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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 05 JULY 27 – AUGUST 2, 2011

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TAK EE E ON E! INSIDE

ANNUAL MANUAL It’s back: Your guide to life, the Treasure Valley and everything

NEWS 8

PAINFUL CUTS Medicaid cuts could cost the state more

PICKS 12

OUT AND ABOUT Six ways to beat off boredom

FOOD 26

FRESH SCENTS Lavender is for more than aromatherapy

“I know all the bathrooms where you can sing when you visit Seattle.”

NOISE 19

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Heather Lile Heather@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreaders: Jay Vail, Sheree Whiteley Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Guy Hand, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall Interns: Lizzy Duffy, Brady Moore, Shelby Soule, Trevor Villagrana ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Conner Coughlin, Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow Photography Interns: Will Eichelberger, Will Jones, John Winn, Matthew Wordell CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE READY TO ROLL: ANNUAL MANUAL AND BW Annual Manual: In the alt journalism world, those two words are the equivalent of “something wicked this way comes.” In other words, for the next year of your life, you’ll be thinking of virtually nothing other than this looming project, and despite your best efforts to chip away at it all year, the final weeks will arrive with massive amounts of work yet to be done, forcing the complete surrender of your personal life, exercise routine, sobriety and, ultimately, your soul. And in the glorious, yet fragile weeks between the time you ship it off to the press and the day it inserts into every edition of your paper, it is then and only then that you will find some peace before it all begins again. OK, that’s a bit melodramatic, but no joke—from the sales staff to the design team to the editorial department, getting Annual Manual from a mere line on our planning calendar and into your hands each year is an immense effort, which makes its arrival in this week’s edition all the more rewarding. Even as it hits stands, however, we know that since we’ve gone to print, a few things have changed, rendering our masterpiece ever so slightly flawed from the get-go. Such is the nature of an annual publication. As always, if you have suggestions for us on how we can improve our yearly guide to life, the Treasure Valley and everything, drop me a line. In other alt journalism news, most of the BW staff just returned from New Orleans, where our annual trade association conference was held. For me it was a chance to regret drinking my first hurricane, as well as to gauge how our daily efforts at BW stack up against those of our peers. So much of our energy over the last few years has been directed at expanding Boise Weekly from a once-weekly newspaper into a seven-day multimedia company that it always astonishes me how indifferent some of our alt media peers are to the old “interwebs.” Then again, some of those papers also produce among the strongest editorial content in the association. As editor at BW, my goal is to nail it all—from digital media to the print product—and trust me, it’s no easy feat. But with a little renewed inspiration from others in the business and a few extra minutes on my hands with the completion of Annual Manual, I’m ready to keep working at it. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Nathan J. Dang TITLE: RNR 11 MEDIUM: Chrome print ARTIST STATEMENT: Part of the most recent incarnation of the series “We SOS 4 RNR.” See tons of Dang’s work at “Dang/ Packer: VaC: August/September” at Visual Arts Collective. Opening shindig is Friday, Aug. 5, 7-9 p.m.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Medicaid cuts could cost the state more

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CITYDESK

FLIPPED OFF Does a logo a burger make? A new Boise eatery is in trouble with the mighty In-N-Out Burger, which has threatened to sue the local restaurant if some serious branding changes aren’t made. Check out Citydesk for the latest front in the burger wars.

BREAKING THE LAW Sneaking out in your parents’ car isn’t so unusual— unless you’re 12. Find out how one tween ended up in trouble with the law after a two-hour joyride at Citydesk.

MORE COWBELL Starting a magazine these days seems a little out of touch but check out the direction the publishers of the new indie music mag Cowbell are taking. Get the details at Cobweb.

SHOW ME THE FUNNY Boise’s comedy scene has been more sad than jovial in recent years but a growing movement is trying to rebuild it from the ground up. Check out Cobweb for video from a recent show at Sockeye Brewery.

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CITIZEN

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE Hey Marseilles conquers Alive After Five 19 MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN Nostalgia for the Light

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SCREEN TV Hello, Dish Network? DirecTV? Is anyone listening?

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FOOD Lavender moves from aromatherapy to the kitchen

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BEER GUZZLER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

CONSTITUTION REBOOT Part II of ? parts We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men, including women—whether or not they are natural born citizens of the United States; whether they are descendants of the Pilgrims who landed on Plymouth Rock or desperate wetbacks who landed in El Paso, Texas, just last night; whether they are African Americans, Asian Americans, Native Americans or not even Americans; whether they are Muslims, Hindus, Mormons or whatever; whether they are capitalists, socialists or something in between; whether they are homeless panhandlers on street corners or multi-billionaire oil barons who inherited their daddy’s empire—are Equal, that they are endowed by the altruistic Values which have Evolved throughout the History of civilized Humanity with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, the pursuit of Happiness and a reasonable expectation that others will keep their noses out of our Sex Lives, and that no matter what the f**ked-up Roberts/Scalia Supreme Court says, corporations are not, nor will ever be, Men. Or Women.—From “Badger” Bob’s upgrade of the Declaration of Independence U I took my latest project to Cope to see what he thought. He was out back, acting like the meaning of life was to sit in the sun eating salty s**t and sucking down one Old Milwaukee after another. When I told him I was re-writing the U.S. Constitution, he got all quivery, worried about how mad some people would get if they knew what I’m doing. I told him I didn’t care how mad they got, and that I was mad at them for treating the Constitution like it was a business arrangement between God and white guys. “Listen to what I have so far. ‘We, the people of the 21st century and the United States, in order to form a more perfect union …’” “Hold on, Bob. Why’d you stick ‘21st century’ in there. That wasn’t in the Preamble I remember.” “You’re right, doofus, because the Preamble you remember was written in the 18th century. And that’s exactly what I’m getting at. What those old boys put together back in 1787 might have worked for a pre-industrial, loosely connected confederation of poorly educated farmers and village smithies and such—back when it took forever for the citizens of Butt Sweat, N.H., to find out what was going on in Sow Waller, Ga. And I’m not saying the framers weren’t smart. But being smart isn’t the same thing as being prophets. There’s no way they could foresee the dilemmas we’re dealing with today. Take that recent court decision on video games … how in hell could people who would be long dead before the first photograph was taken have imagined that one day, kids would be ripping the spines out of moving, interactive images, and that the f**ked-up Supreme Court would allow it to continue as a matter WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

of free speech? Can you believe it?” “Gosh, don’t video game makers have a right to express themselves?” “Wake up, Cope! Do we or do we not have an obligation to keep children from things that could damage them permanently? Do we or do we not try to protect them from pornographers, tobacco and alcohol? Pornographers have a right to express themselves, too. But not with kids! No, idjut, that decision had less to do with free speech than it had to do with the conservative pimps on the court being hell bent on never, ever doing anything that might slow down the corporate domination of America. Now shut up and let me get on with this. I’ve been here half the afternoon and we haven’t gotten beyond the first 20 words of the Preamble.” “OK, Bob. But you wanted my input didn’t you?” “That was why I came here, yeah, but I’m beginning to question that decision. Now let me start again and don’t interrupt this time. ‘We, the people of the 21st century and the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, since the original Constitution had so many ambiguities written into it, it could keep an infinite number of lawyers busy for eternity interpreting it … to insure domestic tranquillity for everyone, and not just for the gated-community d**kweeds who couldn’t give a rat’s a** what happens in inner cities and factory floors and the nation’s schools as long as it doesn’t disturb their f**king golf games … provide for the common defense, and that doesn’t mean invading sh***y little third-world countries just because we want to try out a new weapons system … promote the general welfare, first and foremost by providing socialized medicine and if conservatives don’t like it, they can kiss my a** … and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our prosperity, and let us be clear that the ‘blessings of liberty’ do not include the freedom to snatch up a greater and greater share of the nation’s wealth until the top 1 percent has more than the next 99 percent combined … do ordain and establish this revised edition of the Constitution of the United States of America.’” “Uh, can I interrupt yet?” “So, what do you think? Isn’t that a Preamble more appropriate for today than the old one?” “Well, uh, speaking as a writer, maybe it could use a little tweaking here and there. It’s a pretty long Preamble. And are you planning on leaving the swear words in?” “Why not. They’ll let people know we’re damn serious this time around. And as far as it being long, wait ’til you see what I’ve done with the Second Amendment.” “Golly, Bob. How big do you see this new, revised Constitution being?” “I figure it’ll come in just under 800 pages by the time I’m done.”

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OPINION/TED RALL

GOP’S ELECTION BET Voters focus on spending at just the wrong time SAN DIEGO—Ross Douthat, the conservative columnist for The New York Times, thinks Republicans have overreached in their showdown with President Barack Obama over the debt ceiling. “[The Republicans’] inability to make even symbolic concessions has turned a winning hand into losing one,” he says. Of course, Obama had already agreed to begin dismantling Social Security and Medicare. If he pulls off this “victory,” Obama will have done more damage to the Democratic Party and its core values than any president in our lifetimes. Back a few pages, Times reporter Jesse McKinley writes: “Indeed, the drama of whether the government will raise the debt ceiling (to the chagrin of some conservatives demanding tighter financial belts) or allow it to remain as is (to the horror of the administration and economists who predict financial ruin) seemed largely lost on a populace involved in more pressing—and more pleasant— summer distractions,” asserts McKinley. Among the few political geeks who understand what’s going on, much less have an opinion, the tide is allegedly turning in favor of Obama because he’s willing to compromise and the Tea Party-led GOP isn’t. Conventional wisdom floggers like Douthat say that if Congress can’t strike a deal and economic consequences follow—a reduction in the ratings of U.S. government-issued securities and a panic in the securities market—voters will hold Republicans accountable in 2012. Even if things don’t turn that far south, the GOP will pay for their intransigence. Obama wins in a cakewalk. I’m not so sure.

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Without a doubt, the Republicans’ willingness to imperil the pure platinum credit of Treasury notes and bonds is reckless and irresponsible. There is also no denying their naked hypocrisy and intellectual dishonesty. These so-called “deficit hawks” voted 19 times to raise the debt ceiling by $4 trillion. If Republicans were serious about balancing the federal budget, they’d start by slashing the military, which accounts for 54 percent of discretionary spending. The Department of Homeland Security should be eliminated. Moreover, the middle of the biggest economic meltdown since the industrial revolution is no time to be cutting debt. Read your Keynes: Governments are supposed to spend their way out of downturns and pay down debt during upswings. Republicans, it seems, are trying to finish off an economy that is already gravely wounded. Politically, however, I think they’re onto something. The American people are finally, genuinely alarmed about the pace and scale of government spending. The current national debt of $14 trillion isn’t the magic number that flips some sort of switch in the public. Win or lose on the debt-ceiling showdown, GOP strategists are betting that voters will reward them for taking an uncompromising stand on spending against a president who has increased the national debt faster than any of his predecessors. It’s not 100 percent—but I’d say it’s a pretty safe bet. This is the worst possible time for the American people to start worrying about outof-control federal spending. But it’s good for the GOP.

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CITYDESK/NEWS NO PUBLIC INPUT?

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NEWS GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

Take a look at the working draft of rules for oil and gas exploration in Idaho and you’ll see that they’re covered with red ink. Red signifies additions or changes, so considering that the last time anyone dusted off the rules was a couple of decades ago, red ink is certainly appropriate. The rules are catching up with reality. Natural gas exploration in Idaho has been in the headlines for more than a year, ever since Bridge Resources began drilling in Payette County (BW, News, “Hell of a Well,” July 14, 2010). With some successful gas wells and plans to “frack” a few others (BW, News, “Getting Mini-Fracked, April 27, 2011), Bridge’s plans have gotten a lot more attention from the media, Payette citizens and those who oversee such operations. While negotiated rule-making is not scintillating (BW, News, “A is for Act,” June 8, 2011), there’s plenty at stake. That’s why people representing Bridge, the oil and gas industry, the Department of Environmental Quality and Idaho’s Department of Water Resources are all at the rule-making table with red pencils at hand. Also at the table are representatives of Idaho Conservation League—nonprofit advocates for air, land and water protection. “We’re not against this industry,” Justin Hayes, ICL’s program director told Citydesk. “We’re not opposed to the drilling of natural gas in Idaho. If it’s going to go forward, it has to be done well.” But Hayes was more than a little frustrated on July 20, when the topic turned to drilling permits. “We started talking about the drilling application process, and I asked about public input,” said Hayes. Eric Wilson, Mineral Program Manager for the Idaho Department of Lands (overseeing the rule-making process) said his department would not propose any change to the current permitting process. “We’re not recommending anything different or anything new to the rules that have been in place for quite some time now,” Wilson told Citydesk. But Hayes was having none of it. “I think that’s an intentional dive,” said Hayes. “When Eric said, ‘We’re not changing anything,’ well, that’s code for them continuing to exclude the public.” When Wilson began the negotiated rule-making process in June, he said that Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter (who chairs Idaho’s Oil and Gas Conservation Commission) didn’t want to see “any bells and whistles.” Simply put, if there wasn’t something that was flat-out required in Idaho statutes, then the Department of Lands would be hard-pressed to include a new requirement. But Hayes said there has been plenty of precedence for involving the public. “The DEQ, Health and Welfare and countless other agencies solicit public comment on applications so that things don’t happen in a weird vacuum,” said Hayes. More red ink is expected over the next few weeks, but Hayes isn’t the most optimistic person in the room. “It just feels like decisions have already been made,” said Hayes. “And I’m afraid that this company [Bridge] is going to get exactly what it wants.” —George Prentice

SIXTY MINUTES One hour of PSR can be the difference between crisis and stability GEORGE PRENTICE This year was supposed to be different. After seeing their Medicaid-funded psychosocial rehabilitation counseling dwindle over the last two years from 20 hours per week to 10, and then slashed again to five hours, some of Idaho’s most vulnerable citizens said enough was enough. Hundreds of mentally disabled (some needing wheelchairs or walkers) traveled from every corner of Idaho to the Statehouse on March 8 in an effort to put a face and voice to the crisis. Legislative veterans had never seen anything like it before—a public hearing featuring four-and-a-half hours of heartbreak. One after another, the disabled and caregivers begged lawmakers for financial mercy. “We never asked for help before,” said Angie Martinez. “I’m scare to death,” said Taryn Ivey. “I’m pleading with you to represent me,” said Crystal Anderson. Even in remote Mackay, a disabled young man asked BW to write a letter on his behalf to the Legislature (BW, News, “The Face of Medicaid,” Feb. 23, 2011). “You know what I’d rather not have? I’d rather not have food,” he told BW, saying he desperately needed PSR services to help stem the tide of a severe psychosis. But in spite of the of the gut-wrenching testimony, the majority of Idaho lawmakers still decided to further cut Medicaid funding to thousands of Idaho’s disabled. In fact, the Republican majority went as far as dismissing an economic forecast from Idaho’s chief economist, instead choosing a much more austere baseline to justify deeper cuts. But it turned out their numbers were wrong. On July 12, Idaho’s Division of Financial Management reported that Fiscal Year 2011 closed with a surplus, and indeed the economist’s forecast had a greater grip on fiscal reality than the Legislature. However, not one penny was restored to Medicaid. Consequently, when the 2012 fiscal year began on July 1, the budget axe came down one more time on Medicaid funding for PSR services. In three short years, PSR services have been slashed by more than 80 percent. “History will tell whether this was a session of great accomplishments or failures,” said Republican Sen. Brent Hill, president pro tempore of the state Senate as the session was gaveled to a close on April 7. Most of Idaho’s disabled aren’t worried about political history. They’re worried about today and scared as hell about tomorrow.

Gerry Lind (left) stands outside his new home in Boise’s North End with Karen Clark (right).

MEGAN: FINDING PEACE AND MAYBE A JOB There’s a good reason Megan Silva didn’t attend the March 8 public hearing at the Statehouse. She has severe agoraphobia, a crippling fear of public places and crowds. She is also diagnosed with bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Silva, 37, requires a regimen of medications to function, but she said it’s her PSR worker, Karen Clark of Community Partnerships of Idaho, that is her true lifeline. “Karen doesn’t know how crucial she is to my success,” said Silva, beaming a huge smile while talking about Clark. “We’re certainly working on my social interactions, but I have very specific goals. I’m going to do more volunteer work. I’m going to get a job. I’m going to make a decent living. I’m going to put gas in my car so I can see my children.” Silva is separated from her daughter and son, primarily because she can’t afford a home where the kids can have their own bedrooms. In spite of Silva’s disability, she pays child support to her ex-husband. “I get a Social Security check for $780 each month,” said Silva. “$280 immediately goes for child support. Then I have $500 to pay rent, utilities and food for the month.” Silva said she is skilled in food services. When she was younger, she was a cook and waitress but couldn’t hold a job because of her slow spiral into social anxiety and fear. Now, she said, she is more confident about her future; if only she were as confident about her social services. “I’m really worried about the cuts,” said Silva. “I don’t know what I would do without Karen. We’re starting to work on a resume, and we’re practicing interviewing techniques. Any success that I may have will be highly dependent on Karen. She keeps me focused on my goals.” Along with her goals of gainful employment

and economic independence, Silva has a more overarching objective. “My biggest goal is to find peace,” she said.

GERRY: TO HELL AND BACK When Karen Clark isn’t working with Megan Silva, she is working with a half-dozen other clients. One of them is Gerry Lind. Lind, 48, was lead drummer for the rock band LeRoux in the 1980s and 1990s. The band recorded on the EMI label and produced videos that appeared on MTV. For the most part, LeRoux was an opening act, but the headliners were impressive: Edgar Winter, Foghat, Starship and Survivor. But all of it came to a crashing end, literally, in the fall of 1997. “I was driving,” said Lind in a soft voice, his eyes hidden behind dark glasses. “We were going south on Interstate 5 from Olympia [Wash.] to Portland [Ore.]. There were no shoulders on the highway because concrete barriers had been put up due to construction. Well a truck driver in the next lane turned right into us and pushed us against the barricade. We eventually ended up underneath the truck. I broke my back, neck, right arm, left leg and jaw. Our bass player was pretty banged up, too.” Lind took a very long pause and deep breath. “And every other band member was killed.” Lind spent the next few years in a back brace. Every day since the crash, he has taken morphine and Percocet for pain. Things went from bad to worse. Two marriages failed, and he said, he was convicted of drug possession in 2003 when he “took the rap” for something his wife did. “She even left me while I was in prison. Our daughter was put into foster care. She would be 8-years-old now,” said Lind in a deep whisper. He said he was sent back behind bars in WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NEWS CON’T GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

Katherine Hansen of Community Partnerships of Idaho regularly receives thank you cards from clients.

2007 for violating parole over an unpaid parking ticket. He has been out of jail since 2010, spending time in shelters or halfway houses. “I was even at that halfway house when Candice Dahl stabbed that guy,” said Lind, referring to a July 2010 incident at an unlicensed Boise group home (BW, News, “Halfway to Hell,” Aug. 25, 2010). Today Lind is renting a tiny home in Boise’s North End, not far from Camel’s Back Park. He tries not to dwell on his memories but instead concentrates on the future when he meets with Clark twice a week for PSR services. “He’s no longer the angry person I met a while back,” said Clark. “Gerry understands the victim mindset, and he just isn’t going to go there anymore.” Lind said he expects to be off parole by November, December at the latest. And that’s when he wants to pick up his drum sticks again and start giving music lessons. “But this isn’t easy,” he said. “We’re putting a plan together. I can’t imagine succeeding without Karen’s help.”

MENTAL ILLNESS HAS A FAMILIAR FACE IN IDAHO Clark’s boss, Katherine Hansen, has lost count of all of the men, women and children that Community Partnerships of Idaho has assisted over the years. She said it’s easily over 10,000. PSR is just one way Hansen’s team assists Idahoans. Developmental therapy, employment services for the disabled and training for home-based caregivers are others. “I started Community Partnerships with four friends and $1,000 16 years ago,” said Hansen. “Today, we have nine offices across the state and over 400 employees. We probably assisted 1,000 clients this week alone.” Hansen said a terrible irony in the current economy is that while there is less governmental funding for mental-health services, WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

the need has never been greater. “People end up homeless, they lose their families, they lose their relationships, they lose their jobs,” said Hansen. “And then, all of a sudden, the world crashes and mental illness symptoms start to emerge and people are in crisis.” And the face of mental illness in Idaho is quite familiar. “We’ve seen people come into services that not too long ago had good jobs with the state,” she said. “We’re starting to see people who used to be in law enforcement, who were school teachers. We’re even seeing some of our former colleagues who sued to work in family services.” “They’re our neighbors or friends, our family and our co-workers,” said Anna Johnson, director of mental health services at CPI. “Bipolar, depression, schizophrenia, personality disorders—they’re all around us.” Hansen and Johnson slowly shook their heads when considering that many of their adult PSR clients had their services slashed from 20 hours a week to 10 to five and now to four. Even if 60 minutes a week may not sound substantial to a layperson, Hansen and Johnson said it can easily mean the difference between crisis and stability. “I’m thinking of three clients we just saw this week,” said Johnson. “When they had 20 or even 10 PSR hours a week, they were stable. But now, one gentleman has already ended up back in emergency rooms four times this year. His symptoms increased and law enforcement was involved. He even hurt a nurse in a physical outburst.” “The resulting cost to the taxpayers of Idaho is much, much greater even when you cut down just one hour of PSR services,” said Hansen. “We need to track these reallife stories and encourage as many people as possible to communicate the impact of these changes.”

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CITIZEN

TROY ROHN Battling an epidemic that could fill Bronco Stadium GEORGE PRENTICE

You spoke about your work in front of the Idaho Legislature this year. Yes, I’m very proud to be a part of the Idaho Alzheimer’s Planning Group. But Idaho doesn’t have a state plan for Alzheimer’s. Twenty-seven other states have a plan, but no, we don’t have one. We need a strategic document to help us plan for our future needs. We got in front of the House Health and Welfare Committee in March to do a full presentation, but we never really spent any serious time in front of the Senate committee. I think we were there for about five minutes for a few questions and answers. It’s interesting to note that a good amount of our Legislature is aging. When they spoke to us, many of their questions were personal in nature. The word “epidemic” has been used to describe Alzheimer’s in Idaho. It’s a good word to use. What are the numbers? Right now, there are between 26,000 and 32,000 people in Idaho that are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

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That’s enough to fill Bronco Stadium. That’s right. We are one of the “hot states” that will see the greatest increase in Alzheimer’s. Why is that? We have an aging population and a lot of people moving here are about to retire. Right now, there are roughly 5 million Americans with Alzheimer’s. That number is expected to triple by the middle of the century. How about the health-care costs? It’s about $140 billion a year, and it’s projected that it will completely bankrupt the health-care system by the middle of the century. If you put someone in an Idaho facility today, it’s about $75,000 a year for a semiprivate room. If they need moderate to severe care, that figure jumps to $150,000 a year. A lot of people quickly lose all of their savings. Is there a demographic—racial or sexual profile—of someone who is more apt to get Alzheimer’s? No. The greatest risk factor is age. Women have a slightly higher risk because they live a little longer. You have a 10 percent chance of getting Alzheimer’s when you’re 65. You have a 50-50 chance when you’re 85. Around 1900, the average life expectancy was about 50. Now, the average life for women is about 78 and for men it’s about 72. Is there joy in your work? Probably the biggest reward I get is when I give lab tours to caregivers and family members and individuals living with Alzheimer’s. We talk about the disease and clinical trials. They don’t get anything from physicians. You would be amazed at how thankful they are to get the information.

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Dr. Troy Rohn is a very smart man. He’s researching and publishing his findings on one of the greatest mysteries of our time: Alzheimer’s. In a small office and lab at Boise State, Rohn is trying to unlock the key to a disease that has reached epidemic proportions. Among the stacks of journals and countless files of research, his office is adorned by dozens of beautiful oil paintings that Rohn said are the product of the “other side” of his brain to counterbalance his intense studies.

What can you tell me about Cindy Jacklich? I gave a talk at an Alzheimer’s conference and her family was in the audience. Her husband, Tony, approached me and told me about Cindy. She had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. We agreed to meet and talk. I told them about some clinical trials trying to stop the pathology. Lo and behold, they got Cindy enrolled in a trial study in Salt Lake City. It gave them a lot of hope, structure and purpose. How is Cindy doing? We’re not supposed to know whether she is on a placebo or an active drug, but through my interaction with her, I believe she has not deteriorated at the same rate, and she is really stabilized. Through that interaction, her family realized the importance of research. They have since held fundraisers and given me and my team over $28,000 for our research. For the last six papers I’ve published, I’ve directly acknowledged them for their funding support. I have to ask you about all of the paintings that cover your office walls. It’s a hobby. It’s something that I developed in the last 10 years. Do you ever show any of these at a gallery? They’re quite good. Oh my no. It balances out the other side of my brain. The science side can overwhelm you with tedium. So this is using an entirely different side of my brain.

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Stars that shine as bright as the sun 2011 Olympians on Ice

Johnny Weir 3X US Gold Medalist World Bronze Medalist

July 30

Sasha Cohen Olympic Silver Medalist 2X World Silver Medalist 2X US Silver Medalist

August 6

Meryl Davis & Charlie White 2010 Oympic Silver Medalists 2011 World Gold Medalists 2011 US Gold Medalists

August 13 Performances start at dusk Saturday nights July 2 – September 3. For a Complete listing of Ice Shows and tickets, call 208.622.2135 or visit SunValley.com/IceShows. For Hotel & Ice Show Packages, call 800.786.8259.

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BOISEweekly | JULY 27 – AUGUST 2, 2011 | 11

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

If you’re ban-jonesing for some good tunes, catch Bela Fleck at the Sun Valley Shakedown.

THURSDAY JULY 28 music SUN VALLEY SHAKEDOWN

Watch this Urban Cowboy portray a rural cowboy in Sam Shepard’s Ages of the Moon.

THURSDAY JULY 28 reading SAM SHEPARD AND SCOTT GLENN READ AGES OF THE MOON Scott Glenn and Sam Shepard, two established film and stage talents, will give Boise theater fans a once in a lifetime treat on Thursday, July 28, at the Egyptian Theatre. The two legends will read from Shepard’s 2009 play Ages of the Moon as a fundraiser for Boise Contemporary Theater. Shepard won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1979 for his play Buried Child and has appeared in more than 50 films, including Steel Magnolias, Black Hawk Down and The Notebook. A resident of Ketchum, Glenn is a stage and screen actor who achieved stardom through his role opposite John Travolta in the 1980 hit Urban Cowboy. His film credits include roles in The Right Stuff, Silence of the Lambs, The Hunt for Red October and The Bourne Ultimatum. Ages of the Moon is about a couple of dudes sitting on a front porch in the country, waiting to witness an eclipse of the moon. Ames and Byron are old friends who, accompanied by whiskey, spend a night reminiscing, bickering and growing hostile. Ages of the Moon is kind of like Waiting for Godot, but on a porch. According to The New York Times review of the play, it “is a poignant and honest continuation of themes that have always been present in the work of one of this country’s most important dramatists, here reconsidered in the light and shadow of time passed.” 6 p.m. doors, 7 p.m. show, $50-$100. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, bctheater.org.

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The inaugural Sun Valley Shakedown promises a heathy dose of jazz-fusion, folk and bluegrass with a bill featuring Bela Fleck and the Original Flecktones, and Bruce Hornsby and the Noisemakers. In 1988, Fleck and company set out to create something unique. The quartet—comprised of electric banjoist Bela Fleck, brothers Victor and Roy “Future Man” Wooten and keyboardist Howard Levy—combined spacey effects, extremely technical, jazzy bass and a SynthAxe “drumitar” to create bluegrass-fusion-jazz songs. Hornsby, a singer and pianist, found success with his multi-platinum album The Way It Is in 1986 and went on to join the infamous jam band the Grateful Dead until Jerry Garcia’s death. The Sun Valley Shakedown begins at 5 p.m. but spectators shouldn’t hesitate to get there early for a cool beverage and a choice seat. The grassy terrain offers a comfortable setting and plenty of space for kids, adults and all lovers of music. Tickets are available until noon on the day of the show and concert-goers can take advantage of accessible parking and camping spots. Attendees should leave all tobacco products at home and save some energy for the after party at Whiskey Jacques with the Denver-grown band, Fox Street All Stars. 5 p.m., $48 general, $125 VIP. Sun Valley Festival Meadows, 206 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208-309-1960, sunvalleyshakedown.com.

THURSDAYSUNDAY JULY 28JULY 31 fair CANYON COUNTY FAIR AND FESTIVAL Ah, the county fair. It’s one of the last remaining vestiges of quintessential Americana—cotton candycoated fingers grip tightly onto ferris wheel bars,

starr y-eyed teens win each other over with oversized stuffed animals and ever ywhere teeth tear into meat on sticks. Luckily, Caldwell residents don’t have to wait much longer for their fair fix: the Canyon County Fair has arrived. On Thursday, July 28, the fair features a cow pieeating contest, tricks by magician Adam the Great and an array of ar ts and crafts activities for the whole family. Joe Nichols and Stealing Angels will per form star ting at 8 p.m. Friday continues with the

Celebrity Cooking Show and Ralph Maxwell’s Comedy Hypnosis show, as well as a performance by country music star Tracy Lawrence and Jacob Lyda on the main stage at 8 p.m. On Saturday, ’80s arena rock legends Kansas will tear it up, and country star Jo Dee Messina closes out the weekend with a concert on Sunday. If you’re interested in the more traditional fair elements, fret not. There will be an extensive selection of carnival rides, a dance competition, a pie-baking contest WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FIND TAR A M OR GAN

BUCKSNORT ROOT BEER

Cake Ballers make you holler.

Watch Langhorne Slim play fat licks at the Sawtooth Music Festival.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY JULY 29-30

SATURDAY JULY 30 handmade

music

LOVIN’ FROM THE OVEN AND SUPER SUMMER CRAFT MARKET

SAWTOOTH MUSIC FESTIVAL

Bake sales are to elementary schools what $1,000-aplate dinners are to political candidates: ubiquitous and, if you’re lucky, delicious. Flying M Coffeegarage has matured the concept of a cookie and cupcake sale by inviting other bakeries to partake in a fundraiser for the Idaho Foodbank. Treats will be for sale from Flying M, Great Harvest Bread Co. and Cake Ballers. And to sweeten the deal even more, local bands Dedicated Servers, Grand Falconer and Owlright will also play. If you want some rad earrings to wear to the concert and bake sale, be sure to stop by the Flying M Coffeegarage parking lot from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. for the second annual Super Summer Craft Market. The event will feature a smattering of local DIY-ers, crafters and artisans selling their handmade wares. Craft market, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., FREE. Bake sale and concert, 7 p.m., $3. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, flyingmcoffee.com.

The quiet mountain Hamlet of Stanley will rock once again during the Sawtooth Music Festival. This year brings Langhorne Slim, Viva Voce, Shook Twins, Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats, Free Peoples and more. Sun River Brewing Company will also be on hand with plenty of beer and wine to complement the tunes. Friday night’s lineup includes Screen Door Porch, Fox Street All Stars and More Than Lights, while Saturday brings acts like New Transit, Panhandle Polecats, Sera Cahoone and Fire Kittens. Saturday’s headlining act, Langhorne Slim comes to the festival from the Northwest musical mecca of Portland, Ore. According to Paste Magazine, “Langhorne Slim trades in big, countrified exaggerations, blowing up rural stereotypes to delirious proportions, howling so hard you can practically see the wheat bushels tumbling from his mouth.” Each year The Sawtooth Music Festival chooses a Stanleybased organization as a beneficiary for the event’s proceeds. This year’s beneficiaries are the Stanley School and the Stanley-Sawtooth Chamber of Commerce. The school is trying to raise funds to bring the Missoula Children’s Theatre to the two-room, K-8 schoolhouse. Friday, July 29, 7 p.m.; Saturday, July 30, noon; $50 adv., $55 gate, full weekend pass; $40 adv., $45 gate Saturday only; $15 adv., $20 gate Friday only; FREE for children under 12. Pioneer Park, Stanley, sawtoothmusicfestival.com.

and a muddy pig chase. Thursday, July 28, and Sunday, July 31, 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Friday, July 29, and Saturday, July 30, 11 a.m.midnight; $5 general, $3 seniors and children 6-12, FREE ages 5 and younger. Canyon County Fairgrounds, 111 22nd St., Caldwell, 208455-8500, canyoncountyfair. org.

S U B M I T

FRIDAY JULY 29 film FERRIS BUELLER’S DAY OFF AT IBG The rigors of the work week often go without a reward. So on Friday, July 29, throw on your party pants

and play hooky from your usual Friday night routine at Idaho Botanical Garden with a screening of the classic Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. Ferris Bueller’s Day Off follows lead man Ferris (Matthew Broderick) and friends as they skip school and try to avoid getting caught. Parades, prank calls, car crashes and hilarity ensue during this 103-minute romp through adolescence. Writer and director John Hughes originally planned for the movie to be a love letter to the city of Chicago, having grown up and spent a majority of his younger

Under the dappled shade of a canopy at the Capital City Public Market, Kainoa Lopez scooped out a hunk of thick ice cream, dropped it into a plastic cup and pulled on an elk horn tap, topping the glass with a frothy stream of dark brown root beer. A steady crowd of parents and kids gathered around the booth, debucksnortrootbeer@ yahoo.com manding BuckSnor t Root Beer floats and icy, sweat-beaded glasses of the brew. Handcrafted in Bellevue, Wash., BuckSnor t Root Beer is made with an aromatic blend of organic wintergreen, licorice root and sassafras. Unlike most mass-market sodas, BuckSnor t doesn’t use any ar tificial colors, flavors or high fructose corn syrup—which keeps it from being cloyingly sweet or coating your tongue with a filmy layer. According to its Facebook page, BuckSnor t hopes to transpor t folks back to a simpler era: “To enjoy a BuckSnor t Root Beer is to take a step back in time when a trip to the store to grab some hard candy then a game of hop scotch on the way home was the main goal of any summer day.” If you need a shot of BuckSnort and can’t wait for the market, you can pick up a frosty glass anytime at Bittercreek Ale House, Red Feather Lounge, The Falcon Tavern and Lulu’s Pizza. —Tara Morgan

years there. Nods are made to Windy City landmarks like the Sears Tower and the Art Institute of Chicago. By breaking the fourth wall and engaging in his own social commentary, Bueller acts as a voice for those tied down by the system but unwilling to relent. His adventures might be juvenile but they spoke to a generation. “Bueller? Bueller? ... Bueller?” 7 p.m. gates, movie at dusk; $5 for non-members, $3 members. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Old Penitentiary Rd., 208-3438649, idahobotanicalgarden. org.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JULY 27 Festivals & Events ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Unwind mid-week with friends, live music and a cold beverage during this family friendly concert series. 5 p.m. FREE, The Grove, Boise, downtownboise.org.

On Stage CABARET—Smash hit about love, war and a changing society. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org. COMEDY NIGHT—Danny Amspacher headlines comedy night where locals can try out their own acts. 8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill and Brewery, 3019 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-658-1533, sockeyebrew.com.

SENSORY EXPLORATION: TASTE—Learn about Boise State’s rooftop garden, sample fresh herbs and plant seeds in egg cartons. Spin the taste tester wheel and sample and identify different liquids, sample vegetables and do a craft project. Take a tour of the treatment plant at 11 a.m. 10 a.m.-noon. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-489-1284, cityofboise.org/bee/watershed.

Odds & Ends VINYL PRESERVATION SOCIETY OF IDAHO— Buy, sell, trade and listen to vinyl records with other analog music enthusiasts. 7-10 p.m. FREE, Modern Hotel and Bar, 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-424-8244, vpsidaho.org.

THURSDAY JULY 28 Festivals & Events

Concerts SUN VALLEY SUMMER SYMPHONY—Take in classical music performances featuring work from Debussy to Mahler and everyone in between throughout the summer. Open seating begins at 5:30 p.m. in the pavilion and on the lawn. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Pavilion, Sun Valley Resort, sunvalley.com.

Art ART OPENING: MICHAEL RUSNACK—Check out work by Michael Rusnack during the opening for his new exhibit. 5 p.m. FREE. Green Chutes, 4716 W. State St., Boise, 208-3427111, greenchutesboise.com.

Literature BOISE NOVEL ORCHARD—Writers meet to edit, critique and encourage each other. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208376-4229, rdbooks.org. DOLLAR BOOK SALE—Time to stock up on $1 deals, courtesy of the Friends of the Garden City Library. 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208472-2941, gardencity.lili.org.

Farmers Markets CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—5-8 p.m. FREE Located on the corner of 12th and Dearborn streets next to the library, Caldwell.

Kids & Teens SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPE DISPLAY—Check out ordinary items magnified 22,000 times under a scanning electron microscope, on loan from Boise State. 1-4 p.m. $4-$6.50. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-3439895, scidaho.org.

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CANYON COUNTY FAIR—Grow it and Show It. Exhibits, livestock, entertainment, carnival rides and food vendors round out the offerings. See Picks, Page 12. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. $5 gate admission, $30 carnival pass. Canyon County Fairgrounds, 22nd Avenue South, Caldwell, 208-455-8500, canyoncountyfair.org.

On Stage AGES OF THE MOON— Actor/playwright Sam Shepard and actor Scott Glenn will perform a reading of the play, written by Shepard and presented by Boise Contemporary Theater. There will be a Q&A with the pair following the reading. See Picks, Page 12. 7 p.m. $50-$100. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net. ANNE OF GREEN GABLES— Boise Parks and Rec and Boise Little Theater present this 12th annual youth summer production under the direction of Cheryl Blauer. 7:30 p.m. $5-$8. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. CABARET—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-4299908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. MESSIAH ON THE FRIGIDAIRE— The image of Jesus appears on a refrigerator in a trailer park in a small town in South Carolina and puts the town—and its citizens—in the spotlight in this play presented by the Stage Coach Theatre. 7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, Corner of Brazil and Wright streets, Boise, stagecoachtheatre.com. 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE—Musical comedy about six unusual adolescents who compete in a spelling bee. 7 p.m. $15-$20. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., 208-3850021, kedproductions.org.

Food & Drink FOOD AND FILM—Monthly fundraiser featuring a three-course meal followed by a movie and discussion. Proceeds from the night go toward the growth and preservation of local foods. Held in the cellar room. Visit tvfcmoviefeb2011.eventbee.com for info and tickets. 7 p.m. $25, includes a three-course meal, tvfcfoodfundraiser.eventbrite.com. Red Feather Lounge, 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-429-6340.

Farmers Markets MERIDIAN URBAN MARKET—5-9 p.m. Downtown Meridian on Idaho Avenue between Main and Second streets, 208331-3400.

Kids & Teens SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPE DISPLAY—See Wednesday. 1-4 p.m. $4-$6.50. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, scidaho.org.

Odds & Ends DOWNTOWN NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION MEETING—The DNA is looking for interested residents to join the board and be hold officer elections. 5:50-7:30 p.m. FREE. Downtown Boise Association, 720 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-385-7300, downtownboise.org. IMMIGRATION MYTH BUSTERS LEGAL PANEL—Bring your burning questions about deportation and immigration, to be discussed with an expert panel of immigration attorneys and an American whose spouse was deported. Call Nathaniel at 208-891-6672 for more info. 7-9 p.m. FREE. The Cole Marr Gallery/Coffee House, 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 134, Boise, 208-336-7630.

FRIDAY JULY 29 Festivals & Events CANYON COUNTY FAIR—See Thursday. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. $5 gate admission, $30 carnival pass. Canyon County Fairgrounds, 22nd Avenue South, Caldwell, 208-455-8500, canyoncountyfair. org.

On Stage ANNE OF GREEN GABLES—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $5-$8. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL— The cast and crew of starlight Mountain Theatre perform Disney’s much-loved musical. 8 p.m. $10-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlight16 mountaintheatre.com.

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BOISEweekly | JULY 27 – AUGUST 2, 2011 | 15

8 DAYS OUT MESSIAH ON THE FRIGIDAIRE—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $12-$15. Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, Corner of Brazil and Wright streets, Boise, stagecoachtheatre.com. 14

THICK-HEADED COMEDY TOUR—Four wanna-be comedians travel the country in one crappy van (their words, not ours) performing their stand-up routines to test their skills and determine if they’ve got what it takes to make it as pros. Olek Szewczyk and BWs own Josh Gross will share their stage. 8 p.m. $5. Fatty’s, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-5142531, drinkfattys.com. 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $15-$20. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-3850021, kedproductions.org. THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA—Valentine and Proteus’ friendship is put to the test in this comedy by the Bard. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Concerts SUN VALLEY SUMMER SYMPHONY—See Wednesday. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Pavilion, Sun Valley Resort, sunvalley.com.

Art ART OPENING: THRESHOLDS— Michael Chamber’s new exhibit features oil paintings, collages and linocut prints. Visit his blog about his work at michaelchamberspaintings.blogspot.com. 6:30-9 p.m. FREE. The Gallery at The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

CHUCKWAGON EXPRESS—Enjoy dinner in Banks and a scenic train ride along the Payette River. 7 p.m. $49.99 for one adult and one child, additional pricing/packages available. Thunder Mountain Line Scenic Train Rides, 120 Mill Road, Horseshoe Bend, 208-7934425, thundermountainline.com.

SATURDAY JULY 30 Festivals & Events CANYON COUNTY FAIR—See Thursday. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. $5 gate admission, $30 carnival pass. Canyon County Fairgrounds, 22nd Avenue South, Caldwell, 208-455-8500, canyoncountyfair. org.

On Stage ANNE OF GREEN GABLES—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $5-$8. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. CABARET—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-4299908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

CHUCKLES COMEDY CABARET—Weekly comedy featuring newbies and established stand-up comedians. 8 p.m. $12. China Blue, 100 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-9515. MESSIAH ON THE FRIGIDAIRE— See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $12$15. Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, Corner of Brazil and Wright streets, Boise, stagecoachtheatre.com. 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $15-$20. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-3850021, kedproductions.org.

Food & Drink SUMMER LUAU PARTY—Don your Hawaiian shirts and grass skirts for an evening of music, dancing and food, island style. 5 p.m. $10. Helina Marie’s Wine and Gift Shop, 11053 Highway 44, Star, 208-286-7960, helinamaries.com.

Workshops & Classes HEMP KNOTTING—Learn how to incorporate hemp knotting into your jewelry making. 12:30 p.m. $15 plus materials. Need to Bead, 1100 N. Orchard St., Boise, 208-384-0404, needtobeadboise.com.

SUDOKU | THE MEPHAM GROUP

Citizen BENEFIT CAR WASH—Broadview University and Warrior’s Promise Foundation unite to give back to those who’ve served our country. Proceeds from this car wash will go to make sure that veterans in our community who need service dogs will get one. Visit warriorspromise.org or call 208-577-2900 for more info. 4 p.m. Donation. Broadview University, 750 E. Gala Court, Meridian, 1-866-253-7744, broadviewuniversity.edu.

Kids & Teens SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPE DISPLAY—See Wednesday. 1-4 p.m. $4-$6.50. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-3439895, scidaho.org.

Odds & Ends BOISE CAFE LATIN NIGHTS— Get a basic Latin dance lesson at 9 p.m. and then commence salsa-ing it up to music from a live DJ. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $5. Boise Cafe, 219 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-343-3397.

16 | JULY 27 – AUGUST 2, 2011 | BOISEweekly

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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8 DAYS OUT VINTAGE SWING DANCE—Instructions on classic Lindy Hop moves. All ages. No partner required. 8 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, heirloomdancestudio.com.

Sports & Fitness SUN VALLEY ICE SHOW— Part of an annual series of performances by Olympic and world-class ďŹ gure skaters, featuring Johnny Weir. 9:30 p.m. $54-$102. Sun Valley Resort, Sun Valley, 208-622-4111, sunvalley.com.

Kids & Teens

On Stage

HAPPY BIRTHDAY HARRY POTTER PARTY—Harry Potter’s birthday celebration includes writing secret messages with invisible ink, broomstick races, drinking butterbeer and more. 1 p.m. FREE. Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-562-4996, boisepubliclibrary.org.

CABARET—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Odds & Ends HOLISTIC AND WELLNESS FAIR—Card readings, psychic and channeled readings, dream analysis, Reiki healing, massage. Find out your antioxidant score, view and purchase art work, jewelry and more. 1-6 p.m. FREE. Her Spirit Center for Growth, 5181 Overland Road, Boise, 208-345-3588.

Farmers Markets CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, Boise, 208-345-9287, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle. KUNA FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-noon. Bernard Fisher Memorial Park, Swan Falls Road and Avalon Street, Kuna. MERIDIAN FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. Located in the Crossroads shopping center at Eagle Road and Fairview Avenue, meridianfarmersmarket. com.

SUN VALLEY SUMMER SYMPHONY—See Wednesday. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Pavilion, Sun Valley Resort, sunvalley. com.

Farmers Markets

SUPER SUMMER CRAFT MARKET—All day celebration of local crafters and artisans, who will be on hand selling their unique creations. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-4675533, yingmcoffee.com.

Odds & Ends

Festivals & Events

NAMPA FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. Located in Lloyd’s Square, Nampa, nampafarmersmarket.com.

Concerts

SATURDAY CRUISE NIGHT— Stop by for music, food, hot rods and hot wheels drag races for the kids. 5-10 p.m. FREE. Bad Boy Burgers 2, 7000 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-373-0020.

SUNDAY JULY 31

MIDDLETON FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. Located in Roadside Park at the corner of Highway 44 and South Middleton Road, middletonfarmersmarket. webs.com.

COMEDY AT THE BALCONY— Try your stand-up routine out and/or come watch local and professional comedians. Sign up at 6:30 p.m. for your chance to win a $50 bar tab. Hosted by Mikey Pullman. 8 p.m. FREE. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 226, Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com.

CANYON COUNTY FAIR—See Thursday. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. $5 gate admission, $30 carnival pass. Canyon County Fairgrounds, 22nd Avenue South, Caldwell, 208-455-8500, canyoncountyfair. org.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

EAST END MARKET—10 a.m.-2 p.m. Bown Crossing, end of Parkcenter Boulevard, Boise.

IDAHO CITY RIDE AND SKATE—Hop on your hog and head to Idaho City for the day. Motorcyclists will meet at Ben’s Crow Inn and ride to Idaho City, where there will be live music and skateboarding at the skate park. Skaters meet at the skate park around 3 p.m. 1:30 p.m. FREE. Ben’s Crow Inn, 6781 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208342-9669.

Bellevue Labor Day Presents

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Tuesday, Aug. 9 @ John Alan Partners Outdoor Pavilion, in Bellevue with opening band

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Tickets: $15 Kids 10 and under are free PRESENTED BY

Cox Communications ‹ Atkinsons’ City of Bellevue John Alan Partners Commercial & Residential Real Estate SPONSORS

Mahoney’s ‹ The Silver Dollar ‹ KECH/KSKI ‹ ResortQuest Sun Valley Hayden Beverage ‹ The Weekly SUN ‹ Marsha K’s BBQ The Canyon 106.7 ‹ Sun Valley Bronze ‹ Webb Landscaping Blaine Porter ‹ Kirsten Shultz Photography The Copy Center ‹ Oak Street Foods ‹ Melissa Ayres

INFO: bellevuelaborday@gmail.com

MONDAY AUG. 1 On Stage HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL—See Friday. 8 p.m. $10-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com.

Concerts SUN VALLEY SUMMER SYMPHONY—See Wednesday. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Pavilion, Sun Valley Resort, sunvalley. com.

Odds & Ends BOISE OPEN MIC MONDAY— With Larry Buttel. 8 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny Irish Pub and Grill, 855 Broad St., Ste. 250, Boise, 208-343-5568, hapennybridgepub.com.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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PIONEER TOASTMASTERS— Work on public speaking. Guests and new members are always welcome. Not so sure you want to speak? No problem, show up and sit in. For more information, email personalityonpaper@ yahoo.com. 7:30 p.m. FREE, 208-559-4434. Perkins Family Restaurant, 300 Broadway Ave., Boise.

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8 DAYS OUT TUESDAY AUG. 2

WEDNESDAY AUG. 3

Food & Drink

Festivals & Events

TUESDAY NIGHT FLIGHTS—Featuring a different winery each week, usually consisting of a combination of three red and/ or white wines to sample. 5:30 p.m. $8-$12. Twig’s Cellar, 816 W. Bannock St., Lower Level, Boise, 208-344-8944, twigscellar.com.

ALIVE AFTER FIVE—See Wednesday, July 27. 5 p.m. FREE, The Grove, Boise, downtownboise.org.

Workshops & Classes

LIQUID FORUM—Learn about and celebrate the work nonproďŹ t organizations do for the community. Sponsored by United Vision for Idaho. 5:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

GUIDED MEDITATION CLASS— Spend part of your lunch hour on Tuesdays developing inner peace and discover how to increase health, success and conďŹ dence through meditation with Jessica Hixson from River Valley Hypnotherapy. Noon-12:30 p.m., sliding scale. Muse Building, 1317 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-342-3316, musebuilding. com/muse_building/muse.html.

PERFORMANCE POETRY WORKSHOP, SLAM OF STEEL AND HAIKU BATTLE—Performance poetry workshop followed by an open slam. 7 p.m. $5 poetry slam, $1 with student ID, boisepoetry.com. Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-331-5632.

Literature

Concerts

DROP-IN WRITING WORKSHOP—Informal writers’ workshop is free to writers who wish to hone their skills, work on character development, overcome writers’ block ad be inspired. Led by Adrian Kien, a poetry and composition professor from Boise State. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3318000, thecabinidaho.org.

SUN VALLEY SUMMER SYMPHONY—See Wednesday, July 27. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Pavilion, Sun Valley Resort, sunvalley.com.

Sports & Fitness

Sports & Fitness BOISE HAWKS BASEBALL— See Tuesday. 7:15 p.m. $7-$12. Hawks Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks. com.

Citizen BOISE BICYCLE PROJECT VOLUNTEER NIGHT—Donate time to help build and repair bicycles for those in need. 6-8 p.m. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., Boise, 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org.

Farmers Markets CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—5-8 p.m. Located on the corner of 12th and Dearborn streets next to the library, Caldwell.

Kids & Teens TEEN LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITY—Help plan events by becoming a member of the Teen Advisory Board. 4 p.m. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-5706900, boisepubliclibrary.com.

Odds & Ends LAST CALL TRIVIA—Wednesdays, 8 p.m. FREE. The Lift Bar and Grill, 4091 W. State St., Boise, 208-342-3250, theliftboise.com; 7 p.m. FREE. Eastside Tavern, 610 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-345-3878; 8 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Wild Wings, 3223 E. Louise Drive, Meridian, 208-288-5485, buffalowildwings. com; 9 p.m. FREE. Applebee’sEmerald, 7845 W. Emerald, Boise, 208-378-1890. SCRABBLE GAME NIGHT—6 p.m. FREE. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 1315 N. Milwaukee, Boise, 208-375-4454, barnesandnoble.com.

BOISE HAWKS BASEBALL—vs. Salem-Kaiser Volcanoes. 7:15 p.m. $7-$12. Hawks Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com.

Odds & Ends BEER PONG TOURNEY—$4 pitchers and a $300 cash prize. 10 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208514-2531, drinkfattys.com. BOOZE CLUES—Trivia and prizes with the one and only E.J. Pettinger. 9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s, 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344.

IDAHO NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Call 541-344-2739 (x203) for more info

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STAND-UP COMEDY NIGHT— Test your routine during open mic night, hosted by Danny Amspacher. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-322-3430. NAMI SUPPORT GROUP— Share your experiences, coping strategies and offer support and encouragement to others living with mental illness. Call 208-376-4304 for more info. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, yingmcoffee.com. PABST BINGO NIGHT—Play bingo for PBR, swag and other random stuff found at second hand stores. 7 p.m. FREE. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208384-9008.

Skeleton Blues by Connor Coughlin was the 1st place winner in the 9th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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NOISE C HONA K AS INGER

SETTING SAIL WITH HEY MARSEILLES Seattle chamber pop septet preps for second album TARA MORGAN It was the shrill bird chirps that gave him Hey Marseilles jumps at the chance to check out the acoustics in Boise bathrooms. away. Matt Bishop, lead singer for Seattle’s chamber folk outfit Hey Marseilles, had snuck into the garden behind Seattle Unisimilar to what was on To Travels and Most of the songs on To Travels and versity’s Office of Admissions, his day job, Trunks, as the title suggests, are about travel- Trunks, but we’ve also got a few songs that to squeeze in a phone interview. Though have a bit more grit to them.” ing. On the hip-twisting, handclap-filled, Bishop peppered our conversation with In addition to learning how to work horn-blaring ditty “Rio,” Bishop sings “drink university-worthy words like “cogent” and together more efficiently over the past three ’til tomorrow becomes yesterday / think of “phraseology,” he also showed his humble years, Hey Marseilles has also started to the shorelines you have yet to see.” And on side, referring to people as “folks” and experiment with the recording process. the softer, guitar-strummed “Cigarettes,” thanking me earnestly for taking time to “We were just really trying to take Bishop’s quivering, Colin Meloy-ish croon talk to him. echoes a similar theme: “I, I remember / how advantage of acoustic spaces, so a lot of the Hey Marseilles has been making “Seattle second record is being recorded in tunnels we, we danced out loud / and safe and solswoon,” according to the Seattle Weekly, with its brand of accordion-soaked orchestral emn harbors / away from windswept towns.” and warehouses, and different tracks for different instruments are being recorded in Though the band didn’t explicitly set out pop since the band self-released its debut To different naturally acoustically beneficial to make a concept album, Bishop said the Travels and Trunks in 2008. But that swooalbum’s travel-themed lyrics and French Riv- spots,” said Bishop. nitude soon spread to the rest of the country With half-joking excitement, Bishop iera feel reflected the fact that most members when the seven-piece signed to Fuzed Music were in their starry-eyed early 20s when they admitted, “I know all the bathrooms where and re-released the album in 2010. you can sing when you visit Seattle.” made the record. Over the past six months, “When we released [To Travels and Though they may lay down tracks in Hey Marseilles has been working on a Trunks], it kind of just slowly built up follow-up EP, which will be released this fall, public bathrooms, the band cleans up nicely. an audience in Seattle over a period of The Seattle Symphony recently invited the months,” said Bishop. “When we finally got and a full-length album, set to come out in early 2012. Interestingly, the new record also group to collaborate on a special perforto a point where we had met our managemance in October called Sonic Evolution. has an overarching theme: the recession. ment and label, they were interested in “The symphony approached us a few “I didn’t figure out until a few weeks ago re-releasing it primarily for the sake of months back. They just recently got a new what all the songs in relation to each other expanding our audience outside of Seattle director and they’re trying to do some and having it sound good and having a more are all about … it’s not a political set of unique shows,” explained Bishop. “So that songs by any means but [reflects economic] cogent effort behind trying to get it out show, about half of it they’ll be doing variastress. A few of us have lost our jobs and there,” said Bishop. And the band did break out of the Pacific four guys moved into a foreclosed house not tions of compositions by Seattle artists like Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Jimi Hendrix, and too long ago, which Northwest. Seminal then the second half of the show, we’ll be actually turned out ’90s band Toad the playing with them—one original piece that to be a fantastic opWet Sprocket invited With Junior Rocket Scientist. we’re writing with the symphony and then a portunity—it’s where Hey Marseilles to Wednesday, July 27, FREE. couple of our songs as well.” we recorded most of open on a national THE GROVE But before Hey Marseilles storm the the record.” tour, and NPR called Downtown Boise at 8th And while the new Seattle Symphony, they’ll pack their trunks the band “sublime and Front Steets album may sound like and head to Boise. The group will perform and heartfelt” during heymarseilles.com for free at Alive After Five on Wednesday, a weighty departure a live performance at July 27. Though the group tends to play from the breezy To Seattle’s KEXP radio. gigs in dark, rock ’n’ roll haunts, they’re Travels and Trunks, “It was hard to foalso comfortable getting down with an allBishop assured fans cus on any one musiages crowd. cian at a time, as they were all playing parts that the band’s core sound will remain “One of the weird things about our unchanged. you wanted to linger with, but the wayfarmusic, in a good way, is our demographic “I think a lot of our foundational stuff, ing spirit of the songs drew me quickly from tends to be pretty varied … We’re fortunate in terms of the aesthetic of our sound, is one to another, and I soon found myself in that our music is super popular with going to be comparable—pretty folky and drifting off to parts unknown,” said NPR’s younger kids and their parents, which is influenced by an eclectic culture of music,” Cheryl Waters. “It’s an adventure anyone great,” said Bishop. said Bishop. “Some of the songs will sound should enjoy.” WWW. 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LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY JULY 27 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: HEY MARSEILLES— With Junior Rocket Scientist. See Noise, Page 19. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove AMY WEBER AND BEN BURDICK TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire CHUCK SMITH—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

STYX AND YES, JULY 28, EAGLE RIVER PAVILION If you get nostalgic for the halcyon days of summer, a coheadlining concert with Styx and Yes may make you dream of the daze of adolescence. Known for their ’70s prog-rock styles, both Styx and Yes found fans in the ’80s by incorporating more pop into their music. Styx’s 1983 concept album, Kilroy Was Here, wasn’t a commercial success but the phrase “Domo arigato, Mr. Roboto” stuck. British band Yes paved a prog-rock path starting in the late ’60s, but their own 1983 hit, “Owner of a Lonely Heart,” put them on a new generation’s radar. In the past 30-plus years, both bands have carried on, and their stop in Eagle is part of their Progressive U.S. Tour. With newish albums to support, both Yes and Styx may garner even more new young fans and keep their place in pop culture. When South Park lampoons you (as they did with “Come Sail Away”), you know you’ve earned it. —Amy Atkins 6 p.m., $39.50-$99.50. Eagle River Pavilion, 827 E. Riverside Drive, Eagle, landofrock.com.

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ELEPHANT REVIVAL—With Jeff Crosby and the Refugees. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $13 door. Linen Building GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s JODI JAMES—9 p.m. FREE. Bouquet JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

SUMMER SLAUGHTER TOUR 2011—Featuring The Black Dahlia Murder and Whitechapel. 3:30 p.m. $22.50-$45. Knitting Factory THE THROWDOWN FINALS—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid

THURSDAY JULY 28 DOWNTOWN NAMPA NIGHTS: THE ALMOST DANGEROUS BAND—5:30 p.m. FREE. Lloyd’s Square FREE PEOPLES—9:45 p.m. FREE. Liquid FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

SCATTERED TREES—With Apple Horse. 8 p.m. Flying M Coffeegarage STYX AND YES—See Listen Here, this page. 6 p.m. $39.50-$99.50. Eagle River Pavilion SUN VALLEY SHAKEDOWN—Featuring Bela Fleck and the Flecktones and Bruce Hornsby and the Noisemakers. See Picks, Page 12. 5 p.m. $48-$125. Sun Valley Festival Meadows TALLY HALL—With Speak and Casey Shea. 8 p.m. $8. VAC TERRY JONES AND BILL LILES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill THURSDAY THUNDER: THUNDER BODY—With Tim Snider’s Sound Society. 6 p.m. FREE. Edwards Stadium 22 Plaza

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE: FREUDIAN SLIP—6:30 p.m. $7 members, $10 general. IBG

KARMEN WOLFE ENSEMBLE—6:30 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

HILLFOLK NOIR AND TRAVIS WARD—7 p.m. FREE. The Modern

FRIDAY JULY 29

KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

KEVIN KIRK—With Steve Eaton and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

AGAINST THE GRAIN—With Trigger Itch and Thousand Effigies. 9 p.m. $TBA. Red Room

LEXICONDON—With JacuzziHiDive. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

MOVEMENT MUSIC FAN NIGHT—9 p.m. $5. Reef

BLAZE AND KELLY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

RABBIT—With Marshall Poole. 8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage

ROCK THE MOUNTAIN—Featuring Tommy Dirtweed, Reverend Otis and The Traveling Medicine Show and more. $20-$25. Grimes Creek, Idaho City

EMILY BRADEN—7:30 p.m. $10. Blue Door

RIZING TIDE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

FORREST DAY—See Listen Here, Page 21. 9:30 p.m. $5. Reef

JOHN JONES, MIKE SEIFRIT AND JON HYNEMAN—With Kevin Kirk and Sally Tibbs. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LIKE A ROCKET—9:45 p.m. $3. Grainey’s THE PRARIE SKY PILOTS—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid RAZORS—With Tree, Art Fad and Central City Music Company. 8 p.m. $5. VAC REBECCA SCOTT—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s ROCK THE MOUNTAIN—$20-$25. Grimes Creek, Idaho City SALLY TIBBS AND KEVIN KIRK—With John Jones, Mike Seifrit and Jon Hyneman. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SAWTOOTH MUSIC FESTIVAL—Featuring Langhorne Slim, Shook Twins, Fox Street All Stars and more. See Picks, Page 13. $15-$50, FREE for kids 12 and younger. Stanley SERA CAHOONE—With Goldfinch. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill TRACY LAWRENCE—8 p.m. $25-$30 reserved, FREE lawn seating. Canyon County Fairgrounds WELL SUITED—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE SATURDAY JULY 30 B3 SIDE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s DAN COSTELLO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub DJ AMAR—With the Natural Movement. 10 p.m. $5. Neurolux EMILY BRADEN—7:30 p.m. $10. Blue Door ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill HYDE PARK ‘TIL DARK: FORREST DAY AND SAMBADA—5 p.m. $5. 13th Street Pub LIKE A ROCKET—9:45 p.m. $3. Grainey’s LOVIN’ FROM THE OVEN BENEFIT CONCERT AND BAKE SALE—Featuring Owlright, Dedicated Servers and Grand Falconers. See Picks, Page 13. 7 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage MARCUS EATON—With Jeff Crosby, Chloe Lear and Kitch Membery. 8 p.m. $6. Knitting Factory MATT HOPPER—9 p.m. $5. Bouquet ORGONE—10 p.m. $7. Reef REX AND BEVERLY—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper RIZING TIDE—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

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ROCK THE MOUNTAIN—$20-$25. Grimes Creek, Idaho City SALLY TIBBS AND KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SAWTOOTH MUSIC FESTIVAL—See Friday. $15-$50, FREE for kids 12 and younger. Stanley THIS IS HELL—With Endwell, March of the Martyrs, For My Own and Blackcloud. 7 p.m. $10. The Venue UNKO ATAMA—With Sandusky Furs and Sneezebill. 9 p.m. $TBA. Red Room

SUNDAY JULY 31 AC SLATER—10 p.m. $10. Reef BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES— Noon. FREE. Grape Escape GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers MORE THAN LIGHTS—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

MONDAY AUG. 1

UBER TUESDAY: THE PRIDS—8 p.m. FREE. VAC WHITESNAKE—7 p.m. $39.50$59.50. Eagle River Pavilion

LARRY BUTTEL—7 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO— 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

TUESDAY AUG. 2 DAVID MAYFIELD PARADE— With My Goodness. 8:30 p.m. $8-$10. Bouquet JEFF MOLL AND GUESTS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny KEVIN KIRK—With Cheryl Morrell, Clark Sommers and Camden Hughes. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers RICKIE LEE JONES—7 p.m. $35-$80. River Run Lodge, Sun Valley TERRI EBERLEIN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

WEDNESDAY AUG. 3 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: TONY FURTADO—With New Transit. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove AMY WEBER AND BEN BURDICK TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire BRANDI CARLILE—With Ivan and Alyosha. 8 p.m. $23-$60. Knitting Factory GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers MUSIC FROM STANLEY: JAMES ORR—4 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge

MUSIC FROM STANLEY: CARRIE RODRIGUEZ—4 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge STRAIGHT AWAY—1 p.m. $10, $8 wine club members, FREE kids 14 and younger. Ste. Chapelle Winery

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

FORREST DAY, JULY 29, REEF Bay Area hip-hopper Forrest Day’s eclectic blend of rap, jazz and fusion rock speaks to the California lifestyle of beaches, babes and brews. But Day and his band of the same name aren’t all sunshine. His lyrics come from a dark place, telling stories of struggle and self-introspection. Poverty, unemployment, love and frustration act as keynotes in Day’s analysis of everyday life, and as a performer, he pulls no punches when it comes to expressing himself. With a background in punk rock and jazz, Day has taken influences from the likes of Frank Sinatra and Jay-Z and molded a sound that is not only honest and relatable but interesting as well. Day grew up playing saxophone, an instrument that, much like his music, doesn’t always blend into its surroundings. The musician not only stands out as a white rapper but also as a white rapper who plays the sax. With help from his top-notch band, there has been some hype about Forrest Day—something the live shows easily live up to. —Trevor Villagrana 9:30 p.m., $5. Reef, 105 S. Sixth St., reefboise.com.

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SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

LOST IN THE STARS Nostalgia for the Light illuminates a people and a problem GEORGE PRENTICE In Nostalgia de la Luz, the most beautiful title of any film so far this year, we are instantly swept away to a breathtaking tour of the cosmos. But in short time, we recognize that our cinematic journey will not only explore the heavens but also Earth and, ultimately, hell. Released as Nostalgia for the Light, the film from master documentarian Patricio Guzman transports us to the relatively unknown Atacama Desert in northern Chile. Even from space, the big blue marble on which we live is Chile’s Atacama Desert is a place of wonder—and thousands of mummified bodies. scarred by the brown patch that is Atacama. At 10,000 feet in elevation, the desert has that only the Atacama and its guardians of But the mystery of why the Atacama absolutely no humidity, and the air is crystalstars and planets know the truth. Desert contains so many human remains is line and dangerously thin. As a result, scienNostalgia for Light also introduces astroltists have fallen in love with the Chilean sky— a shameful reminder of mid-20th century ogers looking to the heavens and a group of astronomers found that they could “touch the history. In the 1973 Chilean military coup women who wander through the desert, siftled by Augusto Pinochet over the demostars” and began building the planet’s largest ing scorched earth with their fingers, searchcratically elected government of President telescopes in Atacama. ing for remains of their husbands, brothers Salvador Allende, thousands of citizens Even without the aid of magnification, the or children. In a beautiful moment near the were murdered and up to 80,000 political night sky is brilliant with nebulae, constelend of the 90-minute film, two of the women prisoners were inlations and galactic terned, many of them are invited inside a massive structure, which mysteries. But the tortured. Many of the houses a telescope. They look inside the lens driest portions of the NOSTALGIA FOR THE LIGHT (NR) while a young astronomer beams. But even so-called “desapareregion have never Directed by Patricio Guzman he knows that none of his science can assist cidos” (the disaprecorded a drop of Featuring Patricio Guzman, Gaspar Calas, the women’s journey for closure. peared) were transprecipitation and the Lautaro Nunez Of the countless images of Nostalgia for ported to abandoned land is permeated with Opens Friday at The Flicks the Light, one is burned indelibly into my mining camps in the salt. No insects, birds memory: As beautiful images of starbursts Atacama Desert that or animals have ever and planets dissolve into one another, the became makeshift survived there, and camera settles on something that resembles concentration camps. due to the environmental confluences, human the surface of Mars. But as the lens pans Most of the prisoners were never acremains are mummified in the desert, frozen in down, we realize that it is not another planet, time. As Guzman narrated the nearly impossi- counted for in the two decades that Pinobut a bronzed, seared human skull. chet remained in power. A few mass graves ble-to-believe story, I had to remind myself to were discovered, but most Chileans know breathe—the visuals were overwhelming.

SCREEN/THE TUBE AN OPEN LETTER TO DIRECTV AND DISH NETWORK Dear Mr. DirecTV and Mr. Dish, I know you have been terribly busy trying to bash each other’s brains in, but could one of you, please, please, please consider adding a stateside edition of Canadian channel CBC to your lineup? For goodness sakes, BBC America is a major success here in the United States. Plus you fill our schedules with programming from Korea, Italy, Central America and everywhere else—but Canada. What do you have against our neighbors to the north?

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Little Mosque on the Prairie—the Ingalls’ problems were never this funny.

Having grown up in a border town, I used to love original programming on the CBC, such as The National, Street Legal and, of course, Hockey Night in Canada. And to this day, anytime I travel to Toronto or Vancouver, I’m reminded that their shows have only gotten better. Little Mosque on the Prairie (that’s a real show), George Stroumboulopoulos Tonight (that’s his real name) and The National (it’s still on the air and has been since 1954) are all swell. So how about a little love for our hoser cousins, eh? —George Prentice WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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SCREEN/LISTINGS Special Screenings CABLE ONE MOVIE NIGHT— Bring your lawn chairs, snacks (or purchase some there), blankets and the family to watch a flick on an inflatable screen in the park at dusk. The movie this week is How to Train Your Dragon, rated PG. Friday, July 29. FREE, Settlers Park, corner of Meridian and Ustick roads, Meridian, meridiancity.org/ movienight. FERRIS BUELLER’S DAY OFF—Enjoy food and drinks from local vendors before the iconic ’80s teen flick starring Matthew Broderick and Jennifer Grey begins at dusk. See Picks, Page 13. Friday, July 29, 7 p.m. FREE members, $5 nonmembers. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. SODA SPRINGS—2C Entertainment presents a special screening of this film of a man’s struggle to confront his past and make a future for himself. Visit sodaspringsthemovie.com for more info. Saturday, July 30, 8 p.m. $10. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3450454, egyptiantheatre.net.

For movie times, visit boiseweekly. com or scan this QR code.

SCREEN/NEW DVD RELEASE

LIFE DURING WARTIME Life During Wartime is a new breed of sequel. Eleven years after he helmed Happiness, Todd Solondz directs yet another tale of dysfunction. Joy (Shirley Henderson) takes some time away from her husband. While she does, her dead ex-boyfriend attempts to win her back from the grave. Joy’s sister, Trish (Allison Janney), is excited about getting remarried, until she learns her ex-husband Bill (Ciaran Hinds), a pedophile, is being released from prison. Bill desperately wants to reconcile with their son, who is finding it very difficult to forgive or forget. If you saw Happiness, definitely check out this dark comedy from Solondz.

TRUST Computers have long been the subject of movies, even before they were a ubiquitous presence in our lives. Trust is a drama that looks at the dark side of this technology as a young teenage girl is targeted by an online sexual predator. Annie (Liana Liberato) becomes more drawn into her virtual life as her parents (Clive Owen, Catherine Keener) are occupied with sending Annie’s brother off to college in the fall. Annie’s online crush talks her into a meeting, where she discovers Charlie (Chris Henry Coffey) isn’t who he claimed to be. The family is torn apart as Annie struggles to accept the loss of her innocence and her father becomes obsessed with finding justice. —Lizzy Duffy

SCREEN/APP I’MA LET YOU SING IN A MINUTE, BUT THIS IS THE BEST APP EVER Life would be just a little bit cooler if ever ything were auto-tuned. Riding the bus would be like living with T-Pain. Going downtown would sound like living in a world full of Lil Waynes. Open your windows and chirping birds would sound like Kanye West. Now, you can live that way—kind of. The Gregor y Brothers, the guys behind Auto-tune The News, which includes ”The Bed Intruder Song” and “The Backin’ Up Song,” have released Songify for the iPhone. Open it up, tap the screen, talk into your phone and Songify is a hell of a good time, although it does the rest. Auto-tune your unless you buy some of the cat meowing, auto-tune dayother beats, the three that Visit iTunes to download time television, auto-tune your come with the free price tag Songify or songify.com to life. Songify gives you three get a little old. But you can hear more from the Gregory beats to lay beneath your next keep the fun quotient up by Brothers. hit song. You can buy several sharing your hits with your others, including the beats friends on Facebook and Twitfor the Gregor y Brothers’ songified version ter with the click of a button. If only life were of Jimmy McMillan’s “The Rent Is Too Damn so easy. High” speech. —Brady Moore

24 | JULY 27 – AUGUST 2, 2011 | BOISEweekly

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FOOD/YEAR OF IDAHO FOOD GU Y HAND

PURPLE PASSION Getting a taste for lavender GUY HAND

Title itle e Spons nso or:

26 | JULY 27 – AUGUST 2, 2011 | BOISEweekly

There’s not another crop that caresses the senses like lavender. That sounds a little sentimental, a little grandmother’s-potpourri corny, but “caress” is the right word for lavender. Even before arriving at the Lakeside Lavender Festival in Nampa on a mid-July weekend, the scent of it drifted on the air like fresh laundry and violets. And once I’d caught a glimpse of those fields of lavender flowers, I couldn’t help but let out an involuntary, lavender-laced sigh: The place looked like a French Impressionist painting. Lakeside Lavender Farm is like going to heaven in a handbasket. The word “lavender” comes from the Latin “lavare,” which means “to wash.” workshops on lavender growing and eating talk about working to make lavender more Lavender has a cleansing, comforting quallavender-inspired lunches. popular in the kitchen. ity that ancient Romans revered, spiking Though the Idaho Department of Ag“We’ve been kind of trying to emphasize bathhouse water and the travel kits of riculture doesn’t track the the culinary side,” Clark said. marching soldiers with lavender (appargrowth of small-scale laven“That’s been one of the fun ently, even world dominators like an ocder farms, an Internet search aspects of the whole lavender casional caress). For those who want to give pulled up several Idaho lavenbusiness for us, introducing In 19th century London, young girls sold lavender a try in their own der festivals, from Priest Lake nosegays of lavender to mask the Dickensian people to the food. And that’s kitchens, culinary lavender to Twin Falls. It’s a national why we give complimentary stench, and during World War I, hospital grows well in Southern Idaho, or Lakeside Lavender phenomenon, according to lavender lemonade and lavworkers swabbed floors and open wounds Farm offers you-cut bundles Washington lavender festival ender cookies, so that people with lavender. Today, lavender is more often for sale. Lavender is also veteran Paul Jendrucko. found tucked into dried flower arrangements, can have that taste.” available at Idaho Indie “To my knowledge, there That lavender taste may be stuffed in sachets or distilled into perfumes Works, located at 106 N. Sixth St. in Boise. For those are about a 150 lavender fesnew to many Americans, and and scented soaps. But this Mediterranean considering jumping on the tivals throughout the United so too is lavender farming herb is also cousin to mint, sage and thyme lavender farming bandwagStates,” Jendrucko said. “The and those in the know use the delicate-tasting and the lavender festival pheon, the first-ever Northwest Sequim Lavender Festival out nomenon itself. Clark’s family angustifolia side of the Lavandula genus as Regional Lavender Conference will be held this year on the Olympic Peninsula in an actual kitchen herb. Just take a look at the has owned this land for more in Seattle, Nov. 11-13. Visit Washington state is problist of ingredients on that bottle of Herbes de than 80 years, but they’ve growinglavenderconference. ably the matriarch and most only been growing lavender Provence in your spice rack. com for more information. famous lavender festival in for the last nine. At the entrance booth to this year’s sevthe country.” “Well, we started growing enth annual Lakeside Lavender Festival, JesJendrucko helped found lavender because Marie, my sica Flynn was offering free lavender lemonade and tea cookies to a steady stream of wife, had read an article in Oprah magazine the Sequim Lavender Festival, which recently celebrated its 15th year, and now teaches about a lady that had moved to Texas and arriving visitors. Both treats had just a hint lavender-growing classes under the pseudof soft, lavender flavor—too much lavender got involved in lavender and lavender festionym Dr. Lavender. He said baby boomvals,” Clark explained. “So we did a little can taste like a shot of laundry detergent. ers, like himself, who were headed into research, planted some lavender and then “I love the culinary varieties,” Flynn retirement with time on their hands and a went to Washington to lavender festivals.” said as she held up a wand of the stunning, The Sequim area of Washington has doz- little land were the driving force behind the densely flowered Royal Velvet lavender. lavender farming and festival surge. ens of lavender farms and is credited with “You can cook with it when you’re done “Many of them had small pieces of land, sparking the lavender festival craze about looking at it,” she said as she took a sniff. and they weren’t going to buy a bunch of 15 years ago. “Then we’ve got Munstead and Blue Hidheavy equipment and go into mass com“There wasn’t anybody cote and a variety of others modity vegetable production,” Jendrucko in the Treasure Valley at that you can cook with.” explained. “Lavender and cut flower prothat time doing it,” Clark After wandering around LAKESIDE LAVENDER FARM duction was something that was attainable continued. “And we thought the festival for a while, tal1003 W. Locust Lane, we had a place that we could and manageable.” lying up numerous other Nampa A 2006 National Sustainable Agriculture 208-466-0523 do it ... We have been proven lavender-spiked edibles like lakesidelavender.com Information Service survey found correct on that.” lavender lattes, lavender iced that “almost without exception, lavThe proof was in the teas, lavender cream sodas, ender farmers in the United States festival. All around us, lavender honey and laven28 are all in the entertainment farming people were cutting lavender bouquets, der ice cream, I wasn’t surprised to hear business,” focusing on small-scale Lakeside Lavender Farm owner Steve Clark taking horse-drawn buggy rides, attending WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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FOOD/CON’T production, festivals and the public’s growing interest in agritourism. Most lavender festivals in the United States are held in June or July, at the peak of a region’s lavender-flowering season. But locally, the opportunity to taste dishes laced with lavender might linger. Dustan Bristol, chef and owner of Brick 29 restaurant in Nampa—caterers of the lavender-inspired lunch at the Lakeside Festival— picked up 2 pounds of the Clark family’s lavender and plans to use it when the mood strikes. “We like to use lavender in creme brulee, panna cotta, and we love it with lamb,” Bristol said. “Because of the festival, we currently have a special salad on the menu for lunch right now where we’re doing lavender poached chicken with a roasted cherry vinaigrette, hearts of palm and candied almonds.” Nick Duncan, head chef at La Belle Vie in Nampa, taught a cooking class at the festival and was also inspired to add some lavender to his restaurant’s menu. For the class, he created something special. “We did a lemon and lavender sorbet, and then a panko and lavenderencrusted chicken breast,” Duncan said. “The chicken breast turned out so good that we actually started doing that at our restaurant.” For chef Franck Bacquet, culinary lavender is nothing new. He cooked with lavender when he was a young chef in France and stocks several varieties in the kitchen of his Boise restaurant Le Coq Rouge. “Normally, you use lavender with something mild,” he said in his rather formidable French accent. “It won’t go very well with beef, but goes very well with chicken, pheasant, partridge and seafood. Seafood is the best, I think.”

FOOD/BEER GUZZLER

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28 | JULY 27 – AUGUST 2, 2011 | BOISEweekly

SUMMER REFRESHMENT IN A CAN The summer heat has finally hit. If you don’t already know that I’m a big fan of beer in cans, you haven’t been paying attention. They are eminently recyclable, chill more quickly than bottles and work in those remote locations where glass is discouraged or forbidden. The three new canned brews that follow are built for summer. Two come from Jackson Hole’s Snake River Brewing; the other is a unique brew from San Francisco’s 21st Amendment. SNAKE RIVER BREWING PAKO’S IPA This beer pours a hazy amber, topped by a thin but very persistent egg-shell froth. Rich, resiny hops dominate the aroma profile that’s laced with touches of tropical fruit. The palate echoes the nose—it’s filled with floral hop flavors, that while omnipresent, aren’t overblown or overly bitter. Smooth malt colors the mid-palate, along with creamy orange, grapefruit and a bit of pineapple. My new, go-to IPA—absolutely delicious. SNAKE RIVER BREWING PALE ALE This brew is a light golden color in the glass with a substantial, creamy head that collapses slowly, leaving a bubbly lacing that sticks. Sweetgrass combines with citruslaced hops on the nose. It’s light and lithe in the mouth, where the flavors are nicely balanced by softly toasted malt playing against a fairly aggressive, resiny hop backbone. This pale ale would go great with spicy Asian cuisine. 21ST AMENDMENT BREWERY HELL OR HIGH WATERMELON WHEAT BEER I did not expect to like this beer—I mean, watermelon wheat? My guess was the only thing it had going for it was alliteration. I stand corrected. This is a remarkably satisfying, definitely different, “bet you can’t drink just one” thirst quencher. It’s a cloudy, straw-colored pour with smooth wheat and just the lightest touch of hops with a tangy kiss of watermelon that works for me. It drinks great straight from the can. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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NEXT STEP AWARENESS Physic reading for $30. For seeing your life for work, love & health. Call Ajna counseling 863-6864. Day & evening appointments. The insight gained can be life altering. Available for parties too.

BW SPIRITUAL OPEN & AFFIRMING CHURCH St. Joseph Reformed Catholic Community is a church which is open & affirming. All are welcomed to celebrate the Mass, participate in the sacraments & in the whole life of the church. Mass is celebrated every Sunday. We are thankful to the community of Boise First United Church of Christ for welcoming us & sharing their

space with us. The address is 2201 Woodlawn Avenue in Boise. Just a few blocks south of State Street. Please join us as we celebrate Christ. Parish phone: 9145934 or www.reformedcatholicchurch.org FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

BW FOR SALE CUSTOM HOME- NE KUNA 3000 sq. ft.- Built 2006 Granite counter tops, black walnut flooring. The kitchen center island with a black walnut butcher block top, custom cabinets, pot rack, full tile back-splash, Jenn-Air double ovens & gas cook top. This home has views of the Boise mountains & valley featuring over 40 acres of common area. $249,900. Driving Directions: Overland, South on Cloverdale, Pass Kuna Mora, Left on Tustin into Arrowrock Ranch Sub. Brett Hughes, 208-484-2156. Boise Cribs Real Estate Team.

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boise’s organic skincare Facials and waxing By appointment only Gift certificates available Éminence organic skincare products

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A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas.

*AMATEUR MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, spa/showers, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio.

WISE TOUCH MASSAGE THERAPY JULY SPECIALS: 60 min. $45, 90 min. $65, couples $100. M/F Therapists available! Please call 989-0066, to schedule a appointment today! FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

729 N. 15th St. 208 344 5883 remedyskincareboise.com

BW MASSAGE A awesome full body by Terrance. $45/hr. In home, studio/outcall. 841-1320.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/ Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 8662759. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. ULM 340-8377.

VIP MASSAGE

Free Foot Bath for Body Detox with 1 hr. foot massage. Treatments for acute and chronic cold hands & feet. Body Massage with special techniques. Pain Relief. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS NAMPA ART GUILD ARTIST CALL Nampa Art Guild is looking for submissions for its 26th Anniversary Juried Show “Art Out LOUD”, which runs Oct 25th Nov 2 at the Nampa Civic Center. The show is open to all artists 18 yrs. & older with original works created in the last two years. Those works can be in oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, pastel, pencil, pen/ink, mixed media & one-of-a-kind woodworking, sculpture, & hand-thrown pottery. September 26th is deadline for digital entries. Please see the Show Prospectus on our web site for more information.

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BW LOST LOST: ORANGE MALE CAT I lost my 14 year old Orange Short hair male cat on July 5th. We just moved from SE Boise to NW Boise & I let him out too soon. He may be on his way back to finding our old house. He has a collar. His name is Finn. He is orange with white paws & orange eyes. He has white on his inner neck & belly & a white spot on the left side of his nose. He is also de-clawed in front. If you have any information or think you have found him, please let me know. Sara 208-284-8819.

BW FOUND FOUND - TAN MALE CHIHUAHUA Sunday evening, July 3 in 5100 block of Yorgason Ave, Boise. ann@beach-mail.com

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LADIES PRESCRIPTION GLASSES Found late Friday night at the Grove tables by the conference doors. Ladies designer optics gold & brown earpieces. bigtimej@msn.com but for quicker response call or text 484-6023.

BW GARAGE SALE EVERYTHING FROM A-Z Multi family. Appliances, furniture, clothes, house wares, tools & electronics, appliances, washer & dryer, bikes, baby clothes. Everything must go. Saturday, July 30, 7:30-1:30, 5986 Tallowtree Way, Columbia Village. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

F O R S A LE BW STUFF 1978 VW BUS Selling the Family Truckster. Haul you & 6 of your friends all over town. Very clean & runs very strong. Nicely tuned & brand new stereo. $5500. Thanks 841-5216. 9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. ABSTRACT PAINTING Large 6 ft x 3 ft abstract triptych 3-panel painting $60 OBO. Cash only. 208-562-0477. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 8881464.

KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643. WARHOL FRAMED PRINT Framed Andy Warhol print ‘Flowers’. Great print modern frame-3 ft x 3 ft. $60 OBO. Cash only. Please call Jan at 208-562-0477. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. 5 PIECE BEDROOM SET $60. Cream colored, gold trim. Queen size head board, dresser, 2 night stand two-drawer dressers & mirror. Phone or text 208-761-6266. LIVING ROOM END TABLE Beveled glass Jade colored green base, approximately 21 inches high. $20. 208-761-6266.

SOLDIER SUMMER WHITE SALE Soldier Mountain Summer White Sale Begins July 10th, Adult Season Pass - $150. Child Season Pass - $95. Senior Season Pass $95. Family Season Pass - $345. Buy Your Pass By August 1st To Get This Amazing Deal! administrator@soldiermountain.com TV 27” TV with universal remote. Excellent condition. 208-761-6266.

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B A RT E R BW NEED ESTHETICIAN/MASSEUSE Cosmetologist looking to trade haircut & color for facial or massage. Looking for ongoing trade. No money exchange or dollar for dollar...service for service only. Email to set up kristenl_sievers@ yahoo.com.

TRADE

SARA’S FURNITURE

Will pay CASH for furniture. 607 N. Orchard St. Call 322-1622.

Accepting Knick Knacks for in store trade at Thrift Store with a Twist. Jewelry, DVD’s, Clothes. 4610 W. State St. 570-7962.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

TAZ: 3-year-old male Siamese-mix cat. Declawed on front feet and would love to be the only cat in your home. (Kennel 113#7321740)

MUFFIN: 1-year-old female domestic shorthair mix cat. Very sweet, friendly and ready for her new family. (Kennel 5- #13583597)

LITTLE DUDE: 1-year-old male domestic shorthair mix cat. Very friendly, handsome and misses having a family. (Kennel 104- #13628524)

STAR: 7-year-old female pug mix. This girl loves to sit and dance for treats and to be brushed. Very friendly, with a cute smile. (Kennel 411- #13561227)

PANCHITO: 7-yearold male Lab mix. Friendly and needs daily exercise. Crate-trained, good with children and other dogs. (Kennel 416- #7229761)

LUCY: 19-month-old female Lab and border collie mix. Housetrained, good with older children and has lots of potential. (Kennel 402#10014904)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

KALO: Loveable furball waiting for you.

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LUNA: Blue-eyed beauty TRISTAN: Beautiful seeks lifetime love. calico seeks real-life fairytale.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JULY 27 – AUGUST 2, 2011 | 31

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Lawn Mowing by Cy. $10- $25. Free estimates. Call Cy at 4079333.

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address

THE END IS IN SIGHT BY DANIEL A. FINAN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

9 Senescence 15 Puzzle 20 Advantage 21 “Chasing Pirates” singer Jones

1 Punch 4 Birthstones whose name starts with the same letter as their month

Case No. CV-IE-2011-07186 NOTICE TO CREDITORS [Id. Code. Sec. 15-3-801(a)]

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Andrea K. Haydon has been appointed personal representative of the estate of the above-named Decedent. All persons having claims against the Decedent or his estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, or filed with the Clerk of the Court.

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ACROSS

BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estate of HOWARD J. SUCHY, Deceased. Case No. CV IE 1111723 NOTICE TO CREDITORS

S E RVIC E S

NYT CROSSWORD |

Andrea K. Haydon c/o IVER J. LONGETEIG 5304 N. Turret Boise, Idaho 83702 Personal Representative June 30, 2011. Pub. July 13, 20 & 27, 2011. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: GREG GORDON, Deceased

NOTICES

MUSIC

SWAPCAFE.COM Come join us! Trade your stuff, your skills, your inventory. Submit via SwapCafe.Net for personal swaps or SwapCafe.Com for B2B. Good luck trading! Questions Info@SwapCafe.Net

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46 Critter with foot-long teeth 47 Dipped sticks? 48 Island known for having “the wettest spot on Earth” (450+” of rain per year) 49 French Revolution figure 51 Adrien of cosmetics 52 Iraq war subj. 53 Hardly breaking a sweat 55 Goldenrod, e.g. 56 Article for Lil Wayne 57 Eastern sect 58 Appears gradually on the screen 59 One of 15, once: Abbr. 60 Major upset, say 62 See 72-Across 65 Monster of Norse myth 66 End of a command at the Battle of Bunker Hill 69 Symbol of strength, to the Maya 72 With 62-Across, Whoopi’s “Ghost” role 73 Granter of an honorary degree to George Washington in 1776 74 Farmer’s ___ 77 Where K-I-S-S-I-N-G happens 79 Hydroxide, e.g. 80 C.I.A. forerunner 81 Palm variety 82 “Godspeed!” 86 Water ____ (dental product company) 87 How some stock is purchased 88 City on the Ruhr 89 Pianist Albéniz 90 TV part 91 Gymnast Comaneci 92 Place with snorts 93 End of a Benjamin Franklin aphorism 96 Bring to a ___ 98 9/ 99 Pacifist’s protest 100 The Jackson 5’s first major label 103 Most clueless 108 Papal legate 111 2009 fantasy film based on a best-selling book 114 Goof 115 Former U.N. leader Kofi

116 Key of the “Odense” Symphony 117 “Swan Lake” maiden 118 Arm of a starfish 119 Has over 120 Tree with fan-shaped leaves 121 Grill brand 122 Cause for a TV-MA rating

DOWN 1 Contemporary of Freud 2 See 96-Down 3 Vegetable on a vine 4 Cruising the beat 5 Hoi ___ 6 Coach Parseghian 7 Varnish resins 8 Jesus, to Christians 9 Quarterfinal groups, e.g. 10 “The way I see it …” 11 See 15-Down 12 Jesús, for one 13 Notre Dame football legend 14 Time to enjoy le soleil 15 With 11-Down, leaders 16 Chicago mayor before Emanuel 17 Number with two 18 Riga resident 19 Switch ending 26 Creator of Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose 27 Watch on the beach, maybe 29 Like bubble gum and questions 33 Skills 35 Main 36 Détentes 37 Classic root beer brand 38 1980s lightweight boxing champ 39 Of the same sort 40 D.C. baseballer 41 “Ya think?!” 42 Stuff in a pit 43 Give a body check 44 “C’est ___” 45 Vols’ school 49 Where Julio Iglesias was born 50 Rampaging, after “on” 53 Had been

87 Big name in brewing 90 Modern update 93 Clue 94 San ___, Calif. 95 Little thrill 96 2006 comedy title character from western 2-Down 97 Buck in the Country Music Hall of Fame 100 [Kiss] 101 “Yikes!” 102 Perfect specimens 103 Half: Prefix 104 Cry after hitting a jackpot 105 “Peter Pan” fairy, for short 106 Struggle (through) 107 Surfer’s concern 109 “Dies ___” 110 Serengeti antelope 112 Witch 113 Point of writing?

54 They moved from Minnesota to Los Angeles in 1960 56 1994 Denis Leary/ Kevin Spacey flick 57 Sorority letter 60 Stone in Hollywood 61 Word repeated in “I ___! I ___!” 62 Bellyache 63 Home of the 46-Across: Abbr. 64 “Ta-da!” 66 “Così fan ___” 67 “Buzz off!” 68 Eddie on “Leave It to Beaver” 69 Dovetails 70 Emily Dickinson poem “For Every Bird ___” 71 Bombastic 74 Some clickers 75 Over 76 Military group headquartered in Colo. Spgs. 78 Architect Saarinen 79 Hankering 81 “___ Alive” 83 Today preceder 84 “Silent” one 85 Krazy ___ 86 Something to watch when there’s nothing on? L A S T H O L L E R O I C O U N S E C O I N R U N S E N G E C U P E P S W S O M E E V A D T A K E A T E T E S L G I I D O L R O O I N D I S H O W H O N O

O C T A

W A S H L T O R A I D

W E E K ’ S

F N O O R I M

B E C O R K D A Y E D S O N S N E A B N A F A A L L C A T E R E R E R

Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

B A H S

C R I S P

L O S E S I I T S I C H D I A L H E

S T E R O B C E O Y E D S

O D D O E S E S P K O V I C

W N E A T P P S A U L E

A N S W E R S

A M A U T R V I E E E A R E E N F N E S O T C L H A I G R B E A U O W D Y E A A L M N T S T S

T O N I C

T I T L E D

S A S L I D G E E A N E T T E A E R R L R E S S

A I N E D S T U R E I E T A M S C S I F R E T O R A P A C E S E K E A N G E R S E A R I E N U S E S D S S F P D A R O E N E R I S S E T S E A S T O N G A D E R S H I N E S U N T A N

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): I love how the poet Rachel Loden describes her impressions of Daniel Borzutzky’s The Book of Interfering Bodies. She says that reading it is like “chancing upon a secret lake full of trembling lilies that projectile vomit both poems and petroleum.” I call this imaginary scene to your attention, Aries, because I’m wondering if you might encounter a metaphorically similar landscape in the coming week. The astrological omens suggest that you’re attracted to that kind of strange beauty, surreal intensity and tenderness mixed with ferocity. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): This would be an excellent time to ripen and fine-tune your independence. Would you be willing to try some experiments in selfsufficiency that would inspire you to love yourself better? Is there anything you could do to upgrade your mastery of taking good care of yourself? By working on your relationship with yourself, you will set in motion a magic that will make you even more attractive to others than you already are. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Even if you don’t usually consider yourself a matchmaker, you could be a pretty good one in the coming week. That’s because you will have more insight than usual about how to combine things in harmonious and evocative ways. In fact, I suspect you will possess a sixth sense about which fragments might fit together to create synergistic wholes. Take maximum advantage of this knack, Gemini. Use it to build connections between parts of your psyche and elements of your world that have not been in close enough touch lately. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You already know what you need to know in order to make a dicey, spicy transition, Cancerian. Even more amazingly, you already have what you need. But for some reason, you don’t trust what you know and don’t believe you have what you need. You’re still in a fretful mode, hunting far and wide for the magic key that you think still eludes you. I’m here to persuade you to stop gazing longingly into the distance and stop assuming that help is far away. Look underfoot. Check with what’s right in front of you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): During my years as a singer in rock bands, I’ve had a theatrical approach to performing. On some occasions, I arrive on stage from the back of the club. Dressed in leather and rags and witchdoctor finery, with a rainbow of fake eagle feathers splayed from my coiffure, I climb into a grocery cart, stand up giving the V for Victory sign with my outstretched arms, and have my bandmates wheel

34 | JULY 27 – AUGUST 2, 2011 | BOISEweekly

me through the crowd. I highly recommend that you arrange to make an equally splashy entrance in the near future, Leo. Picture yourself arriving at your workplace or classroom in resplendent glory, maybe even carried on a litter or throne (or in a grocery cart) by your entourage. It would be an excellent way to get yourself in rapt alignment with this week’s flashy, self-celebratory vibes. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): When I was 19 years old, I was wounded by a shotgun-wielding assailant at Duke University. A few years ago, I revisited the scene of the crime. For two hours, I sat there meditating on the exact spot where I’d been shot. Among the questions I pondered was this: Had there been any benefits that came out of that difficult event? The answer was a definitive yes. I identified several wonderful developments that happened specifically because of how my destiny was altered by the shooting. For instance, I met three lifelong friends I would not have otherwise encountered. My challenge to you, Virgo, is to think back on a dark moment from your past and do what I did: Find the redemption. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In her song “Tik Tok,” pop star Ke$ha claims that she brushes her teeth with whiskey—Jack Daniels, to be exact. In interviews, she has said this is not a glamorous fiction or rhetorical device; she really does it. “Jack Daniels is an anti-bacterial,” she told Vanity Fair. You might want to experiment with rituals like that yourself, Libra. At least for the next two weeks or so, it wouldn’t be totally crazy to keep yourself more or less permanently in a party mood. Why not prep yourself for unfettered fun from the moment the day begins? From an astrological perspective, you need and deserve a phase of intense revelry. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): English raconteur Quentin Crisp told the story of a veteran Hollywood film actor giving advice to a younger actor just getting started. “You’re at a level where you can only afford one mistake,” the wise older man said. “The higher up you go, the more mistakes you’re allowed. Right at the top, if you make enough of them, it’s considered to be your style.” I think this perspective is perfect for you to meditate on, Scorpio. The time is ripe to fuel your ambitions and gain more traction in your chosen field. One of the goals driving you should be the quest for a greater freedom to play around, experiment and risk-making blunders. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I have regular intimate communion with the Divine Wow (formerly known as God). Whether I

believe in my Dear Companion is irrelevant—just as I don’t need to believe in a juicy Fuji apple while I’m eating it. That’s why atheists seem to me like goofy kooks, as fundamentalist in their own way as evangelical Christians. They have absolute, unshakable faith that there’s no such thing as our Big Wild Friend. Agnostics I can understand better; they’re like pre-orgasmic virgins who are at least open to the possibility of getting the full treatment. I offer these comments as a prelude to my prediction for you, Sagittarius, which is that you will soon have a very good chance to get up-close and personal with the Divine Wow. (If that offends you because you’re an atheist, no worry. Nothing bad will happen if you turn down the invitation.) CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): For more than 11 years, a New Jersey man named Jesus Leonardo earned an annual salary of about $45,000 by gathering up and cashing in horse-racing tickets that had been accidentally thrown away by the people who bought them. I suggest we make him your role model and patron saint for the coming weeks. Like him, you are in line to capitalize on discarded riches and unappreciated assets. Be on the lookout for the treasure hidden in the trash. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You’re now in a phase of your long-term cycle when life will be extra responsive to your vivacious curiosity. That’s why I encourage you to ask riveting questions. Ask whom? God, if that’s your style; your higher self, if that works better; or sources of wisdom and vitality you respect, if you prefer. Here are four queries to get you started: 1. “What is the most magnificent gift I can give to life in the next three years?” 2. “How can I become more powerful in a way that’s safe and wise?” 3. “How can I cultivate my relationships so that they thrive even as my life keeps changing?” 4. “What can I do that will help me get all the love I need?” PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I was considering the possibility of getting my family members those GPS devices that locate your car if you’ve forgotten where you parked it. But then I had second thoughts. Wouldn’t that be one additional thing encouraging us to let our memories atrophy? The conveniences that technology provides are wonderful, but at a certain point, don’t they start threatening to weaken our brain functions? I invite you to meditate on this issue, Pisces. It’s time to have a talk with yourself about anything—gadgets, comforts, habits—that might be dampening your willpower, compromising your mental acuity, or rendering you passive.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 20 Issue 05