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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 19, ISSUE 31 JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011

TAK EE E ON E! CITIZEN 12

THAHN TAN A familiar face signs off

PICKS 14

GET OFF YOUR COUCH This week’s cream de la creme of events

REC 24

TRAIL QUEEN Idaho mountain biker named best in the country FOOD 26

BEER, CHEESE, CHOCOLATE ... A foodie trifecta in one place once a month

“My job is not to do what’s popular. My job is to do what’s right and make it popular.”

NEWS 9

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Heather Lile Heather@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreader: Annabel Armstrong Interns: James Ady, Eric Austin, Alex Blackwell, Kat Thornton, Jordan Wilson Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Andrew Crisp, Guy Hand, Damon Hunzeker, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall, Steve Silva ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, nick@boiseweekly.com Justin Vipperman, Justin@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Conner Coughlin, Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, Glenn Landberg, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Patrick Sweeney, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2010 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE DEJA VU This week’s issue feels like a sequel in many ways. Or, at least as far as commentary around recent stories goes, it feels like an un-Hollywood version of Bill Murray’s Groundhog Day. The handful of noteworthy items I addressed in last week’s Note are still hanging on and, in some cases, even gaining momentum. In Mail this week, it’s part two of the SNUS ad debate. Should BW have published a series of SNUS ads? Some readers don’t think so. Some readers, apparently, think BW should have pulled all the SNUS ads before readers started complaining rather than waiting until after the griping began. Thing is, we haven’t pulled them. Also, for the record, the publisher stands behind her decision to run the ads. My only question—not that I have any say whatsoever in the advertising realm—is: How come there’s no outrage over the classified ad hawking married women looking to cheat on their spouses? Of everything advertised in our paper, that’s the one I’d think people would get their panties in a twist about. Or not. In other controversies ... it looks like the case is closed in the story of a Walgreens pharmacist who refused to fill a prescription for a drug that stops uterine bleeding. And it was a surprise ending: turns out that under Idaho state law, pharmacists are not required to fill any prescription. Abortifacients? Nope, don’t have to. Asthma medication? Nope, don’t have to. You better hope your local pharmacist doesn’t have a moral issue with your ability to breathe or you could be in real trouble. See Citydesk at boiseweekly. com for more on that story. Finally, there’s the elephant I’ve thus far ignored: Boise Co-op. The stories posted at Citydesk have garnered a record number of comments and things have gotten pretty nasty in some places. After the Jan. 24 meeting, however, it looks as though the store is definitely moving forward in another direction. The full story is on Page 10. Strangely, the only place things have been unsettlingly quiet this week is on Bill Cope’s latest column. I suspect this week’s column on Tom Luna might change that. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Eli Craven TITLE: Mule Deer #2 MEDIUM: Acrylic medium image transfer on paper ARTIST STATEMENT: Fresh Air Regional Juried Exhibition opening this week at Boise State’s Visual Arts Center. elicraven.com

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | 3

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What you missed this week in the digital world. GU Y HAND

NORWAY By Samuel D. Hunter A Division of Oliver Russell

INSIDE

Jan. 26 - Feb. 19

THE RETURN OF THE KILLER JALAPENO SHRIMP BITES

300 railtees@gmail.com

Former Tapas Estrella and MilkyWay owners Mitchell and Andrea Maricich opened their newest food venture last week: Salt Tears Coffeehouse and Noshery. It was last weekend’s North End see-and-be-seen brunch hot spot, and Guy Hand has the lowdown and a few photos at Cobweb. 400

JOE’S PEEPING BOISE Amid all the Boise Co-op hullabaloo and the impending Whole Foods invasion, rumors once again began to circulate that Trader Joe’s has been eyeing the City of Trees. What says those who should know? Citydesk has the answer.

WHAT DOES A YELLOW LIGHT MEAN? SLOWER. WHAT ... DOES ... A ... YELLOW ... When it’s not election season, news out of the Wood River Valley takes some interesting turns. Recently, dust has been kicked up over Timmerman Junction. The big debate: implementing full stops or posting a lower speed limit.

IDAHO IS INTOLERANT? YOU DON’T SAY ... Disappointing news from the Daily Beast last week: Idaho is 45th in the nation on the tolerance scale. Disturbing fact numero uno from the report: on a scale of one to 10, Idaho actually scores a negative one on gay rights.

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EDITOR’S NOTE

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MAIL

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Boise looks at cutting down on idling—in a grassroots sort of way

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Boise Co-op after the members’ meeting

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CITIZEN

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE The Quick & Easy Boys deny their jam-band label 19 MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN Place your bets on the Oscars

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SCREEN TV Sir Charles plays TV’s court jester

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REC Rebecca Rusch, queen of the trail

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FOOD Beer + cheese + chocolate = happy campers 26 CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | 5

MAIL NO TO TOBACCO There was a letter a few weeks back about your advertising the SNUS ads. It made me think that “Yes, your paper is so ‘green’ and so ‘anti-bad things’ that why should you guys include these ads?” I really appreciated the last-page ad for Project Filter this week. This will do so much good, better than advertising snuff. I decided to go to idaho.quitnet.com and so has my boyfriend. Thanks! —Joy Compton, Boise As a fervent supporter of Boise’s alternative publication, I was disheartened to know the Weekly would even consider placing fullpage tobacco advertising on its pages. When I spoke to the publisher by telephone about my concerns, I was told, “It’s a legal product” and “I’m trying to run a business.” I believe the Weekly has a moral and ethical obligation to protect the community from dangerous tobacco products by refusing the industry’s disease-tinged money. Just say no. —David Triggs, Boise Interesting how you decide to kick the SNUS ads only now. It would be nice if our local alternative paper had a conscience without the locals having to constantly hassle them through letters. Maybe you should use your little heads next time before selling advertising space to some corporate ass holes. Just some good advice. —Lucy, Boise *Editor’s Note: Typically we don’t run letters signed with only first names, but this one was so good, we had to share it. Sorry, “Lucy,” but you may be disappointed to see that we haven’t actually kicked

the SNUS ads.

ON LUNA’S NEW PLAN The Lunacy Plan 1. Save money by driving teachers out of education. 2. Destroy teamwork with merit pay. 3. Replace teachers with lap tops. 4. Explain plan with cliches. —Jim Fennell, Ola

BOTH SIDES OF COPE TOBACCO AND TAXES Dear Boise Weekly: As a tax payer I’m footing the bill for Medicaid and frankly, I’m concerned. I’ve seen the reports that Medicaid is looking at a deficit of over $150 million. At the same time, tobacco use is costing Medicaid $83 million a year. Am I the only one who sees a connection? I fully support increasing the tobacco tax and using those dollars for Medicaid because it just plain makes sense. Like the 67 percent mentioned in the recently published poll, I believe this is a fair tax increase because it helps cover the health-care costs we all pay through higher taxes and higher insurance premiums caused by tobacco use. By increasing the tax, we can dramatically reduce the number of people who become addicted and address the revenue problems. As our legislators go to Boise in January, I urge them to protect our youth and health-care programs by increasing the tax on tobacco. —Rita Burns. Caldwell

DOUBLE DUTY WAS BETTER I have for years looked forward to Wednesday to read the Boise Weekly. Now, I realize that the most important aspect of the only alternative in Boise was the side-by-side reviews of restaurants. Reading Guy

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. 6 | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Hand’s dull and irrelevant “articles” has been frustrating. Why does the Weekly want to publish such boring writing? Do you actually pay Guy Hand? Unless the old restaurant reviews make it back in a week or two I sadly have to tell you that I no longer will pick up my priceless copy. —Per Christensen, Boise

Regarding Bill Cope’s recent “Both Sides? NO!” article (BW, Opinion, Jan. 19, 2011): Love how the NeoCons here insult, hurl damaging, pathetic insults at Cope and Libs, etc., but not one of them can refute one word that Cope printed ... mainly because it’s dead on true. “Loughner is as far from right wing as you can get” ... hilarious. Yes, and right wingers are as far from the truth as you can get, too. Just pathetic. A NeoCon speaking of the truth is like a Nazi speaking of a love for the Jewish people. What the hell would they know about it to begin with? Keep up the inept work and the lies, conservatives, while the sane sit off to the side and laugh their collective asses off at you. —Kevin Karstens, Boise I agree with Bill Cope’s thesis regarding the Arizona shootings and wish to see it extended. John Hinckley used Taxi Driver as a basis to shoot Reagan; let’s tighten down on movies. Charles Manson used the Beatles’ White Album to launch mass murder; let’s tighten up there, too (rap with its incessant calls to kill cops we’ll exclude). Mark Chapman used Catcher in the Rye as rationale to kill John Lennon—same for books. I don’t recall Cope reacting to the mockumentary depicting, realistically and graphically, George Bush’s assassination. Oh wait—that’s artistic license and freedom of speech. Got it. —Thomas V. Munson, Boise WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

BILL COPE/OPINION

ASK BILL

A closer look at Lunarship Dear Mr. Cope: I am a mother. Four of my children already attend Ezra T. Benson Elementary, and the other three, not counting the one who won’t be born until May, will be attending that school unless we move, which I hope we do, as the house we currently live in has only four bedrooms and if we all want to eat at once, I have to cover the foosball table with a sheet of plywood and use the tarp we keep over the wood pile for a tablecloth. But that is beside the point. I am worried about Tom Luna. My husband and I voted for him because he is—and was the other times he ran—the Republican. Believe me, no one from our church is telling us to always vote for the Republicans. We decided totally on our own to always vote for the Republicans, and if you talk to my husband, he can tell you exactly why he decided the two of us had decided to do that. To be honest, I do not pay much attention to how the other Republicans we vote for are doing, as I am confident in thinking that they are doing a good job at whatever their job is, or their fellow Republican office buddies would be telling them to do a better job, wouldn’t they? But I do try to keep up with what Tom Luna is up to, as he is the Something-Something of Public Schoolings, or something like that. I care very much that my children get a good education, or else how will they ever compete in a global marketplace when they grow up, especially if somebody keeps letting those other countries into the global marketplace? I have heard that Tom Luna has come up with a totally different kind of plan for running Idaho schools. The trouble is, I am not sure how it will affect my children and it makes me worried to think about, even though my husband says I should not be worried because Tom Luna is a Republican, so how bad could it be? But I cannot help it. I call it “mother’s intuition,” and it is telling me that somehow or another, this plan of Tom Luna’s could possibly be not so good of a plan. Mr. Cope, I need someone other than my husband to tell me there is no reason to feel worried about this. That is why I am writing you. And if you cannot make me feel less worried, could you at least tell me what I need to say to make my husband feel as worried as I am? —Worried Mother Dear Worried: As I no longer have a child in the public school system, I usually ignore whatever Tom Luna is doing to it. I had convinced myself that Luna, like mediocre men in general, could never do so much damage that better people couldn’t correct it later. But perhaps I have been negligent in this regard. It is no accident that as America falls farther and farther behind other countries academically, the deeper into reactionary darkness our leadership has plunged. Conservative politics thrive on ignorance. What’s more, I have had a mother, and she, too, was prone to worry. It’s no fun for anybody, is it? So for the sake of your lovely seven and a half children, I will stand back at a panoramic distance, soak in Mr. Luna’s vision of what our public education should turn into, and report what I see. First impression: Holy crap, am I glad my kid is done with public schools! Mom, I don’t imagine that assessment does anything to ease your worry pangs, so let me approach it another way. In my considered opinion, what we have is a typical Canyon County ideologue who has made it his mission to spread his questionable obsessions into a field that he is unqualified to enter through the normal channels—e.g., as a trained and competent educator—and who has decided that there are too many teachers in Idaho even as the state’s student population is growing at such a rate that some districts can’t build schools fast enough to provide them all a roof over their heads. (In this matter, Mom, you could help out by spacing out your blessed events a bit. Giving birth shouldn’t be like hoarding garden gnomes.) Furthermore, the eminently unexceptional Mr. Luna has proposed that after corrupting the noble vocation of educator so thoroughly with such imported ideas as merit pay and systematic job insecurity, whatever teachers remain should be subject to performance evaluations from not only the proudly ignorant jackasses who couldn’t keep up with the smarter kids even if they tried, but their parents as well—which, to me, is like inviting rodeo ropers to score ballerinas. Furthermore, the conspicuously unremarkable Mr. Luna has determined that teenagers aren’t spending enough time on the Internet and would insist that they cannot graduate unless they have completed a predetermined minimum of online credits. The state would provide every ninth grader laptops, which the students could keep upon graduation, assuming it still worked after four years of Red Bull and Twizzlers, and the credits would be provided, presumably, by the same online course hawkers who have been so generous to Mr. Luna’s political campaigns. In summary, Mom, you have every reason to be worried. With ample support from a governor and Legislature every bit as undistinguished as Tom Luna, I predict Idaho’s schools will soon be on their way to becoming as culturally and intellectually desolate as Mr. Luna’s ideology. If I were you, I’d pack the kids in the minivan and get thee to a state less eager to let chronic underachievers determine what authentic academic achievement looks like. Dad could follow later with the foosball table. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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OPINION/TED RALL

MOURNING IN AMERICA Somber is out. Kitsch reigns.

LOS ANGELES—Americans don’t mourn right. We are tacky. We turn tragedy into kitsch. Recently the news has been dominated by the aftermath of the Tucson, Ariz., massacre: the memorial service, the funerals, even the reopening of the Safeway supermarket. A memorial service at a sports arena. What is wrong with us? Thousands of cheering fans—er, mourners—donned “Together We Thrive: Tucson & America” T-shirts, handed out by the University of Arizona. They greeted the arrival of President “Bar-Rock Star” Obama with applause and wolf whistles. They interrupted with raucous hoots every couple of minutes— and he did nothing to tamp down the unruly crowd. Emergency responders got a standing ovation. Attendees clapped at the mention of the 9-year-old girl who was shot to death. Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer was booed. A memorial service should not feel like a WWE event. Each mass tragedy amps up the volume and surreal inappropriateness of Americans’ public expressions of grief. After 9/11, New Yorkers posted “missing” posters for people they knew were dead. Stuffed animals and grammatically challenged notes, soggy and runny, hung from the fence at St. Paul’s Chapel near Ground Zero while vendors hawked cheap framed photos of the Twin Towers a few feet away. From memorial pages on Facebook to memorial decals on SUVs, Americans think anything goes when you’re mourning the death of a loved one—or someone whose death made national news, which somehow makes you want to feel involved even though, of course, you are not. Just be sad. It’s OK. As the cultural critic Marita Sturken wrote

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in her 2007 book Tourists of History: Memory, Kitsch, and Consumerism from Oklahoma City to Ground Zero, all this tacky phony sentimentality serves a sinister purpose. Mainstream American culture is being manipulated by government and big business to separate us from what is real—death and horror—and to obscure who is behind it—our government and big business. So, as a public service to the grievers of the future, I hereby offer the following:

ETIQUETTE AFTER A MASSACRE (1) When interviewed on TV never say your “heart goes out to the victims and their families.” We have heard that hoary chestnut a million too many times. Keep your heart where it belongs, inside your rib cage. (2) If you are a public official holding a press conference about a school shooting/workplace shooting/terrorist attack, refrain from thanking a long list of local and state officials for their help. This isn’t the Oscars. (3) Whether attending a memorial service or actual funeral, leave your hoodies, baggy pants and tank tops at home. No baseball caps, no T-shirts. Don’t wear anything with a team logo. (4) If you know one or more of the victims, ask their surviving relatives whether they would prefer flowers or a donation to a preferred charity. Do not waste money on flowers and stupid stuffed animals. (5) Unless the victims include at least one politician, no politician should speak at the service. (6) No. Applause. Ever.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NEWS/ROTUNDA NEWS

SOMETHING IN THE AIR Boise may see momentum on anti-idling campaign GEORGE PRENTICE

ADAM

In the wake of an ineffective effort to sway citizenry to support a downtown streetcar in 2009, Boise Mayor Dave Bieter explained what, if any, lesson was learned. After giving a detailed and rather long answer including polling data, strategic partnerships and economic forecasting, he took a long breath. “My job is not to do what’s popular,” said Bieter. “My job is to do what’s right and make it popular.” One of Bieter’s barometers in determining what is “right” is Boise’s Citizen Survey Report, a biennial gauge of wants, needs and challenges. The $35,000 study conducted by Opinion Research Corporation, a global market research firm, surveyed 550 adults (with a margin of error of about 4 percentage points). The fresh-off-the-presses 2010 edition included some expected trends: concerns about the economy, public transportation and urban sprawl. But several opportunities were also revealed: support for a second Foothills levy (60 percent), support for a local option sales tax (56 percent) and a call for stricter limits on panhandling (78 percent). Tucked deep inside the report was possibly the biggest surprise. Air quality registered the greatest increase in positive ratings over every other quality-of-life metric. But that’s not to say that the ozone is anywhere near where Boise’s air quality expert thinks it needs to be. “The answer is clearly ‘no,’” said Beth Baird. Baird’s official title is air quality program coordinator but her colleagues call her Boise’s air quality champion. “Beth spends a lot of time pouring over air quality data,” said Vince Trimboli, the city’s public works community relations supervisor. “And when she’s not working on research or outreach, she’s the coordinator of the Treasure Valley Clean Cities Coalition.” TVCCC has impressive private/ public stakeholders: Ada County, Allied Waste, Boise State, Bureau of Land Management, D Idaho Power, Intermountain Gas, Stinker Stations, Stoel Rives Law Offices and the University of Idaho. The coalition promotes alternative fuels, RO

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fuel economy and idle reduction. Idling of vehicles has long been a hot topic of debate. For each driver running his or her engine to warm up his or her car, there is someone saying that the resulting CO2 emissions are choking us. For each delivery driver making quick stops, there’s a study saying even brief idling is wasting huge amounts of money. But municipalities across the United States have legislated against idling at their own peril. “I’ve done quite a bit of research on ordinances and campaigns in other cities,” said Baird. “There are some successful programs, but honestly there are a lot of unsuccessful programs.” Whether or not a new anti-idling ordinance in Ketchum is successful is probably too early to tell, but only three months into enforcement that city has already made a major change. “Yes, they dropped the fine. That’s true,” said Craig Berry, executive director of the Environmental

Resource Center, advocate for Idaho’s first anti-idling ordinance. Simply put, the new Ketchum law reads that a vehicle cannot be left running “solely for the comfort of the driver or passengers.” It impacts all personal and commercial motorists but exempts vehicles left running while stopped at traffic lights or construction zones. Following a 12-month trial (more than 400 warnings were handed out), Ketchum police began ticketing violators in November. It didn’t take long for some push back. “One hundred dollars was a pretty stiff first-time violation,” said Ketchum Sgt. Nathan Taylor. “And $300 for every violation thereafter was simply too high.” As a result, Ketchum officials quickly lowered the $100 fine to $25 and the $300 fine to $52. “I think they wanted the penalties to be more in line with parking fines,” said Berry. “But I still think it has enough teeth. If someone is hit with a fine for idling, they’re going to start turning off the ignition.” Don’t expect any fines in Boise, or an ordinance or a program for that matter. “No. Definitely not a program. We’re at a very, very, very early stage,” said Trimboli. “It’s easy to throw an outreach campaign together with good intentions, but this should be carefully crafted. This is very early.” Baird and Trimboli have begun listening to commercial drivers and representatives from neighborhood associations (Boise has 35 neighborhood associations). They discussed possible signage and effective messaging. “I think people would rather learn about idling versus a do-this-or-we’llbring-the-hammer-down,” said Trimboli. “People simply don’t want to be told what to do. We’ll have greater success if we give people the opportunity to understand the importance of this issue.” In the next month, Public Works is expected to update the mayor and City Council on its findings and ask for some direction. Ideally, an outreach campaign could be unveiled later this year. “But we’re still early in the process,” said Trimboli. “Did I say this was early?”

This week JFAC hears from the public on Medicaid.

MORE DRAMA EXPECTED AT CAPITOL ON FRIDAY There will be no “bad guy” in the Capitol auditorium at the Idaho Statehouse on Friday, Jan. 28. There will be no Tom Luna versus teachers’ unions. There will be no debate over lap tops. The issue coming before lawmakers, while packed with complexity, comes down to a basic question: Are you willing to cut services to Idaho’s most vulnerable citizens? In order to meet Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s projection of an $84 million shortfall, Idaho’s Department of Health and Welfare is considering Plan A and Plan B. Plan A would see a hefty budget ax come down on Medicaidfunded services to adults. Wholesale cuts to developmental disability and psycho-social rehabilitative services could result in more than $25 million in reductions. Plan B would include less of an axe and more of a scalpel to select services, resulting in approximately $20 million in savings. Advocates for the disabled say they need to influence lawmakers that there is a Plan C. It’s risky and it may become the political hot potato of 2011. But it’s simple. “We want our legislators to know we support a tax increase if it is necessary to avoid further cuts in Medicaid.” That’s the heart of a petition making its way across Idaho, from the desks of healthcare administrators to the bedrooms of the infirm, from therapy clinics to the kitchen tables of families fearing the worst. “Twenty-five thousand. I fall asleep thinking of that number. I wake up thinking of that number,” said Katherine Hansen of the Idaho Association of Developmental Disability Agencies. “I’m fully expecting to be holding a petition with 25,000 signatures come Friday morning. And I’m going to hand it to the chairs of the Joint Finance Appropriations Committee.” JFAC chairs and their colleagues from both sides of the aisle decided that before the 2011 legislative session gets any more heated with political rhetoric, they would hold two unprecedented events: two listening hearings in which members of the public could weigh in on education and Health and Welfare. The education hearing was, by all accounts, a success considering that the hallways of the Capitol were filling as early as 6:30 a.m. on Jan. 21. It was estimated that nearly 600 people attended the hearing. “This Friday could easily be higher,” said Hansen. She met with an anxious group of caregivers, parents and disabled adults the evening of Jan. 24 in the basement of St. Luke’s Regional Medical Center in Eagle. Attendees said they desperate10 ly wanted to tell their story but were clearly nervous about the daunting

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | 9

NEWS/ROTUNDA task of speaking about something so personal in such a public fashion. 9 “Tell your story,” Hansen said, calming the gathering. “Try to end in a supportive way. Say, ‘I’m here to keep this,’ instead of ‘Don’t cut this.’” Hansen brought reinforcements. Former legislators Robbie Barrutia, Kathy Garrett, and Jim Hansen (Hansen’s brother) offered tips to speakers-in-the-making. “Define what your ‘ask’ is,” said Garrett. “Tell them that this is an excellent investment,” said Jim Hansen. “Tell them what is was like before these services existed,” said Barrutia. “Let me tell you what it was like,” jumped in Hansen. “Anyone here remember what it was like in the 1960s?” A few hands went up. “Then you know what I’m talking about,” she said. “A thousand people in the state hospital. People with disabilities died too soon. And those that survived were heavily medicated.” Fawn Bell and Juanita Allen remember it well. They’re caregivers for their older sister, 68-year-old Barbara Allen. “Barbara is M.R.D.D.,” said Bell. “That’s mentally retarded with a developmental disability. Thank God we take care of her at home now. When she was in a facility, she was over-medicated. Because of existing services, we can take care of her now.” Those are the exact services that are being threatened. “You’ll be hearing a lot about certified family health providers on Friday,” said Hansen. “Let me tell you about some of them.” She said she held a letter from a family living outside of Burley. “Their son, Eric has a developmental disability,” said Hansen. “They get paid $54 a day to care for Eric. But he’s doing well now. He’s able to work part time and even serves as a volunteer. Eric can learn. He can continue to become more independent. But they’re looking at cutting his services. Eric’s mother wants to ask lawmakers if they ever get to a point where they don’t need to learn anymore. Just because Eric has a disability, we’re saying he can’t continue to learn and develop. At what age do we ask that a person is not valued?” Parents and caregivers want lawmakers to ask the big question: Is this not worth raising taxes for? “And we wouldn’t want the dedicated revenue just disappearing into the general fund,” said Barrutia. “I think there’s a great opportunity to possibly raise the tax on cigarettes. A $1.25 bump in cigarette taxes could raise $50 million. And we could put that in a dedicated fund for health.” “Don’t these lawmakers see what’s at stake?” asked Bell. “Of course they see it,“ answered Garrett. “They just don’t know what to do.” Garrett said the issue is not about politics. It never has been. “I was a Republican lawmaker,” said Garrett. “I’m still a conservative. But that doesn’t take away my heart and compassion.” Hansen said she expects a lot of heart, compassion and even tears at Friday’s hearing. She’ll be there early. Garrett said she expected to wake about 5 a.m. after dreaming more about the number 25,000. — George Prentice

10 | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

NEWS

CO-OP DETENTE Conflict cools at Boise Co-op board meeting TARA MORGAN A sizable crowd lingered outside St. John’s Parish Hall Jan. 24, anxiously awaiting the start of a Boise Co-op meeting called by recently fired manager Ken Kavanagh. Words like “rumors,” “answers” and “innuendo” hung thick in the evening air. But once the crowd pushed through the church’s double doors and settled into the basement’s limited chairs, co-op board member David Eberle made something very clear: “This is a board meeting not a member meeting.” Though Kavanagh originally hoped for a member vote Monday night to reverse the board’s contentious decision to fire him, the board insisted that the meeting conflicted with co-op bylaws and, therefore, no vote would be allowed. The objective of the meeting, Eberle noted, was to update members on the current state of the co-op and allow them to voice concerns about the grocery store’s future without Kavanagh. “Gary Lyons was appointed … to help guide the co-op through the transition until we can complete a new management structure for the co-op … it was a decision that we did not take lightly,” said Eberle. Kavanagh, who was in a conference with lawyers and two of the six co-op board members during the first part of the meeting, entered the room to issue a statement. “We came to a monetary agreement,” said Kavanagh. “I don’t necessarily understand the ‘new direction’ of the co-op. I didn’t think there was anything wrong with the old direction. I want to thank everyone who has supported me. Somebody compared it to being at your own funeral.” Pat Haas, acting chair of the co-op board, also gave a statement. “We and Ken have entered into an agreement that basically settles our differences and legal disputes and the details of that agreement are, of course, confidential … We can say that there will be a change of leadership going forward and that Ken has agreed not to contest that decision … the recent decisions about the change of leadership … had absolutely nothing to do with Ken’s DUI in 2009 or the recent probation violations.” Interim co-op manager Lyons met with co-op employees in the weeks after Kavanagh’s termination and has assessed a number of areas where the store needs improvement. “I have learned that we lack basic business controls. For example, we lack clear job descriptions, goal setting and performance evaluations. As a result we have employees that are confused, scared and working in an environment where misconceptions, rumors and gossip take place,” said Lyons. He continued: “Customer feedback is clear … there are too many products out of stock, our pricing policies need to be reviewed, our store is crowded—which is a

good thing—and the parking lot seems to be crowded all the time.” But lurking under the surface of Lyons’ talk of improvement was the evening’s elephant in the room: Whole Foods. Once the floor opened to members, most voiced concerns that the natural foods chain will threaten the co-op when it opens a Boise location if changes aren’t made quickly. “You’re going to get competition soon, and it’s coming in other places besides Whole Foods,” said Lois Morgan, a co-op member since 1982. “I want to support you. I want to give my money to you. I want to eat healthily, so I need to feel some loyalty to you. I get more friendliness at Fred Meyer sometimes than I do at the co-op.” Josie Erskine, co-owner of Peaceful Belly Farms, also uttered fears about the future. “No one is going to support Peaceful Belly the way that the co-op has. Whole Foods won’t. Fred Meyer won’t. Walmart won’t,” said Erskine. “I love the co-op and really truly hope it does stay loyal to the small farmers because we’re dependent upon them.” Lyons tried to assuage concerns about competition from Whole Foods by illuminating the co-op’s relative strengths. “We don’t want to look like Whole Foods, and we don’t want to smell like Whole Foods. We will compete on the values, on [our] abilities or uniqueness or quirkiness—whatever you want to call it,” said Lyons. Many at the meeting also wanted to proclaim their support for Kavanagh. One member called the “public lambasting” of Kavanagh’s character in the blogosphere “criminal and offensive to me as a human being,” while musician and former co-op employee Brett Netson expressed his disgust with the way Kavanagh was fired. “This is just shameful, regardless of what Ken did or didn’t do … I just want the employees that are here to keep that in mind. What is the board of directors going to do the next time your employment needs to be terminated? I was fired from the co-op for real reasons. I left the keys in front door,” said Netson, to much laughter. “I’m not shopping at the co-op. I’m done.” But impassioned speeches aside, Christine King, a co-op member for 20 years, seemed to sum up the meeting most eloquently. “I considered Ken a friend, but when I knew Whole Foods was coming, I knew things were going to change … If we want the co-op to be the co-op, we’ve got to change with it,” she said. The co-op board explained that it will continue to review managerial candidates but can’t specify a date for when Kavanagh’s successor will take the reins. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

February 6th is

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | 11

CITIZEN

THANH TAN IdahoPTV journalist signs off GEORGE PRENTICE

This is a significant change. The Texas Tribune is a public media organization that uses a digital platform. They have a full staff of reporters presenting content for an online audience. I’m coming in there as a multi-media reporter. That means I’ll be doing a mix of everything—video reports, data visualization and a decent amount of writing for the Texas Tribune website and occasionally contributing to the New York Times, because they have a partnership. What will be your beat? The Texas Tribune covers public policy for the state of Texas. It was started 14 months ago by Evan Smith, the former editor of the Texas Monthly, who I consider to be a visionary. He secured funding from a venture capitalist to create a new media start-up and decided to hire the best of the best, pay them the way journalists should be paid and put out the best possible news content. Have you spent any time in Texas? No. My only exposure was a one-day trip to Austin for my interview three weeks ago. What was the difference between your first Idaho Reports broadcast in January 11, 2008, and your last on January 21, 2011? In 2008 my goal was to get a show on the air, keep it going and try to make it interesting.

12 | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

And the program was a half-hour then. Pretty quickly, I learned to engage more with our audience through social media like Facebook and Twitter. And you expanded the show. We used to have the same line up every week. But I wanted to hear different voices, different power players and people who had direct knowledge of government. So that meant a new mix of reporters, scholars and lawmakers. Would people be surprised at how hard it is to put that show on the air? Absolutely. Thirty minutes was hard enough, but we expanded the format. And we were covering a moving target. Sometimes there would be breaking news an hour before show time. Throughout the week, you thought you knew what the big topics were going to be, but things happened very quickly. Let’s talk about Idaho Public Television. In 2010 you were in the unique position of covering the legislature when IdahoPTV was on the chopping block. It must have been a delicate balance to report on something that was your livelihood. That was the most challenging time I ever had at public television. I so believe in the mission of IdahoPTV, and I believe that government should play some role in our ability to get our content out there and educate people throughout the state. When the proposed cuts were announced, there was a real possibility that I could lose my job. I remember the morning that our general manager told us the governor was considering phasing out funding for public television. I just started crying. The next day I went to the briefing to hear what would be in the

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Thanh Tan is busy this week saying her goodbyes and packing her reporter’s notebook before heading to Austin, Texas, to become the multi-platform reporter for the Texas Tribune. Following commercial television assignments in Portland, Ore., and at Boise’s KBCI-TV, Tan assumed the producer/host duties of Idaho Public Television’s Idaho Reports, the Friday night recap of all things political.

governor’s State of the State. I had to step outside into the hallway to have a good cry. I had to go on the air a couple of hours later. It was really hard. That’s when you summon up all the professional ability that you have. You have to train yourself to disengage from the part that is affecting you personally. Tell me about the friends you’ve made while in Idaho. My best friends, those that know me best as an adult, are all here. I have friends from all walks of life—inside and outside journalism, my foodie friends from my local food group, my political friends and my friends at IdahoPTV, who I’m going to miss so much. And what are you looking forward to the most? Professionally, I’m at a point in my life where there was still time to take a risk. I think I have found a place that values really strong journalism. I’m fascinated with the idea of working in a place like Austin and working for an organization with a huge emphasis on innovation, taking journalism to the next step. When do you leave? I have to report to work on Feb. 7. This happened very quickly. It’s quite overwhelming. Where will we be able to see your work? Texastribune.org.

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | 13

THURSDAY-SUNDAY JAN. 27-30 dance

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

IDAHO DANCE THEATRE WINTER SHOW The world of professional dance can be daunting. Visions of bloody toes and extreme dedication may be the first to flash into your mind. While you may think you can’t appreciate dance like the diehards, the people at Idaho Dance Theatre have spent the last 22 years making the art of dance accessible to all. It all began with Marla and Fred Hansen and Carl Rowe. In 1989 they got together a group of dancers to give a performance in Boise. It went over so well that they founded the Idaho Dance Theatre. Rowe and Marla Hansen are still at the helm as the resident choreographers, and this year’s winter show promises to “defy gravity and the laws of physics.” IDT believes it is important for all people to experience dance. If you’ve never seen a dance performance before, IDT is a good first. According to its website, the company promises to “combine avant-garde movement and cinematic lighting with stunning choreography.” Add in an intimate theater setting, and even the most skittish dance virgin will be put at ease. Those strapped for cash can get pay-what-you-can-afford tickets to attend the Thursday night preview. Thursday, Jan. 27, $5 minimum or pay-what-you-can preview show, doors at 6:30 p.m., show at 7 p.m.; Friday, Jan. 28-Saturday, Jan. 29, 8 p.m., and Sunday, Jan. 30, 2 p.m., $10-$35. Boise State Special Events Center, 208-331-9592, idahodancetheatre.org.

Her smile makes us phleboto-misty eyed.

WEDNESDAY-MONDAY JAN. 26-31

Idaho Dance Theatre has a leg (or six) up on their competition.

blood HOME IS WHERE THE HEART IS BLOOD DRIVE In addition to being National Soup Month, January is also National Volunteer Blood Donor Month. And thanks to the Red Cross, you can now get a chance to have your rent or mortgage paid for the month while doing your part to contribute to the always-scarce blood supply. The Red Cross relies upon volunteer donations to fulfill the need for blood. This month, the Red Cross will show its gratitude to donors by holding a drawing to win one month’s mortgage or rent payment (not to exceed $1,500). You can enter by going to any American Red Cross location in Idaho and donating blood through Monday, Jan. 31. The Home Is Where the Heart Is blood drive could provide an opportunity to greet your landlord with a smile and a handshake instead of a wince and a grumble this month when the rent is due. In order to donate, you will need to register with the Red Cross and pass a mini-physical. The rest of the process is easy, with a slight exception for the insertion of the needle. But once the needle is in, the actual blood donation ordeal takes approximately eight to 10 minutes and is followed by refreshments and a snack. Through Monday, Jan. 31. FREE. American Red Cross locations in Idaho, Montana and Utah. Boise American Red Cross, 5380 W. Franklin Road, 208-342-4500, redcrossidaho.org.

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SATURDAY JAN. 29 battle of the bands HOT LOCAL KNIGHTS If you prefer your knight in shining armor to wear skinny jeans in place of chain mail and wield a guitar instead of a lance, then you might just find your Lancelot at Hot Local Knights, the Venue’s annual battle of the bands. Every Saturday in January

a slew of local acts have been rock ’n’ roll jousting for sweet prizes. They’ll keep going until Saturday, Feb. 5. Each night has featured a different type of music—hardcore, alternative, metal, indie/acoustic, pop punk—and the evening’s top two bands from each category go on to compete in the finals. Prizes include $1,000 cash for first place, a $600 gift certificate to Boise Guitar Center for second place and $500 worth of recording time at Speck Studio for third place.

On Saturday, Jan. 29, the Venue will showcase local indie/acoustic acts, including Jacob Donivan, CBS, Just a Fluke, Chris Cross, Castanelli, The Desert Starrs, Mitch Spivey, The Bread Bear, Rob Lanterman, Apple Thief, Jason Chacon, A Sea of Glass, Uriah and Desirae Bronson. Tickets are $8 per night and can be purchased through any band on the lineup or at ticketfly.com. 5 p.m., $8. The Venue, 521 W. Broad St., 208-9190011, boisevenue.com. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FRIDAY JAN. 28 FIND

music CHAD AND JEREMY On a dreary winter afternoon in Boise, the weather is dismal. Freezing rain pelts the windows, leaving threatening puddles. “It’s miserable out there,” the people cry, wrapping cold hands around steaming bowls and cups. But in another time—1964—in what feels like another world, popular folk rock duo Chad and Jeremy released their No. 7 Billboard hit, “A Summer Song.” “Sweet sleepy warmth of summer nights / gazing at the distant lights/ in the starry sky,” they crooned. Chad and Jeremy, a part of the British Invasion, sang about sweet summer evenings, melting the freezing rain away. Now, for one night only, Chad and Jeremy—along with local openers The Mystics—bring that promise of summer to the Egyptian Theatre for a good cause. Chad Stuart, a longtime Sun Valley resident, and band mate Jeremy Clyde—flying in from England for the event— have been reunited to support the efforts of the Central Asia Institute, founded by Greg Mortenson, author of Three Cups of Tea and Stones into Schools. Mortenson is world renowned for his charity work. Twice nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, Mortenson has helped build hundreds of schools in Afghanistan and Pakistan, which have ser ved hundreds of thousands of children. On Friday, Jan. 28, supported by the Rotar y Club of Boise East, Chad and Jeremy will bring you back to the sweet ’60s and donate proceeds from the concert to this excellent charity. 7 p.m., $25-$35. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Color me bad.

GOINGTODAY.COM

SATURDAY JAN. 29 DIY remodeling IDAHO REMODELING AND DESIGN SHOW Whether you want to express your inner HGTV host, finally tackle that four-seasons room addition or just give that macabre bathroom a face lift, Boise Centre is the place to be during the Idaho Remodeling and Design Show. This behemoth spectacle of home design will provide business product displays as well as services available in the Treasure Valley. From kitchen makeovers to garage storage ideas, the exhibits will be a comprehensive glimpse at some of the most recognized and qualified names in remodeling and redesign. Your head may spin from all the fabric swatches and marble remnants, but tr y to absorb the helpful information regarding residential and commercial design, architecture, interior design, landscaping, furnishings and home entertainment. Sponsored by the American Society of Interior Designers and the American Institute of Architects, the design expo will provide current and economical tips for home improvements on a budget. So harness your inner Ty Pennington and head over to the Idaho Remodeling and Design Show. Saturday, Jan. 29, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sunday, Jan. 30, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., FREE with printed online pass. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., 208-336-8900, idahobusinessleague.com.

MONDAY JAN. 31 storytelling STORY STORY NIGHT

Rainy weather doesn’t suit Chad and Jeremy.

S U B M I T

This past December’s Story Story Night theme, Going Home: Stories of Returning, drew one of the highest levels of attendance the Linen Building has ever seen. There wasn’t even standing room. Why? Because the live storytelling event consistently delivers heart, humor and insight, making it the rare sort of event that anyone

A Sky HIH-398 Dynamic Microphone. A Maui Xaphoon bamboo sax. The Qwik Tune Guitar Professor. Audiophiles, bargain skimmers and musicians alike: Pay attention. From violins to tuners, tweeters, subs and pickups, goingtoday. com is a fantastic site for nabbing new audio equipment at bargain-basement prices. Watching the site for a week showed great deals on analog and digital pedals, a chromatic tuner, a Dunlop guitar slide and even an authentic goingtoday.com Irish tin whistle. The idea is simple: Goingtoday.com offers one deal a day, starting at midnight. You have 24 hours—or until supplies last—to take advantage, lest these bargains sink into the sea of regret. “Deal-a-day” sites are popping up all over, with this one and steepandcheap.com taking the cake. With some of these music recording staples going for less than a Jackson, this site is the perfect outlet for musicians and music lovers. But it’s not just gear for musicians on the site, whose parent company is WrightWay Music Products. Last week the site showcased a music lover’s steal—a vinyl to CD recorder for preserving all those old albums. In order to purchase, you need a PayPal account and all payments are done through the web. —Andrew Crisp

can get on board with. January’s Story Story Night, Hooked: Stories of Cravings and Compulsions, will offer addiction-themed stories—everything from heroin to chapstick. Featured storytellers include BW Fiction 101 Third Place winner Elisabeth McKetta, Elizabeth Rodgers and Al Blank. As always, after the featured storytellers there will be a story slam during which audience members are drawn from a hat to tell their own five-minute stories. 7 p.m., $5. The Linen Building, 1402 Grove St., 208-385-0111, storystorynight.org.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | 15

8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JAN. 26 On Stage COMEDY NIGHT—Open mic for anyone brave enough to give it a go. 8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill and Brewery, 3019 Cole Road, Boise, 208-658-1533, sockeyebrew.com. NORWAY—Idaho native Samuel D. Hunter wrote this play about two college friends, their ultimate relationship and how it affected those around them. Visit boiseweekly.com and click on “Promo” for info on how to win tickets. 8 p.m. $14-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Literature DOLLAR SALE—Find great bargains at the friends of the Garden City Library $1 sale. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208472-2940, gardencity.lili.org. DROP-IN WRITING WORKSHOP—Authors and teachers Malia Collins and Adrian Kien offer writers of all levels a chance to create and share work in a friendly atmosphere. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

Odds & Ends BOISE UKULELE GROUP—This ukulele group offers instruction and a chance to jam. All levels welcome with no age limit and no membership fees. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Meadow Lakes Village Senior Center, 650 Arbor Circle, Meridian.

IMPROVOLUTION—Interactive show that incorporates everything from stand-up routines to skits. 7 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, flyingmcoffee.com. JEFF DUNHAM—The comedian’s Identity Crisis Tour makes a stop in the Treasure Valley. 7:30 p.m. $43.50. Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208468-1000, idahocenter.com. NORWAY—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $14-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. STEEL MAGNOLIAS— Women share their lives, secrets and pain in the setting of a southern beauty parlor. 7 p.m. $15-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

Food & Drink BOISE GREEN DRINKS—Eat, drink and be eco-friendly during a social gathering for anyone interested in environmental issues. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Bittercreek Ale House, 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-1813, bittercreekalehouse.com. FOOD AND FILM—A threecourse meal followed by a movie and discussion. Proceeds from the night go toward the growth and preservation of local foods as part of the Year of Idaho Food. This month’s movie is Broken Limbs, a documentary about apples, agriculture and the American farmer. 6:30 p.m. $25, Red Feather Lounge, 246 N. Eighth St., 208-429-6340, tvfcfoodfundraiser.eventbrite.com.

Literature DOLLAR SALE—See Wednesday. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2940, gardencity. lili.org. KK BREES SIGNING—The author will sign copies of her book Headwind: The Intrepid Adventures of OSS Agent Katrin Nissen. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

FRIDAY JAN. 28 On Stage BEDSIDE MANNERS—Stage Coach Theater presents this farce about one crazy spring night. 8:15 p.m. $12-$15. Idaho Outdoor Association. Grange Hall, corner of Brazil and Wright streets, Boise. CASH ON DELIVERY—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. IDAHO DANCE THEATRE WINTER SHOW—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10-$35. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub. boisestate.edu. NORWAY—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $14-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater. org.

VINYL PRESERVATION SOCIETY OF IDAHO— Buy, sell, trade and listen to vinyl records with other analog musical enthusiasts. Guest speakers and DJs. 7-10 p.m. FREE, Modern Hotel and Bar, 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-424-8244, vpsidaho.org.

THURSDAY JAN. 27 On Stage CASH ON DELIVERY—Fastpaced farce about a con artist who plays the welfare system and makes a small fortune doing so. 7:30 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. IDAHO DANCE THEATRE WINTER SHOW—Preview night for the professional dance company’s winter show. Del Parkinson accompanies the dancers on the keys. See Picks, Page 15. Visit idahodancetheatre.org or call 208-331-9592 for more info. 7 p.m. Pay-whatyou-can, $5 minimum. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, sub. boisestate.edu.

16 | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Skeleton Blues by Connor Coughlin was the 1st place winner in the 9th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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8 DAYS OUT STEEL MAGNOLIAS—See Thursday. 6:15 p.m. $15-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org. TIME MACHINE—The gang from Red Light Variety Show travels through time in their latest production. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Art

On Stage

SUNDAY JAN. 30

IDAHO DANCE THEATRE WINTER SHOW—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $10-$35. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu.

Festivals & Events REMODELING AND DESIGN EXPO—See Saturday. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE with pass. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, boisecentre.com.

FRESH AIR AND THE SPACE BETWEEN OPENING—Meet the artists participating in the new exhibits “Fresh Air: A Regional Juried Exhibition of Emerging Artists,” and “The Space Between.” 5-7 p.m. FREE. Gallery 2, Hemingway Center, Room 110, 1819 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3994, boisestate.edu.

SATURDAY JAN. 29 Festivals & Events HOLISTIC AND WELLNESS FAIR—Spoil yourself with a massage, reiki healing, a chiropractic adjustment and more. There will be unique artwork and jewelry for sale also. 1-6 p.m. FREE admission, price varies for services. Her Spirit Center for Growth, 5181 Overland Road, Boise, 208-345-3588. REMODELING AND DESIGN EXPO—Get ideas some DIY tips to take with you and implement in your own home at this two-day event featuring the latest in home design. See Picks, Page 14. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE with pass. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-3368900, boisecentre.com.

MONDAY JAN. 31 On Stage INSERT FOOT THEATRE—Local improv comedy. 8 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, heirloomdancestudio.com.

Kids & Teens SNOW CASTLE EXPERIENCE—Bring the family to learn, then sculpt a snow castle together. Awards given for the best designs. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Brundage Mountain Resort, 3890 Goose Lake Road, McCall, 1-800-888-7544, brundage.com.

STORY STORY NIGHT—This month’s theme is Hooked: Stories of Cravings and Compulsions. See Picks, Page 15. 7 p.m. $5. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

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On Stage BEDSIDE MANNERS—See Friday. 8:15 p.m. $12$15. Idaho Outdoor Association. Grange Hall, corner of Brazil and Wright streets, Boise. CASH ON DELIVERY—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $9$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. IDAHO DANCE THEATRE WINTER SHOW—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10-$35. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. NORWAY—See Wednesday. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $14$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. STEEL MAGNOLIAS—See Thursday. 6:15 p.m. $15-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

Art GLAMOROUSNOISE—A fashion and art show featuring work by Tod Alan and Tyler Bush. DJs will provide the tunes and there will be a full bar for those 21 and older. 10 p.m. $20. Studio J, 1322 W. Main St., Boise, 208-713-9329.

Kids & Teens CHINESE NEW YEAR CELEBRATION—Ring in the Chinese New Year with games, crafts and a dragon parade. No registration is required. 2-3 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Animals & Pets BALD EAGLE DAY—Enjoy a full day of learning about the wildlife along the Boise River. For more details visit baldeagledays.blogspot.com. 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. FREE. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Avenue. Boise, 208-429-9908, idahoshakespeare.org.

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | 17

8 DAYS OUT Food & Drink MINDFUL PIZZA NIGHT—Facilitator Dave Ficks, Ph.D., M.Ed. will discuss eating mindfully while you grub on an assortment of specialty pizzas. You must register online at mindfuleatingtour.com to reserve a spot. Call Dave at 208-863-3398 for more info. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $25. Flying Pie Pizzaria, 6508 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-376-3454, flyingpie. com.

discussion forum showcasing a different local nonprofit each month, along with a silent auction and local music. 5-7:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

On Stage NORWAY—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $14-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater. org.

Talks & Lectures POLAR BEARS AND CLIMATE CHANGE TALK—Dr. Steven Amstrup will discuss his 30-yearlong study of how climate change is affecting polar bear habitat. This talk kicks off the Peregrine Fund’s conference Gyrfalcons and Ptarmigan in a Changing World. A photo exhibit featuring animals of the Arctic will be shown in conjunction with the lecture. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, 208-426INFO, union.boisestate.edu.

Workshops & Classes WATER-EFFICIENT LANDSCAPING—Series of four classes focusing on planning and perfecting a water-efficient lawn. Class meets on consecutive Wednesdays for four weeks. To register call 208-362-7336 or e-mail landscape@unitedwater. com. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Festivals & Events POETRY SLAM OF STEEL AND HAIKU BATTLE—Performance poetry workshop followed by an open slam. For more information, e-mail cheryl_maddalena@ yahoo.com. There is a $25 prize for the haiku champ. 6 p.m. $5 poetry slam, $1 with student ID, boisepoetry.com. Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-331-5632.

DIDGERIDOOS AND STORYTELLING CLASS—Children in fourth through eighth grades will explore the Aboriginal culture of Australia and make a didgeridoo. 4:15-5:15 p.m. $15 + registration fee. Sage International School, 457 E Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-343-7243, sageinternationalschool.org. MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP— Lego workshop for kids. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, 208-362-0181, adalib.org. TEEN LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITY—Become a member of the Teen Advisory Board and gain leadership experience. 4 p.m. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, 208-5706900, boisepubliclibrary.com. VIBE TRIBE—Dance class for kids six to eight years old. 5-6 p.m. $150 for entire session. Trey McIntyre Project Headquarters, 775 Fulton St., Boise, 877867-2320, treymcintyre.com.

Calls to Artists

Citizen

TUESDAY FEB. 1

Kids & Teens

BOISE BICYCLE PROJECT VOLUNTEER NIGHT—Volunteers may donate their time to help build and repair bicycles for the needy. 6-8 p.m. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., Boise, 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org.

SUDOKU |

BW COVER AUCTION GRANT SUBMISSIONS—Applications are due Friday, Feb. 4. Boise Weekly will award more than $16,000 this year. For info on how to apply visit boiseweekly. com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

Odds & Ends BEER PONG TOURNEY—Eight tables set up for play, $4 pitchers and a cash prize. What more could you ask for? 10 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-514-2531, drinkfattys.com. BOISE ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY—Learn how to use a telescope to view the sky during this month’s meeting. Visit boiseastro.org for more info. FREE, Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., 208-343-9895. BOOZE CLUES—Trivia and prizes with the one and only E.J. Pettinger. 9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s, 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344. COMEDY NIGHT—Test out your routine on patrons during open mic night. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-3223430.

WEDNESDAY FEB. 2 Festivals & Events LIQUID FORUM—Liquid Lounge and United Vision for Idaho host a

18 | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

| EASY

| MEDIUM |

HARD

|

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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2011

BANFF

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 6, 2011

RUSH HOUR DREAM STONES INTO SCHOOLS AZADI: FREEDOM KRANKED KIDS SALT

5 MINS 13 MINS 30 MINS 4 MINS 28 MINS

INTERMISSION

THE SWISS MACHINE INTO DARKNESS CHIMAERA DREAM RESULT TOTAL:

20 MINS 15 MINS 7 MINS 17 MINS 2:20

MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR SCHEDULE AND FILM DESCRIPTIONS

EGYPTIAN THEATRE, BOISE

MONDAY FEBRUARY 7, 2011

THE LONGEST WAY WILDWATER LIFE CYCLES DEEPER

5 MINS 30 MINS 14 MINS 27 MINS

INTERMISSION

AS IT HAPPENS STILL MOTION EASTERN RISES

TOTAL:

16 MINS 5 MINS 38 MINS

2:15

PRESENTED BY THE BOISE NORDIC FOUNDATION | WWW.BOGUSBASINNORDICGROUP.ORG 2 | 2011 BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR | BOISEweekly

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HAPPY

NEW

GEAR FROM YOUR FRIENDS AT

1021 Broadway Ave Boise ID 208 385-9300

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: From the film Rush Hour Dream; From the film Azadi Freedom; From the film Dream Result; From the film Salt.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6

RUSH HOUR DREAM

Germany, 2009, 5 minutes Directed and Produced by Kerim Jaspersen and Christian Menn Focus: Paragliding, Environment

An office worker in Düsseldorf, Germany, has a Rush Hour Dream in the tramway on his way to work and wakes up on a beautiful mountainside to discover that he is carrying a paraglider in his laptop.

STONES INTO SCHOOLS

USA, 2010, 12 minutes Directed by John Kuhrt Produced by Michael Simon Focus: Culture, NGO- work in Pakistan/Afghanistan

A behind-the-scenes look at Greg Mortenson’s inspiring work to build schools in war-torn Afghanistan, Stones into Schools depicts some of the history, challenges, and successes of this remarkable project. Mortenson’s book by the same name has been a best seller, along with his first book, Three Cups of Tea.

AZADI: FREEDOM

Canada, 2010, 30 minutes Directed and produced by Anthony Bonello Focus: Skiing, Mountain Culture

AZADI: Freedom takes a look at Kashmir in the wake of the violent militant insurgence of the 90s through the lens of skiing. The unique role that skiing is playing in rebuilding tourism in Kashmir is explored using cinematography, animation, and the story of local characters. The film crew explores the future presented to young Kashmiri as they venture into the mountains — on backcountry skis. The world’s highest skiable gondola sits amid the most militarized region in the world, yet the freedom of adventure is drawing foreigners back to this former Shangri-La.

KRANKED KIDS - JUST DOWN THE ROAD Canada, 2010, 4 minutes Directed and Produced by Bjørn Enga Focus: Mountain biking/humour

Kranked Kids – Just down the road is a delightful four-minute comingof-age mountain bike parody.

SALT

The Banff Centre Award for Creative Excellence Australia, 2009, 28 minutes Directed and Produced by Michael Angus and Murray Fredericks Focus: Human Adventure/Exploration

Each year, internationally acclaimed photographer Murray Fredericks ventures to the heart of Lake Eyre, which lies in a remote corner of WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

southern Australia. This journey represents a key stage along the photographer’s personal and professional path. Completely isolated, the horizon his only point of reference, and his thoughts his only companion, Murray is forced to brave storms, mud, lightning, and all manner of problems; yet his biggest obstacle is salt, which is inescapable. In Salt, Fredericks’s camera captures scenes and intense moments that prove beauty lies hidden in the midst of this bleak, empty, desolate land.

THE SWISS MACHINE USA, 2010, 20 minutes Produced by Nick Rosen and Peter Mortimer Focus: Climbing / Mountaineering

Ueli Steck may be the greatest speed alpinist the world has ever seen. In The Swiss Machine, Steck tells of his record-breaking ascents in the Alps, accompanied by stunning aerial footage that captures him racing up 2500-metre alpine faces. When he joins Alex Honnold in Yosemite, Steck sets his ultimate goal: to take his one-man alpine speed game to the largest, highest walls in the world.

INTO DARKNESS

USA, 2010, 15 minutes Directed and Produced by John Waller Focus: Caving

Into Darkness is a short adventure essay about the experience of exploring the secret underworld of caves. Journey along with a group of cavers who push through impossibly small passages to access some of the final frontiers on Earth. The images and sounds of spectacular and remote wilderness caves will reveal a fantastic world unlike anything we experience on the surface.

CHIMAERA

Canada, 2010, 7 minutes Directed by Dave Mossop Produced by Malcom Sangster Focus: Skiing

“Chimæra” refers to a mythological fusion of forms or a foolish fantasy. Shot with a unique camera system capable of shooting over 1000 frames per second, Chimæra slows our perception of reality and offers an unprecedented look at a skier’s life. It is an experience that blurs the borders between real and imaginary.

DREAM RESULT

People’s Choice Award, Radical Reels Night, sponsored by The North Face USA, 2009, 17 minutes Directed by Rush Sturges Produced by Tyler Bradt Focus: White-water kayaking

A group of top athletes and friends are driven by passion to explore the limits of possibility. Expeditions to Norway and a quest for waterfalls throughout Argentina and the US are all part of the program in Dream Result — so hang on for the ride!

BOISEweekly | 2011 BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR | 3

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: From the film The Longest Way; From the film Life Cycles; Ozturk & Richards Collection, from the film As it Happens; From the film Eastern Rises.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7

THE LONGEST WAY

Best Short Mountain Film, sponsored by Mountain Hardwear Germany, 2009, 5 minutes Directed and produced by Christoph Rehage Focus: Adventure, Humour

discovery, solitude, and risk. It’s a visually stunning feast for the senses, and an expedition into new ideas.

LIFE CYCLES

Canada, 2010, 14 minutes Directed and Produced by Ryan Gibb and Derek Frankowski Focus: Mountain Biking

A highly entertaining time-lapse of a one-year-walk from Beijing to Urumqi. Time and distance travelled are charmingly demonstrated by the growth of a beard in this five-minute short.

Filmed in Ultra HD, Life Cycles provides some of the most visually stunning images the mountain sports world has ever seen. It’s a beautiful celebration of the bicycle, and is sure to amaze anyone who has ever ridden one.

WILDWATER

DEEPER

When ordinary people share a singular passion, the extraordinary emerges. WildWater is a journey into the mind and soul of white-water and an exploration of places only river-runners can go — places of

Follow Jeremy Jones and other top freeriders as they venture past the boundaries of helicopters, snowmobiles, and lifts to explore untouched realms. Hang on tight in Deeper as Jones faces the biggest challenges

USA, 2010, 25 minutes Directed and produced by Anson Fogel Focus: White-water paddling

USA, 2010, 27 minutes Directed by Jeremy Jones Produced by Steve Jones Focus: Backcountry Snowboarding

4 | 2011 BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR | BOISEweekly

he has ever encountered in snowboarding. All night hikes, sleeping on peaks, camping 65 miles from civilization, 20 below temperatures, 10 day storms, and 30 kilometre days bring the adventure back into riding. This film is 100 per cent carbon neutral.

AS IT HAPPENS

USA, 2010, 16 minutes Directed and produced by Renan Ozturk and Corey Richards Focus: Mountaineering

Renan Ozturk and Corey Richards “go rogue” and file video dispatches from their attempt at the first ascent of Nepal’s 6,000 meter Tawoche Himal. As it Happens takes these individual pieces and ties them together in one well-made story that lets a challenging trip unfold as it happens.

STILL MOTION

Canada, 2008, 5 minutes Directed and produced by Jonathan Schmidt Focus: Environment / Wildlife

Compiled from the highlights of a whole year of wildlife research, still images from motion-triggered wildlife cameras create an intricately sequenced movie-like production of Alberta’s amazing wildlife. Playful fawns, stalking cougars, and curious elk take centre stage in Still Motion. The film asks an important question: Just who is looking at whom?

EASTERN RISES

Best Film on Mountain Sports, sponsored by ‘Live out There’ USA, 2010, 38 minutes Directed by Ben Knight Produced by Travis Rummel Focus: Fly-Fishing, Environment, Culture

The Kamchatka Peninsula in the Russian Far East may as well be the end of the earth. Its enormously wild landscape is swarming with bugs and bears and threaded with rivers full of massive mouse-eating trout. In the stunning film Eastern Rises, fishing is poetry, Bigfoot lurks in the fog, and fishermen risk life and limb in decommissioned Cold War helicopters to explore rivers that have never been fished before.

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NEWS/NOISE NOISE

DOWN AND DIRTY

Cameraman kitteh: “We’re lol-ing.”

Portland’s Quick and Easy Boys bring the party to Boise

I CAN HAS COLORBRAWL?

ANDREW CRISP Portland, Ore.-based trio the Quick and Easy Boys might not want to be called a jam band, but if the shoe fits ... Touring behind their second album, 2010’s Red Light Rabbit (2010, Per Capita Records)—their first pushed by a label—the guys are staples of the So-Po district of their home base and are spreading their genrebending funk across the West. With their war cry of “Yeah, bud!” QEB are all about The Quick and Easy Boys are on the fast track to a slow jam. getting the audience groovin’. “We started the band when we were all Success isn’t always about selling a of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, complete going to school in Eugene. The idea was lot of records or getting a song picked with Flea’s funky bass line and Anthony that we would do whatever we wanted for a commercial. With word of mouth Kiedis’ chanting vocals. In the title track, to musically,” bassist Sean Badders said. and networking, QEB has built a solid Russell lends his powerful picking to fre“We’ve been a very DIY band.” following in the thousands. Self-promotion netic surfer rock chords. Along with Badders is guitarist Jimmy has meant sticking true to what music is all “We can be the rock ’n’ roll band but Russell and Michael Goetz on drums. The about for them. have the freedom to change from song to band formed in Eugene in 2005 and from “We’ve always known that the music song ... to play everything under the wide there, they took on Portland, building a industry and the big labels are ... all just umbrella of rock,” said Badders. solid fan base in the jam band scene. In a big joke. While it sounds like a fantasy “Daggers,” the final track on Red 2008 they released Bad Decisions with to have somebody give you $10 million Light Rabbit, is less Chili Peppers and Good People on their own, and in 2009 and say, ‘OK, go make an album,’ there’s they set out on their first tour of the United more Tom Waits. Strumming a bourbon all this other garbage you have to go barroom baseline, a twanging guitar States. Their continually growing fan base through,” Badders said. “All of the sudden reprisal fades in mid-song but ends the is due, in no small part, to energetic live hard-hitting album aggressively. It serves as they have this huge break. All of the sudden performances, which Boise audiences will they have this song on a commercial. You a perfect counter-balance to an otherwise get a chance to experience on Friday, Jan. could be great. You have this opportunity. It upbeat, up-tempo album. 28, when the band performs at Liquid. QEB’s style isn’t always well understood. doesn’t automatically translate into success “We don’t necessarily consider ourselves Badders admitted that some reviewers think by any means.” a jam band. We like the ability to go into a Instead, the boys prefer being in tune it’s too ungrounded, but that assessment jam if we want to but retain that pop style with their fan base and networking with felfails to take the power of a live perforformat,” said Badders. low musicians on every stop on a tour. mance into account. According to Badders, Growing up, each of the members was “It’s all just community ... The hippie the interaction with the audience is what’s drawn to a variety of music, with 311’s important: playing something they can con- community and the punk community are Chad Sexton and Pink Floyd’s David Gilmvery different, but they’re both communities nect to, regardless of its pre-defined genre. our as strong influences. that are very close-knit,” said Badders. “We’ve had reviews where somebody “Ska and punk music, that was the stuff Badders also talked about what would say it’s so that really got me social networking is doing for bands, all over the place. I excited and upbeat including Foursquare and Twitter, and guess there’s some about music,” BadFriday, Jan 28, 9 p.m., FREE. how those tools are making it easier for truth to that,” said ders said. “At the LIQUID self-promotion—and what it means to interBadders. “But there’s same time, I was dis405 S. Eighth St. also something about act with fans. covering my dad’s old 208-287-5379 “Somebody types ‘having a great time what the listener music collection.” liquidboise.com right now.’ Somebody else can check it out wants to see.” For QEB, playThe Quick & Easy Boys also play in Ketchum online ... or if somebody is in the area, they He also thinks ing music was all on Wednesday, Jan. 26, and during the Winter can come by and check it out as something they’ve focused about exploring their Carnival in McCall on Saturday, Jan. 29. For more information, visit to do,” Badders said. on what people favorite bands, not thequickandeasyboys.com. There’s always face-to-face networking, like to listen to and just trying to emulate too. In clubs like Liquid, QEB can grab a that has helped craft a specific sound or beer with their fans. Badders enjoys that their style. genre. Channeling there’s a lot of room to meet new people “We’d be playing for like three hours— their diverse influences, there are underfour hours in some cases—and people might after shows. tones of spaghetti-Western folk, machina “After we play, there’ll be an after-party not like it,” he said. “[It was] ‘How are we distortion and Zeppelin-style takes on the or something and [we’ll] stay up until going to get people interested? How are we blues. Red Light Rabbit’s “Foster, I ...” is morning,” he said. going to get people to have a good time?’” instantly reminiscent of the tube-sock days WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Indie bands have long partnered with music blogs—Pitchfork, Stereogum, Brooklyn Vegan—to exclusively release new videos. But last week marked the dawn of a new era in cross-promotion: Hazy surf rock trio Best Coast linked paws with Lolcat pioneers I Can Has Cheezburger to premiere its new video “Crazy For You.” The video’s aesthetic is one-part subtitled French New Wave film and one-part Milo and Otis cute-tastrophe. Sitting in a chair labeled “Teh Director,” a cat in a button-up shirt and tie yells “Cut,” while Best Coast frontwoman Bethany Cosentino strums a guitar in a summery jumper. Yet somehow, through all the purposeful misspellings and kittens operating heavy machinery, Best Coast’s new video holds its head high—then politely asks for a cheezburger. Find a link to the video at boiseweekly.com on Cobweb. In equally colorful news, Boise’s newest all-ages venue Colorcube will host its official grand opening blowout this weekend at its space at 1718 Main St. The lineup for Thursday, Jan. 27, includes free performances by Desirae Bronson and Boise Rock School bands No Preservatives and Preemptive Breakdown. On Friday, Jan. 28, Colorcube will host Jr. Rocket Scientist, A Seasonal Disguise, Isaac McRoberts and Katie Wilson Henbest. And on Saturday, Jan. 29, you can check out Dedicated Servers, Mousy Brown, Bridgeport, Spondee and Owlright. All shows start at 7 p.m. and both the Friday and Saturday concerts cost $5 each. Speaking of all-ages shows, Brawl Studios is putting together the inaugural fourday Boise Hard-core/Metal Fest. The event will feature local, regional and touring bands and is slated to run Wednesday, March 30, through Saturday, April 2, at Mardi Gras. In addition, local hard-core band Brawl, fronted by Brawl Studios’ Eric Muniz, will release its new EP, The Bitter End on Tuesday, Feb. 1. Brawl also has a 7-inch vinyl titled Punishment slated to come out on Tuesday, March 1. For more info on Brawl, visit myspace.com/brawlmetalcore. —Tara Morgan

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | 19

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE

TENNIS, JAN. 28, NEUROLUX In 2009 the husband and wife duo Patrick Riley and Alaina Moore set off to fulfill Riley’s lifelong dream of sailing along the Eastern Seaboard for a year. As a result, Cape Dory was born—an EP of songs documenting their maritime adventure. Moore’s ethereal, sweet voice complements Riley’s and bandmate James Barone’s pop stylings, which are reminiscent of a simpler time in music’s history. Think girl groups of the ’50s and ’60s, mixed with today’s sensibilities, written on and about the high seas, and you’ve got a treasure of a concept album. Just 2,500 nautical miles later, songs such as “Seafarer” and “Take Me Somewhere” reflect the simplicity, serenity and solitude of time spent sailing with only one’s best compadre for company. Tennis plays Neurolux as part of their whirlwind tour before making an appearance at SXSW this spring. —Heather Lile With Finn Riggins and Active Children. 7 p.m., $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

20 | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

WEDNESDAY JAN. 26

THURSDAY JAN. 27

FRIDAY JAN. 28

AMY WEBER AND BEN BURDICK TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Sapphire

ALLEN WENTZ AND FRIENDS JAM AND OPEN MIC—9 p.m. FREE. Bouquet

BRIANNE GRAY—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

ELLA FERRARI—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piazza Di Vino

CHAD AND JEREMY WITH THE MYSTICS— See Picks, Page 15. 7 p.m. $25-$35. Egyptian

DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s

GIZZARD STONE—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JONATHAN TYLER AND THE NORTHERN LIGHTS—With Matt Hopper and the Roman Candles. 8:30 p.m. $5 adv., $7 day of show. Reef

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s SLEEPY SEEDS—With Mosshead, Street Pyramids, No Comprendo and With Child. 8 p.m. $5. VAC SOUL SERENE—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid THREE INCHES OF BLOOD— With Holy Grail. 8 p.m. $12 adv., $14 day of show. Neurolux VANPAEPAEGHEMS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

MOUSY BROWN—With Junior Rocket Scientist. 9 p.m. FREE. Reef NO PRESERVATIVES— With Preemptive Breakdown, Desirae Bronson. See Noise News, page 19. 7 p.m. FREE. ColorCube ROB PAPER—With Steve Eaton and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club

JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel JOHN JONES, MIKE SEIFRIT AND JON HYNEMAN—With Kevin Kirk and Sally Tibbs. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—9:45 p.m. $3. Grainey’s JUNIOR ROCKET SCIENTIST— With A Seasonal Disguise, Isaac McRoberts and Katie Wilson Henbest. 7 p.m. $5. ColorCube THE MELODRAMATICS—10 p.m. $5. Reef POKE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s THE QUICK AND EASY BOYS—See Noise, Page 19. 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid REBECCA SCOTT—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club SHERPA—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye SHON SANDERS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

TENNIS—With Active Children and Finn Riggins. See Listen Here, this page. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 at the door. Neurolux TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill THOMAS AHLQUIST QUARTET—6 p.m. FREE. Blue Door THE USELESS—With P36, Threshold, Krystos and Hotel Chelsea. 7:30 p.m. $6. Knitting Factory

SATURDAY JAN. 29 DEDICATED SERVERS—With Mousy Brown, Bridgeport, Spondee and Owlright. 7 p.m. $5. ColorCube DISCOMA—With Bonefish Sam and Zach Vaughn House and his Noodling Space Guitar. 8 p.m. $5. VAC ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill HOT LOCAL KNIGHTS: INDIE/ACOUSTIC NIGHT—Jacob Donivan, CBS, Just a Fluke, Chris Cross, Castanelli, The Desert Starrs, Mitch Spivey, The Bread Bear, Rob Lanterman, Apple Thief, Jason Chacon, A Sea of Glass, Uriah and Desirae Bronson. See Picks, Page 14. 5 p.m. $8. The Venue

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE B R ANTLEY GU TIER R EZ

GUIDE JON HYNEMAN—With Sally Tibbs and Kevin Kirk. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—9:45 p.m. $3. Grainey’s

REX MILLER—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill WHISKEY WRANGLE WITH NEO TUNDRA COWBOY—With Snake Muzzle. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Bouquet

JOSHUA TREE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s MIKE QUINN—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub REBECCA SCOTT—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m. Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club SCHOOL OF ROCK—2 p.m. $5$8. Blue Door TAUGE AND FAULKNER—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid TERRY JONES—7 p.m. FREE. Twig’s

MONDAY JAN. 31

ATOMIC TOM—With James Orr. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $12 day of show. Neurolux CARTER FREEMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

BEN BURDICK AND BILL LILES—6 p.m. FREE. WillowcreekVista

CONTEMPORARY NIGHT WITH ARTS WEST LIVE—With Divit and Fonny. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

DAN COSTELLO AND THE TRUCK STOP TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. $2. Liquid

JEFF MOLL AND GUESTS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

RUSS PFEIFER—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

KEVIN KIRK—With John Jones. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE SHAUN BRAZELL BAND— With David Veloz. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

LARRY CONKLIN—11 a.m. FREE. Moon’s

SONNY MOON FOR FOUR— 7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

SUNDAY JAN. 30

TUESDAY FEB. 1

TERRI EBERLEIN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

STEVEN TONEY—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

WEDNESDAY FEB. 2 AMY WEBER AND BEN BURDICK TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Sapphire BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid GIZZARD STONE—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s HASTE THE DAY—With MyChildren MyBride and Plea For Purging. 6:30 p.m. $13 adv., $15 at the door. The Venue JAMES MILLER—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman, Phil Garonzik and Erin Hall. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Find even more live music events at boiseweekly.com.

FETISH 37—With The Forgotten. 9 p.m. FREE. Red Room GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

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V E N U E S

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

ATOMIC TOM, FEB. 1, NEUROLUX When Atomic Tom’s instruments were stolen late last year, the Brooklyn-based rock band did what any hard-working group would do ... they made do with the tools at hand: their iPhones. Using instrument apps—piano/vocals, drums, guitar and bass—the foursome performed their single “Take Me Out” for an unwitting (but apparently not unwilling) audience in a New York City subway car full of passengers The video of the performance has been viewed more than 4 million times, and as we know, a well-watched Youtube video can be a musician’s direct line to success. That and an appearance on the Ellen DeGeneres Show. Right, Justin Bieber? The foursome play Boise on Tuesday, Feb. 1, and while they probably have new instruments by now, here’s hoping they’ll iPhone-in an encore of that performance. James Orr, who is everywhere lately, opens. —Amy Atkins 8 p.m., $10 adv., $12 door. Tickets are available at the Record Exchange and ticketweb.com. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-336-5034, neurolux.com.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | 21

LISTINGS/SCREEN Opening

V i s i t b o i s e w e e k l y. c o m a n d c l i c k on Scr een for movie times.

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

THE GOLDEN TICKET And the winners are ... Well, you tell us. THE MECHANIC—Starring the tireless Jonathan Statham as Arthur, a meticulous assassin with a hunger for revenge. Problems surface when he reluctantly brings in a young sidekick in training. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

THE RITE—As a priest with a fine knowledge of the underworld, Father Lucas (Anthony Hopkins) introduces a young seminary student to exorcisms and the Vatican’s dense history. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

Continuing BLACK SWAN—Natalie Portman and Mila Kunis star as a ballerina and her understudy in an exploration of vicious backstage rivalry. Suspenseful thriller in the world of professional ballet. See review at boiseweekly.com. (R) Flicks

GEORGE PRENTICE Taking Oscar too seriously is a fool’s errand, but dismiss the little golden man and you’re ignoring pop-culture’s most famous sweepstakes. So rather than the fluff and puff of the self-important Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, let’s have some fun with this carnival of movies. For goodness sakes, it’s a contest, and a flawed one at that. How else to explain less-than-average Best Picture Winners like Cavalcade, Rocky or Shakespeare in Love? Worse yet, explain the list of Oscar losers like Citizen Kane, Dr. Strangelove, Raging Bull, Network and The Wizard of Oz. In that spirit, we’re unveiling our 2011 Oscar Will Win/Should Win contest. It’s pretty simple. Find this story at boiseweekly. com under “Screen” and vote in the poll posted there. Tell us who will win and who should win in the top six categories. The nominees are as follows:

The Fighter dominates the supporting acting categories with nods to Christian Bale, Melissa Leo and Amy Adams. The film is a heavyweight contender with seven nominations including Best Picture.

Best Actor: Javier Bardem (Biutiful), Jeff Bridges (True Grit), Jesse Eisenberg (The Social Network), Colin Firth (The King’s Speech), James Franco (127 Hours)

Best Actress: Annette Bening (The Kids Are All Right), Nicole Kidman (Rabbit Hole), Jennifer Lawrence (Winter’s Bone), Natalie Portman (Black Swan), Michelle Williams (Blue ValTo vote for your Oscar picks, entine)

Best Picture: Black Swan, The Fighter, visit boiseweekly.com. Inception, The Kids Best Supporting Are All Right, The Actor: Christian Bale King’s Speech, 127 (The Fighter), John Hawkes (Winter’s Hours, The Social Network, Toy Story 3, Bone), Jeremy Renner (The Town), Mark True Grit, Winter’s Bone Ruffalo (The Kids Are All Right), Geof-

Best Supporting Actress: Amy Adams (The Fighter), Helena Bonham Carter (The King’s Speech), Melissa Leo (The Fighter), Hailee Steinfeld (True Grit), Jacki Weaver (Animal Kingdom) Best Documentary: Exit Through the Gift Shop, Gasland, Inside Job, Restrepo, Waste Land Again, the polls are open at boiseweekly. com. When you participate, you’ll be entered in a drawing to win Flicks tickets so that you can start scoping out next year’s possible nominees. Good luck, have fun and let us know who will win and, more importantly, who should.

frey Rush (The King’s Speech)

SCREEN/THE TUBE MADE IN DAGENHAM—Sally Hawkins, Bob Hoskins and many more star in the true story of women machinists who, after fighting for equal wages, left their jobs at the Ford Motor Company in England in 1968. See review at boiseweekly. com. (R) Flicks

say, but we don’t know if Barkley will sit still or eat a live chicken to demonstrate the metaphorical disintegration of the Phoenix Whether or not you care about sports, Charles Barkley, a glorious Suns’ defense. caricature of himself, is the most unpredictably watchable person on Barkley’s off-the-top-of-his-head statistics are far more interesting television. He consistently turns TNT’s Inside the NBA into an effusive than real statistics. He’ll confidently assert something like, “They had spectacle of misplaced malice and misunderstood malapropisms. more threes tonight in 27 minutes than the Steelers had six touchYou never know what Barkley will say. He may, while discussing basdowns in two years, and if hockey had a four-minute warning, nobody’d ketball, proclaim an obscure relic like Mookie Blaylock to be the greatknow about a seven-year itch.” est athlete of all time while pointing out that “Mookie Blaylock” sounds Barkley has often discussed his guberlike a weird foot disease. Then he’ll start natorial aspirations in his home state of talking about pop culture or politics. By Alabama, which could possibly establish the end of one sentence, Rob Schneider another spectacular platform. Imagine his has been snubbed by the Oscars, and state-of-the-state address: “The legislaWinston Churchill winds up being some ture people are a bunch of silly goof-asskind of “dumb-dumb knucklehead.” es. I’m a great-lookin’ fat man. God bless On Martin Luther King Jr. Day, America and the homosexuality people Barkley attempted to advance a seriand Alabama.” ous point as he awkwardly told viewers, On the MLK Day show, Barkley said “People try to make it about black and of a random player, “He’s trying to be white, but [King] talked about equality Francis Ford Coppola.” Nobody on the for every man, every woman ... I love the program, including Barkley, appeared to homosexuality people.” know what he meant—and that’s what So far, the “homosexuality people” makes it great. haven’t commented. —Damon Hunzeker Inside the NBA airs Thursdays on TNT. Times vary Ever ybody knows what Jay Leno will

LATE NIGHT WITH CHARLES BARKLEY

JUSTI N LA RO SE/TN T

NO STRINGS ATTACHED—Platonic friends Emma (Natalie Portman) and Adam (Ashton Kutcher) make a conscious decision to take their friendship to the next level of intimacy, asking themselves if they can remove their emotions and keep it purely physical. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 23

depending on when NBA games air.

22 | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

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LISTINGS/SCREEN NEW DVD RELEASE/SCREEN

RABBIT HOLE—Nicole Kidman and Aaron Eckhart star as a happily married couple who lose their son in a tragic accident. Based on the Pulitzer Prize winning play by David Lindsay-Abaire. (PG-13) Flicks 22

Special Screenings

SANTA SANGRE For the first time, Alejandro Jodorowsky’s 1989 macabre masterpiece, Santa Sangre, will be available on DVD in the United States. Santa Sangre is the story of young Fenix, who witnesses his philandering circus-strongman father cut the arms off of his ultrareligious mother. After being confined to a mental institution, an older Fenix becomes his mother’s arms ... and her conduit for revenge. Cinematically, this is an incredibly beautiful piece of film, and as the story dances in and out of flashbacks, viewers will be swept up into the surreal, somber and scary nature of this movie. The DVD contains an additional five hours of extras, including documentaries, interviews and commentary.

TUPAC UNCENSORED AND UNCUT: THE LOST PRISON TAPES It’s not news that almost as much material about rapper Tupac Shakur has been released posthumously as it was while he was still alive. Here is yet another contribution to the library of the dead rapper’s media. Filmed during his lockup at the Clinton Correctional Facility in 1995, this short documentary shows a reflective and candid Shakur looking back on his life. It’s made all the more poignant by the fact that his life would soon end—Shakur was shot and killed in 1996. While much of the footage in this roughly 45-minute doc has been seen before, for the diehard Shakur fan, Tupac Uncensored is a collection must-have. —Amy Atkins

TWO WHEELS TWO PLANKS— Vermont-based photographer Brian Mohr and his companion Emily Johnson skied and biked through Norway and documented their journey. This slide show/ video presentation of the trip is part of the duo’s ongoing Wild People, Wild Places series. A raffle will follow the screening. Saturday, Jan. 29, 6:30 p.m., FREE, $5 raffle tickets, Idaho Mountain Touring, 1310 Main St., Boise, 208-336-3854, idahomountaintouring.com.

T H E AT E R S EDWARDS 22 BOISE 208-377-9603, regmovies.com EDWARDS 9 BOISE 208-338-3821, regmovies.com EDWARDS 14 NAMPA 208-467-3312, regmovies.com THE FLICKS 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com MAJESTIC CINEMAS MERIDIAN 208-888-2228, hallettcinemas.com

FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: NORTHGATE CINEMA COUNTRY CLUB REEL NAMPA REEL 208-377-2620, reeltheatre.com OVERLAND PARK $1 CINEMA 208-377-3072, opcmovies.com NORTHERN LIGHTS CINEMA AND GRILL 208-475-2999, northernlightscinemagrill.com

HAPPY

NEW

GEAR FROM YOUR FRIENDS AT

APP/SCREEN PHONE APP: KEEP UP WITH THE RUNKEEPER PRO It’s almost the end of Januar y and the holidays are a distant memor y. For many of us, after the dietar y debaucher y of Christmas, there was the saving grace of the New Year’s Resolution. From the most dedicated athlete to the reformed couch potato, there were promises of gym time, diets and being healthier. But it’s easy to forget about all of that by the end of the month. Runkeeper Pro can help. The app, one of the highest grossing health and fitness apps of 2010, is free through the end of January for both iPhone and Android users. Usually $10, Runkeeper Pro will WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

help track and motivate your outdoor workouts. This app will make you feel like a spaceage athlete. It utilizes GPS to track where you run, how fast you run and the calories you burned. Then it lays out that info beautifully on Google Maps so that you can easily see your progress. This Pro version also adds customizable audio cues, coaching ability and in-app playlist functionality so you don’t have to mess with iTunes during your workout. And for those who aren’t seasoned runners, the app tracks just about ever y other kind of outdoor activity including cycling, walking, skiing and hiking, too. Visit runkeeper.com for more

1021 Broadway Ave Boise ID 208 385-9300

information.

—Jordan Wilson

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | 23

NEWS/REC S TEVE S ILVA

REC TODD M EIER

QUEEN OF PAIN Taking an Owyhee County Historical Society field trip is like traveling in a time machine.

Sun Valley super athlete conquers all DEANNA DARR

OWYHEE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY FIELD TRIPS As we start a new year, thoughts are often on the future. We make resolutions to change and better ourselves. But what if instead of a gym membership to help your future self, you signed up for a membership to the past? Owyhee County is well known for its wild and woolly histor y. The state’s largest county boasts a past filled with cattle drives, horse thieves and shady characters that covered its spectacular landscape. The Owyhee County Historical Society does its best to preser ve and protect this wonder ful legacy. To this end, the historical society oversees the Owyhee County Historical Society Museum and Librar y, a museum in Murphy filled with all manner of artifacts and exhibits, a bookstore and a librar y, all of which capture some of Idaho’s incredible past. One additional—and fantastic—service that OCHS provides is monthly field trips. These guided trips are open to the public and are one-of-a-kind, maybe even once-ina-lifetime, trips into the beautiful Owyhee country to explore and learn about special places, people and the area’s colorful past. The OCHS field trips usually begin with a meet-and-greet rendezvous, then visitors caravan to a predetermined destination (four-wheel drive vehicles are sometimes required), where longtime ranchers, land owners, miners or other experts are waiting to tell the story of the past from a first-person perspective. An informal pot luck lunch takes place after the trip. An annual membership to OCHS is $25 for individuals and $35 for a family. For more information, check out owyheemuseum.org. And since you’re sure to get a little exercise wandering through and learning about the Owyhee country side, this is one membership you might just use. —Steve Silva The museum is typically open Tue.-Sat., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Owyhee County Historical Society, 17085 Basey St., PO Box 67, Murphy, 208-495-2319, owyheemuseum.org

In person, Rebecca Rusch looks like an otherwise sane—albeit ridiculously fit—person: no outward signs of any mental instability or psychosis hide behind her warm smile. But then you find out the nickname her professional peers have given her: Queen of Pain. No, she’s not a dominatrix, but she does dominate when she’s on two wheels cruising over the single track. Her nickname comes from the fact that she seems to be able to push herself through more discomfort, exhaustion Sun Valley’s Rebecca Rusch isn’t just the Queen of Pain, she’s also queen of the trail. and pain than anyone else on the mountain bike racing circuit, a trait that has taken her to the open class, but she doesn’t focus on it. hour barrier—and finished 22nd overall. the top of the sport at the tender age of 42. “I can’t change it, so I’ll embrace it,” she “Now I have a huge target on my back,” Just more than a year ago, BW sat down said. “You’re seeing it more and more, evshe said with a laugh. with the Sun Valley resident on the heels erywhere. You’re seeing older athletes doing Just as Rusch transitioned from advenof her win at the near-legendary Leadville better and training better.” ture racing to mountain biking more than 100—a race she did on a whim—to talk It’s a view Babbitt shares, adding that six years ago, she’s finding new focus as she about her multiple world championships in Rusch is a racer to keep watching. the sport of 24-hour solo racing and her past moves from 24-hour races to stage races and “Women and men are staying fitter longer shorter courses—although few would call in elite adventure racing. ... if you continue to train, and your body is 100 miles short. A racing season later, Rusch is celebrating better able to handle the training load, you “I have asthma, and the long efforts being named mountain biker of the year in the become smarter about it,” he said. “[Rusch Endurance Live Awards, an offshoot of endur- were taking their toll on me,” she said of is] smarter than she’s ever been and faster ance sports publication Competitor magazine. the day-long races. “I wanted to give my than she’s ever been. That’s a pretty good lungs a break.” It’s not the first time Rusch has been Her new focus has allowed her to compete combination.” singled out. She was previously honored as Unlike many other mountain bikers, in more races thanks to the shorter recovery an adventure racer, a multi-day, multi-sport team race. This second award makes her one time between events. It also meant that Lead- Rusch hasn’t headed to a warmer climate ville has become her target race, the endpoint where she can ride year round. Instead, of only a handful of athletes who have been Rusch’s winter training includes hours spent of her long hours of training. honored in multiple sports. in the gym, on the trails skate skiing and in Last year, Rusch went to Leadville better The Endurance Awards have been handed the hills backcountry skiing. prepared, better acclimated and with a clear out for 19 years as a way to showcase the “I don’t want to leave Idaho just to ride,” talents of athletes who often go unnoticed by vision. But as a defending champion, she was she said. “I would miss skiing and all those the mainstream, according to awards founder the focus of more attention from both fans other activities.” and competitors. Bob Babbitt, editor-in-chief of Competitor Next month she’ll head to South “Part of being an athlete is being able to magazine. America to begin her race training by comhandle that stress,” she said of the pres“While they might not know each other, peting in various races, including several in sure. “You can harness it and use it to your they share a common ability to hurt. It’s a Argentina. She said her focus will remain on advantage.” camaraderie built on pain management,” shorter races, including the possible addition Rusch’s ability to compete at the elite Babbitt said. “It’s a tough lifestyle. They’re levels of multiple sports testifies to her talent, of some Super D races—hard-core downhill not going to make the money, but they love cross-country bike races she categorizes as Babbitt said. it. It’s a passion.” “It has the ability to transcend her sport,” “pretty fun.” Winners are selected by experts at the pubIn the true style of great competitors, he said. lication who look at specific disciplines, be it Rusch is already planning two steps ahead, Much has been made of Rusch’s dominamountain biking, road racing or triathlon. tion of a sport with ranks filled with younger admitting that she’s toying with the idea of “She’s hands down the best female mounathletes, but age isn’t a factor for her. In fact, time trial road racing. So don’t be surprised tain biker around,” Babbitt said of Rusch. she sees her experience to see her turn up at the Twilight Criterium The award is the sometime in the future. as a benefit. cherry on top of “I’m not usually a road racer, but the time “I train smarter and another epic seaFor more about the Queen of Pain visit rebeccarusch.com. know more,” she said. trial is you, alone, and I think it might be a son, which included good race for me,” she said. “That’s sort of “I’m a better athlete Rusch’s repeat win at in my head—not this year, but next.” now than I’ve ever the Leadville 100—a Regardless of what race she turns up at, been. It’s just brains.” 100-mile race set entirely above 10,000 there is no question that she will be racing. While she’s happy she can be an inspirafeet in the Colorado Rockies. This time “I don’t feel old yet,” she said. “There will tion for other athletes, Rusch admits to being around, she not only won the women’s divicome a day, but I’m not there yet. I’ll do it as sion, but set a new course record—becoming a bit riled when some race organizers want long as I’m competitive and having fun.” her to enter the masters category rather than only the second woman to beat the eight-

24 | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

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LISTINGS/REC PLAY/REC

Register

PATR IC K S W EENEY

2011 GEORGE’S CYCLES SPRING RACE SERIES—Series consists of three races. Register at sportsbaseonline.com for all three races. No single race registration. Call 208-343-3782 for more info. $50 for the series. 2011 SLAMMER ROAD RACE— Road race to be held on Sunday, March 20, at 10 a.m. The race begins and ends on S. Cole Road, half a mile south of Ten Mile Creek Road. Register online through March 20 at sportsbaseonline.com. For more info call 208-343-3782. $15.

TRIVIA IS THE NEW BOWLING What was the name of the Brady Bunch’s dog? Who wrote Red Badge of Courage? How many muscles does it take to move one step? If you or your drinking buddies know the answers to any of these questions, you don’t have to spend your weeknights at home yelling at the TV, trying to outwit Jeopardy contestants any more. Instead, you can spend a raucous evening with friends, talk a little smack and win bar tabs—and if you join Last Call Trivia’s current league, possibly take home $1,000. The game is fairly simple: You get the length of a song to answer each question and can bid a varying number of points without losing any for a wrong answer. Bonus questions help make up for missed points. Games take place in numerous bars around the valley concurrently and because Boise’s Last Call is part of a national franchise, the questions are the same at each location, as are prizes: a $30 bar tab for first place, $20 for second and $10 for third. On a Wednesday night, the air inside the recently smokefree Jumpin’ Janet’s was thick with competition as roughly 60 people participated in trivia night with stand-up comic Josh Adams holding court as host. Team Motor City Kitties cheered loudly when they got an answer right, while Team Britney Spears’ Beef Curtain groaned slightly at another missed point. (Yes, teams make up their own names.) My team, Team Bragkins—which includes my friend Matt Bragg and the occasional BW colleague LAST CALL TRIVIA drop-in— Various start times, FREE. Buffalo Wild whooped and Wings, Bulls Head Pub, Eastside Tavern, weeped. We Hyde Park Street Pub, Jumpin’ Janet’s, Liquid Lounge, Mulligans and The Office. were holding at third with Get more information (and hints each week) several other at lastcalltrivia.com/boise. teams right at our heels. Whoop. Every wrong answer we offered cut like a “what is a serrated kitchen utensil called?” Weep. A subsequent Sunday at Liquid and another Wednesday at Janet’s netted us fourth place both times. The top 20 teams get a shot at the two final spots and the $1,000. Although we walked away with no bar tab (weep), we are currently in 16th place (whoop). Trivia has become quite popular as evidenced by Booze Clues trivia at Pengilly’s every Tuesday. Host (and BW contributor) E.J. Pettinger challenges participants’ speed-dial skills, since the only way to get points is to be the first person to call the bar’s number with the correct answer. On Mondays, you can join Bragg as he calls out themed trivia questions at Pitchers and Pints, where the team with the lowest points at the end of the night gets to choose the next week’s theme. There’s still time to join Last Call Trivia’s league but be careful: With $1,000 on the line, I won’t hesitate to weep if I see that your team is beating mine. —Amy Atkins WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BEAT THE DOC FUN RUN AND CANINE CANTER—5K loop course including off-road trails and a gravel road to be held on Saturday, March 26, at 10 a.m. Register online at spondoro. com through the day of the race. $30.50-$35.50, plus $5 for your dog. Eagle Island State Park, 2691 Mace Road, Eagle. DRY CREEK HALF MARATHON—To be held on Saturday, April 2, at 10 a.m. Course starts and finishes at the Merc at the Hidden Springs town square. Register online at bluecirclesports.com through April 2. $38. LES BOIS 10K TRAIL RUN 2011—10K run to be held on Saturday, March 5. Course is 6.2 miles out and back on dirt trails behind Fort Boise Park. Register online at bluecirclesports.com through March 5. $28. SPRING VOLLEYBALL LEAGUE—Get your team together. League play begins Monday, Feb. 14, at the Fort Boise Community Center. Visit cityofboise. org/parks for more info or to register by Jan. 28. $245 per team plus $20 USSSA fee. Boise City Recreation office, 110 Scout Lane, Boise, 208-384-4256, cityofboise.org/parks. WEISER RIVER TRAIL 50K RELAY AND SOLO RUN—Run this 50K solo or with a team on the scenic Weiser River Trail. Race to be held on Saturday, April 30, with staggered start times beginning at 9 a.m. Register online at bluecirclesports.com through the day of the race. $60 solo, $200 per team of five.

Events & Workshops IDAHO STAMPEDE BASKETBALL—Vs. Fort Wayne Mad Ants. Friday, Jan. 28, and Saturday, Jan. 29, 7 p.m. $12-$20. Qwest Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, qwestarenaidaho.com. KRIYA YOGA INITIATION WEEKEND—Learn about ancient meditation techniques that help develop the body, intellect and soul. Friday, Jan. 28, 7 p.m. FREE. Stevens-Henager College, 1444 S. Entertainment Ave., Boise, 800-294-9192, stevenshenager.edu. WCFC: HARD KNOCKS—World championship full-contact match. Saturday, Jan. 29, 8 p.m. $25-$85. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | 25

NEWS/FOOD JOYC E ALEX ANDER / B W AR C HIVES

FOOD

TEARS OF SADNESS AND RADNESS We begin this week with some unfortunate news: Chef Roland Joseph, owner of Chef Roland’s Cajun Cuisine, suffered a fatal heart attack on the evening of Jan. 18. The eclectic Cajun chef was known for his generous spirit—hosting free Thanksgiving and Christmas meals for the less-fortunate—and his boisterous personality. Family and friends gathered to celebrate Chef Roland’s life at his restaurant on Jan. 22. Salt Tears Coffeehouse and Noshery, the new venture from former Tapas Estrella and MilkyWay owners Andrea and Mitchell Maricich, officially opened last week. Nearly three years after closing MilkyWay, the Maricichs have returned with their new venture. The cafe is inside the airy Green Chutes co-op and focuses on light breakfasts, soups, sandwiches and evening small plates with occasional specials. Check out Guy Hand’s photos of Salt Tears on Cobweb at boiseweekly.com. A bit further down State Street, there’s another new, easy-to-miss gem. Don’t let the red, white and green sign fool you, the tiny restaurant perched on the edge of the Big Lots parking lot at State and Glenwood streets isn’t another Papa Murphy’s. It’s a similarly named, but family owned, Italian deli called Uncle Giuseppe’s. Opened in late November 2010, Uncle Giuseppe’s sells imported meats, cheeses and Boar’s Head products. It’s owned by former Long Island retiree Jimmy Beltucci. “We owned, in New York, something similar to the Boise Co-op where we manufactured all our own raviolis and fresh pastas, and we also had a deli,” explained Beltucci. If you were to judge the shop by Beltucci’s thick New York accent alone, you’d get a good sense for what they carry—salami, prosciutto, pastrami, mortadella sopressata. Sandwiches are topped with provolone or Beltucci’s wife’s homemade mozzarella and piled high on Italian bread. The Beltuccis moved to Idaho when their daughter decided to go to Boise State, and they hope to eventually pass the business to their son. For more info, call 208-853-5048. If soups are more your style, Lisa Peterson’s gourmet home delivery business A’Tavola has partnered with Tully’s to serve specialty homemade soups. “We just did a salmon chowder. Tomato orange is very popular. We do a carrot fennel, roasted cauliflower, a field-and-forest mushroom,” said Peterson. The soups are available at the Tully’s in BODO and at Capitol Boulevard and Idaho Street. For more information, visit atavoladelivers.com. —Tara Morgan

GU Y HAND

Au revoir Chef Roland.

WHEN IT’S EASY BEING CHEESY The marriage of beer and cheese (and chocolate) GUY HAND It’s a Wednesday afternoon, and I’m standing at the Boise Co-op cheese counter with four people whose jobs I covet. They’re sipping beer and sampling cheese, searching for the perfect marriage of flavors for the Front Door Pizza and Tap House’s ever popular First Thursday pairings of beer, cheese and chocolate. An enthusiastic Cera Grindstaff, the house If you miss Front Door’s First Thursday beer and cheese pairing, you bleu it. It’s good for what ales you. manager at Front Door, says they’ve been on the hunt for perfect pairings for the past three “It has such a great nose on it,” adds Grind- porter is as respectable as pairing it to a hoity years. The group must be doing something right because Grindstaff says the monthly tast- staff as she gives the beer a little sniff. “Do you burgundy or toity bordeaux. Some restaurants in Portland, Ore., even sport beer sommeliers get a little bit of the wood from the barrels?” ings are always packed. who will fine-tune your selection with the laserGelsthorpe nods. “Yeah, way popular,” she says with an “You can smell the funk, and there’s almost like expertise of a wine steward—while sparing eager bounce. “We sell out. We have enough to you the condescendingly raised brows. some cherry notes to it,” he says. do 30 plates, and we always sell out.” Over the years that the Front Door/Co-op Jessica Price, the Front Door’s beverage With a slightly more reserved flourish, Matt manager, hasn’t contributed much so far, apart group has been pairing cheese to beer, they’ve Gelsthorpe, Boise Co-op’s beer buyer, rises learned a few lessons, noticed some patterns, from quietly suggesting that I take smaller purposefully from behind the cheese counter, discovered some natural mash-ups. gulps. Instead, she judiciously contemplates pulling wedges of cheddar and rounds of “We’ve had success with a number each lingering taste. Eventually, she has a chevre out of the case. of the hoppier styles and hoppier beers verdict on the cheese. “Cera e-mailed me yesterday with the beer with cheddars,” says Gelsthorpe. “That “That’s really good. It brings that cherry list,” he says. “I’ve tasted the majority of these seems to be a classic pairing: an IPA and a in there, and it kind of loses the sourness,” beers before so I started grabbing cheeses nice sharp cheddar.” she says. today that I thought would work.” Price says stouts work with bleu cheeses “It makes this beer much more approachIf you think this sounds like little more because big beers typically pair nicely with able,” Gelsthorpe interjects after swishing than a field trip boondoggle for foodies, it’s big cheeses. Pilsners often work with subtle a sip from cheek to cheek. “A lot of people not. These tasters take the challenge of finding cheeses, like young goudas. And beers with are going to be very afraid of this beer, and the right match seriously. Really. Now they’re I’ve actually had bottles returned, saying this citrusy notes work well with chevres. trying to tease out the consummate cheese for But she adds a cautionary note. beer is bad.” a cantankerously sour beer. “I’ve learned that when you assume that “Yeah,” Grindstaff says. “It actually mel“With the sour beer,” Gelsthorpe says as something will go together, it usually doesn’t. lows out those sharp acidic he holds up a bottle of Jolly A lot of it is trial and error.” A bad pairing flavors. It brings out the nice Pumpkin Brewery’s Noel de BOISE CO-OP 888 W. Fort St. can be tragic—like sucking on old pennies flavors in the beer.” Calabaza, “it will be a little bit 208-472-4500 or licking a damp barn door—and that’s They all agree. That’s the more difficult just to find the boisecoop.com why the group takes to their search with the power of a good pairing. one that works best. We really sobering knowledge that innocent taste buds A challenging beer can be want it to pop because the beer THE CHOCOLAT BAR 805 W. Bannock St. are at stake. tamed, enhanced by the right is spectacular and difficult.” 208-338-7771 “Typically I like to get the beer on my palcheese—and vice versa—creThe selection is so difficult thechocolatbar.com ate so [I] start getting those flavors,” Price says ating a magical mingling of that Robert Harrelson, Front of the tasting technique she has come to use. flavors greater than the sum of Door’s kitchen manager, makes FRONT DOOR 105 S. Sixth St. “And then the cheese—what you really want their gustatory parts. It’s like sure everyone contributes an 208-287-9201 adding the perfect nutrient to a to do is get it in there and let it soften up a opinion. thefrontdoorboise.com little bit so it pretty much encompasses most of temperamental orchid: Flavors “The more palates, the your palate.” suddenly bloom on the tongue better,” Harrelson says. “Not She takes a sip, smooshes a nubbin of in beautifully unexpected ways. everyone’s palate is the same, so you know if cheese with her tongue, takes another sip, Grindstaff takes another swig. just one person was doing this, it could come “I really think that beer is blowing up lately, then does a little jig that seems to signal a across as not being as good. We try to have as good match. like in the past couple of years. It’s awesome many people doing this as possible.” “Both of these shine through and complefor us,” she says. The group starts out with some so-so ment each other,” she says. She’s right. Beer is beginning to get some matches, then takes a bite of Rouge et Noir, a But cheese isn’t beer’s only natural respect in serious food circles. It isn’t the Rodbuttery, triple creme brie from California. partner. The Front Door’s First Thursney Dangerfield of beverages anymore. And “Yeah, that really did have a little pop there’s a craft beer revolution going on. Today, day pairing also includes chocolate. to it,” says Harrelson through a just-percep28 So, the next stop is the Chocolat Bar in learning to pair a meal with an artisan ale or tible grin.

26 | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

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FOOD/REVIEW LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

downtown Boise and a chat with owners Chris and Kristi Preston. “It’s been just a wonderful surprise how well beer and chocolate go together,” Chris says. “And the beers that we’ve had have just really been outstanding. It’s been this wonderful surprise every month to see how are we going to be wowed. It’s really been enjoyable.” The Prestons make chocolates from scratch and try to pair special ingredients to that month’s beer selection. Kristi has a platter of possibilities ready to go. “We’ll use things like red chili and pair that with the beer, and then another one might be something that has ginger in it or just a plain dark chocolate with almonds,” she says. “So it’s this real variety of flavors that complement with the beer. It’s fun that way.” Price says the Front Door tries to include Idaho-made ingredients as often as possible, having paired beers from Grand Teton Brewery, Laughing Dog and Sockeye and cheeses from Ballard Family Dairy. Compared to Oregon and Washington, though, Idaho isn’t yet a big producer of craft beer, cheese or chocolate. But if this afternoon’s outing is any indication, there’s light on the culinary horizon: Idahoans are definitely refining their palates and since beer, cheese and chocolate are gateway foods, once a community gets a taste for a good pairing, a more complex food culture can’t be far away. More disciplined than I, Price moves on to the next chocolate choice while I stall over second helpings of the last. “That’s a very interesting beer,” she says as everyone moves down the counter, leaving me to surreptitiously snag one more truffle. “You get that sweet up front and then all those hops come in on the back end. “I’m thinking maybe that dark chocolate with the ginger . . .” 26

Flambeautiful.

BAAN THAI If you’re a downtown Mai Thai regular, you’ll feel at home at Baan Thai in Eagle. Bulbous hanging lanterns cast a low, soft glow on sturdy dark wood tables and a long, trickling water feature bisects the upscale restaurant. Though Baan Thai in fact occupies the former Mai Thai Eagle building—Mai Thai silent partner Shannon Robnett bought the space in 2010—a number of things have changed. Robnett painted over Mai Thai’s light-sucking deep maroon walls and adorned them with colorfully surreal local art. The menu has also lightened up—portion sizes are slimmed down and prices have dropped to match. Most lunch items at Baan Thai—like the potato- and peanut-studded massaman curry and the cashew chicken in hot chili oil paste—hover in the $6.95 range, while the majority of dishes on the dinner menu—like the pad se-ew noodles in oyster sauce and the duck noodles with roasted duck and baby bok choy—run $9.95. But where Mai Thai is known for its eccentric, vegetarianfriendly Thai fusion menu, Baan BAAN THAI Thai keeps it classic. A collec78 Eagle River St., Ste. 165 tion of rich soups and fried rice mybaanthai.com dishes rub up against fragrant curries and noodle stir-fries. Decadent coconut milk, Thai basil and sweet and sour sauce dominate a menu concocted by a native Thai chef. On a recent weekday evening, I passed a couple of chatting families lingering over wine and pulled up a chair by a large window bathed in a yellow glow from the patio’s twinkling Christmas lights. One dish immediately stole my attention—the Fish on Fire ($19.95): deep-fried halibut fillets and slivered bell peppers smothered in a spicy, coconut red curry sauce, all set on fire. Hell yes. While the dish was delightful, the presentation wasn’t quite as badass as I’d imagined. My server slid the moderatesized plate down next to my sword-heavy cutlery, threw a few shakes of Bacardi 151 around the rim and flicked her lighter a few times. It felt a bit like blowing out a fishy birthday stew. As I scooped up bites of the crunchy halibut and white rice, I couldn’t help but think anything with that kind of fat content—deep-fried and ladled with coconut milk—has an unfair deliciousness advantage. The next time I’m passing through Eagle with a hankering for Thai food, I’ll definitely swing back into Baan Thai. But I’ll forgo the flambe for something classic ... and much cheaper. —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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R E A L ES TAT E BW ROOMMATES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: www.Roommates.com BOISE BENCH ROOM TO RENT Needing a long-term roommate M/F to share my home. $325/ mo. + $200 deposit, half the util. I am planning on going to school & need a responsible person. 412-9677. CLEAN ROOMIE-MOVE IN NOW Meridian, 1400 sq. ft. house, 3BD, 2BA, spare room avail. Single father, kids half the time. You would have your own room & bathroom. One dog & open to negotiating your dog. Util. paid. 401-6660. skierbuilderrafter@yahoo.com IN MERIDIAN 2BD mobile home with W/D & DW. + 1/2 utilities & some help with transportation. Near freeway in Meridian. Smoking ok. $250/mo. Call Jon 353-7308. MALE ROOMATE WANTED Looking to share nice 2BD, 1BA house with right person. $325/ mo. + split util. around $385 for everything. Nice backyard, W/D avail. House is located in North End Boise. Must love dogs. Please call 570-9335. NEED ROOMMATE ASAP Nampa room for rent. Background check required. $300/mo. $100 deposit. No pets. Please call 208407-2848. ROOMMATE WANTED To share a mobile home. $200/mo. for bedroom or $100/mo. for living room (w/hide-a-bed). Each option includes util. Occupant has a dog & cat. Smoking ok, but no drugs/ alcohol. About 2 blocks from bus stop. Dale 353-9787.

3127 Jordan. Clean & nice. New remodel. 850 sq. ft., 2BD, 1BA. Call Fred 384-0438. Bench studio. W/S/T pd. Avail. Feb. 1. $450/mo. 343-9562. COMMERICAL KITCHEN RENTAL I am looking for a commercial kitchen to rent space at by the hour. If you have one to rent or know of one please e-mail. mgudgus@yahoo.com DUPLEX 2BD, 2BA in quiet Cul-De-Sac. This duplex has a 2 car grg., private patio & yard. $700/mo. $200 dep. New Paint & carpet. W/D. No pets. Contact Jay for appt. 922-0888. Maple Grove/Ustick Area GREAT HOME IN MERIDIAN 3BD, 2BA, 2 car grg. Yard fully fenced & includes a play set. A/C, gas heat, W/D hook ups. No pets/ smoking. $900/mo. deposit $750. 6 mo. min. lease. Please call for more information and to schedule an appointment. 208-841-4556 or 208-921-2708. NORTH END HOUSE Cute & clean. 416 North 21st ST. 1450 sq. ft. remodeled 3BD, 2BA. Pets negotiable, no smoking. $900/mo. $600 deposit. Call 841-6808. PERFECT LOCATION! Downtown/North End location! 2BD, 1BA, large deck, fenced yard, private back patio, W/D, W/S/T paid. $800/mo. 1st mo. move in special of $500/mo. for February. Deposit only $375! Great neighborhood and walking distance to downtown area. 208861-8050.

BW RENTALS DOWNTOWN BOISE. 1BD. $490. 343-5476.

Highrise

REAL ESTATE - COMMERCIAL

paid. Other renters include: clinical therapists, massage therapist, novelist, residential designers, nutritionist & a salesman. We would love to share the space with the right new tenant. Call Derek anytime at 841-4112 for a showing. Available now. LEGAL OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT Office for rent in small law firm in downtown Boise. Rent includes use of one office, conference room, kitchen, bathroom, one parking space, high speed internet & receptionist services. $400/ mo. 208-319-3634.

BW FOR SALE EAGLE HILLS HOME! Sits on the ninth Fairway. Just steps to the clubhouse! This home has only had one owner & has been taken great care of. Don’t miss this opportunity for a great house on Eagle Hills golf course! Katie Rosenberg with ASCENT Boise Real Estate 208-841-6281. $150,000. www.ASCENTBoise.com FREE MONEY TO HOME BUYERS Did you know there are still programs & grants that give qualified/eligible buyers money toward a home purchase? There is no charge to see if you qualify & with prices at an all time low... you may end up paying less to own a home than what you pay for rent. No cost or obligation to apply! Homes in our area are at an all time low! If you have steady income, so-so credit, and want to see what your options are call Heidi, Market Pro Realtor at 208-440-5997 or Krista at 208-860-1650. E-mail HeidiChallenger@gmail.com What have you got to lose? Want a free list of area foreclosed home deals? Jump on www.ChallengerBoiseHomes.com OWN 20 ACRES, Only $129/ mo. $13,900 near growing El Paso, Texas (safest city in America!) Low down, no credit checks, owner financing. Free map/pictures. 866-257-4555 www.sunsetranches.com

BW COMMERCIAL SWEET SUITE IN NORTH END We have two lovely office suites available in the Zegen Building at the bottom of Harrison Boulevard at 1524 West Hays Street. All util. except phone & internet are

C A RE E RS BW HELP WANTED CHAIR LEASE~EAST BOISE Whimsy Salon has one PT & one FT chair for lease. PT $75/wk., FT $125/wk. We have a handicap ramp and parking is plentiful. 402 East Jefferson, one block east of St. Luke’s. We have all the convenience of a downtown location without the hassles of parking meters. Please call Sharon at 3440080 or 890-2397 for any questions or to schedule a time to visit. $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www. easywork-greatpay.com Local data entry/typists needed immediately. $400 PT - $800 FT weekly. Flexible schedule, work from own PC. (800) 920-4851. NURSING MOMS Great opportunity to put your healthcare experience to work for you! www.ilove2behome.com Paid In Advance! Make $1000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. homemailerprogram.net PERSONAL ASSISTANT A personal assistant for an executive position is needed urgently. Send resumes to dhartlon@aol. com for immediate consideration.

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BW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES UP FOR A CHALLENGE? Own your own business and take advantage of an exploding market. Visit www.CandlesAreLove.net for more info or call 210-725-8123. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

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MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW MASSAGE A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas. *A Massage by Terrance. Full body, hot oil, private studio, heated table. In/Out Call. 841-1320.

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Free Foot Bath for Body Detox with 1 hr. foot massage. Treatments for acute and chronic cold hands & feet. Body Massage with special techniques. Pain Relief. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole. BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383.

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FO R SA L E BW STUFF 9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 888-1464.

KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. MAC BOOK PRO FOR SALE New 13”, 2.4GHz Mac Book Pro, $1,200 value. Purchased 9/28/10 from Mac Life. Barely used. Price includes receipt, cords, charger, box, etc. & Microsoft Office Mac 2008 software with snap on leatherette case. Cash or cashier’s check only. $1,000 firm. Call 424-0409. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

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B OISE W E E KLY BW SHOP HERE SALEABRATION U R Cr8ive. Come unlock ur potential. Learn to sew@ caledonia. Find us on FB. Caledonia Fine Fabric’s SALEABRATION. 20% to 70% off almost the entire store.

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GUITAR

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Will pay CASH for furniture. 608 N. Orchard St. Call 331-2366.

MUSIC BW INSTRUMENTS & EQUIPMENT

Taylor Guitar 512/cedar top. As new w/unregister lifetime warranty. $2000. 455-9068.

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CELLOS FOR SALE Half-size & full-size student cellos in good condition. Hard standup travel case included with halfsize & soft backpack case for full size. Call to check them out. 367-1289.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

GRETZKY: One-year-old neutered male yellow Lab mix. Playful, wellmannered young dog who is good with other dogs. (Kennel 326#12149835)

NALA: Six-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair. Cuddly, lap cat who prefers to be indoors. Litterboxtrained. (Kennel 115#9584592)

SKIP: Ten-month-old neutered male miniature pinscher mix. Enjoys playing with other dogs, toys and tennis balls. High energy. (Kennel 319- #12182648)

SAMMY: Eight-year-old spayed female greyhound mix. Crate- and house-trained. Walks nicely on a leash. (Kennel 317- #12196970)

TWILIGHT: Two-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat. Talkative with lots of stories to tell. Declawed. (Kennel 60- #12234059)

ZORA: Two-year-old female domestic shorthair cat. Litterbox-trained and has lived happily with other cats. (Kennel 116- #12252140)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

DEWEY: Dashing brown TOFU: Gentle female and grey tabby seeks dilute calico who loves warm lap and a home. to play and snuggle.

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NOUVEAU: Handsome gentleman seeks companion.

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NYT CROSSWORD | 1 Most debonair 8 Cookie with a geographical name

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46 Literary title character from the planet Antiterra 47 See 69-Down 48 “If you don’t meet my demands within 24 hours, I’ll blow up a Russian river”? 55 Corner 56 Not give ___ 57 Start of a Beatles refrain 58 Pained expression? 60 Aunt of 1960s TV 61 “I Shot Andy Warhol” actress Taylor 62 Fail to notice 64 Old-timey oath 66 Life vest worn on a Korean border river? 71 Piranhas in a German border river? 76 Speed of sound 77 ___ spell 79 One often going by limo 80 “American Beauty” director Mendes 83 Corporate shuffling, for short 85 Stand-up guy? 89 ___ dixit 90 Workers 92 Request to an Alaskan river to return to its headwaters? 95 Played one’s part 97 Can of Cornwall? 98 Provoke 99 Atlanta-based cable inits. 100 Aggressive posturin’ on an English river? 107 The merchant of Venice 108 Stephen of “The End of the Affair” 109 Tad 113 Bookish 116 “Buon ___” 119 Dull discomfort 120 & 123 What minor rivers of Pakistan say at their junctions? 125 Train track beam 126 Channel crosser Gertrude 127 Connected, as circuit elements

128 Fountain orders 129 Team whose home ice is the Prudential Center 130 V.M.I. athletes

DOWN 1 N.F.L. commentator Phil 2 Labor party? 3 Adrift, say 4 Priests’ changing room 5 U2 collaborator on “Passengers: Original Soundtracks 1” 6 Hold ’em alternative 7 Tubes, e.g. 8 Illinois home of Black Hawk College 9 With 11-Down, prehistoric period 10 “My Name is Asher ___” 11 See 9-Down 12 Snacked 13 Reachable by pager 14 Cold war term of address 15 Hopeful 16 Narrow inlets 17 Sommelier’s prefix 18 ___ Mawr 20 One who doesn’t retire early 25 Shield border, in heraldry 28 “___ you!” 31 Jamie of “M*A*S*H” 33 Pop 34 Lickspittle 36 Last Julio-Claudian emperor 37 Semiliquid lump 38 California governor who was recalled in 2003 39 Workers’ rights org. 40 Christine ___, “The Phantom of the Opera” heroine 41 “Wow!” 42 2006 World Cup champion 43 Andrea ___, famous shipwreck 44 Minute 49 “Confessions of an English ___-Eater” 50 Pinpoint, say 51 Works on copy 52 Actress Skye 53 It has a big mouth

54 Father, as a mudder 59 H as in Hera 63 “I thought ___!” (“My feeling exactly!”) 65 “Shrek!” author William 67 Unsettle 68 ___-deucey 69 With 47-Across, onetime Chinese premier 70 2009 sci-fi role for Chris Pine 72 – 73 Hemingway, once 74F ly catcher 75 Whiff 78 Expensive bar 80 Silly singing 81 Main 82 Prefix with carpal 84 ___ apparatus (cell organelle) 86 School whose motto is Latin for “Never tickle a sleeping dragon” 87 “Typee” sequel 88 Rock, in modern lingo 91 Cry of accomplishment 93 Neighborhood west of the Bowery 94 Kicks in 96 Stonewallers’ statements 101 Acronym for a smallrunway aircraft L A S T

P I S C O P O

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E S T O P P E L

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102 Sent to the free-throw line 103 Like some jokes and jobs 104 Van Gogh painting that sold for a record $53.9 million in 1987 105 Prefix with con 106 Cut a fine figure? 110 Earth shade 111 0.2% of a ream 112 Tends, as sheep 113 1960s dance, with “the” 114 Trillion: Prefix 115 Risk territory east of Ukraine 116 Rook 117 Cozy corner 118 Look badly? 121 The Silver State: Abbr. 122 Soft & ___ 124 Ice cream mogul Joseph

Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

P O P P A A L I A S U R D A Y K P S M E S E Y E W G L E N P O I N T I G H T S K S O U L O A L S O Z I P P G E N E L E N D S P I N S A A T A P R I C C O A G H T I S H E A N T T H E M S H O M E R Y E A N I

T R N I A N H I D I A L O G

A R T I L L E F R A Y L A I C F I U N N G

A N S W E R S

W O F E E F I N T F E V N I T E N E A R E S R N S T S T T R A D A M I T T E A R E N O C A I D O S O N N E R W A Y O A T T T I N T O R S N A

R E E L S N A D I R A F R O S

S S R S T O N E S A S H E N

S G W R E R E

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B A I T S L I E M C E B O C E N O R D E L D Y

F I N E S S E

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 26 - FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | 33

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): What rewards do you deser ve for all the good living and hard work you’ve done since your last birthday? And what amends should you make for the mediocre living and the work you’ve shirked since your last birthday? If you choose this week to take care of these two matters with purposeful clarity, you will ensure the best possible outcomes. The reward you earn will be the right one, and the amends you offer will provide the proper correction. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): For years I’ve had recurring dreams of sprinting for sheer joy through green hills and meadows, often following rivers that go on forever. I’m never short of breath. My legs never get tired. I feel vital and vigorous and fulfilled. Sometimes I fly in my dreams. Does it seem odd that I prefer running to flying? I think I understand why. The flying dreams represent the part of me that longs to escape the bonds of Earth, to be free of the suffering and chaos here. My running dreams, on the other hand, express the part of me that loves being in a body and exults in the challenges of this world. Given your astrological omens, Taurus, I think you’re ready for whatever is your personal equivalent of running in your dreams. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): An inter viewer asked me if there’s any special ritual I do before writing these horoscopes. I told her that I often say a prayer in which I affirm my desire to provide you with these three ser vices: 1. That what I create will be of practical use to you; 2. That it will help you cultivate your relationship with your inner teacher; 3. That it will inspire you to tap into and use the substantial freedom you have to create the life you want. I hope I’m doing a good job, Gemini, because in the coming weeks your inner teacher will be over flowing with practical clues about the art of liberation. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Spring dawn: Turning toward the storm cloud, I lost sight of the bird.” Let this haiku-like poem by Julius Lester serve as a cautionary tale, Cancerian. You’re at risk of getting so fearfully fixated on a storm cloud that you may lose track, metaphorically speaking, of a rare and beautiful bird. And the thing is, the storm cloud isn’t even harboring that big a ruckus. It will pour out its flash and dazzle quickly, leaving virtually no havoc in its wake. That’s why it would be a shame for you to let your perverse fascination with it cause you to get separated from a potential source of inspiration.

34 | JANUARY 26 – FEBRUARY 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Shockwaves of toxic misinformation pulse through the Internet on a regular basis. One of the latest infections attacked the subject of astrology. An astronomer in Minneapolis proclaimed that due to the precession of the equinoxes, ever yone’s astrological sign is wrong. He was per fectly mistaken, of course, for reasons I explain here: bit.ly/AstroHoax. But few journalists in the major media bothered to check the accuracy of the sensationalist allegation before publishing it, and soon the collective imagination was on fire. In the coming week, Leo, you should be on high alert for a comparable outbreak or two in your personal sphere. Be vigorously skeptical—not just toward the stories other people tell, but also toward the theories and fantasies that rise up in your own brain.

edge. And often the only way to do that is by pursuing what you think you want. Ultimately you’ll be purged of your lesser longings and superficial wishes and be able to crystallize a clear vision of what you truly desire more than anything else.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You are usually conscientious about attending to the details. It’s one of your specialties to take care of little necessities. You often know what to do in order to fix mistakes and messes caused by the imprecision of other people. For now, though, I encourage you to take a break from all that. In my opinion, you need to regenerate and replenish yourself, and a good way to accomplish that is to let your mind go blissfully blank. At least consider it, please. Give yourself permission to space out about the intricacies. Steep yourself in the primordial ooze where ever ything is ever ything.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A “karma whore” is someone who performs an abundant number of favors and acts of kindness in the hope of accumulating extra good karma. Judging from the astrological omens, I’m thinking this week will be prime time for you to flirt with being such a person. Why? Because the blessings you bestow in the near future are more likely than usual to generate specific blessings coming back your way. You don’t necessarily have to go to ridiculous extremes—holding the door open for five people behind you or allowing 10 cars to merge in front of you on the highway. But from what I can tell, the more help you dole out, the more you’ll get in return.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I’ll be interested to see how you shift your attitudes about love in the coming weeks, Libra. Fate will be bringing you good reasons to move away from long-held opinions about the nature of romance and intimacy. Your subconscious mind will be stirring with new dispensations about how best to deal with and express your life-giving longings. All in all, the process should be pretty enjoyable, especially if you relish psycho-spiritual riddles that impel you to probe deeper into the mysteries of togetherness. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Dear Rob: I am a professional obsesser. I mean I obsess on things a lot. But here’s the thing. When I do obsess on something and work with manic intensity to achieve it, I am changed in the process— frequently to the point of no longer desiring what I was once obsessed by. This makes me crazy! Any advice? —Flagrant Scorpio.” Dear Flagrant: This is a gift, not a problem. Figuring out what you don’t want is a key factor in developing self-knowl-

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in such a way that will allow a solution,” said philosopher Bertrand Russell. In other words, the words you use to describe your dilemma are crucial. If you’re lazy or pessimistic about framing your big question, you minimize your chances for finding a useful answer. If you’re precise and creative, you’re more likely to attract the information and inspiration you need. This is always true, of course, but especially so for you right now.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You may have no idea of how much power you have right now to start fresh—to escape the muddle of murky old failures. Your imagination might not yet be sufficiently lubricated to glide you into the expansive version of the future you deserve. But I’m hoping that this little horoscope of mine changes all that. I’m praying that you are already registering the pleasant shock I’m trying to jolt you with, and are awakening to the rampant possibilities. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’ve never been a fan of gurus. My view is that everyone should be his or her own guru. But there was one guy whose antics were pretty entertaining who told his followers about how to interpret their dreams in which he appeared. “If you dream of me and I’m not kicking your butt, it wasn’t really me.” I’ll say the same thing to you, Pisces: The only teachers worth listening to, studying and dreaming about in the next two weeks will be those who kick your butt.

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BY JANIE BURNS he economic news isn’t pretty. One out of every 10 Idahoans you meet on the street is probably unemployed. Even if you have a job, how secure is it? It’s not so pretty on the home front either. Every 5th person you meet on the street may not have had enough money to buy food for themselves or their family sometime during the last year. Not good. There aren’t easy answers. But over $1.5 billion dollars, (yes, that is with a “B”) leaves the Treasure Valley economy each year to pay for something we all need every day. Something that we could produce right here creating jobs, saving energy, improving our health and nutrition, and making our community more sustainable? I hope that everyone would say “What are we waiting for?” Thankfully, the answer is right under our nose--- right on our plate. Eating more locally-grown food is a win-win. Skeptical? Those fully-stocked shelves of the supermarket brimming with food from all over the world are awful convenient. And isn’t all this farmland here in the Treasure Valley growing food? Well, not exactly food for us. About 80% of the Treasure Valley’s farm production is about cows--beef cows, milk cows, and feed for the cows. We can only drink so much milk, eat so much beef, and we can’t eat hay at all. It hasn’t always been this way. As just one example of how our food and farming has changed, in 1950, there were 54 farms in Canyon County growing strawberries on 56 acres of land. Today, there’s just one farm that reports raising

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strawberries on just a couple of acres. It became a lot easier to ship California strawberries 1,000 miles and have them almost year round, than to grow them here. When we stopped growing strawberries, farmers lost a cash crop and lost diversity on the farm. Strawberry pickers lost their jobs. Places that made jam out of the strawberries had to turn to processing some other crop. Except that many of those other crops were soon moved out of the valley as well. So how can we turn this around? How can we start eating more locally, becoming more sustainable, keeping our jobs and money here? Here are a few ideas to start: 1. Grow a garden. If you can’t, help a neighbor or a community garden 2. Learn how to preserve food. Think about how to eat locally all year long. 3. Eat seasonally. We humans evolved eating what was ripe, when it was ripe. 4. Cook and eat whole foods. They are cheaper than processed foods and have less additives and food-like substances. 5. Ask for locally-grown food where you eat and shop. If only a few people ask about something, the manager will think everybody wants it. 6. Support farmers at the farmers market. The farmers there are trying new things, expanding what they grow---all for you! 7. Commit to spend just $5 a week on local food. You don’t need to spend more, just buy local instead. 8. Teach a child to garden and cook. What better life skills can someone have?

SOCIAL MEDIA BRINGS GREEN

CHANGE

9. Support 2011: the Year of Idaho Food. This is a grass-roots, year-long, statewide look at the surprising variety of foods grown in Idaho — and not simply focusing on the foods themselves, but also on the social, economic and environmental significance of those foods. Check it out at www.nwfoodnews.com. 10.Just do one thing. If we all did something, it would be a lot.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 19 Issue 31