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local, independent News, opinion, Arts and entertainment www.boiseweekly.com Volume 19, Issue 37 March 9–15, 2011

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Tak EE e on e! news 9

Westward Ho Idaho goes to Oregon for medical marijuana

picks 12

Packin’ Food in Your Fanny Dig out your best fanny pack for the Idaho Foodbank

arts 20

All That Jazz Preservation Hall Jazz Band joins TMP

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Trainwrecks Doggin’ on Sheen and the Oscars

“The biggest education gap of black and white children in this country is between teachers’ ears.”

citizen 10

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NOTE LESSONS IN CIVICS AND CHRONIC We spent a good part of last week following around a bunch of kids. As junior high and high school students ditched class and took to the streets of downtown Boise in protest of education reforms, we were there with cameras and our trusty notepads documenting the scene. Some of the adults I’ve talked to about the students’ behavior dismiss the protests, saying the students were simply mimicking their parents and teachers and ultimately, their peers. I have no doubt that’s true in some cases, but a few of the students had well-crafted questions about Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna’s proposed reforms. Sure, maybe those questions were crafted by their parents, and sure, the choice of venue and the manner in which the students sometimes chose to make their voices heard was inappropriate. But I can tell you, having covered local protests as a reporter, that not everyone who stands with a group on any issue understands the complexities of the issue at hand—many are simply aping their peers, as many of these students were. Regardless of how well the protesting students understood the issue, they were getting one important lesson: In America, you can gather at your state’s Capitol, you can chant, you can criticize your lawmakers, and you have a right to do so. At Citydesk at boiseweekly.com you’ll find video, photos and reporting of the students’ protests, as well as answers to some of the students’ questions from Luna’s camp. Meanwhile, in this edition of Boise Weekly, we yet again turn an eye to medical marijuana. As states bordering Idaho legalize the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes, and as some lawmakers continue to build steam behind their annual push for legalization in Idaho, some Gem State residents aren’t waiting for Idaho to get its act together. Instead, they’re crossing the state’s borders in search of treatment. News Editor George Prentice takes us inside an Ontario, Ore., medical marijuana dispensary that gets plenty of Idaho business while the Legislature considers the newest version of Idaho’s Medical Marijuana bill. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST

ARTIST: Jim McGarvey TITLE: Repurposing

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Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. M ATTHEW W OR DELL

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

A FEW THOUSAND WORDS BW’s crack photo snappin’ team was busy last weekend. Log onto Cobweb for photos of Alan Heathcock’s book launch/signing/reading/party with Hillfolk Noir at the Linen Building, as well as a whole mess of images from Red Light Variety Show’s “Time Machine,” Battle School at Colorcube, Art in the Bar and Portland Taiko.

MARCH 12 FROM 7PM-10PM

CAN’T BEAT ’EM, JOIN ’EM In November, BW reported on crowdfunding, an increasingly popular capital-raising method among artists looking to fund one project at a time. Investment with financial return violates SEC regs, so small business hasn’t been able to take advantage of the crowd-sourced funding method—until now.

30-50% off

SNOWBOARDS, BOOTS, BINDINGS, OUTERWEAR, SELECT SHOES, & STREET CLOTHING.

COLLEGE: SO OVERRATED Higher ed lost $7.5 million last week when JFAC took an axe to the state’s general fund. In January, the guv proposed a 1.3 percent cut but last week’s cut represents almost three times as much as that at 3.5 percent.

BPD CHIEF SAYS NO TO GUNS ON CAMPUS BPD’s chief is BW’s Citizen in next week’s issue. In light of proposed legislation to allow students to carry guns on Idaho’s public college campuses, BW asked Chief Mike Masterson his opinion. His answer has drawn some fire at boiseweekly.com.

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MAIL

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Border crossing for medical marijuana

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ROTUNDA

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CITIZEN

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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MUSIC GUIDE

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ARTS Trey McIntyre Project teams with Preservation Hall Jazz Band for a Mardi Gras unlike any other 20 SCREEN Suggestions for a non-lame Oscars

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FOOD Seed farmers sprout a new movement in farming while honoring tradition

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BEER GUZZLER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | 5

MAIL DON’T GO ON I agree with Mr. Paul Thomas who wrote the letter in the March 2-8 edition of Boise Weekly— our schools have become a hotbed of left wing, atheistic, communist indoctrination and Tom Luna’s reform methods will go a long way in stopping that. However, Mr. Thomas’ recommendations to keep our kids out of those centers of left-wing indoctrination—colleges—don’t go far enough. I would like to add that we could save more money and our heritage by limiting education in Idaho to the eighth grade. After all, we don’t need this “humanitarian, scientific” indoctrination of our children. Knowing how to write their names should be enough. And look at the money it would save. No high school. If the left wing commies in this state want a high school education for their kids, let them pay for it separately. Don’t use our tax money. Our children don’t need it. —Pete Simmons, Boise

IN SUPPORT OF LUNA I can’t believe the paper I read every week is so one sided on the Tom Luna issues that have been happening. For one, him being a part of the Bush administration has nothing to do with anything he is doing right now. For people to judge him based on that is pathetic. Second, I am for his bill and everything he has done for education. I would have been so grateful for a laptop when I was in high school, and half the teachers that I had told me they weren’t there for me, they were there for a paycheck. Why not welcome change? Half the people I know from high school have either dropped out or

were completely unprepared to start college. Luna wants to prepare kids in advance to be independent and to know what to do when they get to the college level. The high school “walk out” was also a load of crap. Most of those kids weren’t there because they know about the bill or about Tom Luna, they did it to get out of school for the day. Lastly, saying that he could have vandalized his own property because he was involved in the Bush administration is a load of shit. It was not planned or done by someone he knows, it was done by someone who clearly can’t handle things maturely. —Jocelyn Goldsberry, Boise

GORE PATROL Deanna Darr’s article on wild boars in Idaho was terribly surprising to me (BW, Feature, “Unwelcome Invaders,” Feb. 23, 2011). I’ve worked for the Bureau of Land Management in Southwest Idaho for the last seven summers—often in the field and typically in the Bruneau area—and I’ve never heard a mention of feral pigs. In addition to booby-trapped marijuana gardens, the idea of a sharp tusk in the back of the leg will keep me on guard this summer when I’m out monitoring vegetation. —Micaela Delagarde, Boise

REPS NEED A PAYCUT When I read Ted Rall’s “No Hope or Change” (BW, Opinion, March 2, 2011) it hit a nerve in me. His article on the lack of effort of the president to take a pay cut caused a flash back to when I called Mike Simpson’s office in Twin Falls last week to give my support on financing public radio and television

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. 6 | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | BOISEweekly

and to give my opinion that the state’s senators and representatives should take pay cuts to reflect the real world that we all are living in. Everywhere people are losing their jobs, or if able to keep their jobs, are having to take reduced hours, benefits or pay. In some cases more than one reduction is on the table in order to keep one’s job. So why are we still forking out our hard-earn money on taxes for our “representatives” to keep living the fat life in Washington, D.C.? What made Ted Rall’s article more disturbing is the argument I received from Simpson’s Twin Falls staff who took my phone call, claiming that Simpson “works too hard to take a pay cut” and asked me did I “have any idea how expensive it was to maintain two households required by his office,” and did I “have any idea how expensive living in Washington, D.C., was?” It showed me just how out of touch and arrogant our “representatives” are. My wife and I work damn hard for our income and have taken pay cuts and hour cuts to keep our jobs. Even though we are not upside down on our house it becomes harder for us to make the monthly payments. We can barely afford health insurance and we are two healthy, fit individuals. Yet our fat cat arrogant “representatives” find themselves too important to sink to the people’s level and take a pay decrease. Let’s take away their subsidized health insurance, insist on pay cuts and eliminate benefits, such as flying first class, expensive living accommodations and extended paid vacations just for starters. When did it change from a privilege to a right for our “representatives” to live the level they live off of our hard earned tax paying incomes? —Eric Allen, Bellevue Visit boiseweekly.com for more letters to the editor. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

BILL COPE/OPINION

FUTURE-RAM-YA’

Part I: The consequence of doing Koch You’ve heard—I know you have—people talk about accepting the consequences of one’s actions. It’s a persistent sermon from our preachy neighbors on the right, the responsibility to “accept the consequences of one’s actions.” Particularly when it’s somebody else they have in mind. However, there is another name for the consequences of our actions, and happily, it’s quicker to say. The future. The greatest influence over which actions we take, if we are thoughtful human beings, is our ability to extrapolate those actions out into a viable vision of the future, yes? That ability may come as a result of education, prior experience, native intelligence or common knowledge. But without it, everything we do, every act we commit, is guesswork. The extrapolation itself could amount to something so relatively insignificant as, “If I eat that burrito so soon before bedtime, I’ll be farting all night long,” or scenarios far more portentous—i.e., “What comes next after people like the multibillionaire Koch brothers and their toadies get everything they want?” The latter of those two questions has been heavy on my mind lately, as it is so often the consequences of other people’s actions that determine our futures more profoundly than anything we do as individuals. Given the broad-scale assault on what’s left of middleclass economic stability by people who already have more money than God—or if not God, then certainly more money that you, me and 95 percent of Americans, put together—I wouldn’t expect the brothers Koch, nor their skulking minions, to answer such a question. Not honestly, at any rate. Nor would I expect the gullible lower percentiles who constitute the right’s fawning flock to extrapolate a future from current events, as I’ve seen no evidence of a talent for long-range thinking in those people. Yet such an extrapolation must be done, don’t you think? If the insatiable David and Charles Koch get their way, if state leaders slavishly servile to the super rich (New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, Ohio Gov. John Kasich, Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter and Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna, to name a few) get their way, if the voracious corporate beast that every day devours another chunk of our America gets its way, what is our future? Once organized labor is thrashed to extinction and the public schools are as privatized as prisons and military mess halls; once higher education is priced out of reach for common citizens and all benevolent government programs are sold off to cronies; once reproductive freedom is choked out by the hands of theocrats and our very survival is at the whim of insurance magnates; once any and all regulation of corporate and banking concerns is scuttled and consumer protection, environmental protection and worker protection are things of the WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

past … then what will our country, our lives, look like? The following is the way I see it unfolding. I’ll make it as short as I can, but I can’t cram the whole future into what’s left of this page, so it’ll come in two parts. As any storyteller knows, it is always easier to comprehend something vast through the experiences of an individual rather than the mass impressions of generic eyes, so I create my character, “Billy,” on whom the future will fall. I don’t consider him strictly fictional. Let us think of him as my grandson, as yet unborn. U Billy loses his latest job because he is too sick to go to work. It’s his third bout in a year with salmonella from contaminated greens. Each time, he lodges a complaint with the restaurant in question, but since the Food and Drug Administration was converted years before into a tax-funded public relations agency for the agri-industry and big pharma, that’s as far as it goes. All three restaurant managers tell him essentially the same thing—“So sue me”—knowing full well that anyone bringing suit against a business now has at least an even chance of ending up in prison himself. (This is the inevitable result of those tort reforms that redefined virtually any lawsuit against a business enterprise as “nuisance litigation”—or as the decrepit, 99-year-old Justice Clarence Thomas croaked out when the reforms were approved by the Supreme Court, “lynching by shyster.”) Billy’s wife tells him to stay away from the salad bar and stick to the deep-fried items. “You wouldn’t be getting salmonella all the time if you’d forget about that damn spinach and go with the hush puppies.” He snaps back, “I wouldn’t be getting salmonella all the time if there were somebody inspecting the damn food supply for contamination, that’s what!” His wife rolls her eyes. “There you go again with that socialist talk.” “I’m just trying to lose a little weight, dear. You should, too.” Taken together, Billy and his wife weigh 487 pounds. She has diabetes, and he will as well by the time he’s 33. She considers herself lucky that their health care is covered by her job, even though a condition of her continued employment is that she stays in the company’s health plan, that she is responsible for 100 percent of whatever cost they throw at her and that by the time they deduct the premiums, she nets just enough money to pay for the gas it takes to drive to work each day. “Thank God they did away with Social Security,” she mutters, “or I’d have to use public transportation.” (This comment reflects her sense of black humor, as everyone knows there is no longer any public transportation.) Join me next week as young Billy goes job-hunting in the future.

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OPINION/TED RALL

PHONY BUDGET CRISIS Forget austerity. Tax the rich.

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NEW YORK—Everywhere you look, from the federal government to the states to your hometown, budget crises abound. Politicians and pundits from both parties tell us that the good times are over and that we’ve got to start living within our means. It’s a lie. Two case studies have made news lately: California, where new/old Gov. Jerry Brown is trying to close a $25 billion shortfall with a combination of draconian cuts in public services and a series of regressive tax increases, and Wisconsin, where right-winger Gov. Scott Walker says getting rid of unions would eliminate the state’s $137 million deficit. Never mind the economists, most of whom say an economic death spiral is exactly the worst possible time for government to cut spending. Pro-austerity propaganda has won the day with the American public. A new Rasmussen poll found that 58 percent of likely voters would approve of a shutdown until Democrats and Republicans can agree on what spending to cut. The budget “crisis” is a phony construction, the result of right-wing “starve the beast” ideology. There is plenty of money out there, but the pols don’t want it. There is no need to lay off a single teacher, close a single library for an extra hour or raise a single fee by one red cent. Every government can not only balance its budget but have a surplus. The solution is simple: tax the rich. Over the last 50 years tax rates for the bottom 80 percent of wage earners have remained almost static. Meanwhile the rich have received tax cut after tax cut. For example, the rate paid by the top .01 percent—

people who currently earn more than $6.5 million a year—fell by half. Europe has one of the fairest ways to generate revenue for government: a wealth tax. In Norway, for example, you pay 1 percent of your net worth in addition to income tax. What if we imposed a Norwegian-style wealth tax on the top 1 percent of U.S. households? The poorest among them is worth a mere $8.3 million. This top 1 percent owns 35 percent of all wealth in the United States. “Such a wealth tax ... would raise $191.1 billion each year (1 percent of $19.1 trillion), a significant attack on the deficit,” Leon Friedman writes in The Nation. “If we extended the tax to the top 5 percent, we could raise $338.5 billion a year (1 percent of 62 percent of $54.6 trillion).” Business shills whine that America’s corporate tax rate—35 percent—is one of the world’s highest. Our real corporate rate—the rate companies actually pay after taking advantage of loopholes and deductions—is among the world’s lowest. According to The New York Times, Boeing paid a total tax rate of 4.5 percent over the last five years. Yahoo paid 7 percent. GE paid 14.3 percent. Southwest Airlines paid 6.3 percent. America’s low effective corporate tax rates have left big business swimming in cash while the country goes bust. As of March 2010 non-financial corporations in the United States had $26.2 trillion in assets; 7 percent of that was in cash. The national debt is $14.1 trillion. Which is a lot. And, you see, entirely by choice.

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NEWS/ROTUNDA NEWS GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

CROSSING THE LINE Oregon marijuana dispensary serves Idaho customers GEORGE PRENTICE There’s something vaguely familiar about 45th Parallel. The small but inviting Ontario, Ore., shop features a large glass display case, not unlike a deli or even a candy store. But you quickly realize you have stepped through the looking glass when you look closer at the labels on Mason jars inside the case: chocolate chunk, blue dream and purple wreck (and more than a dozen other flavors of marijuana) sit alongside Rice Krispie treats laced with marijuana oils. Since 45th Parallel opened its doors two months ago, perhaps hundreds of Idahoans have traveled to the marijuana dispensary, the only one of its kind within seven hours of the Idaho/Oregon border. We say “perhaps” because none of the current and soon-to-be customers BW spoke with wanted their names printed. There’s a good reason: while each has been referred for medical marijuana by a physician, clients know they can’t legally bring it back to Idaho. Even Bill, the director of the 45th Parallel, a non-profit co-op, didn’t want his last name mentioned. Though his operation is on the up and up with Oregon law enforcement and the Department of Human Services, he doesn’t want any push back for himself or his relatives, one of whom is a Treasure Valley law enforcement officer. “We know of at least 500 Idaho clients that have bought property in Oregon just in the last 60 days,” said Bill. “They don’t want to break the law, so this is going to be their new home. Idaho is losing residents, there’s no doubt about it.” 45th Parallel will only sell marijuana on consignment. “I have pot growers who walk in here, and they want to sell it to us at street prices,” said Bill. “I instantly show them the door. No. 1, we’ll only sell at low prices. Marijuana is anywhere from $300 to $600 an ounce on the street. We’ll sell it for $150 to $250 an ounce. We’re not here to make a profit. No. 2, we will not buy directly from a grower. They must be state-approved, and we will only sell their marijuana on consignment. That’s the only way they’ll get paid.” Bill said Oregon State Police closed three marijuana dispensaries in Grants Pass, Ore., for buying marijuana directly from fake “growers” in a state police sting operation. A 45th Parallel customer must first get a referral from an Oregon physician before getting an Oregon Medical Marijuana Program card, issued by Oregon Human Services. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

More than dozen varieties of marijuana are sold at 45th Parallel in Ontario, Ore.

On a recent Saturday afternoon, BW visited members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. a special clinic held by a Portland doctor who “I realize my district is very high LDS,” said traveled to Ontario for the specific purpose Lacey. “And the church may not support this of considering OMMP referrals. He required yet. But I’ve watched too many elderly that are current (no older than one year) medical dependent on pain medication in the last years records from each client. BW spoke to more of their life.” than a dozen patients, almost all from Idaho. Trail jumped into the faith-based Their chronic pain was the result of the worst of medical maladies: multiple sclerosis, cancer, conversation. “If Jesus walked the Earth again, and AIDS and major skeletal injuries. While none walked into Idaho, and was faced with this would reveal if they were planning to bring issue, what would his answer be?” Trail asked any marijuana back to Idaho, each was well rhetorically. aware of the law—possession of less than 3 “You never know until it hits you, until ounces of marijuana in Idaho could result in a it comes to your own house,” said Lacey. year behind bars and/or a $1,000 fine. “Pain pills do terrible, terrible things like Moscow Republican Rep. Tom Trail wants excruciating constipation.” to change that. Idahoans will soon be hearing “When you have to undergo an industrial about his new bill: the Idaho Compassionenema, it’s unlike anything else,” added Trail. ate Use Medical Marijuana Act. Simply put, The Moscow Republican said he doesn’t it would protect Idahoans with serious and debilitating medical conditions from arrest and expect any vote on medical marijuana this prosecution for using medical marijuana under legislative session but he’s anxious to begin a Statehouse conversation. their physician’s recommendation. “This has been bubbling under “I can’t tell you how many Idathe surface for a long time,” said hoans I’ve spoken with that take a Trail. “Everyone knows Idaho is a laundry list of pain medications, each conservative state, but a recent statewith its own side effects,” said Trail. wide survey indicated that a majority “All they want is relief from pain and of people would support a carefully some normalcy.” crafted medical marijuana law.” Trail said he’s referred several But until the day Idaho joins dozen folks in the direction of the Oregon, Washington, Montana Ontario dispensary. VIDEO: Take a tour and a dozen other states in making “But of course, that comes of 45th Parallel. medical marijuana legal, scores of with a big asterisk,” said Trail. Idahoans living with cancer, AIDS “Once they cross the state line and MS will continue to head to the into Idaho, they’re subject to our border for relief. laws. But think of what alternative they “We had a purple heart soldier with trauhave: buying marijuana on the street withmatic brain injury come in here. He was on 10 out any quality assurance.” different types of pain pills,” said Bill. Trail’s co-sponsor on House Bill 19 is PoAfter a long pause, he continued catello Republican Rep. Roy Lacey, an Eastern “I’m sorry. I’m gonna cry.” Idaho conservative whose district is filled with

WATERED-DOWN WATER BILL HEADS TO FULL SENATE “Be careful what you wish for. It might come true.” Those words, spoken by Boise Democratic Sen. Elliott Werk seconds before a vote on an industry-backed water bill, may come back to haunt lawmakers. On March 7, the Senate Resource and Environment Committee voted 7-2, approving a plan that would dramatically alter how and when Idaho protects its waters. The legislation would need a sign-off from the Environmental Protection Agency, and environmentalists said there’s a good chance that might not happen. “If you support this legislation, you’re probably making it easy for the EPA to come in here and start making decisions for you,” warned Justin Hayes, program director for Idaho Conser vation League. “Quite frankly, Idaho would probably get a more favorable standard from the EPA to protect our water quality.” In January, Idaho’s Department of Environmental Quality proposed new antidegradation legislation, instituting new rules to protect high quality water, but the bill died in committee. Idaho’s most powerful business lobby, the Idaho Association of Commerce and Industry, stepped in to unveil its own—pardon the pun—watereddown version of anti-degradation. Among other things, the IACI-sponsored bill eliminates nearly 300 bodies of water from the designation as “special resource waters,” which would have them evaluated in the same fashion as all other waters. Special resource waters include sections of the Clearwater, Salmon and Snake rivers. Furthermore, the compromised anti-degradation measure would slide 46 more water bodies from a Tier 2 status (requiring more protection) down to a Tier 1 status (Idaho’s baseline for water quality). “I think what I’m hearing from you is the solution to pollution is dilution,” said Werk, pointing to IACI representative Alan Prouty, who is also vice president of environmental and regulator affairs for the J.R. Simplot Company. However, Prouty touted plenty of support, saying the legislation was crafted with input from dairymen, cattlemen and irrigators. In fact, one industry—mining—indicated that the legislation was too strict. “There will be less mining in Idaho because of this,” said Jack Lyman, executive vice president of the Idaho Mining Association. “Our members can’t afford the 10 years it will probably take to resolve this issue.” But Lyman’s colleagues could be waiting more than a decade if the EPA rejects the plan. “What would happen if the EPA says ‘no’ and drafts their own rules?” Werk challenged Barry Burnell, water quality administrator at DEQ. “If industrial dischargers needed to renew a permit, they would face much more stringent rules,” said Burnell. “I don’t think the EPA would approve a permit that would allow any additional degradation of Idaho waters.” The bill, which has already been approved by the Idaho House, now heads to the full Senate for a final vote. —George Prentice

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CITIZEN

JANE ELLIOTT A blue-eyed visionary GEORGE PRENTICE

How well do you recall April 4, 1968? To this day, it makes my stomach churn. I can honestly say my life has never been the same, nor has the life of this nation. How did that resonate for you personally? I had seen King as a symbol of hope for communication between people who were different but had the same desires. I was trying to teach my third graders how wonderful America was. And he was a man assassinated because of the color of his skin. How soon after did you first try your blue eyes/brown eyes exercise? The very next day. I was going to separate my third graders based on the color of their eyes. One day blue-eyed children were the bottom of the ladder. The next day browneyed children were looked down upon.

10 | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Did the students embrace the exercise? Absolutely, because they thought it sounded like fun. What was the initial reaction outside of the classroom? No one knew about it except the children and their parents. It wasn’t until the local newspaper wrote an article on it that anyone really heard about it. But then the Associated Press picked up the story, and you got a call from The Tonight Show. We did the exercise in early April, and I was on national television with Johnny Carson in late May. I had never even been on an airplane before. Johnny was very kind but also very curious about the exercise. As a result of that appearance, I got letters from all 50 states. I’d say about a third of them were vicious or vile. Was there fallout back home? About 20 percent of parents who had children going into the third grade told the principal that they didn’t want their children in my class. Each year for the rest of my career, someone asked for their child to not be in my classroom. Did you have support from your principal? It was quiet support. They never fired me, let’s put it that way. Did you experience harassment in your personal life? My own children were beaten up and spat upon. And people stopped eating in my parents’ restaurant.

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

April 4, 1968, changed everything for Jane Elliott. While much of the nation froze in shock at the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., Elliott took action in the only forum that she had: the classroom. The day following King’s death, Elliott introduced an exercise to a small group of 9 year olds. Word of the exercise quickly spread from her small classroom in Riceville, Iowa, to every corner of the United States. A few weeks later, she was sharing her story on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. Elliott’s daring lesson is known as the controversial “Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes” exercise, segregating children based solely upon their eye color. The physical aspect of the exercise was simple. The emotional impact was daring. Elliott, 77, is scheduled to bring her story to Boise State on Wednesday, March 9, as part of a discussion on the anatomy of racism.

Did you continue the blue eyes/brown eyes exercise each year? I did. I knew I had an extremely valuable teaching tool. The biggest education gap of black and white children in this country is between teachers’ ears. Can you compare 1968 to 2011? I think it’s as bad today as it was in 1968 except that we have learned to be covert with our racism. People always tell me, “I don’t see color.” That’s ridiculous. They choose their car by its color. They choose the color of their hair. Do you see color? Is the color of your skin important to you? Does it give you power? I’m sure it does. But if you ask the same questions of a person of color, they’ll say yes, their skin color matters. But no, it doesn’t give them any power. Prejudice is an emotional commitment to ignorance. We don’t want to learn about people who are different from ourselves. People of color have no choice than to learn about white folks. What color are your eyes? [Strong laughter] Mine are blue. My husband’s are brown. And we’ve got multicolors among our kids.

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | 11

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events B W AR C HIVES

You’ve got to hand it to Erin Cunningham—she’s on fire.

Steve Fulton sounds off on audio marketing.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 9

art MFA EXHIBIT OPENING RECEPTION

learning stuff VIDEOGRAPHY AND RECORDING CLASS So you have an artistic vision. That’s great, get in line. But what’s that you say? You also have a well-produced audio and/or visual representation of that vision that can be used for promotional purposes? Well, my mistake then. Please, step right this way into the hall of fame. Mind the piles of commoner droppings on your way in. OK, maybe that’s not a verbatim representation of climbing the artistic ladder. But that little wanker Justin Bieber has shown it isn’t that far off. The world is growing more media centric by the day, and those who can effectively convey their artistic vision will be able to reach more people with it, thereby lessening the chance of them actually starving. To prevent that wave of starvation, the Boise Department of Arts and History has organized a series of workshops for artists and performers covering how they can be more effective in their business, including a seminar on videography and audio recording. The audio section will be taught by Audio Lab owner Steve Fulton, who has crafted highquality audio for local and national acts in Boise for more than a decade. Fulton will offer strategies to overcome common sound issues in the production of polished audio marketing tools. The video section of the workshop will be taught by local video freelancer and former photojournalist Ron Garnys, who will go through the process of making a short video step by step— everything from script creation to equipment selection to effective filming techniques. Both sections are essential knowledge for local musicians and anyone interested in not being left behind in the Internet-dominated future. A complete list of workshops and dates can be found at artsandhistory.cityofboise.org. 5:30-7 p.m., FREE. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

FRIDAY MARCH 11 opera OPERA IDAHO WITH MATT MORGAN

FRIDAY MARCH 11

AND SARAH JANE MCMAHON More people could use a smorgasbord of opera— samplings of opera’s best, all in one event, satisfying lay person and aficionado alike. Let’s admit it: Opera can be dense and intimi-

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dating to newcomers. It is a sophisticated art, and no one wants to appear lacking in knowledge while watching, so why not get the CliffsNotes version, care of Opera Idaho? Both the well-versed and neophyte can be happy

You know spring is in the air when graduate students at Boise State start getting twitchy and exhausted as they prepare for thesis defense time. For students in the master’s of fine arts program it’s twofold—first defending their work to faculty and peers, and then exhibiting it to the public. Matt Bodett, Erin Cunningham and Arin Lindstrom will display the culmination of their college careers on Friday, March 11, when the MFA thesis exhibit opens at the Boise State Visual Arts Center. Erin Cunningham is nervous but confident about the whole process. This exhibition, she explained, will be her first in two years. The show is called “Confabulation” and refers to the psychological term describing a disorder in which a person creates false memories but is unaware that they have done so. “The paintings I have been making have to do with my own particular memory of photographs, and how photographs can inform memory, even if you weren’t present at the time of the photograph, or if you don’t remember the event in which the photograph was taken,” Cunningham said. For the exhibit, she spent a lot of time researching theories that applied to memory and 20th century photography. You can check out Cunningham, Bodett and Lindstrom’s work on Friday at the opening reception and speak with the artists. Their work will be on display in the Visual Arts Center through Friday, March 25. 6-8 p.m., FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center, Gallery One and Gallery Two, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-3994, artdept.boisestate.edu/vac.

about Opera Idaho’s latest offering, taking place at the Egyptian Theatre. The event boasts two rising opera stars, tenor Matt Morgan and soprano Sarah Jane McMahon, who promise to woo the audience with the best opera has to offer. The pair will sing opera classics from La Boheme, Gianni Schicchi, La Traviata, Faust, The Pirates of Penzance and

West Side Story. The singers themselves are not to be missed. Morgan, a performer with the New York City Opera, has been a leading man in many different productions, including Don in Mozart’s Don Giovanni and Romeo in Romeo et Juliette. McMahon is a leading lady in her own right, starring in such roles as Maria in West Side Story

and Micaela in Carmen. These two stars are coming to Boise ready to turn you into the opera-wise sophisticate you have always hoped to be. 6:30 p.m. doors, 7:30 p.m. show, $22-$69 adult, $20-$62 senior, $15-$54 child. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-387-1273, egyptiantheater.net., operaidaho.org. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

E.J. PETTINGER

FIND PAJAMAJEANS The things waiting to be discovered on television in the early hours of the morning are fascinating. And hold on to your Snuggies, folks, because the next big thing in lazy loungewear is upon us, thanks to early morning TV. PajamaJeans are a cross between jeans and leggings, only softer because of the special “Dormisoft” blend of cotton and spandex. According to the commercial, they are perfect for exercising, running errands and lounging in—or for throwing into a suitcase for a spontaneous weekend getaway to the seaside because, of course, they don’t wrinkle. A “famous European designer” invented them, and they come in eight sizes. The statuesque among us are out of luck, as they only come with a 31-inch inseam. However, “they are cute if you roll the flared bootleg into a cuff and wear ’em with your sexiest shoes.” Wait, what? Yes, for those mornings when rolling out of bed, throwing on a hat and heading into work sounds way better than the whole showering-and-hygiene thing, you can just wear your pajamas. PajamaJeans, that is. But don’t forget your sexiest shoes. Yes, it’s lazy on a whole new level.

Elizabeth Gilbert talks commitment from a skeptic’s viewpoint.

Who ever said fanny pack fans are behind the times?

TUESDAY MARCH 15 reading

SATURDAY MARCH 12

ELIZABETH GILBERT

pouch pride INTERNATIONAL FANNY PACK DAY Think mom jeans with a banana clip chaser. International Fanny Pack Day will be a tacky celebration of a frightening fashion faux pas. Sometimes referred to as the belt pack, hip sack, waist bag, bum bag or buffalo pouch, the fanny pack became a sensation in the late 1980s for soccer moms and shameless dads the world over. Coming in all colors, patterns and materials, the once-fashionable fanny pack caused a sensation unseen until Beanie Babies. International Fanny Pack Day is not only a chance to celebrate the horrifying trends of yesteryear, it is also a benefit for the Idaho Food Bank. Each fashion criminal sporting a hipaccentuating colostomy bag is asked to bring two cans of food to help Idaho’s hungry. Liquid Lounge generously and fearlessly hosts this throwback to a time when utility trumped attractiveness, when fabric growths of all sizes could hang from the upper femur and contained everything from now-obsolete traveler’s checks to a warm, gooey pack of gummy bears. Tight roll the jeans, mismatch the colors, strap on what looks like a belt but acts like a purse, and kill two birds with one stone as you simultaneously perplex children and help out a great Idaho cause. 7 p.m., donation of two cans of food. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

you eat them—in a box, with a fox, on a train or in the rain—green eggs and ham still seem like a moldy, gooey plate of gross. Luckily Boise Philharmonic is doing its damndest to make Dr. Seuss’ icky creation at least sound more appealing. On Sunday, March 13, at

SUNDAY MARCH 13 philharmonic GREEN EGGS AND HAM Regardless of where

S U B M I T

Author Elizabeth Gilbert is widely known for her 2006 memoir Eat, Pray, Love. But before Gilbert traipsed across Italy, India and Indonesia, she had a quiet sort of success in less-commercial literary circles. In 1997 she published a collection of short stories, Pilgrims, which was both a New York Times Notable Book and a PEN/Hemingway finalist. Gilbert also wrote for many men’s magazines, including GQ, in which a 1997 article called “The Muse of the Coyote Ugly Saloon” was adapted into the film Coyote Ugly. Gilbert’s latest book, Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace With Marriage, is another memoir, in which she explores the institution of marriage around the world. Gilbert, who never wanted to marry again, had to in order to maintain her relationship with Felipe, the Brazilian man Gilbert met and fell in love with in Bali. In an interview on her website Gilbert explains: “I was hoping to make peace with those new terms—to essentially study my way through the history of marriage until I could find a way to be OK with the fact that I was entering that institution again, and the best way I know how to really get granular and intimate with a subject is to write a book about it.” So whether you’re a longtime fan of Gilbert or a newcomer, you can hear her speak on Tuesday, March 15. Gilbert will be at the Egyptian Theatre as part of The Cabin’s Readings and Conversations Series. 6:30 p.m. doors, 7:30 p.m. show, $12 students, $35$55 adults. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-3450454. Tickets available from The Cabin at 208-331-8000 or thecabinidaho.org.

2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m., the orchestra will present an operatic version of Green Eggs and Ham and Miss Gertrude McFuzz at the Egyptian Theatre. The concert will celebrate the birth of Sir Rhymeslayer himself, Dr. Seuss. So, even if you find Sam I Am to be an annoying

pajamajeans.com

—Heather Lile

pest pedaling a plate of poo, let the philharmonic cure your green-eggs-and-ham disgust with a dose of culture. 2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.; $15 adult, $10 student, child, senior. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-387-1273, boisephilharmonic.org.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | 13

8 DAYS OUT ARTS/NEWS PATR IC K S W EENEY

WEDNESDAY MARCH 9 Festivals & Events MARDI GRAS PARTY—Celebrate Mardi Gras with jambalaya, beads, screwy hurricanes and jazz and Dixieland music. 6-9 p.m. $10. Corkscrews Wine Shop and Pub, 729 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-888-4049, corkscrews1.com.

On Stage THE DROWSY CHAPERONE— Whatever can go wrong is likely to in this musical comedy about a wedding that may or may not happen. 7 p.m. $6-$8. Eagle High School, 574 N. Park Lane, Eagle, 208-939-2189, ehsmeridianschools.org. FIDDLER ON THE ROOF—Some traditions are made to be broken, as this tale of one family’s love, devotion and defiance shows us. The classic musical hits the stage in Boise as part of the Fred Meyer Broadway in Boise series. 7:30 p.m. $28$50.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

Workshops & Classes MAP AND COMPASS BASICS— Topics include understanding map symbols, orienting the map and compass, reading terrain features and more. 7 p.m. FREE. REI, 8300 W. Emerald, 208-3221141, rei.com/stores/boise. VIDEOGRAPHY AND RECORDING CLASS— Ron Garnys and Steve Fulton will teach artists and performers how to record their work in order to produce a quality promotional tool, See Picks, Page 12. 5:30-7 p.m. FREE. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Green GROWING FRUIT TREES—Learn how to grow fruit trees successfully in your garden or yard. 6 p.m. FREE. FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-4000.

Odds & Ends KARAOKE AND WINE ROCK STARS—Unleash your inner rock star. Don’t worry, the wine will help. 8-11 p.m. $10 wine tastings. Helina Marie’s Wine and Gift Shop, 11053 Highway 44, Star, 208-286-7960, helinamaries.com. THE SEAPORT BEAT RADIO DOCUMENTARY SERIES—Listen to the radio documentary series on music and history from Pacific Northwest Underground while enjoying a cup of joe. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, flyingmcoffee.com.

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BOSCO’s Open Studio events offer art appreciators behind-the-scenes glimpses of artists at work.

COVERING THE ARTS On March 2 a panel made up of local luminaries met at Boise Weekly HQ and sifted through the applications for the 2010 Boise Weekly Cover Auction grants. Our thanks go out to Karen Bubb, City of Boise Department of Arts and History’s public arts manager; Michael Faison, executive director of the Idaho Commission on the Arts; Jessica Flynn, founder and CEO of Red Sky Public Relations; choreographer and visual artist Amy O’Brien; BW art director Leila Ramella-Rader; and Ryan Smith, a longtime supporter of the auction and 2010’s high bidder. With the return of some unused money from the 2009 grants, we had a total of $15,646 to award thanks to the hundreds of art appreciators who joined us at our cover art auction this year. The grants will be awarded as follows: Boise Contemporary Theater: $3,000. BCT will create a new theater arts education program, the BCT Theater Lab, in which students will create stage props for use in BCT productions. WGP: $2,800. Theater company Welsh Garcia Productions will produce an original horror play that will integrate local history and folklore and will run three weeks during Halloween. BOSCO: $2,000. Boise Open Studios Collective Organization will put the grant money toward its annual Open Studios event. Trey McIntyre Project: $2,000. TMP’s grant award will go toward its third annual “9+1” exhibit. Boise Bicycle Brigade: $1,521. BBB will have 30 artists each create a bike-themed poster, from which 30 prints will be reproduced and sold at an upcoming poster party. Idaho Dance Theatre: $1,000. ITD will use the money to purchase new dance costumes for Orpheus and Eurydice, a collaboration between IDT, Boise State, BAM and Opera Idaho. Boise Parks and Recreation: $780. Parks and Rec will hold a two-hour potter class designed for individuals with disabilities. When we founded the PJ Dean Artist Grant in 2010, our intent was to award funds to one artist. We quickly learned that it was too difficult to choose only one and this year we have four. Rachel Reichert: $1,000. Reichert is working on “Searching for Quartzburg,” a multi-media project in which she “investigates the lives of Idaho residents ... dreamers, visionaries, eccentrics, hermits ... in one word, outsiders.” Scott Michael Phillips: $545. Phillips, who is new to Boise, plans to work on a non-objective, abstract painting project that he will then donate to the Idaho Youth Ranch and other organizations for them to sell. Benjamin Love: $500. This grant money will go toward a print exchange portfolio that will include work by 16 artists from across the United States and Canada. Tomas Montano: $500. Montano will complete a series of large, screen-printed and painted plywood panels. —Amy Atkins WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT Screen

THURSDAY MARCH 10

CALL OF THE WILD PRESENTATION—Boise’s Big Read comes to a close with a visual presentation of almost all of the sites in Jack London’s novel, from California to the Yukon. Presented by London’s biographer, Daniel Dyer. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org.

On Stage THE DROWSY CHAPERONE— See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $6-$8. Eagle High School, 574 N. Park Ln., Eagle, 208-939-2189, ehsmeridianschools.org. LEAVING IOWA—A writer returns to his childhood home in Iowa with his father’s ashes as per his request, only to find that the family home has been converted into a grocery store. 7:30 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org.

Talks & Lectures THREE COURSES + CAKE LECTURE SERIES—Debbie Millman, graphic designer, author of several books on the subject and president of the design division for Sterling Brands in New York City will speak. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $18-$25. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

MOLLY SWEENEY—Aimee Nell Smith portrays Molly Sweeny, a woman who has been blind since infancy. The story focuses on her relationships with her husband and a world-famous eye doctor. 7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, Corner of Brazil and Wright streets, Boise.

Odds & Ends LAST CALL TRIVIA—If you know more random tidbits of info than the next guy, you might just win a bar tab. 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Food & Drink BEER AND WINE TASTINGS— Sample a rotating selection of European wines and beers. See website for more info. 5-8 p.m. $10. Tres Bonne Cuisine, 6555 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208658-1364, tresbonnescuisine. com.

POKER—Play for fun and prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

FRIDAY MARCH 11 On Stage BALLET INNOVATION—Ballet Idaho dancers get to express their creative sides when they become the choreographers for two performances. 8 p.m. $15. Esther Simplot Center for the Performing Arts, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-345-9116. THE DROWSY CHAPERONE— See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $6-$8. Eagle High School, 574 N. Park Lane, Eagle, 208-939-2189, ehsmeridianschools.org. EL KORAH MELODRAMA—The Shriners shine during this 48th annual benefit performance. A buffet dinner will be available for an additional $10. E-mail elkorahshrine@gmail.com for more info. 8 p.m. $12.50 or $90 for a table of 8. El Korah Shrine Center, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, elkorah.org. LEAVING IOWA—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. MOLLY SWEENEY—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $12-$15. Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, corner of Brazil and Wright streets, Boise. PIRATES OF PENZANCE GOES WEST—The Starlight Mountain Theatre puts its own spin on the classic opera. Call 208-4625523 or visit starlightmt.org for more info. 7:30 p.m. $10-$22. Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208-898-9425. PITA PUN—The Prairie Dog players put a new spin on the childhood classic. 7:15 p.m. $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208336-7383, pdplayhouse.com.

Concerts BOISE PHILHARMONIC—The Chef and the Gourmet benefit for the philharmonic’s education programs, featuring fine food, wine and entertainment. Call 208-344-7849 for more info. 6 p.m. $150. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-3368900, boisecentre.com. CABARET DE L’AMOUR—The Common Ground Choir will transport you to the post-war Paris cabaret scene via music. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub. boisestate.edu.

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

IN CONCERT: MATT MORGAN AND SARAH JANE MCMAHON—Opera Idaho presents an evening of music from La Boheme, La Traviata and more. See Picks, Page 12. 7:30 p.m. $15-$69. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net. TREASURE VALLEY SYMPHONY—Conductor Arturo Chavez will lead the program featuring master composers. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Jewett Auditorium, The College of Idaho, 2112 E. Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208459-3405 or 208-454-1376, caldwellfinearts.org.

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8 DAYS OUT Art

Screen

GREENSPAN OPENING RECEPTION—Celebrate the opening of Michael Greenspan’s exhibit “Constructs.” 6-8 p.m. FREE. Stewart Gallery, 1110 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-0593, stewartgallery.com.

HIDING—A documentary depicting the plight of North Korean refugees hiding in China. Visit linkglobal.org for more info. 5 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. FREE. Trademark Church, 1723 Eastman St., trademarkchurch.com.

MFA OPENING RECEPTION—Meet artists Matt Bodett, Erin Cunningham and Arin Lindstrom during the opening of their masters of fine arts thesis exhibits. See Picks, Page 12. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Boise State Visual Arts Center, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, boisestate.edu/art.

Literature ROBB BOLEN BOOK SIGNING— Local author of Blackfeet Raiders Nomads of the North will be signing copies of his latest book. 1-4 p.m. FREE. Our Memories Indian Creek Museum, 1122 Main St., Caldwell, 208-459-1413.

SATURDAY MARCH 12 On Stage BALLET INNOVATION—See Friday. 8 p.m. $15. Esther Simplot Center for the Performing Arts, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208345-9116. CHUCKLES COMEDY CABARET—Boise’s newest comedy venue will feature someone new each week, from hot young newbies to established stand-up comedians. 8 p.m. $12. China Blue, 100 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-338-6604.

Workshops & Classes KNOW AND GROW GARDENING FOR KIDS—Kids will plant seeds and taste fruits from nations served by the Peace Corps. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $3-$5. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3342120, history.idaho.gov.

Green GROW YOUR OWN BLUEBERRIES—Everything you need to know about growing blueberries. 10 a.m. FREE. FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-4000.

Odds & Ends INTERNATIONAL FANNY PACK DAY—Wear your fanny pack to benefit the Idaho Food Bank. See Picks, Page 13. 7 p.m. Donation of two cans of food. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. SPORTS CARD SHOW—Buy, sell or trade cards with other sports card enthusiasts. 9 a.m.4 p.m. FREE. Holiday Inn BoiseAirport, 3300 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-343-4900.

SUNDAY MARCH 13 On Stage GREEN EGGS AND HAM—Celebrate the birth of Dr. Seuss with the Boise Philharmonic’s version of Green Eggs and Ham and Miss Gertrude McFuzz. See Picks, Page 13. 2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. $10-$15. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net. MOLLY SWEENEY—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $12-$15. Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, corner of Brazil and Wright streets, Boise. PITA PUN—See Friday. 2 p.m. $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208336-7383, pdplayhouse.com.

Concerts DARKWOOD CONSORT—The four members of the Consort will play Irish music. 2 p.m. $10$15. Cathedral of the Rockies, First United Methodist Church, 717 N. 11th St., Boise, 208343-7511.

Odds & Ends LAST CALL TRIVIA—Followed by Anarchist Karaoke. 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. THAT’S WHAT SHE SAID SUNDAYS—Free pool tournament and karaoke. Noon-6 p.m. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-3223430.

THE DROWSY CHAPERONE— See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $6-$8. Eagle High School, 574 N. Park Lane, Eagle, 208-939-2189, ehsmeridianschools.org. EL KORAH MELODRAMA—See Friday. 8 p.m. $12.50, or $90 for a table of 8. El Korah Shrine Center, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, elkorah.org. LEAVING IOWA—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. MOLLY SWEENEY—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $12-$15. Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, corner of Brazil and Wright streets, Boise. PIRATES OF PENZANCE GOES WEST—See Friday. 7:30 p.m. $10-$22. Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208898-9425. PITA PUN—See Friday. 7:15 p.m. $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., 208336-7383, pdplayhouse.com. TMP: MARDI GRAS— Trey McIntyre Project and New Orleans Preservation Hall Jazz Band team up to celebrate Mardi Gras. See Arts, Page 20. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $10-$57. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

16 | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Skeleton Blues by Connor Coughlin was the 1st place winner in the 9th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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MONDAY MARCH 14

ELIZABETH GILBERT— A reading by the author of the best-selling novel Eat, Pray, Love. See Picks, Page 13. 7:30 p.m. $12-$55. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre. net.

On Stage MEXICAN AMERICAN MUSICAL HISTORY—Mexican American history represented by music, with a focus on five different eras. Part of Boise State’s Chicano Awareness Week. Call 208426-5950 for more info. Noon-2 p.m. FREE. Student Union Brava! Stage, Boise State, Boise.

Talks & Lectures PANEL DISCUSSION—A discussion on what is and what is not national culturalism, and what it means to non-dominant groups in a community. 6-8:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union (Simplot Grand Ballroom), 1910 University Drive, Boise.

Religious/Spiritual OPEN CIRCLE—The Universal Pagan Temple invites the public to grow and evolve mentally, spiritually and emotionally with other like-minded people during service. 7 p.m. FREE. The Community Center, 305 E. 37th St., Garden City, 208-336-3870, tccidaho.org.

Odds & Ends BEER PONG TOURNEY—Eight tables set up for play, $4 pitchers and a $300 cash prize. What more could you ask for? 10 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-514-2531, drinkfattys.com.

Odds & Ends BOISE UKULELE GROUP—This ukulele group offers instruction and a chance to jam. All levels welcome with no age limit and no membership fees. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Meadow Lakes Village Senior Center, 650 Arbor Circle, Meridian.

BOOZE CLUES—Trivia and prizes with the one and only E.J. Pettinger. 9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s, 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344. COMEDY NIGHT—Test out your routine on patrons during open mic night. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-322-3430.

TUESDAY MARCH 15

WEDNESDAY MARCH 16 Festivals & Events POETRY SLAM OF STEEL AND HAIKU BATTLE—Performance poetry workshop followed by an all-ages poetry slam. For more information, e-mail cheryl_maddalena@yahoo.com. There is a $25 prize for the haiku champ. 7 p.m. $5 poetry slam, $1 with student ID, boisepoetry.com. Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-3315632.

Opportunities

11-6

For All Your Tobacco Pipe Needs! Pipe Accessories Wood Pipes

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Tobacco Blends Organic Teas

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www.bernenspipeshop.com 2232 W Main St Boise, Idaho 83702 208-297-7585

Food & Drink DRINKING LIBERALLY—Leftleaning individuals gather to talk politics, share ideas and inspire change. The event is a project of Living Liberally. 7 p.m. Solid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208345-6620, drinkingliberally.org.

Workshops & Classes PAVER CLASS—Learn how to create patios, pathways and more. 6 p.m. FREE. FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-4000.

Talks & Lectures IDAHO ENVIRONMENTAL FORUM—Todd Shallat will use art to convey his understanding of science and cultural trends as they pertain to Idaho’s natural environment. 11:30 a.m. $5$13. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza.com.

Workshops & Classes THE SCREENWRITERS GROUP—Learn and practice pitching your screenplay or project. For more information, e-mail sherry.ae@hotmail.com. 6:30 p.m. Idaho Pizza Company, 405 E. Fairview Ave., Meridian, 208-375-4100, idahopizzacompany.com.

Kids & Teens

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP— Young designers, inventors and engineers can bring their creations to life with Legos. Bring a shoebox full of your own if you’ve got them. Some will be provided for you if you don’t. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org. TEEN LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITY—Take a leadership role and help plan events by becoming a member of the Teen Advisory Board. Gain experience in program planning and satisfy volunteer hours for school. 4 p.m. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-570-6900, boisepubliclibrary.com.

Odds & Ends THE SEAPORT BEAT RADIO DOCUMENTARY SERIES—See Wednesday. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-4675533, flyingmcoffee.com.

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | 17

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY MARCH 9 AMY WEBER AND BEN BURDICK TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire

MUFFALO—With Low-Fi. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $5. VAC THE THROWDOWN—Featuring Rishloo, Eye Will and the Boys and This Must I. 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

BARBARA LAING—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe BRADLEY DEAN—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine lounge BRIANNE GRAY—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

MUFFALO, MARCH 9, VAC Pop quiz: What band has been together seven years, features former members of Queens of the Stone Age and The Eagles of Death Metal, had their self-titled debut album produced by Butthole Surfers’ Paul Leary and will be the only Boise-based band showcasing at SXSW this year? Answer: Muffalo. Why haven’t you heard of them? Because their first show ever is on Wednesday, March 9. They’ve spent their time flying between Oregon, Boise and Los Angeles, working on the gritty alt-rock tunes that comprise their debut. But the chemistry between members Dean Gunderson, Derek Myers and Gene Trautmann nullified the inconvenience. “So many bands put out an album and break up two years later. This is better, more mature,” says Myers, Muffalo guitarist and music director of the Eagle-based School of Rock. Muffalo will play six shows en route to SXSW—and turn Muffalo into a real working band along the way. —Josh Gross With Low-Fi. 9 p.m., $5. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., visualartscollective.com.

18 | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | BOISEweekly

DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid THE DIRTY HEADS—With New Politics and Pacific Dub. 8 p.m. $14-$35. Knitting Factory THE DOWNTOWN STRUTS— With The Brothers Gross, Third Base and Jerkwadz. 8 p.m. $5. Red Room GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KRIS DOTY—With Kelli Schaefer and The Pastor’s Wives. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

THURSDAY MARCH 10

RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire

KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club

KING COTTON CD RELEASE PARTY—8 p.m. $5 (FREE with CD purchase). VAC

THE SHIVAS—With Nera. 7 p.m. $5. ColorCube UMPHREY’S MCGEE—8 p.m. $17.50 adv., $20 day of show. Knitting Factory

BLUE DOOR FOUR—With Arts West Live. 6 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

FRIDAY MARCH 11

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

B3 SIDE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

BILL MCKEETHE—6 p.m. FREE. Moxie Java-Five Mile

KEVIN KIRK—With Steve Eaton and Phil Garonzik. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BREAK AS WE FALL—9:30 p.m. $3. Grainey’s

MIKE MARSHALL AND DAROL ANGER—With Vasen. 8 p.m. $30 general, $50 VIP. BCT NEW YORK RIFLES—With Mike D and Trigger Itch. 8 p.m. $3. Red Room PRAIRIE SKY PILOTS—10 p.m. FREE. Liquid THE QUICK AND EASY BOYS— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

BUCK NAKED—9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel DANNY SCHAFFER—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye FULL MOON PEANUT BUTTER—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire JIM LEWIS—7 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

MISSIONARY POSITION—With Mousy Brown. 9 p.m. $5. Red Room MORE THAN LIGHTS—9 p.m. $5. Reef MORNING TELEPORTATION— See Listen Here, Page 19. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux REX AND BEVERLY—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper RIZING REZISTANCE—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid ROBERT JAMES—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m. Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club TRUCK STOP TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub THE WELL SUITED—8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage

JOHN JONES, MIKE SEIFRIT AND JON HYNEMAN—With Kevin Kirk and Sally Tibbs. 6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE SATURDAY MARCH 12 BREAK AS WE FALL—9:30 p.m. $3. Grainey’s

SPOEK MATHAMBO AND RAINBOW ARABIA—9:30 p.m. $7 adv., $10 day of show. Reef TAUGE AND FAULKNER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

DAN COSTELLO—9 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

VAGERFLY—With Watch It Sparkle and Night Train. 8 p.m. $5. VAC

DECKER—With Chad Summervill. 8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage

WHISKEY WRANGLE—With Neo tundra Cowboy and Snake Muzzle. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Bouquet

ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill THE GETAWAY CAR—With Uintahs and Castanelli. 7 p.m. $5. ColorCube MOONSHINE AND MAYHEM—9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel PISCES PARTY—With Blacksmith, Eyewill and more. 8 p.m. $3. Neurolux QUARTERTONS—9 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge REX AND BEVERLY—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club SAVING ABEL—With Nonpoint and Red Line Chemistry. 9 p.m. $15 general, $25 VIP. Knitting Factory SOUL SERENE—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire

MONDAY MARCH 14 ANDREW CORTENS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill BLUES JAM WITH RICHARD SOLIZ—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

TUESDAY MARCH 15

WEDNESDAY MARCH 16

B3 SIDE—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

AMY WEBER AND BEN BURDICK TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire

CARTER FREEMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Solid JAMES LANMAN AND THE GOOD HURT—With Nicole Peoples. 8 p.m. $5. VAC JEFF MOLL AND GUESTS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny KEVIN KIRK—With John Jones. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers RICHARD SOLIZ—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s TERRI EBERLEIN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill TUCKSEDO TERRE TUCK FAMILY BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

BRIANNE GRAY—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown THE COUNTRY CLUB—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS—With Heartless Bastards. 8 p.m. $24$55. Knitting Factory GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers MELVIN SEALS AND JGB—With Prairie Sky Pilots. 8:30 p.m. $17. Bouquet

THE BOISE STATE JAZZ ENSEMBLE—6 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

THE THROWDOWN—Featuring White Bread, Controlled Burn and Boss Hawg and the Short Bus. 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

LARRY BUTTEL—7 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny OLD ONE TWO—With White Bread, Milk and Oilslave. 8 p.m. FREE. Red Room PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. $2. Liquid THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO— With David Veloz. 6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers STEVEN TONEY—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

Kevin Kirk

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

MORNING TELEPORTATION, MARCH 11, NEUROLUX Think about how much extra sleep/Internet time you would get if you could simply teleport from one place to another rather than fly, drive, bike or walk. Of course you can’t, but you can be transported—at least temporarily—with Portland, Ore.’s spacey psychedelic rock band Morning Teleportation. Modest Mouse’s Isaac Brock is a big fan and his seal of approval certainly helped the quartet earn spots at Bonnaroo, Sasquatch and a couple of upcoming shows at SXSW. But even the support of a star will only help so much. Morning Teleportation will do just fine on their own based on their stellar, other-worldly debut, Expanding Anyway, which came out on Brock’s label Glacial Pace on March 8—Brock co-produced the album as well. See them in Boise on Friday, March 11, before they rocket off into super stardom. —Amy Atkins With Sleepy Seeds. 9 p.m., $5. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th, neurolux.com.

BOISE ROCK SCHOOL the BEST PLACE for KIDS to ROCK W W W. B O I S E R O C K S C H O O L . C O M

END OF SESSION GIG

march 24th - Linen Building

SPRING BREAK CAMP

march 29 - april 1

email info@boiserockschool for details

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | 19

ARTS/STAGE KURT GERBER

JAZZ HANDS Preservation Hall Jazz Band joins TMP on stage JAMES ADY Just days after 2011’s Mardi Gras celebrations quiet down, Boise-based dance company Trey McIntyre Project and the famed New Orleans Preservation Hall Jazz Band will rev the festivities back up. The two performance powerhouses will join forces in an exuberant mix of artistry, energy and visceral spirit on Saturday, March 12, at the Morrison Center. This collaboration has been in the subconscious making for years. New Orleans is a beloved stomping ground for TMP Artistic Director Trey McIntyre, who for years enjoyed the city’s easily accessible proximity to his dance alma mater, the Houston Ballet. During his years as a regular visitor to the city, McIntyre established long-lasting friendships and an affinity for the city’s saturated culture. TMP’s Chanel DaSilva, Brett Perry and John Michael Schert dance in denim. “New Orleans is so welcoming, and the people are very similar to Boiseans in the said the energetic Chanel DaSilva, who has was surprised by his gentle and calm demeansense that no matter where you are, you been with TMP since it was founded in 2008. or … he was very laid-back,” said Jaffe. always feel like you belong,” said McIntyre. As satisfying as the partnership has been, After that initial meeting with McIntyre, That affection led to the creation of 2008’s introducing a live seven-piece jazz band into Jaffe expressed immediate interest and comMa Maison and the brand-new The Sweeter a dance performance posed a few artistic mitment to an artistic merger, and the two End, both of which will be on the Morrison respective directors began brainstorming. Mc- challenges. Center stage on Saturday for a matinee and “It just takes some time to feel each other Intyre commissioned PHJB to write the music an evening performance. out, getting the tempos correct and making to which he would choreograph both Ma The idea for the two ballets first emerged sure no one feels artistically compromised,” Maison and The Sweeter End. McIntyre was in 2008 while TMP was performing at New said McIntyre. York’s Association of Performing Arts Present- even present in the studio as PHJB recorded TMP spent a full week in New Orleans the music that he would later take back to his ers. Friends of McIntyre’s from the New Orprior to the Mahalia Jackson Theater perforleans Ballet suggested some kind of collabora- home studio on Fulton Street for rehearsals. mance, rehearsing with PHJB to iron out all The brightly colored Ma Maison costion between his company and one of the jazz the little nuances that make a good perfortumes, developed by acclaimed New Yorkgroups from the Big Easy, spurring McIntyre mance great. Now Boise audiences will get to based designer Jeanne Button, are accentuatto search out the right music for his dancers. After spending just one night at the world- ed by skeleton masks, adding quirky elements experience the culmination of this incredible collaboration. Jaffe said he and the rest of the of androgyny, anonymity, humor and fright. renowned Preservation Hall and hearing band are looking forward to being here, too. Costumes for The Sweeter End were imagPHJB live, McIntyre’s decision was made. “We have actually been to Boise and Sun ined and constructed by New York-based “It’s almost a religious experience to Valley before, and the thing that never gets designer Andrea Lauer with denim donated just be in that historic space and hear them old is seeing just how majestic the natural by Levi’s—Lauer’s designs in the familiar perform. You can actually see the grooves environment is,” Jaffe said. “You know, New material are at once urban and country. in the wood floor where the musicians have Inspired by ritual, the celebration of death Orleans is pretty flat, and we don’t get to stood for decades,” said McIntyre, a selfsee the mountains unless we’re traveling, so and the respectfully feared afterlife, both proclaimed dance anthropologist. Idaho is pretty cool for us.” Ma Maison and The PHJB is a veritable When asked what the future holds Sweeter End are fueled Southern institution, for TMP, McIntyre wasn’t ready to divulge by themes of life’s Saturday, March 12, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., which has counted $35-$57, $10 tickets available for students, his plans. pleasures and expressome of world’s most seniors and Boise State faculty “I am working on a few ideas, but nothing sions of primal joy. talented jazz musicians for matinee only. Both received fantastic I’m ready to talk about,” he said. and pioneers as memMORRISON CENTER McIntyre did, however, admit to an ongoaudience response bers, including Louis 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane ing desire to integrate the latest technologies and critical praise Armstrong, Buddy 208-426-1110 for his multi-media enhanced shows. He after the sold-out Bolden, Bunk Johnson mc.boisestate.edu Feb. 7 performance in enjoys remaining as flexible in his work as his and Jelly Roll Morton. dancers’ rubber band-like hamstrings. New Orleans in the Led by creative direcJaffe has some personal and professional 2,300-seat Mahalia Jackson Theater. That tor and PHJB tuba player Benjamin Jaffe, the night was the world premiere of The Sweeter expectations of his own that he hopes to musical tour de force was founded in 1961 by express during the show. End, which ended in a standing ovation and Jaffe’s parents, Allan and Sandra, who named “[I] always want the audience to leave was a jubilant and fitting close to a powerful the band after its French Quarter home. having had a fantastic experience,” he said. evening. “The first time I met Trey, he was with “This is at the core of New Orleans music; “We have been doing Ma Maison since some of the dancers from New Orleans Ballet, and although I don’t really know exactly what 2008, and the piece takes on a whole new feel- it’s emotional and allows people the chance ing when we dance it with the musicians live,” to celebrate.” I expected from meeting a choreographer, I

20 | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | BOISEweekly

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THE BIG SCREEN/SCREEN

NOTE TO THE ACADEMY: REALLY? Oscar Mayer wieners are more interesting than Oscar’s major winners GEORGE PRENTICE Our long national nightmare is over. The bloodletting, aka the 2011 Academy Awards, is a painful memory. For goodness’ sake, James Franco’s slice of wry humor as Oscar host had about as much humor as James Franco slicing off his arm in 127 Hours. “I just got a text message from Charlie Sheen,” deadpanned Franco, dressed as Marilyn Monroe. Paging Ricky Gervais. Every possible excuse was offered to account for the dull performances by Franco and his co-host Anne Hathaway. But the numbers speak the truth. In the coveted demographic of 18 to 49 year olds, the kudocast went down in history as the second least-watched since Nielsen started tracking back in 1992. There’s also a fair amount of data to back up the fact that the show’s content (or lack thereof) played a big role in the decline. Traditionally, the Oscars grab new viewers as the show progresses. But this year, as the awards gained in importance, viewership lost viewers. In other words, people simply gave up on the show. There’s no time like the present to deal with the future, so here are a few ideas for 2012: 1. Have some respect for the movies. I was initially skeptical of the Academy’s decision to double its Best Picture nominees from five to 10, but I’m a believer now. This year, the 10 nominees were all deser ving. Yet there was scant mention of Inception, Toy Stor y 3 or True Grit, all box office champions. The Oscar show could easily craft tributes to each nominee, with live appearances by cast members. This one’s a no-brainer, Academy. Follow the money. 2. This was the whitest Academy Awards in decades. Apar t from Halle Berr y, Jennifer Hudson and the almighty Oprah, the show was embarrassingly Caucasian. In speaking of Lena Horne’s struggle with an all-white film industr y, Berr y said, “That was a ver y different time in Hollywood.” Her remarks should have shamed the producers. 3. Do not, I repeat, do not go old-school again. Just because Franco and Hatha-

way failed doesn’t mean that we need to slide back to Billy Cr ystal. Cr ystal was fabulous for his time. But any one of a number of contemporar y comic actors could step into the spotlight: Jack Black, Sandra Bullock, Steve Carell, Rober t Downey Jr., Jimmy Fallon, Will Ferrell, Tina Fey, Seth Rogen. If none of these work for you, Academy, I have more. Call me. 4. Show the voting results. Would anyone really be insulted if once the winner picks up the Oscar and leaves the stage, we could see how the Academy voted? It’s a competition. Take your noble heads out of your noble asses. 5. It’s a television show, so make good television. It’s not a concert, so what’s wrong with showing extended scenes of films as singers warble through the Best Song nominees? Showing wideangle camera shots of Randy Newman or Mandy Moore is pretty dull TV. And

once and for all, please move the editing, makeup and sound awards to the off-camera technical ceremonies. Ultimately, the responsibility of the Academy Awards show needs to be handed over to solid television producers. Just because a film producer has a pipe dream of running the Oscarcast, doesn’t mean he or she is qualified to produce three hours of primetime television. A good choice would be George Stevens Jr., producer of the always-classy Kennedy Center Honors. 6. I understand that criticizing the Oscars is almost as popular as the Oscars themselves, but this year’s television ratings were troubling. The 2011 Academy Awards will be remembered for two things: the winners (Colin Firth, Natalie Portman) and the losers (the audience). Get your act together, Academy.

ADAM ROSENLUND

THE TUBE/SCREEN kids use the word “bitchin’”—but imagine the torment of knowing you’re a talented Martian musician while having to disguise yourself as an average Two and a Half Men sucks but drug addiction and hooker abuse are $2-million-per-episode TV star. And on the business side of things, Sheen equally bad. So what are we to make of the blessings the latter have bepredicted that “they’re going to rename it Charlie Bros., not Warner Bros.” stowed upon us by stopping production on Charlie Sheen’s crappy show? That certainly has a better ring to it than “Emilio Estevez’s Brother Bros.” Pass the pipe and praise debauchery, because without those magic According to the rock star with “tiger blood and Adonis DNA,” it took elixirs—including, in his words, “bangin’ 7-gram rocks”—Sheen wouldn’t him an hour to conquer his addictions. That’s imhave given us the greatest show on Earth: his pressive, especially when compared to the tales public descent into Kafkaesque lunacy. of people who took all afternoon to get sober. The limitations of the space-time continuum And now he has work to do. preclude exploring the glorious fount of his recent “I won Best Picture at 20—I wasn’t even trytirades with any hint of analytical justice, but it’s ing,” Sheen told NBC. “I wasn’t even warm.” He still fun to give the whole mess a surface glance. then mentioned the possibility of Major League After calling himself a warlock and demanding 3. First of all, Arnold Kopelson, the producer of a raise for the laugh-track sitcom that even he Platoon got the award. Secondly, the weird thing called a “pukefest,” Sheen told The Today Show, is that Sheen considers an Oscar-winning film a “I’m tired of pretending I’m not special. I’m tired mere stepping stone to Major League 3. of pretending like I’m not bitchin’—a total freakin’ rock star from Mars.” Charlie Sheen doesn’t even need the other man —Damon Hunzeker It’s odd to hear a 45-year-old father of five and a half. He is “winning” without them.

THE SHINE IS OFF OF SHEEN

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | 21

SCREEN For movie times, visit boiseweekly. com or scan this QR code.

T H E AT E R S EDWARDS 22 BOISE 208-377-9603, regmovies.com EDWARDS 9 BOISE 208-338-3821, regmovies.com EDWARDS 14 NAMPA 208-467-3312, regmovies.com THE FLICKS 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com MAJESTIC CINEMAS MERIDIAN 208-888-2228, hallettcinemas.com

FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: NORTHGATE CINEMA COUNTRY CLUB REEL NAMPA REEL 208-377-2620, reeltheatre.com OVERLAND PARK $1 CINEMA 208-377-3072, opcmovies.com NORTHERN LIGHTS CINEMA AND GRILL 208-475-2999, northernlightscinemagrill.com

SCREEN/NEW DVD RELEASE

THE WALKING DEAD

INSIDE JOB

For zombie fans, AMC’s The Walking Dead was a creepy dream come true as it chronicled post-apocalyptic corpse-filled cities and a gang of survivors hoping to best death at each turn. Zombie aficionados’ cravings were satisfied like the zombies munching fresh braiiiiins. The humans are the show’s protagonists and after the running and screaming, they turn out to be real people with real problems: failing marriages, broken families. Developed for TV by Frank Darabont, director of The Shawshank Redemption, the show is ultimately about who these people are and how they come to matter to each other. And how the hell they are going to avoid being eaten.

Perhaps the most interesting moment of the 2011 Oscars came from Charles Ferguson, director of Inside Job, which won the award for Best Documentary Feature. When accepting his award, he angrily said, “Forgive me, I must start by pointing out that three years after our horrific financial crisis caused by financial fraud, not a single financial executive has gone to jail and that’s wrong.” As his speech suggests, the documentary focuses on the financial crisis of 2008 and how it was avoidable. It will leave you, according to one reviewer, “smart angry.” A film that promises to leave viewers both educated and motivated? Yes, please. —Jordan Wilson

SCREEN/INTERNET THINK IT’S TRITE? GUESS AGAIN Max Abrams, Paul Carganilla, and Keith Toll are three actors you may never have heard of but they are worth noting. The actors took a cliche premise—three guys in their mid-20s who share a two-bedroom, one-bathroom apartment—and managed to make it new with the creation of the 2010 Web-only series Guess Again. The series revolves around the relationships between the very different friends. Dean and Rex don’t appreciate “all he brings Dean (Carganilla), who recently received to the apartment”: a Nintendo 64, strawberrynews that his ex-girlfriend is marrying a guy filled Pop-Tarts and Pokemon-shaped macaroni who the roommates thought was gay, is the and cheese. level-headed worry wart. Rex (Abrams), a Though the premise sounds regurgitated, Jersey Shore-esque tool with an incongruent Guess Again’s creators/actors manage to body that resembles a dilemma more than a deliver a fresh comedy style “Situation,” is unintentionally and to showcase characters in prejudiced and as ignorant as Watch Guess Again at whom you want to invest. If you he is arrogant. And rounding guessagain.net. think this show sounds like a out the roommate triad is Jerseries version of Knocked Up or emy (Toll), a gullible yet lovable Half Baked, guess again. character who echoes Jason Segel’s character in I Love You Man. Jeremy is devastated when —Alex Blackwell

22 | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | BOISEweekly

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FOOD GU Y HAND

SEWING THE SEEDS New farming generation swaps seeds, stories GUY HAND On stage at the Basque Center in Boise, farmer Casey O’Leary cuts through the air with an imaginary blade as she sings out a self-penned, seed-centric poem. “Slicing self-consciously, subconsciously stabbing the dense, orange sponge top of my Halloween prop, I’m pondering the wisdom in the combining of red wine and knife.” The 31-year-old O’Leary is one of several participants in a recent Year of Idaho Food seed swap who have decided to share not only their heirloom seeds but stories about them. The long, lanky O’Leary flails her arms, arches her brow and builds her slam poetry paean to seeds into a nearly screamed crescendo. “Again, I embrace the magic in these unassuming seeds,” she shouts. “The canvas! The paint! The painter! All together in a gelcovered shell!” This is probably one of those “you had to be there” moments. But O’Leary’s poetic passion for seed is a stunning contrast to Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack’s recent grim statement that the average age of an American farmer is 57 years old, and more sobering still, that young farmers are dramatically dropping off in numbers. O’Leary and the other young farmers and serious gardeners in this room suggest that small-scale agriculture, at least here, might not be tilting toward the grave just yet. Ariel Agenbroad, a University of Idaho small farms educator in Canyon County, agrees. “If you look at all types of agriculture nationally,” she says, “then the numbers from Vilsack are correct. If you break that down into small farms, then you actually see that the reverse is true, that there is an increase in the number of young, women and minority farmers.” A recent United States Department of Agriculture survey for Idaho backs up Agenbroad, saying that the number of the smallest Idaho farms (with sales under $10,000) grew by 400 in 2010 while the largest farms (with sales of $250,000 or more) dropped by 300. Agenbroad knows O’Leary and says she’s a perfect example of this brand-new breed of farmer: farmers who are often young, focused on local markets and frequently female. In her backyard greenhouse O’Leary has dropped the theatrics but is no less passionate about heirloom seeds and farming. Dressed in a down vest and dirty jeans, she kneels quietly, planting seeds in flats for the coming season. “Today we’re doing Swiss chard plus WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Casey O’Leary flashes her greenhouse grin.

several different kinds of lettuce, three different mustard greens, bok choy and Chinese cabbage,” she says in a soft whisper as she carefully pushes small seeds into dark soil. I ask O’Leary what she finds so riveting about something as seemingly simple as a seed. “The amazing thing about seeds,” she says, “is that inside that little thing is all of the elements necessary to sustain the life of the plant, once you add water. So it’s this incredible thing. Every single thing the plant needs to start its life is encased in that shell, and without the seeds there would be no food.” O’Leary is also fascinated by the idea of saving seed rather than buying it. By saving seed from the best fruits and vegetables from every harvest, then planting those seeds, harvesting, saving and planting again, season after season, each plant variety evolves to better suit local climate and soil. “You’re basically able to create your own seed stock that’s adapted to your specific plot of land in your specific town,” she says. O’Leary is herself adapted to a specific plot of land in a specific town, having grown up seven houses down from where she now sprouts vegetables for several urban farm plots in Boise’s Collister neighborhood. Yet, she doesn’t come from a long line of farmers. “Actually, most of the people that are young folks that are farming here also didn’t come from farming backgrounds,” she says. “We all kind of found it.” Many of the new farmers she knows are people like herself, anxious to do something good in the world, but having trouble engaging in politics or the more confrontational aspects of activism. Agenbroad points out that not all the people searching for a meaningful life are young. She says retirees and people looking for a career change also find life on the land appealing. For all

of them, farming—especially small-scale, sustainable and frequently organic farming—offers a chance to work in what they see as a positive, pastoral and hopefully profitable environment. And unlike industrial agriculture, these new farmers can hit the ground with little more than a chunk of dirt, a shovel and some enthusiasm. “You can watch whole processes of life and death,” O’Leary says of the small-scale farming life she’s lived for seven years. “It really grounds you in. It’s a seasonal thing, so you move with the Earth rather than just locked away in a box. And it’s been the most creative and mentally challenging thing I’ve tried to do, too. It’s really difficult work, mentally.” It occurs to me that O’Leary and this new generation of farmers sound a lot like the heirloom seeds they save. Both are packed with potential. They’re diverse, if occasionally untested and at times unruly. They’re good at producing quality if not quantity. They’re sometimes a little scruffy-looking. And, whether seed or farmer, with enough nurturing, they can grow into vigorous expressions of the place in which they live. Only time will tell whether either will survive the vagaries of climate, soil and agricultural economies. O’Leary brushes away a strand of her long, straight hair as she looks up from a handful of seeds. “This new crop of farmers sprouting up and doing it on small-scale, diversified farms, it’s so much this radical new thing. It’s just going back to what was already being done before. And so in that way I think it does tie well into the heirloom seed idea that new farmers are somewhat like heirloom seeds. We’re just reconnecting to what was already happening before and diversifying and keeping alive all of these very different, placebased, localized agricultural economies. And that’s really exciting work.”

BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | 23

FOOD/TREND COCONUT WATER If you’ve ever tried to pull a Baloo the bear and crack open a coconut shell with a swift thump to the noggin, you’ve been sorely disappointed. The coconut’s hard hairy exterior takes a good machete whack or saw blade to break into. And after doing all that work, you’d assume the milky nectar nestled inside would be sweet, coconut bliss. Wrong. Unless you enjoy the taste of a virgin pina colada wrung out from a wet sock. Yet somehow, despite the questionable taste, a devoted following in the United States has started clamoring for coconut water over the last five years. Marketed as a fat-free, low-calorie, hydrating beverage, coconut water has been held up as an alternative to sports drinks like Gatorade. Coconut water is naturally jam-packed with electrolytes like potassium—670 milligrams per serving, which is more than a banana—and claims exist that it can cure hangovers and has antiaging properties. Made from tender, young, green coconuts, which are harvested at six to eight months old, coconut water has long been a popular beverage elsewhere in the world. According to an article in Beverage World, coconut water sales in Brazil exceed sales of orange juice, raking in $300 million annually. Now the drink is also generating millions in the United States market with three main brands dominating the shelves: O.N.E. (distributed by PepsiCo), Zico (owned by CocaCola) and Vita Coco. Boise Co-op offers a variety of coconut water brands including Vita Coco, Amy and Brian’s, and Grace, some of which feature flavors like acai pomegranate and mango peach. —Tara Morgan

24 | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | BOISEweekly

FOOD/BEER GUZZLER

BRITISH BITTER Back in the day, most British breweries produced two ordinary ales for consumption in the local pub: a mild and a bitter. There could be wide stylistic differences between breweries but compared to the mild, the bitter would be the drier, more hop-driven of the two. I can’t imagine an American industrial brewery labeling its beer as bitter, but what we’re talking about here is a soothing, sessionable ale with a nice hop bite designed for everyday consumption. Here are three rather different takes on the style: BATEMANS XXXB Batemans has a nice copper pour with a tight head, is darker than most bitters and offers up soft hops, biscuit and nutty malt aromas. It opens with smooth malt on the palate, backed by a subtle fruit component with touches of green tea and fennel. The dry hop flavors balance things out on the finish. It’s a great choice as we segue into spring. CONISTON BREWING BLUEBIRD BITTER This one pours a clear, bright amber with a creamy head that fades quickly but leaves a nice lacing. Soft and grainy hops dominate the nose, colored by a floral touch of herb and mineral. It’s very dry on the palate with just a whisper of sweet, biscuity malt and a wellbalanced hit of light, smooth hop bitterness. Despite a fair amount of carbonation, this is an easy-drinking, eminently quaffable ale. WELLS BOMBARDIER A scarlet-tinged amber in color, the Bombardier throws a thick tan head with good persistence. The aromas are a mix of lightly herbaceous hops and malt with a hint of spice. In terms of body and flavor, it strikes a happy medium between the Batemans and the Coniston ales—not as rich as the former but not as dry as the later. The mild malt flavors up front give way to a refreshing hop bitterness with just sweet fruit coloring the mid palate. Definitely worthy. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BW COMMERCIAL CREATIVE DOWNTOWN OFFICE For the creative sort! Downtown Boise sublease of front half of building. Can rent full 960 sq.ft. or individual work pads of 225 sq.ft. (up to 4 available). $1200/ mo. or $350/mo./pad. Located in the Linen District, expansive front windows, many free amenities, and join in on Mastermind Business Development sessions! Looking for like minded business in creative, idea generating industries. Call for more details at 208.344.2680 or e-mail judi@kiefferdesigngroup.com.

BW VOLUNTEERS COMMUNITY ED INSTRUCTORS! Boise Schools Community Education has been providing lifelong learning to the Boise Community for 40 years. We use volunteer instructors from our community to bring inexpensive, fun classes to the Treasure Valley at area schools. We need instructors for all subjects, but particularly: Microsoft Office Suite Social Networking Music/Guitar Art of all Mediums Foreign Languages ~and more!! Our instructors not only serve their community, they build their resume, create relationships, have fun, network, and build their teaching or speaking skills. We would love to hear from you on a class idea! Please contact us today: 854-4047.

BW CLASSES & WORKSHOPS BEEKEEPING CLASSES Interested in honey bees? We will be teaching bee keeping classes, go to tubbsberryfarm.com for more information! HEMA - SWORD FIGHTING Get trained in historical European sword combat, we can turn you into a reliable fighter with the longsword or sword and shield. We don’t charge for lessons and we have some loaner equipment. Phone GLOCK, 208-375-7171.

REAL ESTATE - COMMERCIAL

YOUR KID CAN BE ON TVCTV! “Chill Skillz” TV show! Age:7-14, $60. Contact Leta: metamorphosisstudio@hotmail.com

SHORT ORDER COOK Needed PT. Drop off resume at ‘Ohana Hawai’ian BBQ, 1735 Franklin Rd, Meridian. 888-2661.

BW LOST

First three months free. Call Bette at Studio U, 4532 Overland Rd., 284-3194. SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELORS An established substance abuse provider wants to open a location in Idaho. Are you the right therapist to join our team? To apply: www.RecoveryHelp.com and click-on JOBS for more information about the positions AND how to apply. TECHNOLOGY Hewlett-Packard Company is accepting resumes for Systems/ Software Engineer in Boise, ID (Ref. #BOISSE11). Conduct or participate in multidisciplinary research and collaborate with equipment designers and/or hardware engineers in the design, development, and utilization of electronic data processing systems software. Design, develop, troubleshoot, and debug software programs. Mail resume to Hewlett-Packard Company, 5400 Legacy Drive, MS H16F-61, Plano, TX 75024. Resume must include Ref. # BOISSE11, full name, email address & mailing address. No phone calls please. Must be legally authorized to work in the U.S. without sponsorship. EOE.

BW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

STATIONS FOR LEASE

LOST BASSET HOUND *REWARD* White & tan/brown Bassett Hound male. Comes to the name Rosco. Lost around Idaho Center, Nampa. Reward for safe return. Please, call 208-249-5635 or 208-695-3225. LOST CAMERA REWARD Lost Canon Eos Digital SLR 2/13 - fell from car between Trailhead above Idaho City and Boise - in black case with one broken zipper and extra telephoto lens. Please return for reward. 307-840-3650.

C A RE E RS BW HELP WANTED FLAGGER CLASSES Flagger classes are organizing now. Call Ron at 640-1745. I am an Idaho Certified Flagging Instructor. $50/class & it is a 6 hr. class. The cards I issue are Evergreen Safety Council. $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www. easywork-greatpay.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com Paid In Advance! Make $1000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. homemailerprogram.net PHONE ACTRESSES FROM HOME. BEST PAY OUTS, BUSY SYSTEM, BILINGUAL/SP A+. Weekends a must! Land Line / Good Voice 1-800-403-7772. LIPSERVICE.NET

BUSINESS FOR SALE

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BW HYPNOTHERAPY INTERVIEW/HYPNOSIS SWAP I am doing interviews in exchange for free hypnosis & coaching. 3 hr. session, 1.5 hr. interview, simply interviewing you about a skill

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FO R SA L E BW STUFF

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Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 888-1464. FREE HD FOR LIFE! Only on DISH NETWORK. Lowest Price in America! $24.99/mo. for OVER 120 CHANNELS! PLUS-$550 Bonus! Call Today, 1-888-904-3558. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464.

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B OISE W E E KLY BW ANTIQUES

SARA’S SECONDHAND

Will pay CASH for furniture. 608 N. Orchard St. Call 331-2366.

MUSIC BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION Original Batman & Joker guitars. Limited editions. Matched pair. Serial #004 with gig bags. 208324-5493. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

BW MUSICIAN’S EXCHANGE GOSPEL, BLUES, JAZZ, SOUL Vocalist looking to play gigs. Serious inquiries only. 570-0907.

INVITATION

All musicians who played in H.S., college, or whatever, and would like to pull their instruments out of their closets, dust them off and make happy sounds. The Mulligan Band is the answer for those people looking for an opportunity to make music once more. Take it from me Joe Trumpet, it’s great fun! Band practice is 8:30am at Dunkley’s every Saturday morning. For more information, contact Jim Perkins at 375-1201 or james.e.perkins@gmail.com

JAM SESSION AT JOE’S CLUB Every Sunday starting Feb. 20th at 3pm. Joe’s Club, 318 S. Main St, Payette, Idaho. Call 371-0247 for details. NEW METAL BAND IN BOISE If you like old school metal then check out Calderra! From what I can tell these guys are a brand new metal band in Boise. A great combination of old school meets new school where the singer actually sings. Pretty refreshing cause I am burnt-out on screamo. I don’t know when they’re playing next but they have a couple tunes posted on myspace. I give them my thumbs up. myspace.com/ calderraband Viva Las Vegas! Elvis impersonator for hire. Parties and Weddings. Located in Mtn. Home. John 598-2848.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

AYALA: One-year-old male red Chow Chow and golden retriever mix. Large, strong and devoted to people he knows. (Kennel 326#12426029)

CIRCE: Four-year-old female domestic mediumhair cat. Declawed on front feet. Needs a quiet, indoor home without children. (Kennel 87- #12303186)

ANNIE: Eight-year-old female domestic longhair. Gentle cat who is used to a quiet, adult-only home. Litterbox-trained and declawed. (Kennel 38- #12485854)

JUNIOR: Two-year-old male brindle and white boxer. Calm, gentle, bonds quickly. Appears to be house-trained. Good with dogs. (Kennel 325- #12463657)

SHIA: Seven-year-old female Norwegian elkhound mix. Appears to be house- and cratetrained. Extremely well trained. (Kennel 406#12424058)

SPOT: Eight-year-old male domestic shorthair. Very social cat who is good with children. Doesn’t mind dogs or other cats. (Kennel 103#12481417)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

KNAVE: Sweet talkative BACH: Brilliant comsenior seeks forever poser seeks muse and friend. forever family.

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RINA: Will you be the one to take this large, lovely lady home?

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I RECYCLE OLD BATTERIES Have an old battery or batteries laying around you want recycled? Email mgudgus@yahoo. com or call 861-2187 & I’ll come pick it up. No cost to you for disposal. I am looking for any type of dead automotive battery out there. Truck, van, SUV, boat, RV, golf cart, tractor, bus in any condition. SOLAR AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY Residential and commercial solar electric systems, LED lighting and energy audits. We will help make you and your business more energy efficient. call 208388-4793. YARD SALE Have a happening Yard Sale with signs from the Boise Weekly. Heavy Duty Yard Sale signs $.50 each. Stop by or call 344-2055 for details.

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V-2 BY PETER A. COLLINS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

13 Annoyed with persistent petty attacks 20 Qualify 21 Contest site

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VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

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42 River crossed by the Longfellow Bridge 44 Clogs at the bottom? 45 Arrive at by air 46 Repair shop figs. 47 British P.M. after Lloyd George 49 Ward, to the Beaver 50 Payday, often: Abbr. 51 Crash-investigating org. 52 Striped stones 55 What “Arf! Arf!” or “Meow!” may mean 57 “The Real World” airer 60 2009 hit film with subtitled scenes 62 Earn 63 Word on either side of “à” 66 Contributes 68 Transfer, as at a nursery 70 “The Charge of the Light Brigade” figure 72 Block component 73 “Wedding Crashers” co-star, 2005 76 Evolutionary chart 77 Key of Chopin’s “Polonaise-Fantaisie” 79 Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, once, on “S.N.L.” 80 “Spider-Man” director 81 “Get lost!” 83 Ft. Collins setting 84 Abbr. on a currency exchange board 85 Toy company behind yo-yos 86 Entered carefully 88 Canyonlands National Park features 90 Bands on the run? 91 Aircraft control surface 93 Good name for a surveyor? 94 Some Muslims 95 Those near and dear 98 Quality of new-fallen snow 101 “___ Pieces” (Peter and Gordon hit) 102 Congolese river 104 Nondemocratic rule 105 Short answers?

106 Kind of scan, for short 107 Keepers of the flame? 111 E.R. readout 112 Old nuclear watchdog: Abbr. 113 Dutch city ESE of Utrecht 114 Toil 115 The Beavers of the N.C.A.A. 116 QB’s miscue 117 Newcastle-to-London dir. 118 Play that introduced the word “robot” 119 Anathematic 120 Break, of a sort 121 Some Windows systems

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6

Eighth Hebrew letter Discovers Post-flood locale The other way around Old verb ending About 16,900 ft., for 3-Down 7 Letter’s end? 8 The situation 9 Tree with very hard timber 10 TV title character who said “I’m not an Amazon” 11 Covered, as cookware 12 Some gunfire 13 Overhead ___ 14 Cadence syllables 15 “Let’s make ___ true Daily Double” 16 Plant with purple flowers 17 Name of 13 popes 18 Gold and silver, but not bronze 19 ___ City, Fla. 28 Antiquity, poetically 29 Demise 32 Course for new U.S. arrivals 35 King on un trono 36 A-one service? 37 Setting for part of 2005’s “Munich” 39 Royal name in Norway

78 Satisfied, for a while at least 80 #2’s 82 Home recorder 85 Repair shop job 87T eetotaler 89 U.S.S.R. part: Abbr. 90 What may help one live and learn? 92 Classic hair removal brand 94 Catch some flies 95 Some beans 96 Meanies 97 Hack 98 Overly caffeinated 99 Pooped 100 Some NCOs 103 “___ Enchanted” (2004 film) 104 V 108 U.R.L. ender 109 Brewhouse fixture 110 Code-breaking grp.

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Use for skating Break down Infernal Big name in mustard Sloppy, as a kiss Sword: Fr. ___-X “Oh, joy!,” e.g., typically 55 Inane 56 ___ Miller (Julie Christie title role with 57-Down) 57 Warren Beatty title role with 56-Down 58 Group with a board of governors 59 Weekly since 1955, with “The” 61 Type in again, as a password 62 “After you” 63 Vessel seen just below the surface? 64 Hired gun, in gang slang 65 Coils 67 Clotting agent 69 Plastic used in piping 71 Subs 74 Marcel Marceau, e.g. 75 [This makes me mad!]

L A S T

Y O U P D Y N A S L O P E O M A R D O G H S T O A T P A S S I T A P A B L E L I A R E N U R M A K E A R E N M I I B E L L A T L A S T O R A R D

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Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A P P E A L S T O

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N G C O R R I B R E T S I O E L D E R

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | 29

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Dear Mr. Astrologer: Like the god Prometheus, I stole fire from the gods and gave it to people who sometimes make awful use of it. As punishment, the gods chained me to a rock on the beach and arranged for an eagle to come daily to eat my liver. Luckily, the liver grows back every night. Unluckily, the eagle always returns to devour it again. I’m used to it by now; it doesn’t hurt as much as it once did. But I’m still eager to get out of my predicament. Any suggestions? —Aries in Limbo.” Dear Aries: Your rescue is scheduled for no later than your birthday, possibly before. In the meantime, the best thing you can do to prepare for your release is to feel gratitude for all you’ve learned during your ordeal. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your meditation for this week comes from writer H. P. Lovecraft. “What a man does for pay is of little significance. What he is, as a sensitive instrument responsive to the world’s beauty, is everything!” While that’s always good counsel, I think it’s especially apt for you right now. You’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when you’d be smart to evaluate your own worth based less on what job you do and more on who you are. Practice thinking this healing idea: The soulfulness you embody and express from moment to moment is the single greatest measure of your success as a human being. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): One of my favorite peculiarities about the English language is the idiosyncratic words it uses to characterize groups of specific animals. For example, the correct term for many owls gathered together is not “flock” but “parliament.” Likewise, we say rabble of butterflies, prickle of hedgehogs, shrewdness of apes and murder of crows. If I had to come up with a comparable term for the human members of your tribe, it might be something like a “zeal of Geminis” or a “charm of Geminis” or a “romp of Geminis” or an “exaltation of Geminis.” All those words capture part of the glory that will be you, especially for the next few weeks. CANCER (June 21-July 22): The roots of the lotus are anchored in muck at the pond’s bottom. Its leaves float on the water and its dramatic flower rises above on a thick stem. It’s an evocative plant that is featured in many ancient myths. For Buddhists, it was an emblem of enlightenment: beauty ascending from the mud. In India, a thousand-petaled golden lotus symbolized the miracle of creation. To the Egyptians, it represented rebirth. Even modern science has contributed to building the mystique of the lotus, having determined that its seeds can

30 | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | BOISEweekly

remain viable for many centuries. It’s not a fragile marvel. In the 16th century Chinese folk tale, “Monkey,” a teacher instructed the hero on how to achieve a long life. “Even amidst fierce flames,” he said, “the Golden Lotus can be planted.” For the foreseeable future, Cancerian, the lotus is your power object. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Picture a very complicated combination lock, one that requires dialing up eight different numbers to open,” writes Arianna Huffington. “You have seven of the numbers, but the lock still won’t open until you hit upon that final number. Oneeighth may not seem as ‘big’ as seven-eighths, but without the final click of the combination, the tumblers won’t fall into place.” Sound familiar, Leo? In my astrological opinion, you have dialed up the first seven numbers but you don’t know what the eighth is yet. Until you discover it, the lock will stay closed. Where should you look for the missing info? It’s now within your reach. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the coming week, it’s very important that you stay out of other people’s hells—even if they invite you in with a big welcome, and even if you’re tempted to join them there in their infernos as a misguided way of proving your love. Be compassionate, Virgo, but don’t be manipulated or foolish. The best thing you can do to help others is to cultivate your own mental health with ingenuity, trusting in its radiant power to heal by example. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Two paradoxes are better than one,” said physicist Edward Teller. “They may even suggest a solution.” I hope this gives you a glimmer of appreciation for the sparkling contradictions you’re surrounded by. It would be understandable if up until today you felt they were crazy-making stressors that served no good purpose. But now maybe you will be motivated to stand on your head, cross your eyes and try to see how the tangy riddles might actually be used to untangle each other. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Despite the wealth and renown accumulated during his influential career, musician Brian Eno is a big fan of raw simplicity. Speaking about R&B, soul music and psychedelia, he said, “These earlier eras of pop music were characterized not by the search for perfection but by bizarre enthusiasms, small budgets, erratic technique, crummy equipment and wild abandon.” Would you consider playing with that approach in the coming weeks, Scorpio? It’s not necessarily something you should do all the time, but right now I suspect it’s a formula for the most interesting kind of success.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Research Digest Blog asked eminent psychologists to write about the theme “one nagging thing you still don’t understand about yourself.” One expert wondered why he always overestimates how much work he can get done. Another pondered the fact that he falls prey to his own irrational biases even though he’s well aware he has them. A third said he can’t fathom why it’s so easy for him to learn some things and so hard to learn others. What would your answer be, Sagittarius? This is an excellent time, astrologically speaking, to see if you can get to the bottom of a truth about yourself that has always eluded you. (To read the story, go here: tinyurl.com/ dontknowyet.) CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I suspect that you will either be spectacularly right or breathtakingly wrong in the coming days. Which way it goes will all depend on whether you’re observing and responding to the actual events unfolding in front of you or are more focused on the images dancing around in your imagination. Of course it’s always a good idea to get your biases and projections out of the way so you can see life as it really is, but it’s especially crucial now. So much is contingent upon your ability to be acutely perceptive and crisply objective. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the old fairy tale, the character known as Rumpelstiltskin had the power to spin straw into gold. That skill has a metaphorical resemblance to the wizardry you could pull off in the coming weeks: transforming seemingly ordinary or worthless stuff into a valuable asset. Although your work might seem a bit miraculous and make some people wonder if you’ve used hocuspocus, the fact is that it may at times feel tedious or extremely demanding to you. Be gutsy in your mastery of the intricate details, Aquarius. I’ll be thinking of you as the Gritty Magician. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Good things may come to those who wait—but they’re mostly just the things left behind by those who hustle and bustle.” That message was in the fortune cookie I got with my Chinese take-out food tonight. It happens to be a perfect fit for your current astrological omens, so I’m handing it over to you. In the coming week, I don’t recommend that you sit around patiently and watch how the trends ripen. I don’t think you should bide your time or be cautious in making a commitment. Be proactive, Pisces—maybe even gung ho. Carpe the freaking diem.

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 9–15, 2011 | 31

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Boise Weekly Vol. 19 Issue 37