeks, you will be able to extract an unexpected perk from one of your less glamorous responsibilities. I also predict that you will decide not to ram headfirst into an obstacle and try to batter it until it crumbles. Instead, you’ll dream up a roundabout approach that will turn out to be more effective at eliminating the obstacle. Finally, I predict that these departures from habit will show you precious secrets about how to escape more of your own negative conditioning. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Dear Astrologer: My life is stagnant and slow. It suffers bonedeep from a lack of changes, good, bad or in between. Why has my karma been deprived of all motion? Why must I go on frozen in such eerie peace and quiet? I seek your help. Can you cast a spell for me so that I will be happily disrupted and agitated? Will you predict my sorry state of stillness to be ended soon? Arvind Agnimuka, Taurus from Darjeeling.” Dear Arvind: Funny you should ask. According to my analysis, members of the Taurus tribe are about to be roused out of their plodding rhythm by a bolt of cosmic mojo. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I found this unusual classified ad in a small California newspaper. “Wanted: Someone to travel backwards in time with me. This is not a joke. You must be unafraid to see the person you used to be, and you’ve got to keep a wide-open mind about the past—I mean more wide-open than you have ever been able to. I have made this trip twice before, and I don’t expect any danger, but there may be a bit of a mess. Please bring your own ‘cleaning implements,’ if you know what I mean.” As crazy as it sounds, Gemini, I’m thinking you’d be the right person for this gig. The astrological omens suggest you’ll be doing something similar to it. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Of your five senses, which is the most underdeveloped? If you’re a typical Westerner, it’s your sense of smell. You don’t use it with the same level of acuity and interest you have when you’re seeing, hearing, tasting or touching. You may speak excitedly about an image you saw or song you heard or food you ate, but you rarely do that with odors. You easily tolerate an ugly building or loud noise or mediocre food, and yet you feel a deep aversion to an unappealing smell. Having said that, I want you to know it’s an excellent time to upgrade your olfactory involvement with the world. You’d benefit greatly from the emotional enrichment that would come from cultivating a more conscious relationship with aromas.

38 | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Enlightenment is simply this,” said the Zen master. “When I walk, I walk. When I eat, I eat. When I sleep, I sleep.” If that’s true, Leo, you now have an excellent chance to achieve at least temporar y enlightenment. The universe is virtually conspiring to maneuver you into situations where you can be utterly united with whatever you are doing in the present moment. You’ll be less tempted than usual to let your mind wander away from the experience at hand but will instead relish the opportunity to commit yourself completely to the scene that’s right in front of you. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In August 2009, 120 scientists and their helpers staged a BioBlitz in Yellowstone National Park. Their goal was to find as many new species as they could in one day. To their surprise and delight, they located more than 1,200, including beetles, worms, lichens and fungi that had never before been identified. An equally fertile phase of discover y could ver y well be imminent for you, Virgo. All you have to do is make that your intention, then become super extra double-wildly receptive. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Two dangers threaten the universe: order and disorder,” said poet Paul Valer y. I think that’s especially true for you right now, although the “danger” in question is psychological in nature, not physical, and it’s a relatively manageable hazard that you shouldn’t worr y about. Still, the looming challenge to your poise is something that requires you to activate your deeper intelligence. You really do need to figure out how to weave a middle way between the extremes of seeking too much order and allowing too much disorder. What would Goldilocks do? SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Readers of Reddit.com were asked to describe their lives in six words. It would be a good time for you to tr y this exercise. You’ve reached a juncture in your unfolding destiny when you could benefit from a review that pithily sums up where you’ve been up until now, and where you’ve got to go next. To inspire your work, here are some of the most interesting entries from Reddit: 1. Early opportunities wasted, now attempting redemption. 2. Searching tirelessly for that one thing. 3. Living my dream requires modifying dream. 4. Must not turn into my mom. 5. Insane ambition meets debilitating selfdoubt. 6. Do you want to have sex? 7. Slowly getting the hang of it. 8. These pretzels are making me thirsty.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Go where the drama is but not where the melodrama is. Place yourself in the path of the most interesting power but don’t get distracted by displays of power that are dehumanizing or narcissistic. You are in a phase of your astrological cycle when you have a mandate to intensify your excitement with life and increase your ability to be deeply engaged with what attracts you. I urge you to be as brave as you once were when you conquered a big fear and to be as curious as you were when you discovered a big secret about who you are. For extra credit, be highly demonstrative in your expression of what you care about. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In his older years, after steadfastly cultivating his vices with the care of a connoisseur, the agnostic actor W. C. Fields was caught reading the Bible by an old friend. Questioned at this departure from his usual behavior, Fields said he was “looking for loopholes.” I suspect a comparable shift may be in the offing for you, Capricorn. In your case, you may be drawn to a source you’ve perpetually ignored or dismissed or suddenly interested in a subject you’ve long considered to be irrelevant. I say, good for you. It’s an excellent time to practice opening your mind in any number of ways. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I watched a YouTube video that showed eight people competing in a weird marathon. They ran two miles, ate 12 doughnuts, then ran another two miles. I hope you don’t try anything remotely similar to that, Aquarius. If you’re in the mood for outlandish feats and exotic adventures, I suggest you try something more life-enhancing, like making love for an hour, eating an organic gourmet feast, then making love for another hour. It’s a good time for you to be wild, maybe even extreme, about getting the healing you need. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the out-of-print book In Portugal, A.F.G. Bell defines the Portuguese word “saudade” as follows: “a vague and constant desire for something that does not, and probably cannot exist, for something other than the present, a turning towards the past or towards the future; not an active discontent or poignant sadness, but an indolent dreaming wistfulness.” In my astrological opinion, Pisces, it is imperative that you banish as much saudade from your system as you can. If you want, you can bring it back again later, but for now, you need to clarify and refine your desires for things that are actually possible. And that requires you to purge the delusional ones.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

DON’T MISS

AFTER WORK WEDNESDAY Buy any Margarita,

GET 1 FREE!* Each Wednesday 4 p.m.–close BOISE TOWNE SQUARE * 8TH STREET MARKETPLACE

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 24–30, 2011 | 39


Boise Weekly Vol. 20 Issue 09