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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 19, ISSUE 02 JULY 7–13, 2010

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 10

BIGGER THAN A T-REX AND USING YOUR ROADS Exxon/Mobil’s drilling equipment FEATURE 13

BLACK & WHITE PHOTO CONTEST And the winners are ... ARTS 32

SLAMMED The art of poetry and performance FOOD 36

ONO GRIDZ Two reviewers head to Meridian’s Hawaiian island

“Tell those people in Boise that if they don’t come to my show, they’re going to hell.”

NOISE 28

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Business Editor: Zach Hagadone Zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreader: Annabel Armstrong Videographer: Blair Davison Interns: Philip Alexander, Stephen Foster, Rachel Krause, Jacob Lyman Contributing Writers: Jaclyn Brandt, Bill Cope, Andrew Crisp, Jennifer Hernandez, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall, Ben Wickham, Jeremiah Robert Wierenga ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Meshel Miller, Meshel@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Justin Vipperman, Justin@boiseweekly.com Lucas Wackerli, Lucas@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Adam Rosenlund Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Mike Flinn, Steve Klamm, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2010 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE DON’T PUSH IT Last week, the Chicago Reader lost its longtime editor. Alison True, whose tenure with the Reader began in the ’80s, was fired by the paper’s corporate publisher for being—and I’m paraphrasing here—too old guard to see the paper into the future. The corporate publisher who did the firing, Alison Draper, told Reader reporter Michael Miner that the editor of the Reader is expected “to work closely with sales to find innovative ways to take our fair share of the dollars that are shrinking and shrinking quickly.” Miner went on to write that Draper said she wouldn’t “‘blur’ the line between editorial and advertising, but she would ‘push’ it.” Boise Weekly and the Reader are both members of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. Staff from member papers gets together a couple of times a year to compare notes, toss back cocktails and learn from each other’s mistakes and successes. Over the years, I’ve gotten to know many staffers at other AAN papers around the country and while I can’t remember ever meeting True, chances are I did at some point. I can’t personally vouch for True’s character. Nor can I say that I’m well informed about the Reader’s editorial strength under True’s editorship. Maybe she’d lost her edge. Maybe editorial was the paper’s weak link. Maybe, after so many years, she just really needed to go. Maybe. But I doubt it. Regardless of True’s performance, one thing is not quite right about Draper’s post-firing explanation: The idea that a paper’s editor should take responsibility for the bottom line or that it’s even OK to “push” the line between editorial and advertising. It’s not OK. That line should be as demarcated and inflexible as the concrete that physically separates our sales and editorial departments at BWHQ. Blurring the lines between editorial and advertising is called advertorial. It’s not journalistic, it’s not ethical to pass it off as editorial content and it’s the public that loses when editorial integrity is compromised. No matter how bad business was at BW during the heaviest part of the recession, we never once considered chipping away at the wall that separates our editorial and advertising departments. The day BW Publisher Sally Freeman announces her intention to “push” the line between editorial and sales will be the day I’ll hand her my resignation. Thankfully, Freeman is BW’s biggest protector of that line. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST

ARTIST: Warren Lassen TITLE: Eyelash MEDIUM: Photography ARTIST STATEMENT: Photography is a great excuse to look closely at the mundane surrounding us and discover the beauty hidden there.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. Square formats are preferred and all mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JULY 7–13, 2010 | 3

WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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MAIL / MONDO GAGA

6

BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Exxon Mobile marks a path straight through Idaho 10 CITIZEN

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FEATURE Boise Weekly’s Black and White Photo Contest 13 BW PICKS

SMILE FOR THE CAMERA The submissions are starting to roll in for BW’s first-ever video contest. Visit localmotion.boiseweekly.com for a look at the offerings so far, then enter your own video featuring Idaho in some way. Keep it less than three minutes. Readers vote for their favorite, and the winner gets $250 in BW Card credit.

BEYOND THE LOWER 48 Matt Hopper checked in from the road in his home state of Alaska with some radass photos, and Amuma Says No kicks off a trip to Washington, D.C., with promises of photos and updates on their trip to play the Library of Congress and the Kennedy Center.

FACE TO FACE WITH FRANK A&E Editor Amy Atkins sat down with The Last Airbender producer Frank Marshall for this week’s Screen feature, but head to Cobweb to watch a video of her chat as well as her red carpet interview with the Hollywood director. And speaking of famous types ... If you’re not obsessing over Cobweb, last week you missed your five-minute notice that Tony Doerr would read at radioboise.org.

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE Paul Thorn sets his sights on Boise

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MUSIC GUIDE

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ARTS Big Tree Arts works to put the bang in poetry slam 32 SCREEN The Last Airbender

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MOVIE TIMES

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FOOD Meridian gets some island attitude at Kana Girl’s Hawai’ian BBQ 36 BEER GUZZLER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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HOME SWEET HOME

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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Reef July Music Most shows start at 9:00

8th The Supervillains 10th The Chicharones 13th

KATCHAFIRE

15th

Afro Classics

20th

Sister Carol

29th

Nappy Roots

visit www.reefboise.com for details

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BOISEweekly | JULY 7–13, 2010 | 5

MAIL MELALEUCA NO MORE Hello, thank you for the article (BW, Citydesk,“Will Prop. 8 Decision Affect Idaho LGBT Community?”, June 30, 2010). In particular, your mention of the large contribution made by a member of the Vandersloot family, which, evidently owns the Melaleuca corporation. My same-sex partner and I are (will soon no longer be) representatives of Melaleuca. We stood by their products, bought and used them ourselves and as we live in Washington, we were completely unaware of their involvement with the Prop 8 campaign. Had it not been for your journalism and the magic of the Internet, we would have continued to support this company which clearly has no regard for humanity or the true meaning of family values. I don’t know if you are aware, but there was referendum on the ballot a couple years back here

in Washington to overturn domestic partnership rights expansion and while it didn’t pass, the people behind it want to keep all the donors’ identities a secret. This just proves that the public needs to be aware of who is contributing money to campaigns like this so that we, as consumers, can make more informed decisions and support businesses that support us. Once again, thank you. —Richard McLaughlin and Ronald Nebeker Kent, Wash.

BW: A REAL ALT Freebie weeklies get called “alternative” all the time leading to the assumption that “lefty” and “alternative” are pretty much the same thing. If the BW keeps printing articles like Zach Hagadone’s “Curiouser and Curiouser” (BW, Feature, June 23, 2010) you may well earn the label of “alternative.”

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message.

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His objective, in-depth piece might well give some clues to Tea Party folk who need some substance beyond being vehement conservatives. It also might help liberals to learn a thing or two. I know I gained a few more facts about a subject that gets little coverage and causes us all so much confusion. Who can really argue with a desire for “sound money”? —Steve Vetter, Boise

FUTBOL VS. SOCCER Correct you are, Rachael. Sometimes the rest of the world does get it right (BW, Play, “Soc it to Me,” Rec, June 30, 2010). You did. —Cy Ross, Boise

CLARIFICATION Pertaining to “Medical Choices” (BW, News, June 30, 2010), RU-486, a drug that ends pregnancy, is a treatment that can only be given directly from a physician and requires no prescription. Therefore, pharmacists would not be involved in the distribution of any treatment involving RU486. For more on this issue, as well as an update on last week’s story, visit citydesk. boiseweekly.com.

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BOISEweekly | JULY 7–13, 2010 | 7

OPINION/BILL COPE

MAD HUMANS The curse of GOP spongiform encephalopathy

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8 | JULY 7–13, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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Gather ’round. I have a new theory, it won’t explain everything, but it may make sense of the Idaho GOP convention over in Idaho Falls last week. Possibly even Fox News and Sarah Palin. In fact, it could conceivably provide everything we need to know about the modern Republican Party, including why it is the modern Republican Party sees nothing wrong with itself. U When did you first hear of Mad Cow disease? As I remember, the phrase became common in the ’90s, along with those ghastly films of afflicted Holsteins flopping and flailing about like bovine zombies. The notorious episode on which Oprah forswore any future consumption of cow flesh was in 1996, but by then, it’s safe to assume the awareness of Mad Cow was well established in the more informed circles of American society. (Damned elitists! Why is it they always seem to know stuff before anyone else? Some of those pansypants nerds can even tell you that a close relative of Mad Cow was described among the cannibals of New Guinea as far back as the 1920s. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. And who needs to know crap like that, anyway?) But listen, what if Mad Cow had been creeping up on America’s stock of beefly edibles long before we became aware of it? What if it had actually been introduced into the country’s brain matter as far back as, say, the ’50s? Back when Richard Nixon was vice president, know what I mean? What if in reality, Mad Cow made its way into human nervous systems by way of those meats that come in cans—the kind with their own openers glued to the top? I suppose we have to assume the government was testing that substance for things like anthrax and fecal matter, but were they looking for Mad Cow germs? Or franchise burger joints! What hell have those poor patties been through? And I can name at least one burger joint that was opening drive-thrus from coast to coast during approximately the same time frame in which the more informed Americans (them again, those know-it-all bastards!) became aware of the John Birch Society. Or as we called them back then, “the bozos.” (If you’re one of the elitist, informed Americans, it’s likely you will have guessed by now where I’m headed with this. But if you’re one of those who—in line with my theory—is a victim of Mad Cow, I’ll keep explaining. Though I doubt any amount of explaining will help you. I expect that at this very moment, you’re glued to a television set, watching Glenn Beck outlining his latest theory.) Then has Mad Cow been with us since the Eisenhower years, insidiously working its way through the citizenry? Spreading out? Infecting? Moving through the populace with the same rate of growth as those crazy conspiracies the old Birch bozos were always coming up with? Coincidence? And what

if the first section of the brain it attacks is that part which would normally let a person know he is sick? Mad Cow is characterized by lots of little holes in the brain. What if the first holes show up in those lobes that help us learn from history, predict the consequences of our actions, or simply, make any sense when we talk? For example, last week Fox’s Brian Kilmeade commented on President Barack Obama’s inability to stop the abomination in the Gulf. “The president took … hours to pick a commander in Afghanistan, so why is it taking months to plug the leaking oil?” Now tell me, how could a person say something that stupid unless he has lots of little holes in his brain? And what about the Idaho Republican convention? Do you know they actually called for dumping that part of the U.S. Constitution that allows you and I to vote for our senators? Uh-huh, they want to repeal the 17th Amendment, which would put the selection of senators back into the jurisdiction of state legislatures (as it was prior to 1913) and they also took the position that state politicians (meaning in large part, themselves) should take management of U.S. Forest Service and BLM land away from the federal government and hand it over to … (take a wild guess who) … state politicians! Obviously, to you and I, this would be like hiring an insane cannibal to babysit our children, but just as obviously, they are incapable of understanding the absurdity of their own ideas, being as they are, the insane cannibals in this metaphor. So there’s my theory: For 60 years, the scourge of Mad Cow has spread from Republican to Republican, eliminating first any self-diagnostic systems by which they might have sensed something was dreadfully wrong, then eating away any and all vestiges of logic, judgment, classiness, even common decency. It would explain much, wouldn’t it? … the total disappearance of moderates from their number, the spoiled child-like naivete with which they approach even the most complex issues, how bozo John Birch principles could have shifted from their fringe to their very center, Ronald Reagan. Truly, it is difficult to name something the GOP has done in the last few decades that Mad Cow wouldn’t account for. But why haven’t you and I been afflicted? We’ve gnawed through many of the same ground-up animal parts as they, certainly. Clearly, out there somewhere, is an antidote to Mad Cow. Something you and I and liberals in general would have ingested that conservatives didn’t. Arugula, perhaps. Or that steady diet of wine and brie. Maybe it comes from seeing a foreign film now and then or watching PBS. I don’t know what it is, but accident or not, we must thank our lucky stars we came across it. Or we, too, could be flopping and flailing about like bovine zombies. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

TED RALL/OPINION

THE GREAT DISRUPTER Why the United States can’t talk to the Taliban LOS ANGELES—Like all Afghans, Hamid Karzai knows history. Which is why he’s talking to the neo-Taliban. The postmodern heirs to the Islamist government President George W. Bush deposed in 2001, the generation of madrassah graduates who replaced the mujahadeen vets of the anti-Soviet jihad are gaining strength. President Barack Obama, preparing for his 2012 reelection campaign, plans to start pulling out U.S. troops next year. But Karzai’s American overseers are against dialogue. “With regards to reconciliation,” CIA director Leon Panetta told ABC’s This Week, “unless [the neo-Taliban is] convinced that the United States is going to win and that they’re going to be defeated, I think it’s very difficult to proceed with a reconciliation that’s going to be meaningful.” Sen. John McCain said at a recent Senate hearing: “If the president would say that success in Afghanistan is our only withdrawal plan ... he would make the war more winnable and hasten the day when our troops can come home with honor, which is what we all want.” Panetta’s statement provides two insights to those who seek to understand U.S. foreign policy. The government knows it will lose in Afghanistan. Withdrawal has been announced. America’s next step is a massively violent final offensive—in order to prove to the neo-Taliban that it could win if it really wanted to. If by some miracle the anti-Afghan offensive were to work, the United States would never open talks with the neo-Taliban. Whenever the United States thinks it holds the upper hand, it refuses to engage. Only when something tips the balance—like North

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Korea’s development of nuclear weapons—is it willing to chat. More broadly and interestingly, the Panetta Doctrine helps us resolve the big mystery of U.S. actions abroad after 1945. The United States hasn’t won a war since World War II. And it doesn’t seem to want to. When the United States invades, it often fails to occupy, much less annex. When it occupies, it does so with fewer soldiers than necessary to control its newly acquired territory. The United States has been described as an “empire without empire.” It’s more accurate to call it the Great Disrupter. It’s fairly safe to conclude that primary U.S. foreign policy objective is to disrupt potential emerging regional rivals. Iran, for example, is the nation that should logically dominate the Middle East politically and economically. The United States uses sanctions to prevent Iran’s rise to regional superpower. From a geopolitical standpoint, U.S. policymakers are far more concerned about India’s potential role as the leader of South Asia than the threat that North Korea will nuke Seattle. Which is why the Bush administration sent billions of dollars in military hardware and cash subsidies to the violently anti-Indian government of General Pervez Musharraf after 9/11. Naturally, we can’t talk to the neo-Taliban. (Nor can we let Karzai do so.) An Afghanistan that resumes its 1996-to-2001 role as the global capital of Islamist government and Sharia law could represent a new kind of influence—simultaneously religious, political and military—that the United States fears as much as Iran, India or any other country big enough to suck away American market share.

BOISEweekly | JULY 7–13, 2010 | 9

CITYDESK/NEWS ALL SORTS OF SCHOOLIN’

—George Prentice

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NEWS

TAKING THE SCENIC ROUTE Trafficking big oil equipment in central Idaho GEORGE PRENTICE The muggy summer air was thick with skepticism in central Idaho last week. A room packed with Idahoans had just been told that a pending transport project would generate more than 10 million dollars in the Gem State’s economy. “Bullshit,” whispered Jeanne McHale of Moscow. “I don’t trust them.” “Them” is Exxon/Mobil/Imperial, one of the largest publicly traded companies in the world. Not including Imperial (the company’s Canadian operations), Exxon/Mobil is the largest of the oil “supermajors” with daily production of nearly 4 million barrels. One of its many global projects is located in the oil sands of Kearl, in the remote northeast corner of Alberta, Canada. In a complex 10-step process, ore would be mined from the oil sands, crushed, hydrated and diluted into bitumen, which ironically is sold to road and paving contractors. Why the irony? Because for any of this to happen, huge loads for the Kearl project would need to travel across U.S. Highway 12. By all accounts, U.S. 12 is one of the most picturesque drives on the continent; it’s an eastwest highway that connects the Pacific Ocean to downtown Detroit. In Idaho, it begins at the stateline in Lewiston, runs along the Clearwater River to Orofino, winds past the Lochsa River in remote sections of the Clearwater National Forest and then up to Lolo Pass as it approaches Montana. It’s designated as part of the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Passions run high along U.S. 12. Generations of central Idahoans have camped and fished there. More than 150 Idaho businesses line the highway, most of them mom-and-pop operations. So their dander got up when rumors started to circulate nearly two years ago

Surprisingly, the one poster that most that more than 200 loads of giant equipment attendees were craning to see, a map of the could convoy through their playground. But proposed route, was blurry even when magniit was only last week when they got their first fied. Ken Johnson, a spokesman for Exxon, opportunity to give any feedback, or so they a tall soft-spoken man, was unprepared to thought. answer a number of Three meetings were direct queries. scheduled in the region: “How about the in Moscow, Lewiston 5,000 employees of and Kooskia. At the HOW EXXON/MOBIL/IMPERIAL IS PLANNING TO MOVE THE EQUIPMENT businesses along Highfirst, on June 28 in way 12?” asked one Moscow, opponents The transportation across U.S. Highway 12 attendee. were ready. Some in Idaho would be divided into three stages. Each load would travel overnight (no earlier “It’s hard for us to carried signs: “Our than 10 p.m. and no later than 5:30 a.m.). gauge the impact on Shoulders Can’t Bear STAGE 1: From the Port of Lewiston to mile businesses,” diverted Your Loads.” “Oil and post 73.8 near Kooskia (73.5 miles). Johnson. Water Don’t Mix.” STAGE 2: From mile post 73.8 to mile post “Are you prepared “Axle of Evil.” One 139 in the Clearwater National Forest to reimburse businesseven came in costume, (65.2 miles). es for any potential dressed as a giant truck. STAGE 3: From mile post 139 to losses?” asked another. He purposely bumped mile post 174.4 at the Montana state line “We’ll look at into people and (35.4 miles). everything on a caseknocked over stacks The Idaho Transportation Department is by-case business,” said of papers to make his promising that if permits are granted, only Johnson. point. The only probone load will be allowed on a stage at a time. “Will it be only lem was that this was Additionally, ITD’s Jim Carpenter said, “We will only grant one permit at a time. And only these truckloads? no public hearing. As when a load has successfully passed through What’s to keep you a matter of fact, Idaho a stage will we consider the next permit.” from shipping and has no requirement to Exxon is promising a maximum traffic delay shipping and shipping hold a public hearing of 15 minutes. Oil executives say they’re currently negotiating with Idaho State Police to endless loads?” asked on the matter. Securing provide either on-duty or off-duty escorts. “We another protestor. a permit to transport will pay for all of it,” said Exxon spokesman “We have no adsuch a controversial Ken Johnson. ditional plans beyond load requires only an these shipments,” informational meeting. Johnson said cauA nicely dressed, tiously. button-downed team “Forever?” asked the protestor. Johnson from Exxon hung up a series of colorfully smiled but didn’t answer. “C’mon,” pleaded illustrated posters promising all kinds of the protestor. “Please say forever.” Johnson positivity: “Minimizing Impact,” “Safe and offered only nervous laughter. Efficient.”

EXXON/MOBIL LOADS: BIGGER THAN A T-REX AD A M RO SE NLUND

As BW hit stands on July 7, four teams of representatives from the Federal Emergency Management Agency were headed to Idaho to coordinate damage assessments in the counties affected by June’s wicked weather. Federal, state and local representatives will spread out to conduct four concurrent investigations later this week. You may remember in early June when high winds, heavy rains and floods swept through central and western Idaho. Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter requested that FEMA conduct preliminary damage assessments to trigger a possible presidential disaster declaration. That, in turn, could generate up to $2 million in federal disaster assistance. Team No. 1 will cover Lewis and Idaho counties; Team No. 2 will cover Valley County; Team No. 3 will cover Adams County; Team No. 4 will cover Gem, Payette and Washington counties. As far as VIPs go, however, FEMA’s reps are hardly the most high-profile crowd in Idaho this week. Every July, some of the globe’s biggest media tycoons descend on the Wood River Valley for the annual Allen & Co. media conference getting underway this week. Call it summer camp for billionaires. The attendees are supposed to remain hush-hush, but the armada of private jets at Friedman Memorial Airport in Hailey makes it rather obvious. Bloomberg Business is reporting Apple CEO Steve Jobs is in Sun Valley, as is News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch, Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett, Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates, Disney CEO Bob Iger, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Google CEO Eric Schmidt. Ironically, the event is officially closed to the press, but past events have included off-the-record business presentations, along with yoga, golf, trap and skeet tournaments, tennis, barbecues and cocktails at the Sun Valley Resort. It’s the 28th annual event. On June 24, Boise Weekly reported that Idaho’s Public Charter School Commission pulled Nampa Classical Academy’s charter. On July 2, Citydesk followed up that report with news the administration was begging forgiveness from their own educators. Many of the teachers were paid four days late last week, and the school’s treasurer, Matt Schneiderman, apologized in an e-mail, saying he was surprised by the development. Some Nampa Classical teachers receive their salaries over the course of 12 months, which means they expect to be paid through the summer. But the recent revocation of the charter also means revocation of any state funding beyond June 30. In another piece of bad news for NCA: A potential $150,000 loan to the school has fallen apart. Schneiderman says investors balked when the school’s charter was revoked. In what may be the final chapter, NCA has appealed to the State Board of Education, which is expected to rule on the fate of the school at its August meeting. When Nampa Classical Academy opened its doors last fall, it quickly became the second largest public charter school in Idaho with more than 500 students.

For mor e on this stor y, including examples of similar equipment, visit video.boiseweekly.com.

30’ 25’ 20’ 15’ 10’ 5’ 0 MAN

DELIVERY TRUCK

TYRANNOSAURUS REX

EXXON/MOBIL/IMPERIAL TRUCK WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NEWS

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WEIGHTS AND MEASURES

ITD LEGAL LIMIT ON U.S. HIGHWAY 12: Length: 120 feet Width: 20 feet Height: 16 feet Weight: 438,000 lbs.

ADAM R OS ENLU ND

This was clearly not the meeting the folks from Exxon had envisioned. Somewhere between Moscow and Lewiston, the site of their next meeting, they regrouped. The next meeting had a totally different vibe. It was more of an open house, minus the buffet or cash bar. The same friendly posters were up. But the Exxon team had most of the chairs removed from the room, and there was no podium. The room once again filled with frustrated residents, but this time they spent most of their time complaining to each other. By the time the third “meeting” rolled around, this time in Kooskia, central Idaho residents had heard about the two previous sessions. It was clear they wanted a voice, much like the first meeting in Moscow. But Team Exxon was having none of it. In front of the crowd of about 200, Johnson denied a request to answer questions. Lin Laughy, author and PhD from Kooskia, walked around the room, encouraging support of his request for a public forum. Johnson finally agreed, but in no time, it was clear that he regretted giving in. “I want to know how many people are going to have to die on Highway 12 to pack this stuff through,” said Ric Downing of Orofino. “This is a shameful scheme to alter and ruin the Clearwater and Lochsa,” said Shelley Dumas of Grangeville. Johnson stuck to his talking points: negligible impact to tourism; traffic would not be delayed more than 15 minutes; $10.6 million impact to Idaho’s economy in the form of temporary jobs, hotel rooms and meals. The representatives from Exxon were not the only ones in the firing line. Jim Carpenter is a district engineer for the Idaho Transportation Department. For all of his experience managing central Idaho’s highways, he spent an inordinate amount of time verbally juggling crowd management and spin control. He answered as many questions as Team Exxon, if not more. How much will Idaho charge for a permit? “ITD will charge only about $1,000 a load,” Johnson said. “Idaho code restricts the amount the state can charge.” Why is the state allowing such a project to travel a federally designated scenic byway? “Because it’s still part of the nation’s highway system, and those roads are used to transport goods and services every day,” Johnson said. Why is the state allowing a load that exceeds the legal limits? That’s when the Moscow meeting took a wide turn. “Idaho code allows us to issue permits over legal limits,” said Carpenter. He then slipped in a piece of trivia that produced an audible gasp across the room. “As a matter of fact, since 2000, nearly 250 separate loads have exceeded Idaho’s legal limits on Highway 12.” Attendees shook their heads and looked at each other slack-jawed. “It’s not uncommon for us to issue those permits,” reaffirmed Carpenter. A few minutes later, Antone Holmquist of Moscow said, “I hope someone in the Idaho Legislature can do something about this.” In a moment of pure coincidence Moscow Democrat Rep. Tom Trail was walking nearby

LARGEST LOAD PERMITTED BY ITD: Length: 190 feet Width: 20 feet Height: 16 feet Weight: 436,800 lbs.

MAXIMUM LOAD OF EXXON/MOBIL/ IMPERIAL PROJECT: Length: 210 feet Width: 24 feet Height: 30 feet Weight: 580,000 lbs.

and was asked what he and his colleagues were planning. “We simply don’t have a formal hearing process required by law,” conceded Trail. “I want to change that, but it will be the next legislative session ... at the earliest.” Asking him to handicap the mood in the room, he said, “They’re clearly 80 to 20 percent against this thing. But all we can do right now is mail in our comments.” He was talking about ITD’s formal comment period, during which citizens can express their concerns through snail mail or e-mail before July 14. In spite of almost two years of conversations and planning—mostly private—many Idahoans are just getting word of the Kearl Transport Project. If Exxon has its way, ITD will publish answers to many of the public comments by the end of July and then run a test load across Highway 12 sometime in August. Then, Exxon will place equipment orders with a South Korean manufacturing company. The giant equipment would sail across the Pacific, up the Columbia River to the Port of Lewiston. The loads would then travel across Highway 12 (one load a time), with plans for more than 200 loads. Which means that the transport process could take a year to complete. Twelve months of rain, snow and heat. But it still probably won’t be as heated as last week’s meetings in central Idaho. Later, Jeanne McHale shook her head. “Can you imagine more than 200 loads, 500,000 pounds each, traveling across more than 40 bridges on Highway 12?” Clearly, the team at Exxon can. They’ve been imagining it for more than two years. But Idahoans only have a matter of days to have their say.

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CITIZEN

JODY LEE Reel Women talk gender, religion and film JEREMIAH ROBERT WIERENGA

Tell me about Reel Women of the West. Are you appreciators or artists? We started this group years ago [in the fall of 2004], at first, to have a group of women in this area who wanted to make movies together. But the Reel Women of the West membership is in flux. There are movie buffs, people who want to know more about it. Then there are women, like me, who’ve been involved in it for 15 years. And there are hobbyists. I think the one unifying thing is that we want to encourage women who are filmmakers. The celluloid ceiling seems to be impermeable, and we really have to be advocates for each other. These gals are really dedicated to helping each other out, listening to each other’s script ideas, coming up with projects and shooting them. How do you support female filmmakers? We do like to help people with their projects, like [grant recipient] Meghan Underwood ... They come in and show us the work they’ve done with it, and we can offer advice about what interviews are needed or structure. We’re going to help Cecilia Rinn with her belly dance film. She’s going to go down to the L.A. area and needed funds for travel. Shoot, I’m going to apply for funds myself.

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Tell me about your work. You had a piece that was nominated for an Emmy? Rivers in the Desert premiered in 2004 at the Flicks but it was made specifically for public television. It ran on Idaho Public Television about six to 12 times that year. It was about what it’s like to be Jewish in Idaho, primarily in Boise. We used the move of the synagogue from down at 11th and State Street all the way up to where it is now on Latah as a bookend to tell the story of Jews in the West, how they came to be here in this little isolated spot, and also the Aryan Nation and human rights issues surrounding Jews in Idaho. Tell me about your new projects. I did a grant proposal along with Irene Deely at Woman of Steel Gallery. She’s going to be doing a big tour with the Liberty Let’s Roll statue in the fall, and we’re hoping to shoot that. People are so affected by that statue. The impact it has on women and children and immigrants is astonishing. I wanted to be part of that, help put it together. The other thing is a gender study that was shot last summer. I call it Give Way because that’s the yield sign in the United Kingdom, and I’m a real anglophile. My pastor was the one who told me about this. If you walk in a crowded area and a man is walking directly toward a woman, the man will very often expect the woman to get out of the way. And when she doesn’t, he will often walk right into her. If it’s an older man, he will apologize. A younger man, younger than 30, may not even apologize. Sometimes they get very offended because women are expected to get out of their way. It’s a dominance thing. How did you capture this idea? We went down to Sixth and Main. We had

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

The members of Boise-based filmmaking group Reel Women of the West fall into two basic categories—those who create and those who cheer them on. Jody Lee, one of the Reel Women’s founding members, does both. An Emmy-nominated documentarian (2004’s Rivers in the Desert) and former Idaho Public Television producer, Lee’s work ranges from explorations of women’s issues and white supremacy to examinations of summer wildfires. She spoke about Reel Women’s recent i48 win, funding two local documentaries and the aggressive walking habits of men.

all different ages and appearance of women and just had them out walking while we were shooting. Their shoulders were bruised by the end of the evening. They didn’t veer. My instructions were to not veer away from anyone directly in their path. One young gal was only 15, and I thought somebody was going to punch her in the face because she didn’t get out of their way. I’ve seen men get very offended. It says something to me about gender in our society at a very deep level. In the film, do you talk with men? No, we haven’t done that, especially in the place where we were, after men have been drinking. I don’t think it’s necessary to talk to them. Let’s observe, let’s see what’s happening and see what the women who are doing the experiment say. I know that it’s a dominance thing because they would say there are some women who are like that, too, that are coming at you and get mad if you don’t get out of the way. It’s primarily males that are trained to think that way. It’s fascinating to provoke the question. It’s a very deeply ingrained, unconscious sort of behavior. I’ve had some guys come up to me and say they weren’t even aware of it. That’s what fascinates me about film: It’s this incredibly powerful medium and if you use it right, you’re able to open up a little question in someone’s mind. I wanted to make people think a bit. It’s a wonderful experiment.

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BOISE WEEKLY’S

8 th

ANNUAL

BLACK WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST

A

nyone with a point-and-shoot camera can create an image, but it takes an artist to capture one that draws viewers into a world in which composition, light and subject matter are perfectly balanced. When you can do that, then you can call yourself a photographer. Each year, we honor those folks in our Black and White Photo Contest. Most who enter are not professionals, but they are photographers. This year, 204 images faced our judges, who had the daunting task of selecting the top entries in three categories—people, places and things. The judges were impressed by the year-toyear improvement of the images. Across the board, the entries were well executed, thoughtful, creative and, at times, risky. This year’s judges were led by returning judge and longtime New York Times shooter Paul Hosefros, whose images fill a new book on Idaho’s wine country due out later this year. Also returning was photographer Laurie Pearman, whose own stunning images routinely grace the pages of BW and who was a B&W Photo Contest winner herself several years ago. Rounding out the panel were BW Art Director Leila Ramella-Rader, Staff Writer Tara Morgan and Features Editor Deanna Darr. Judging was no easy task, but thank you to all those photographers who submitted their work. —Deanna Darr

THINGS

THINGS

GRAND PRIZE & 1ST PLACE | $300 | WARREN LASSEN, BOISE

2ND PLACE | $100 | PATRICK SWEENEY, BOISE

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THINGS

3RD PLACE | $50 | WHITNEY REARICK, BOISE BOISEweekly | JULY 7–13, 2010 | 13

PLACES

1ST PLACE | $150 | AARON ENGLISH, BOISE

PLACES 3RD PLACE | $50 | KELLY KNOPP, BOISE

PLACES

2ND PLACE | $100 | APRIL MANTHA, MERIDIAN

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PEOPLE

1ST PLACE | $150 | LESLIE SPENCER, BOISE

PEOPLE 2ND PLACE | $100 | JIM BOUDEN, BOISE PEOPLE

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3RD PLACE | $50 | JUSTIN HOWELLS, EAGLE

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PLACES

TAREY P., BOISE

THINGS

BOB BROWN, BOISE

PLACES

JENN TIBBENHAM, BOISE

Sawtooth Relay thanks our sponsors, donors, volunteers, committee, and athletes for their support of this year’s event.

Mark Lisk Photography Redfish Lake Lodge Penske Truck Rental Valley Wide R.E.A.C.T. Wood River Amateur Radio Club Sue Jurf Cindy Hill Barry Jackson

The Athlete's Foot Albertsons

Perry’s Deli Alpicella Bakery

Donors United Dairymen of Idaho Alexander Clark Printing Dawson Taylor Coffee Cathedral Pines Presbytarian Church of the Big Wood

Specialty Construction Supply Evergreen Sprinkler Supply Wood River Y.M.C.A

Committee & Managers Rick Anderson Vanessa Anderson Cindy Andrews Sam D'Orazio & family Duane Evans Dan Finney

Dennis Fischer Anita Hoebelheinrich Julie Hoebelheinrich Nancy Hoebelheinrich Terry Hoebelheinrich Ann Jeffries

Sawtooth Relay www.sawtoothrelay.com June 11, 2011

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Becky Kerr Scott Kerr Nancy Kocher Russ Kocher Mike Koob Mike O’Donnell

Carroll O’Leary Nicki Peters Allen Powers Tony Rerecich Jack Sept Dan Shirilla

Zeitgeist Half Marathon www.zhalfmarathon.com November 6, 2010

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HONORABLE MENTIONS THINGS SUSAN VALIQUETTE, BOISE

THINGS

MARIA ESSIG, BOISE

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AUDRA VAN VLIET, MIDDLETON

WARREN LASSEN, BOISE WAYNE CRANS, BOISE

PEOPLE

PEOPLE

PEOPLE

PLACES

BOB BROWN, BOISE BOISEweekly | JULY 7–13, 2010 | 19

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events LAU R IE PEAR M NA/ B W AR C HIVES

Peep this.

Tony gives us a peek behind-closed-Doerrs.

THURSDAY JULY 8

burlesque PRETTY THINGS PEEPSHOW

reading TONY DOERR It’s a well known fact that short-stor y rockstar Tony Doerr loves Boise. In a 2009 article in Smithsonian Magazine the 2007-2010 Idaho Writer in Residence writes something like a love letter to Boise, stating “I don’t think it’s overstatement to suggest that our town represents ever ything that remains great about America: potential, youth, natural beauty, quality of life.” Doerr continues to spread the love for Idaho’s urban gem, despite becoming all famous and everything. Before he embarks to give readings in cities across the nation, such as Portland, Ore., and New York, Doerr will give a reading from his newest book, Memory Wall, at the Linen Building on Thursday, July 8, a week before it hits shelves. Memory Wall features four short stories and two novellas. The title novella “Memory Wall,” which is set in South Africa in the year 2024, won the 2010 National Magazine Award for Fiction. Like The Shell Collector and About Grace, Doerr continues to set his stories in a variety of distinctive locations, such as the Wood River Valley, South Africa, Wyoming and Lithuania. Local jazz musician Curtis Stigers will be on hand to entertain the crowd with his smooth stylings. Doerr will sign books after the reading and proceeds benefit The Cabin. 7 p.m., $10, The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., 208-331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

FRIDAYSUNDAY JULY 9-11 lavender LAVENDER FESTIVALS Lavender, a purple flowering plant from the mint family known for its soothing proper ties, has seen a notable upsurge in

FRIDAY JULY 9

popularity of late. Flavoring ever ything from cheeses to vodkas, lavender has recently strutted its way onto the VIP list of haute herbs. If you want to join the culinar y cool kids, there are a number of ways to get your hands on some lavender this weekend. At Lakeside Lavender Farm on Lake Lowell in Nampa on Saturday, July 10, and Sunday, July 11, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., you can

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har vest your own lavender from more than 1,500 available plants. After you’ve gathered a sizable bouquet, be sure to grab a lavenderinspired boxed lunch from Brick 29 Bistro or a big bowl of Clark Family’s lavender ice cream. Local ar tisans from Good Scents Herb Nurser y, Hands On Health Massage Therapy and Sew Much More Idaho Purses and Aprons will hawk their homemade

The prospect of seeing bizarre creatures in the flesh—Fiji mermaids, Siamese twins or the amazing alligator man—has piqued the interest of individuals throughout time. So when the Pretty Things Peepshow, which has dubbed itself the Best in Burlesque and Sideshow, promises a performance by “The Midget of Mischief,” there is no denying it—you’re intrigued. The vintage-style traveling burlesque show, with trunks of fishnet stockings, tassels, corsets and feather boas in tow, is touring the nation on a 64-city summer tour and makes its stop at Neurolux on Friday, July 9. Each show is composed of burlesque acts, sideshow performances and the Chinese Execution Blade Box. The Pretty Things Peepshow has appeared in music videos for Red Hot Chili Peppers and 50 Cent as well as at Vans Warped Tour and Ozzfest. With a troupe consisting of the retro beauties Bettina May and Go-go Amy, the 24-inch-tall Lil’ Miss Firefly, song bird Bonnie Voyage and the juggling and sword-swallowing host Freakshow Foley, Pretty Things Peepshow offers what is sure to be unique concoction of Bettie Page, David Blaine and P.T. Barnum. $8-$10, Neurolux, 113 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

lavender-inspired products. Also new this year, La Belle Vie’s Julie Free will offer cooking with lavender classes and Dreamerz Carriage Co. will provide horse-drawn wagon rides. Over in Emmett, there’s more lavender love going on. On Friday, July 9, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Silver Fox Farm will open up its 4-acre farm for you-cut bouquets, live music, wreath classes, lavender products and wool spinning. Lunch will be ser ved from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. On Saturday, July 10, and Sunday, July 11,

River Ridge Farm, also in Emmett, invites lavenderphiles to bring a basket and a picnic to their proper ty for you-cut bouquets, lavender products and painting lessons from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. both days. Friday, July 9-Sunday, July 11, various times. Lakeside Lavender Farm, 1003 W. Locust Lane, Nampa, 208-466-0523, lakesidelavender.com. Silver Fox Farm, 1825 Sunset Dr., 208-365-4424. River Ridge Farm, 907 Jackson Ave., 208-631-4577, riverridgelavender.blogspot.com.

WEDNESDAY JULY 14 picnic GIGMASTERZ The idea of listening to the overplayed classics “Twist and Shout,” “Great Balls of Fire” or “Rock Around the Clock” may trigger lackadaisical yawns. However, when you add the evening summer sun, a garden retreat and a group of live per formers to the picture, it suddenly becomes a WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

K EVIN HIGH

FIND LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

FROZEN WHITE WINE SANGRIA

Caution: naked jacknives can lead to gnarly nutslap. Bill Mallonee is never alonee.

SATURDAY JULY 10

SATURDAY JULY 10

music

nekkid

BILL MALLONEE

SKINNY DIP WORLD RECORD

It’s always a struggle to find new and interesting words that rhyme with baloney. There’s phony and macaroni. and there’s even some loose rhymes: Sony, Shoshone, Barr y Castiglione. But on rare occasions, the pieces just fall into place. Meet Bill Mallonee, a singer/songwriter from Athens, Ga. Paste Magazine ranked him among the top 100 best living songwriters, two spots in front of Connor Oberst and just three spots behind Sting. Mallonee was the founding member of Vigilantes of Love in the late ’80s. Between 1995 and 2002 Vigilantes toured non-stop, playing roughly 180 shows per year. They broke up in 2002, and since then, Mallonee has been traveling and playing music by his lonesome, with his wife or with a traveling band. Mallonee’s sound is ver y similar to Neil Young—heavy on Americana, countr y and psychedelia. His lyrics are ver y much informed by his time spent on the road as a struggling musician. Mallonee spends most of his days playing small clubs and coffee shops. He’s an independent ar tist in the truest sense: no record label, no PR firms and no expensive recording studios—ever ything he does is by his own device. Mallonee is quoted in his website bio saying, “At the end of the day, it’s about the stor y living under your own skin. In my work, I’ve just tried to chase that stor y down and put something of a frame around it for a spell.” Such sentiment makes it clear that Mallonee is in fact, not baloney. Opening the show will be local singer/songwriter Aaron Mark Brown. 8 p.m., $8, Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533.

A word to the clothed: you won’t be joining your fellow equestrian enthusiasts this weekend should you decide to trot up to Bare Backer’s Mountain Retreat, a 130-acre nudists’ hangout outside of Boise. On Saturday, July 10, at 3 p.m. Eastern Nudist Time (that’s 1 p.m. Mountain Nudist Time), folks at the Bare Backer’s Nudist Club will link arms with nudists around the countr y to attempt a new Guinness World Record for the most people simultaneously skinny-dipping. The American Association for Nude Recreation sponsored a similar event last year, which drew 13,648 par ticipants— or 27,296 total buttcheeks—into pools, lakes and rivers across the countr y. The Bare Backers will also host an open house on Saturday, during which you can check out their solar-heated swimming pool and hot tub (no suits allowed) along with the clubhouse and rentable cabin. Why all this fuss about birthday suits, you might be wondering? On the Bare Backers’ FAQ page they answer that question, rather eloquently: “Without clothes, social class distinctions disappear and we are all accepted regardless of physical size, shape or body condition.” 1 p.m., FREE, To reser ve a spot at the skinny-dipping par ty or get directions to the retreat, call 208-322-6853 or e-mail bareidaho@yahoo.com.

lot more appealing. Located south of Shadow Valley Golf Course off Highway 55, Stonebridge Gardens is host to an abundance of flowers and wildlife like hummingbirds, hawks and eagles, and, now, also a score of concer ts and events. Stone-

S U B M I T

bridge Gardens is offering a per formance Wednesday, July 14, by Gigmasterz, giving people the oppor tunity to twist and shake away the hump day blues. Gigmasterz is comprised of David Westmoreland, Jon Klein, Camden Hughes and Damien Bard. The foursome

combines a bit of rock ’n’ roll and ’50s nostalgia in their reper toire but also plays a wide variety of jazz and countr y classics. Bring a low-back chair or blanket and pack a picnic dinner to ensure maximum musical enjoyment. Food and drink, such as homemade tor tilla salad, chips and salsa, and hummus and veggies will also be

As a kid, summer afternoons found me scrounging every last penny from the kitchen junk drawer and pedaling at full speed to the neighborhood 7-11. Yanking down on each of the Slurpee levers—Coke, cherry, blue raspberry—my cousin and I created works of BASQUE MARKET frozen art, swirls of gritty red 608 W. Grove St. 208-433-1208 and brown volcano-ing out the thebasquemarket.com top of a plastic dome lid. Now, thanks to the Basque Market, my Slurpee love has been revived, and what’s more, it has teamed up with my favorite adult summertime treat: alcohol. The Basque Market recently unveiled the deadliest weapon in its summer heat-fighting arsenal: frozen white sangria. White wine, a touch of peach puree and orange juice are blended together and topped with frozen blueberries, peaches and strawberry. This lovely ice queen—though a tad too sweet to sip all night—packs a surprisingly boozy bite. On Tuesday nights from 5-7:30 p.m., First Thursdays from 5-7:30 p.m. and Saturdays from noon-3 p.m., you can kick back on the Basque Market’s tiny patio and enjoy an array of tapas—cod croquettas, olive tapenade, Marcona almonds, tortilla—while taking pulls off your adult Slurpee. But remember, even though you’re numbing your senses with frozen hooch, you can still catch a mean brain freeze. —Tara Morgan

available for purchase from Seasons Bistro and Catering in Eagle. 6-8:30 p.m., $25 per car up to six occupants, Stonebridge Gardens, 9600 W. Brookside Lane, Boise, 208-938-2003, stonbridgegardens.com.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JULY 7 Festivals & Events LIQUID FORUM—Liquid Lounge and United Vision for Idaho host a discussion forum showcasing a different local nonprofit each month, along with a silent auction and local music. This month, Idaho Community Action Network’s Leo Morales will discuss its work and lead a discussion on immigration, followed by music from Ben Burdick and Mingling. 5-7:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-5379, www. liquidboise.com.

On Stage BAT BOY THE MUSICAL—Musical comedy based on the perennial cover-boy for the Weekly World News, in which the feral half-bat/half-boy is discovered living in a cave and attempts to gain acceptance from the community of a small southern town. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-4299908, box office 208-336-9221, www.idahoshakespeare.org. COMPANY OF FOOLS PRESENTS: THE 39 STEPS—In this Monty-Python-esque adaptation of the Hitchcock film by the same name, a man must go on the run from the law in order to clear his name of a murder he did not commit, exposing an international conspiracy in the process. 7 p.m. $10-$28. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, www. companyoffools.org.

Food & Drink BOISE URBAN GARDEN SCHOOL FARM STAND—Fresh organic produce raised by BUGS students. Proceeds benefit BUGS programs. 10:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. and 4-6 p.m. FREE. BUGS Garden, 4821 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-424-6665, www.boiseurbangardenschool. org.

Workshops & Classes THE ALTERED T-SHIRT—Fee includes a kit, snack and instruction on how to effectively create custom T-shirts. 1-4 p.m. $45. The Idaho School of Art and Craft (Mend Inc.), 701 E. 44th St. #11, Garden City, 208-8303644, theidahoschoolartandcraft.wordpress.com.

Talks & Lectures DRINKING MADE EASY WITH ZANE LAMPREY—The host of the Travel Channel’s Three Sheets heads to town with special guests Marc Ryan and Steve McKenna. 8 p.m. $25$50. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, www.knittingfactory.com.

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GIRLS IN TECH—Join Boise Radio host Stephanie Wick for an evening of humor as she discusses what it’s like to host her local program “That’s Woman’s Work.” 5:45-7 p.m. FREE. Boise Water Cooler, 1401 W. Idaho, Boise.

Sports & Fitness TRICYCLE RACES—The disclaimer at the beginning of Jackass was about exactly this sort of thing, which is why it’s awesome. 10 p.m. FREE. The Lobby, 760 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-2183, www.thelobbyboise.com.

Green NATIVE PLANTS THAT BEAT THE HEAT—Learn about heat-tolerant shrubs, perennial flowers and other intermountain native plants suitable for Treasure Valley landscapes from Ann Debolt. 7 p.m. $10-$15. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, www. idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Kids & Teens WATER CONSERVATION: EVERY DROP COUNTS—Art activities for kids to show the importance of water conservation. 10 a.m.noon. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-489-1284, www.cityofboise. org/bee/watershed.

Odds & Ends POKER—Play for fun and prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811. SPLASH BASH—Poolside party with live music, food and drink specials and weekly drawings for prizes. 6-10 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, www. owyheeplaza.com. TEXAS HOLD ‘EM—8 p.m. FREE. Dino’s, 4802 Emerald, Boise.

NOISE/CD REVIEW BEACH FOSSILS: BEACH FOSSILS The hazy, self-titled debut from Brooklyn’s Beach Fossils is a welcome addition to the recent slew of freshmen artists materializing out of the artistically inclined metropolis. The album swims with jangly melodies and undulating rhythms and is heavy on studious indie rock apprehension. The music swirls in place more than it progresses, anchored by glistening guitars and dreary singlespeed drumbeats. Frontman Dustin Payseur’s vocals barely cling to the front; his words blur together in muffled descriptions buried beneath a haze of low-fi production and irresistible guitar hooks. The biggest payoffs come on “Window View,” “Daydream” and “Vacation,” songs that will keep your head bopping long into the warm summer night. The lyrical content is rich in nostalgia, at times harping on teenage quandaries akin to a John Hughes movie, at others ruminating on basic bedroom boredom scenarios, but not without a hint of poetry: “I know I think too much / I know I waste my time,” Payseur muses on “Sometimes,” before reaching a level of contentment on “Youth.” “I gaze out my window / scenery comes and goes / I let the time pass by / so I’ll be by your side.” The chilled-out vibe is perfect for an evening bike ride or back-patio get-together. There are no illusions of grandiosity on Beach Fossils. Instead, Payseur hones in on his finely tuned hooks and milks them for all their worth. “Window View” repeats the insanely catchy guitar melody over and over again. Only after it has been stuck in your head for hours—which it inevitably will be—does the mild repetition become a slight bother. —Stephen Foster WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT THURSDAY JULY 8 On Stage COMPANY OF FOOLS PRESENTS: THE 39 STEPS—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $10-$28. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, www. companyoffools.org. DONNIE MAC’S GOT TALENT—Open talent show where entrants compete for cash and prizes. Sign up anytime. 7 p.m. $10. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-384-9008, www.donniemacgrub.com. A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM—Shakespeare’s chickflick, orchestrated with a ’60s mod twist. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208336-9221, www.idahoshakespeare.org. SHAKESPEARE’S AS YOU LIKE IT—Set in the roaring ’20s. 7:30 p.m. $9-$11. Nampa Civic Center Calliope Garden, 311 Third St. S., Nampa.

Workshops & Classes BASIC DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY—In this four-week class, learn basic photography includ-

ing how to use your camera and compose a picture using lighting, angles, the rule of thirds, and depth of field. Class will include optional assignments with instructor feedback. Please bring a digital camera. 7-9 p.m. $60. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, www.nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Literature BOOK LAUNCH PARTY FOR ANTHONY DOERR—Anthony Doerr will read from his new book, Memory Wall, which features two novellas and four short stories. See Picks, Page 20. 7 p.m. $10. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, www.thelinenbuilding.com.

Odds & Ends GOLDFISH RACING—Goldfish are placed in a raingutter, and it’s your job to urge them on toward the other end by blowing through a straw. Winner gets a big effin’ bar tab and their fish. 10 p.m. FREE. Mack and Charlie’s, 507 W. Main St., Boise, 208-830-9977, mackandcharlies.com. POKER—Play for fun and prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

TEAM TRIVIA NIGHT— 8 p.m. FREE. Bad Irish, 199 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-8939, www. badirish.com.

Animals & Pets BIRDS OF PREY MEETING—Attend a meeting on the second Thursday of every month to help plan the 2009 Birds of Prey Birding Festival. 10 a.m.-noon FREE. Kuna Senior Center, 299 Avenue B, Kuna. 208-861-9131. DJALyon@aol.com

FRIDAY JULY 9 Festivals & Events IDAHO RIVERS UNITED 20TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION—A celebration of 20 years of river conservation with music from Rebecca Scott, Dan Costello and Steve Fulton, a wild sockeye feast, awards, exhibits and kid’s activities. 5-9 p.m. $20. Municipal Park, 500 S. Walnut St., Boise.

COMPANY OF FOOLS PRESENTS: THE 39 STEPS—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$28. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, www. companyoffools.org.

SHAKESPEARE’S AS YOU LIKE IT—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $9-$11. Nampa Civic Center Calliope Garden, 311 Third St. S., Nampa.

Concerts

| MEDIUM |

HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

627 E. RIVERSIDE DRIVE · EAGLE, ID 6:00PM DOORS · ALL AGES TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM IC TICKETS CHARGE BY PHONE (208) 442-3232 CO-PRODUCED WITH CT TOURING

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, www. idahoshakespeare.org. PRETTY THINGS PEEPSHOW—Touring vaudeville and burlesque show. See Picks, Page 20. 9 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th, Boise, 208-343-0886, www.neurolux.com.

| EASY

SATURDAY AUGUST 21 EAGLE OUTDOOR PAVILION

On Stage

OPERA IDAHO: SOUTH PACIFIC IN CONCERT—Rodgers’ and Hammerstein’s classic Broadway musical in concert starring Leslie Mauldin as Nellie Forbush and Brett Hamilton as Emile DeBeque. Musical direction by Stuart Weiser. Bring a picnic, blanket and low-back lawn chair. 7:30 p.m. $15-$54. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, www.idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Kids & Teens SLEEPOVER AT THE LIBRARY—Games, movies, stories and snacks for ages 3-12. Bring a sleeping bag and toothbrush. 9 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, www.adalib.org.

Straight No Chaser SATURDAY OCTOBER 30 EGYPTIAN THEATRE

700 W MAIN STREET, BOISE, ID 6:30PM DOORS · ALL AGES TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM IC TICKETS CHARGE BY PHONE (208) 442-3232 CO-PRODUCED WITH CT TOURING JOIN THE SQUARE PEG CONCERTS STREET TEAM · EMAIL DAN@SQUAREPEGCONCERTS.COM

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8 DAYS OUT Odds & Ends BOISE ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY—The club meets the first Tuesday and second Friday of the month. FREE. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895. www. boiseastro.org. FACE TO FISH DAYS—A weekend of free activities and events, including fish-printing and streamwalks, highlighting programs at the MK Nature Center. 5-8 p.m. FREE. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-334-2225, fishandgame.idaho.gov.

SATURDAY JULY 10 Festivals & Events CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—Open-air market with all manner of local food and products, from fresh vegetables to fresh doughnuts, all served from the freshest of vendors. Live music acts, plus local arts and crafts. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Downtown at Eighth and Idaho streets, Boise. YE OLDE RENAISSANCE FAIRE—More than 100 Entertainers, artisans and vendors will be in attendance. Kids’ games, a royal court, archers, sword fights, demonstrations, artisans, stockades, music, dance and more. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Settler’s Park, corner of Meridian and Ustick, Meridian.

Calls to Artists AUDITION FOR IRVING BERLIN’S WHITE CHRISTMAS— Need two men late 20-40s; one man 50-60s; two women 20-30s; one woman 40-60s; one girl 9-12; several man and female dancers 18-30s and other men and women 18-70. Also looking for two boys and girls 8-12 with dance experience. All auditioners should prepare a short song to be sung with recorded accompaniment or a capella. To register for an appointment visit www.whitechristmas.eventsbot. com. 1-4 p.m. FREE. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, www.boiselittletheater.org.

SUMMER ICE SHOWS—Performances by Olympic and world-class figure skaters Jeremy Abbot and Nathan Chen starting at dusk. $32-$98. Sun Valley, Idaho, Boise.

Workshops & Classes RECREATIONAL GOLD MINING CLASS 101—Two-day class in Cascade taught by Alan Trees, a professional mining equipment designer. Day one will cover basic of gold mining. Day two will be in the field where the class can put their new prospecting skills to use. Cost includes equipment, a book and lunch. Call 208-286 1401 or e-mail dutchovenbandb@gmail. com to register. July 10-11. $85, Cascade.

Green LAKESIDE LAVENDER YOU-CUT FESTIVAL— More than 1,500 lavender plants available for you-cut harvesting, along with live plants for sale, homemade lavender products, creations from local artisans and a special lavender-inspired boxed lunch from Brick 29 Bistro. See Picks, Page 20. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Lakeside Lavender Farm, 1003 W. Locust Lane, Nampa, 208-466-0523, www.lakesidelavender.com.

Odds & Ends BOISE CAFE LATIN NIGHTS— Get a basic Latin dance lesson included in the cover at 9 p.m. and then practice dancing to music by DJ Tomas or DJ Saya. Loosen up with a beer or glass of wine. Empanadas from Tango’s are served Friday evenings. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $5. Boise Cafe, 219 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-343-3397.

BREAKFAST WITH BUTTERFLIES—Learn about the butterflies that visit Idaho while enjoying breakfast in the garden. 9-10:30 a.m. $10-$20. Stonebridge Gardens, 9600 W. Brookside Lane, Boise, 208-9382003, www.stonebridge-gardens. com. FACE TO FISH DAYS—See Friday. 5-8 p.m. FREE. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-334-2225, fishandgame.idaho.gov. SECOND CHANCE PROM AND FUNDRAISER—Get dressed up and dance to your favorite tunes from the ’70s, ’80s and ’90s. Original prom dress fashion show, most fun tuxedo contest. Auction and raffle. Cash bar. Benefiting Idaho Children’s Trust Fund, Northwest Animal Companions and Idaho Food Bank. 21 and older. Info at www.secondchancepromboise.org. 8 p.m. $25 plus one non-perishable food item. Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-381-0483 SKINNY DIPPING WORLD RECORD ATTEMPT—The Bare Backers Nudist Club will be hosting an open house and a synchronized national attempt to set a new skinny-dipping world record. See Picks, Page 21. 1 p.m. FREE. Call 208-322-6853 for directions to resort. See www.bareidaho.com for more info.

SUNDAY JULY 11 Calls to Artists AUDITION FOR IRVING BERLIN’S WHITE CHRISTMAS—See Saturday. 1-4 p.m. FREE. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, www. boiselittletheater.org.

On Stage BAT BOY THE MUSICAL—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208336-9221, www.idahoshakespeare.org. COMPANY OF FOOLS PRESENTS: THE 39 STEPS—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$28. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, www. companyoffools.org. SHAKESPEARE’S AS YOU LIKE IT—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $9-$11. Nampa Civic Center Calliope Garden, 311 Third St. S., Nampa. Dude Howdy by Steve Klamm was the 1st place winner in the 8th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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8 DAYS OUT Festivals & Events

Animals & Pets

YE OLDE RENAISSANCE FAIRE—See Saturday. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Settler’s Park, corner of Meridian and Ustick, Meridian.

FREE INDEPENDENCE BLACK DOG WALK—Group dog walk to raise awareness of “Black Dog Syndrome,” the phenomena discovered by shelter workers that dogs with black coats are adopted at far lower rates, making them more frequent victims of euthanasia. Shelters and rescue groups will be on-hand with dogs and puppies available for adoption. Non-black dogs are requested to wear something black in solidarity. There will be a post-walk barbecue. 1 p.m. FREE. The Ram, 709 E. Park Blvd., Boise, 208-345-2929, www.theram.com.

On Stage BAT BOY THE MUSICAL—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208336-9221, www.idahoshakespeare.org.

Concerts

Bluebird Quilt Studio, 1309 Second St. S., Suite A, Nampa, 208-467-4148, www.bluebirdquiltstudio.com.

Talks & Lectures PICTURING AMERICA: MAKING TRACKS—This eleven-installment book discussion series runs through the end of the year and is focused on railroads. Tonight: Abraham Lincoln and the American West. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, www.adalib.org.

Citizen

MIZ SAIGON—This concert will feature songs from two of the world’s most popular Broadway musicals, Miss Saigon and Les Miserables. Miz Saigon will be performed by five singers and a 25-piece orchestra and include a finale sung by a 100 voice chorus. 7:30 p.m. $28-$76. Sun Valley Pavilion, Sun Valley Resort, Sun Valley, www.sunvalley.com.

MONDAY JULY 12 On Stage PLAYS FROM THE ALLEY—Alley Repertory Theatre’s second annual new works reading series. Tonight will feature Evan Sesek’s Champagne Breakfast in which two friends must cope with being in love with the same girl. 7 p.m. $10. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, www.visualartscollective.com.

Workshops & Classes RECREATIONAL GOLD MINING CLASS 101—See Saturday. Call 208-286 1401 or email dutchovenbandb@gmail.com to register. $85, Cascade.

Workshops & Classes

Green

SIGNING TIME ACADEMY PARENT WORKSHOP—Learn to use sign language to better communicate with your baby and speed development of language skills. 10 a.m.-noon and 1:30-3:30 p.m. $15. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, www. nampaparksandrecreation.org.

LAKESIDE LAVENDER YOU-CUT FESTIVAL— See Saturday. See Picks, Page 20. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Lakeside Lavender Farm, 1003 W. Locust Lane, Nampa, 208-466-0523, www.lakesidelavender.com.

SUMMER QUILT CAMP—Complete a lap-size quilt top in this one-week camp. No sewing experience required. Machines provided. Ages 8-18. Price includes all fabrics for quilt top. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $130.

Odds & Ends SALSA SUNDAYS—6 p.m.-2 a.m. Cowgirls, 353 Ave. E, Kuna, 208-922-9522, www.cowgirlsaloon.com.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

NETWORKING JOB CLUB—Networking Job Club meets to offer leads and ideas with focus on networking, Internet success, developing a successful resume and interview coaching. Facilitator and guest speakers. 10:3011:30 a.m. FREE. Foothills Christian Church, 9655 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-0011.

Animals & Pets PAWS ON THE PATIO—Leashed, well-behaved dogs are invited to hang on the patio to help raise money for Spay Neuter Idaho Pets, by chowing down on some of Zamzow’s finest vittles. 3 p.m. FREE. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-384-9008, www. donniemacgrub.com.

TUESDAY JULY 13 Festivals & Events PLAYING IN THE PLAZA—Food and craft vendors, along with live music by Sweetbriar. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Generations Plaza, corner of Main St. and Idaho Ave., Meridian, www.meridiancity.org.

On Stage COMPANY OF FOOLS PRESENTS: THE 39 STEPS—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $10-$28. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, www. companyoffools.org.

Workshops & Classes DRAWING FANTASY CREATURES—In this three-week class, children will learn drawing techniques to create fantasy creatures. Supplies will be provided. Instructor: Patricia Bess. 3-4:30 p.m. $40. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, www.nampaparksandrecreation. org. VEGETARIAN COOKING MADE EASY—Rachel Hurn, owner of Seasons Bistro, Eagle, will teach the class how to cook with fresh from the garden ingredients. 6-8 p.m. $30. Stonebridge Gardens, 9600 W. Brookside Lane, Boise, 208-938-2003, www.stonebridge-gardens.com.

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8 DAYS OUT Literature

Citizen

POETRY READING—Poetry host Scott Berge invites poets to share their own work or favorite poems during a fun night of poetry readings. Sign up at 6:30 p.m. and start waxing poetic at 7 p.m. For more information, email ScottBerge@live.com. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Alia’s Coffeehouse, 908 W. Main St., Boise, 208338-1299.

BOISE COFFEE PARTY—Prefer your political parties without the tea? The Boise Coffee Party may be just the thing. Discussion of issues and actions surrounding education and the election in November. See www.coffeepartyboise.com, or contact duane@ boisecoffeeparty.com for more info. 5:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. The Fixx, 224 10th St., Boise, 208-331-4011.

Odds & Ends BALLISTIC BEER PONG—Compete for $300 in prizes. 10 p.m. FREE. Bad Irish, 199 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-8939, www. badirish.com. POKER—Play for fun and prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811. SOCRATES CAFE—Interested in life’s greater questions? Join a group of active and engaged listeners who meet every week to discuss burning questions like “what is the standard of beauty?” Or “are happiness and pleasure the same thing?” The group votes on a question and the discussion begins. For more information, e-mail scott@ scottharris.cc. 7-8:45 p.m. FREE. Papa Joe’s, 1301 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-344-7272, www.papajoesboise.com. TEAM TRIVIA NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. Bad Irish, 199 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-8939, www. badirish.com. TEXAS HOLD ’EM—8 p.m. FREE. Dino’s, 4802 Emerald, Boise.

WEDNESDAY JULY 14 On Stage COMPANY OF FOOLS PRESENTS: THE 39 STEPS—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $10-$28. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, www. companyoffools.org.

Food & Drink BOISE URBAN GARDEN SCHOOL FARM STAND—Fresh organic produce produced and raised by BUGS students. Proceeds benefit BUGS programs. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 4-6 p.m. FREE. BUGS Garden, 4821 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208424-6665, www.boiseurbangardenschool.org.

Sports & Fitness TRICYCLE RACES—The disclaimer at the beginning of Jackass was about exactly this sort of thing, which is why it’s awesome. 10 p.m. FREE. The Lobby, 760 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-2183, www.thelobbyboise.com.

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Kids & Teens HOPE FLOAT—Hundreds of youth will be floating Roaring Springs Endless River to raise awareness of the 2010 Great Dolphin Dunk. 11 a.m. Regular admission prices. Roaring Springs Water Park, 400 W. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-884-8842, www. roaringsprings.com.

WATER CONSERVATION: EVERY DROP COUNTS—Art activities for kids to show the importance of water conservation. 10 a.m.noon. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-489-1284, www.cityofboise. org/Bee/WaterShed.

Odds & Ends POKER—Play for fun and prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811. SPLASH BASH—Poolside party with live music, food and drink specials and weekly drawings for prizes. Tonight is Desirae Bronson. 6-10 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, www. owyheeplaza.com.

NOISE/CD REVIEW TAME IMPALA: INNERSPEAKER Tame Impala is a four-piece band from Perth, Australia, that recently released its first LP, Innerspeaker—a collection of airy, groove-based psychedelic rock songs. Drawing heavily from the psychedelic revivalists of the late ’80s—bands like the Stone Roses, Sun Dial and Happy Mondays—while also pulling from classic-rock acts such as Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin and Cream, Tame Impala sculpt a familiar sound with modern sensibilities. Reverb-drenched vocals, blissedout guitars, pulsing drum beats and pleasant spaciousness catapult the band into ethereal territory without ever comprising their sense of origin. Tame Impala doesn’t aim for intensity, instead opting for expansiveness and texture. Songs like “Alter Ego,” “Solitude is Bliss” and “I Don’t Really Mind” sway and morph in a very subtle manner. The lyrics mostly meditate on enhanced consciousness, at times coming off as too conspicuous, like on “Lucidity”: “Lucidity come back to me / Put all five senses back to where they’re meant to be / Wandering around like spare time never knew it / I might suck fizzle or I might just float away.” The album flows along with exceptional continuity, each song setting the stage for the next. The long instrumental “Jeremy’s Storm” is stacked with sonic ear candy and interesting bits that become more apparent with each listen. The seven-minute “Runway, Houses, City, Clouds” is arguably the highlight of the album—a rollicking, fervent piece of music that weaves through a range of movements and peaks that will make you happy you went for the ride. —Stephen Foster WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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NOISE S TEPHANIE R HEA PHOTOGR APHY

A THORNY UPBRINGING Paul Thorn on Pimps and Preachers AMY ATKINS “Tell those people in Boise that if they don’t come to my show, they’re going to hell.” Though Paul Thorn doesn’t have the authority or inclination to send anyone to the netherworld, the threat of spending eternity in hell’s fiery pits was a part of the 45-yearold musician’s upbringing. The son of a Pentecostal minister, Thorn was all too familiar with salvation and damnation. The latter, in part, because at about the age of 12, Thorn met his father’s brother, an actual pimp. Though the two brothers couldn’t have taken more divergent paths, Thorn didn’t look to one or the other for guidance. He looked to both. “I was greatly influenced by these men,” Thorn said, his deep Southern voice reverent. “They were both my mentors.” Growing up in Tupelo, Miss.—the birthplace of the Earth-bound King—under the Sometimes you have to keep smiling ... even if the devil himself is riding in the back of the bus. tutelage of both a man of God and a sinner, Thorn gained an outlook on life that more people might be better served by: He has a body who is ungoverned, you got to watch. all things, even though I’m not a country deep conviction that while it might be easy singer,” Thorn said. “I was on tour with Any time you’re in a position where you to judge someone based on what they do— Toby Keith and he was supposed to be on have followers, like a pimp or a preacher, preacher or pimp—you can’t really know a the Bob and Tom Show and he couldn’t do man without spending some time with him. you are king and you have power. Just beit. I was sort of like the guy on the bench; I On his ninth album, the recently released cause you see the label ‘preacher’ or ‘pimp’ on somebody, you have to spend some time got put in the game.” Pimps and Preachers (Thirty Tigers ReThorn wrote “It’s a Great Day” the night with them to see who you’re dealing with.” cords), Thorn explores those two sides, not before he went on the show as lark. If you listen to the Bob and Tom Show, only of other men but also of himself. Paste “I wrote it as a joke, ’cause I know they a syndicated radio program rebroadcast in Magazine described Thorn’s dichotomous like to laugh. After I left the show, they kept Boise on KKGL 96.9 The Eagle, you feel influences as a “tug of war in his psyche, on playing it. It’s become kind of like this like you know Thorn. During his visits inadvertently priming him for his future working man’s anthem.” to the show, he regales the hosts and the as a musician—and that yin and yang is Thorn is a working man himself. He listeners with tales of his former career as apparent in both Thorn’s lyrics and the recognizes that it takes a lot to build a fan a boxer. In the late ’80s with less than a way in which he mixes gospel themes with base—he regularly posts on his Facebook dozen fights under his belt, his rootsy rock ’n’ roll. The page—and stay relevant in the music inhe fought four-time world sacred and the profane pair Paul Thorn with the Jacks dustry, especially as an independent artist. champion Roberto Duran. nicely, driven by Thorn’s Wednesday, July 14, He has turned down a number of offers Thorn’s laid-back demeanor, dusky voice and subtle, often 5 p.m., FREE that would make his life at least financially baritone voice and Southself-deprecating wit.” ALIVE AFTER FIVE easier, but negotiations always end with ern charm have made him a In the album’s title song, The Grove Plaza Thorn walking away. He’s not willing to popular guest ... well, that Thorn sings “One took me paulthorn.com sing what someone decides he should sing and Thorn’s oft-requested through the darkness / one or wear what someone decides he should song, “It’s a Great Day For led me to the light. / One wear. At that point, he said, he ceases to be taught me how to love / one taught me how Me To Whoop Somebody’s Ass.” an artist and is just another opportunist tryIt’s a ridiculously catchy tune in which, to fight.” It’s intentionally vague, Thorn ing to be famous. Thorn would take fame after a day when everything has gone said, but true. He didn’t just learn about but not at the cost of his integrity—both the wrong, Thorn opines “It’s a great day / for love and light from his father, nor did his pimp and the preacher ingrained that into me to whoop somebody’s ass / It’s a bad uncle only teach him the ways of the street. him. Ultimately, he just wants to do well day, so you better get off my back / You They both offered it all. might get coldcocked / if you cross my path enough to take care of his own. “The way I look at life and the way I “At the end of the day, I’m the father of / ’Cause it’s a great day / for me to whoop equate things comes from the influence of two kids, and a [husband]. At the end of my somebody’s ass.” Even the story behind the people who come from both sides of the career, I would’ve liked to have accumutracks,” Thorn said. “There’s good and bad song tells like Thorn fodder. lated enough nuts in the tree that we can eat “I got on [Bob and Tom] by accident. in every human being you come in contact comfortably. Ya know what I mean?” I was on tour with a country artist, of with ... There’s bad in all professions. Any-

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LISTEN HERE/GUIDE Monotonix

GUIDE WEDNESDAY JULY 7

SOUL SERENE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub & Grill STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-downtown

FRIDAY JULY 9

SATURDAY JULY 10

ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Featuring Slim Cessna Auto Club and Poke. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove

WILSON ROBERTS—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

A TASTY JAMM—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

57 HEAVY—9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

BEN BURDICK TRIO PLUS— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Bouquet BLAZE AND KELLY—6 p.m. FREE. Focaccia’s

MONOTONIX, TURBO FRUITS, VAC, JULY 8 Dads, bolt the doors. On Thursday, July 8, Visual Arts Collective will pulse with more testosterone than an all-boys prep school. Tireless Tel Aviv rafter-climbers Monotonix are storming back through Boise, and this time they’re bringing along Nashville, Tenn., lads Turbo Fruits. With songs like “Naked With You” and “No Drugs to Use” Turbo Fruits—ex-members of Be Your Own Pet—crank out enjoyably immature British-influenced garage rock. Reviewing Echo Kid, pitchfork.com likened the album to a diner cheeseburger: “cheesy, greasy, bloody, goes good with beer.” Topping off this messy man-wich are Boise’s Beautician, a wall-of-sound instrumental duo, and irreverent rockers Microbabies. In a video interview with BW, Microbabies jokingly implored folks to “see us every chance you get because one of us will die.” Oh, boy. —Tara Morgan 8 p.m., $10-$12, VAC, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

30 | JULY 7–13, 2010 | BOISEweekly

BRIANNE GRAY—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian CAPSIZE—With Shadows, Bare Witness, Armada, Gernika and For My Own. 7 p.m. $5. Brawl Studios DYING FAMOUS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

B3 SIDE—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

THURSDAY JULY 8

CRAVING DAWN—9 p.m. FREE. Overland Bar FAMOUS MOTEL COWBOYS SEVENTH ANNUAL REUNION— See Listen Here, page 31. 5 p.m. $10. Bouquet

THE ALMOST DANGEROUS BAND—5:30 p.m. FREE. Downtown Nampa Nights

FREESOUND—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

COME TOGETHER—6:30 p.m. $6-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden

HAWTHORNE HEIGHTS—With The Story Changes. 7:30 p.m. $11. The Venue

BILL MALLONEE—See Picks, Page 21. 8 p.m. $8. Flying M Coffeegarage BRAWL—With All Hands Go, Threshold, Versailles and World These Kings. 7:30 p.m. $6. Knitting Factory THE CHICHARONES—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef FAMOUS MOTEL COWBOYS SEVENTH ANNUAL REUNION— Noon. $10. Bouquet FREESOUND—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

THE HONEYCUTTERS—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

HEARTSOUNDS—WIth Nothington, The Riot Before, The Paris Funds, Upinatem, Light the Sky and All Hands Go. 6 p.m. $7. Brawl Studios

JEREMIAH JAMES GANG—8:45 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s

LITTLE FEAT—8 p.m. $26-$60. Knitting Factory

KEVIN SECONDS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JIMMY BIVENS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s

MONOTONIX—See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $10-$12. VAC

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE PRIDS—WIth The Soft Tags. 9 p.m. $5. Neurolux

MY HEART TO JOY—With Native, Bare Witness, After the Impact, Gernika and Bare Bones. 7 p.m. $5. Brawl Studios

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club

THE PRAIRIE SKY PILOTS—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

KYLER EANON—9 p.m. FREE. The Plank

THE SUPERVILLAINS—8 p.m. $10. Reef

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club

LEE PENN SKY—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

THE THROWDOWN—Featuring THC, Moto Kitty and Fetish. 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

SOUL HONEY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub & Grill

MIKE QUINN—6 p.m. FREE. Tully’s Coffee BODO

JR AND THE STINGRAYS—6 p.m. $25. Stonebridge Gardens REBECCA SCOTT—7 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper Lounge SCORCH THE FALLEN—WIth Here Til We’re Dead. 9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

THE HOLDUP—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef JUSTIN SAYNE—9 p.m. $5. Dino’s

GAYLE CHAPMAN—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub & Grill HYPERNOVA—With the Sleepy Seeds. 9 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux JIMMY BIVENS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JUSTIN SAYNE—9 p.m. $5. Dino’s

POKE—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

GUIDE/LISTEN HERE Pinto Bennett

GUIDE ROCKHOUSE—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club

SUNDAY JULY 11 CORDON BLUES—4 p.m. FREE. Sun Ray Cafe FAMOUS MOTEL COWBOYS SEVENTH ANNUAL REUNION— Noon. FREE. Bouquet MUSIC FROM STANLEY—With Bodo Brothers, Travis McDaniel Band. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge NATHAN MOODY—1 p.m. FREE. Tully’s Coffee

MONDAY JULY 12 BOISE MODERN JAZZ ORCHESTRA—8 p.m. FREE. Bouquet INSIDIOUS—With Decrepency, Mutation, Disfigured and End of All Flesh. 9 p.m. $5. Red Room Tavern PUNK MONDAY—With Slow Children, Knocked Out Cold, Death Punch, Jimmy Sinn. 9 p.m. $2. Liquid

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

TUESDAY JULY 13

THE BOURBON DOGS—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-downtown

BROCK BARTEL SHOWCASE—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

E-40—With Too Short, Mack-10, Lil Rob, Young Brook and Cool Nutz. 7:30 p.m. $25. Knitting Factory

KATCHAFIRE—9 p.m. $10. Reef OFF WITH THEIR HEADS—With In Defence, Think Again, All Hands Go and A New Agenda. 7 p.m. $8. Brawl Studios RUBY TUESDAYS—With New Transit featuring Dave Manion on Pedal Steel. 9 p.m. FREE. Bouquet SAVING ABEL—With We Are the Fallen, American Bang and Taddy Porter. 7 p.m. $21-$60. Knitting Factory

DESIRAE BRONSON—7 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper Lounge

JEREMIAH JAMES GANG—8:45 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s MONDAY’S ALIBI—9 p.m. FREE. Reef SCHOOL OF ROCK ALL STARS PRESENTS LIVE AID REMADE—6 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park

SMOOTH—7 p.m. FREE. Liquid

SIXTH ST. COLLECTIVE—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid

SONIC MINSTREL—8:30 p.m. FREE. Casa del Sol

SOUL HONEY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub & Grill

TAARKA—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

WEDNESDAY JULY 14 ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Featuring Paul Thorn and The Jacks. See Noise, page 28. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove BEN BURDICK TRIO PLUS— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Bouquet

THE VERY MOST—With Mammoth Life, Colony Collapse and Field Guide. 8 p.m. $5. VAC WILSON ROBERTS—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

V E N U E S

SONG & DANCE DJS—Wed: Bad Irish, Balcony. Thu: Balcony. Fri: Bad Irish, Balcony. Sat: Balcony, Dirty Little Roddy’s, Neurolux, Terrapin Station. Mon: Bad Irish, Balcony. Tue: Balcony. OPEN MICS—Wed: Donnie Mac’s, The Plank. Thu: O’Michael’s. Fri: Rembrandt’s. Mon: Terrapin Station, Pengilly’s, Library Coffeehouse. KARAOKE—Wed: 44 Club, Dirty Little Roddy’s, Ha’Penny, Overland, Savvy’s, Sin, Terry’s. Thu: 44 Club, Hannah’s, Overland, The Plank, Quarter Barrel, Savvy’s, Shorty’s, Terry’s. Fri: 44 Club, Nuthouse, Overland, Savvy’s, Sunshine Lounge, Terry’s. Sat: 44 Club, Cricket’s, Hooligans, Savvy’s, Terry’s. Sun: 44 Club, Bad Irish, Balcony, Liquid, Overland, Ranch Club, Savvy’s, Terry’s. Mon: 44 Club. Tue: 44 Club, Cricket’s, Lucky Dog, Overland, Savvy’s, Shorty’s, Terry’s. For the week’s complete schedule of music listings, visit boiseweekly.com.

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

FAMOUS MOTEL COWBOYS REUNION, THE BOUQUET, JULY 9-11 When the Famous Motel Cowboys slide into their Wranglers and dust off their Stetsons for their annual reunion show, they don’t half-ass it. Fronted by Idaho honky-tonk legend Pinto Bennett the Famous Motel Cowboys have put together a three-day country-fried throwdown with a lively local lineup. In addition to hearing Bennett and the Motel Cowboys croon feel-good ditties about life on the road, guests at the seventh annual reunion show will also have the opportunity to sway to the sounds of Blind Driver, Joshua Tree, Jeremiah James, Kip Attaway and the Rhythm Rangers. On Friday, July 9, at 5 p.m., the crew will kick things into gear with a meet-and-greet party at the Bouquet. On Saturday and Sunday things get swinging at the Bouquet at noon, when bar flies can nurse themselves back to life with a build-your-own-Bloody-Mary-bar. —Tara Morgan Friday, July 9, 5 p.m., $10; Saturday, July 10, noon, $10; Sunday, July 11, noon, FREE; The Bouquet, 1010 W. Main St., 208-345-6605, thebouquet.net.

BOISEweekly | JULY 7–13, 2010 | 31

NEWS/ARTS ARTS/VISUAL

POETIC GRAFFITI Big Tree Arts’ poetry slams offer outreach and an outlet JACLYN BRANDT

TREASURE YOUR BEER Forget the muses of old. Languid reclining nudes with padded ivory hips and blushing nipples are a thing of the past. The new inspirational form is a testament to modern consumerism—steely smooth curves with dewy beads of cool sweat. Though beer has always been bottled inspiration for artists, PBR’s annual “PB-Arts Contest” has moved the can to the forefront. Each year, the contest encourages artists to submit PBR-inspired work in four categories—photography, painting, sculpture and poetry—and then awards a grand prize of $1,893 in cash and a year’s supply of PBR, and a runner-up prize of $631 in cash and a four-month supply of PBR, in each category. Last year, PBR painted a few of the top contest winners in mural form on the sides of four downtown Boise buildings—the Davies Reid building, the side of Neurolux, the Linen Building and the side of Mack & Charlie’s facing Addie’s. Josh Udesen from Boise was one of this year’s winners, and his work will be displayed in Atlanta, Ga.; Nashville, Tenn.; and Portland, Ore. For more information and to see the complete PBart gallery “like an art museum without all the wimpy hush hush,” visit pbart.com. Now, something for the kiddos. Idaho Performing Arts recently released a call to artists for the Missoula Children’s Theatre production of Treasure Island. MCT, the largest touring children’s theater in the country, will show up in Boise with a wagon full of sets, lights, costumes and make-up. All they need to complete the production is a cast of local kids aged 6 to 18. Each child actor pays a $95 participation fee and then is cast in a specific role—Jim Hawkins, the Pirate Crew, Jim’s Ruffian Friends, Villagers or cuddly Gulls. Rehearsals take place Monday, July 26, through Friday, July 30, from 1-5 p.m. at Camille Beckman in Eagle, and the play’s performance is on Saturday, July 31, at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. at Eagle Nazarene Church. For more information, call Kim Hasenoehrl at 208-602-8796 or e-mail kim@kimhazdesign.com. —Tara Morgan

32 | JULY 7–13, 2010 | BOISEweekly

LAU RIE PEARMAN

Josh Udesen’s ode to PBR.

on the whole time, I’d consider that workout said. “It might be scrawled on the back of a Last month, Boise Weekly ran a story about a love poem.” menu by a teenager. It could be a song sung a local business owner who was hiring graffiti While the group is funded by a few donaa cappella. It’s all ‘slam poetry.’ It’s the lack artists to decorate his restaurants. While many of limitations on the form that make it so awe- tions, its budget is mostly made up of grants, might argue about whether or not graffiti is including one from Idaho Commission on the some and also so variable.” art, it brings to light the questions of not only Arts. Big Tree Arts’ youth outreach program is Poetry is definitely considered an art form, ‘what is art’ but who decides what is art? Is it funded thanks to such grants. art academics or the working artists? There has been some controversy, Isaac Grambo is involved in both however, surrounding government payof those worlds. In his day job, he ing for arts. KBOI-TV did a story on teaches Art and Communication at the issue in January, with one source usBoise State. But at night he is the event ing Big Tree Arts as an example of why coordinator for the slam poetry orgaarts should not receive state funding. nization Big Tree Arts. “You can have the stance of governSlam poetry has endured many of ment shouldn’t pay for arts. However the same battles over legitimacy that if the government doesn’t do it, what graffiti artists go through to define happens?” Grambo said. “If we don’t their art form. get the $3,000 that helps make it “I hear a lot of people lamenting possible to send two poets to these the divide between page poetry and at-risk students to help them with that performance poetry. Academic poets sort of stuff, then they don’t have that distance themselves from this popular outlet. Then culture starts to sort of medium, and being an art professor I dwindle. We don’t have money to bring can kind of liken that to other things,” in featured poets. The interest in slam Grambo said. “I was just talking today in Boise starts to wane. And then slam about pottery with my Art 100 class, stops. And one of the things I like about and I was talking about how academic Boise is that there is a pretty thriving artists think pottery has a use value arts culture—in music, in visual arts, in and is therefore craft, and therefore is poetry slam—and people are active in not high art. But whatever, it is making it. And people would like to continue beautiful objects.” that, but you need money to do it.” Founded in 2002 by Jeanne Huff Big Tree Arts has two regular events and Bob Neal as Boise Poetry Slam, each month: one all-ages event at Womthe group was later renamed Big Tree an of Steel Gallery every first Tuesday of Arts as a non-profit, run by Huff, Neal the month, and another over-21 event and Cheryl Maddalena. The organizaat Neurolux every third Monday of the tion has one goal in mind, according month. EJ Pettinger, Neurolux general to Maddalena: “creating a stable founmanager, sees a mixed audience. dation for the art form of performance “There are some of our regulars in poetry in Idaho.” that mix, but there’s also a lot of people Slam poetry is a competition performance event that was started in 1986 Isaac Grambo is master of yet another sub-genre: alley slam poetry. we don’t see everyday.” That mix has been more beneficial in Chicago by a construction worker than Big Tree Arts originally imagined. tired of the lack of time limits associ“Neurolux has been fantastic because but some people may disagree that the subated with open mic nights. Slam poetry has people are going to go to Neurolux anyway, genre of slam poetry is art as well. few rules: participants have a three-minute not just to go to a poetry show. It has been “The argument about poetry has come time limit and may not use costumes, props or a way to at least introduce people [to slam up,” Grambo said. “One audience memmusical accompaniment. poetry],” Grambo said. ber once said, ‘I sure heard a lot of spoken According to Conor Harris, a recent addiAs for the all-ages show, it’s a way not word but not a lot of poetry.’ But this is tion to Big Tree Arts, the organization makes only to allow anyone to perform, but also to performance poetry, and what is poetry? it easy to perform. provide youth outreach, an important part of What is art? Who cares? This is a venue for “At the art gallery ... anybody can sign up, the organization. people to speak and and it’s a very open and “Younger people have a lot of emotions perform their original inclusive environment. All ages slams: first Tuesday of each month, and want to say things, and you give them whatever. While there The regular poets, and 7 p.m., $5, $1 with student ID, Woman of some sort of avenue to do that,” Grambo said. are some parameters, the MC and Isaac, are Steel Gallery, 3640 Chinden Blvd. Maddalena agrees. anything goes.” quite frankly bonkers. 21 and older slams: third Monday of each “Being able to support our all-ages work“As for the poems And I love it. They are month, 8 p.m., $5, Neurolux, 113 N. 11th St. shops and youth outreach events with local themselves, and the nutty and witty and boisepoetry.com poets is a huge milestone for us, as this kind definition of a slam not afraid to include of work also helps our local poets to continue poem, it’s really kind anybody in it.” to critique and analyze their own work in of up to you,” Harris said. “I consider a Performers may interpret poetry however increasingly effective ways, and thus buoys poem to be an artistic expression of one’s they choose. feelings. I’m a runner, and when I run a great our whole creative community to ever-higher “It might be great work on the page writlevels of performance.” workout and think of the girl I have a crush ten as a part of an MFA’s thesis,” Maddalena WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

SCREEN

UP IN THE AIR The Last Airbender polarizes audiences AMY ATKINS On a surprisingly muggy day in late June, 20-year-old Matthew and his friend, 19-yearold Austin, are standing outside the Egyptian Theatre, their anticipation almost palpable. They are waiting for producer Frank Marshall to walk down the red carpet and herald the national premiere of the new M. Night Shyamalan movie, The Last Airbender. As a large city bus pulls up to the stoplight, its passengers craning to see why there’s a crowd, Matthew says he’s thrilled Aang, the last Airbender, is a little bent out of shape. to be there. “I love the TV show [Nickelodeon’s Shyamalan’s shoulders. Avatar: The Last Airbender], and I’m so glad arms against the Water, Air and Earth Tribes Mix that with the accusations of “racein hopes of dominating the world. Capturing they actually made a movie. So excited,” he bending” (Caucasian actors were cast in Aang and stopping him from realizing his says, and Austin nods his agreement. what were predominantly Asian and Inuit While many of the adults shuffling around potential will go a long way toward the Fire roles) also being lobbed at the director of The Nation’s ultimate goal. in the midday heat are there to get a glimpse Sixth Sense and this film is limping out of the Aang, an Airbender, is the new Avatar of Marshall—who is once again premiering gate like a horse with a broken leg. (think Buddha), a being with the ability one of his films in Boise—Matthew, Austin Does that mean The Last Airbender to bend all four elements, but who is also and scores of other young adults are here to should be put out of its misery? Not necestasked with keepsee what Shyamalan, sarily. For a viewer without an attachment to ing peace among the Marshall and the THE LAST AIRBENDER (PG) the source material, it’s easy to get lost in the tribes. Afraid of the hundreds of people Directed by M. Night Shyamalan responsibilities of being foreign lands, the greens of the Airbenders’ who worked on the Starring Noah Ringer, Nicola Peltz, Dev Patel worlds, the whites and ice-blues of the Waterthe Avatar, Aang ran film will do with benders’. The action sequences are beautifully away from his home the animated series’ Now playing at Edwards 9 and Edwards 22 choreographed and though the young actors before he could learn beloved characters Visit video.boiseweekly.com for BW’s video will do well to continue studying their craft, to bend the other three Aang, Katara, Sokka interviews with Frank Marshall. elements. He must now the budding relationship between Aang, and the misguided master new skills while Katara and Sokka feels genuine enough to Prince Zuko. want to see it grow (sequels are reportedly in avoiding capture by the Fire Nation. The Last Airbender opens with teenaged the planning stages). Martial arts, lush scenery, CGI magic siblings Katara (Nicola Peltz) and Sokka What all the hubbub means is that if and Shyamalan’s storytelling take this 2D (Jackson Rathbone), members of the Water you don’t already know the story, The Last animation into a fantastical new world. Tribe, rescuing 12-year-old Aang (Noah Airbender is a fine afternoon diversion. But Ringer) and his flying buffalo/Shih Tzu-look- But inexperienced actors and a storyline that verges too far from the source material if like Matthew and Austin you are a big fan ing creature from an iceberg. Aang has been inside the ice 100 years and during that time, have led to some unfavorable early reviews. of the original cartoon, you might leave the theater feeling hot under the collar. And all the blame is being laid squarely on the power-hungry Fire Nation has taken up

SCREEN/LISTINGS Special Screenings

Opening

continuing

BLOOD INTO WINE—Documentary about Maynard James Keenan (singer for Tool, Puscifer and A Perfect Circle) and his vineyard partner, Eric Glomski, and their mission to bring notoriety and credibility to Northern Arizona’s burgeoning wine industry. Sunday, July 11, 6 p.m. $12-$15. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208342-4222.

DESPICABLE ME—Armed with shrink rays, freeze rays and a score of threatening artillery, the villainous Gru, voiced by Steve Carrell, is plotting to steal the moon when three orphaned girls get in his way in this 3D animated film. (PG) Edwards 22

THE A-TEAM—A group of Iraq War veterans looks to clear their names with the U.S. military, which suspects the four men of committing a crime for which they were framed. Based on the iconic ’80s TV show of the same name. (PG-13) Edwards 22

I AM LOVE—Set in Milan, Italy, this family drama stars Tilda Swinton as a devoted wife who falls in love with another man, changing the wealthy Recchi family forever. (R) Flicks

EXIT THROUGH THE GIFT SHOP—A French thrift shop owner in L.A. acquired a video camera and became famous for going out at night and filming graffiti artists at work. (R) Flicks

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

GET HIM TO THE GREEK—A music company assistant (Jonah Hill) is sent to London to retrieve an outrageous rockstar (Russell Brand) for a concert at L.A.’s Greek Theatre. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 GROWN UPS—The death of their childhood basketball coach leads some old friends (Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock) to gather at the site of a championship celebration from years ago. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

IRON MAN 2—Robert Downey Jr. returns as Tony Stark, billionaire arms manufacturer and playboy with a heart of cold fusion and a superpowered exoskeleton he uses to fight the enemies of freedom. But one of those enemies, Ivan Venko (Mickey Rourke), isn’t so pleased with the fact that Stark made his fortune with secrets stolen from Venko’s father and decides to seek superpowered revenge. (PG-13) Edwards 22 JOAN RIVERS: A PIECE OF WORK—Audiences are sucked into the world of one of America’s most irreverent

BOISEweekly | JULY 7–13, 2010 | 33

SCREEN/LISTINGS female comedians in this emotionally surprising documentary on Rivers’ 76th year of life. (R) Flicks THE KARATE KID—Twelve-yearold Dre Parker (Jaden Smith) moves with his mother to China, where he arouses the ire of a schoolyard bully and learns kung fu (not karate) from his apartment’s maintenance man, Mr. Han (Jackie Chan), in order to defend himself and grows up in the process. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 KILLERS—After a romance while on vacation, Jen (Katherine Heigl) discovers her new husband, Spencer (Ashton Kutcher), is a spy being hunted by assassins. (PG-13) Edwards 22 KNIGHT AND DAY—Tom Cruise and Cameron Diaz star in this action-comedy centered on a fugitive couple on an adventure where nothing and no one is what it seems. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 THE LAST AIRBENDER—Based on the popular Nickelodeon television series, the future of mankind falls in the hands of a young boy named Aang, who learns he is the last Avatar with the power to manipulate all four elements. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 MOTHER AND CHILD—With a star-studded cast including Naomi Watts, Samuel L. Jackson and Annette Bening, Mother and Child follows the lives of three unique women fighting to control the chaos in their lives. (R) Flicks PLEASE GIVE—Two young women care for their elderly grandmother while their neighbors, who have already purchased her apartment, wait for grandma to pass away so they can expand their living space. (R) Flicks PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME—Jake Gyllenhaal plays a rogue prince who must race against dark forces to prevent them from using an ancient dagger from the gods to reverse time and rule the world. (PG-13) Edwards 22 ROBIN HOOD—Russell Crowe stars as Robin Hood in his third pairing with director Ridley Scott. In 12th century England, Sir Robin Longstride (Crowe) must rescue his village from the nasty Sheriff of Nottingham (Matthew Macfadyen) while wooing the widowed Lady Marian (Cate Blanchett). (PG-13) Edwards 22 THE SECRETS IN THEIR EYES—Ricardo Darin plays a retired lawyer who is haunted by a case that ended in a false conviction for rape and murder. In Spanish with English subtitles. (R) Flicks TOY STORY 3—The good old toys are back but Andy is all grown up and off to college. The toys are donated and must survive the constant craziness of a daycare center. (G) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE—Seattle may be ravaged by violence and turmoil, but Bella Swan is up to her usual airheaded ways as she continues on in the critical struggle of deciding who to love: the coiffed and diamond-skinned Edward or Jacob, the ever-shirtless teen heartthrob. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22, Edwards IMAX

34 | JULY 7–13, 2010 | BOISEweekly

SCREEN/MOVIE TIMES WEDNESDAY, JULY 7-TUESDAY, JULY 13 THE A-TEAM—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11 a.m., 1:45, 4:25, 7:15, 9:50

BLOOD INTO WINE—

Flicks: Su: 6

DESPICABLE ME—

Edwards 22: F-Tu: 12:30, 2:55, 5:20, 7:45, 10:10

DESPICABLE ME 3D—

Edwards 22: F-Tu: 12, 2:25, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40

EXIT THROUGH THE GIFT SHOP—

Flicks: W-Th: 5:20, 7:20, 9:20;

F-Su: 1:20, 3:20, 5:20, 7:20, 9:20; M-Tu: 5:20, 7:20, 9:20 GET HIM TO THE GREEK—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:50, 4:40, 7:20, 10:05 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:10, 8

GROWN UPS—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:40, 4:45, 7:55, 10:35 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:55 a.m., 1:20, 2:20, 3:50, 4:45, 6:20, 7:20, 8:05, 9, 9:45

I AM LOVE—

Flicks: F-Su: 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30; M-Tu: 4:30, 7, 9:30

IRON MAN 2—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:30, 4:15, 7:05, 10:05

JOAN RIVERS: A PIECE OF WORK—

Flicks: W-Th: 5:05, 7:05, 9:05;

F-Su: 1:05, 3:05, 5:05, 7:05, 9:05; M-Tu: 5:05, 7:05, 9:05 THE KARATE KID—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:05, 4:15, 7:15, 10:25

Edwards 22: W-Th: 10:30 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 3:20, 6:40, 9:40 KILLERS—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:10 a.m.

KNIGHT AND DAY—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:55, 4:35, 7:40, 10:40 Edwards 22: W-Th: 10:50 a.m., 12, 1:25, 2:35, 4:10, 5:25, 7, 8:10, 9:55, 10:40

THE LAST AIRBENDER—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:25, 4:20, 7:35, 10:10

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:30 a.m., 12:55, 2, 3:30, 4:40, 6:05, 7:10, 8:40, 9:45; F-Tu: 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:40, 7:10, 9:45 THE LAST AIRBENDER 3D—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:30, 3, 5:40, 8:15

MOTHER AND CHILD—

Flicks: W-Th: 4:40

PLEASE GIVE—

Flicks: W-Th: 7:10, 9:10; F-Su: 12:30, 4:45, 9:35; M-Tu: 4:45, 9:35

PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME— Edwards 22: W-Th: 2:05, 4:55, 7:40, 10:15 ROBIN HOOD—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 2:45, 5:30

THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES—

Flicks: W-Th: 4:20, 7, 9:25; F-Su: 2:20, 7:10; M-Tu: 7:10

TOY STORY 3—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:20, 4, 7:05, 9:50

Edwards 22: W-Th: 10:45 a.m., 12:05, 12:25, 1:30, 2:30, 2:55, 4, 5:20, 5:35, 6:35, 7:50, 9:05, 10:20 TOY STORY 3 3D— Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:25, 10 TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:10, 1:35, 2:05, 4:05,

4:30, 4:55, 7, 7:25, 7:50, 9:55, 10:20, 10:45 Edwards 22: W-Th: 10:45 a.m., 11:15 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 12:20, 12:40, 1:40, 2:10, 2:40, 3:05, 3:35, 4:35, 5:05, 5:45, 6, 6:30, 7:30, 8, 8:30, 8:55, 9:25, 10:25; F-Tu: 1:40, 4:35, 7:30, 10:25 TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE IMAX— Edwards 22: W-Th: 10:15 a.m., 1:10, 4:05, 7, 9:55

T H E A T E R S Edwards 22 Boise, 208-377-1700, www.regmovies.com; Edwards 9 Boise, 208-338-3821, www.regmovies.com; The Egyptian Theater, 208-345-0454, www.egyptiantheatre.net; The Flicks, 208-342-4222, www.theflicksboise.com; FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: Northgate Cinema, Country Club Reel, Nampa Reel, 208-377-2620, www.reeltheatre.com. Overland Park $1 Cinema, 208377-3072, www.opcmovies.com. Movie times listed were correct as of press time. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEweekly | JULY 7–13, 2010 | 35

NEWS/FOOD FOOD/REVIEWS On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

KANA GIRL’S HAWAI’IAN BBQ Snake—it’s what’s for dinner.

ROAD KILLING ME SOFTLY

36 | MAY 19–25, 2010 | BOISEweekly

LAU RIE PEARMAN

If you were paying attention to Cobweb about a month ago, you might have noticed a post from BW blogger chef Randy King called “Road Kill Dinner.” Believe it or not, the title of the post was not the most horrifying thing about it. Nor was the fact that the post was actually about dinner that made its way to the table after having been hit and killed ... you guessed it—on the road. What was so horrific about King’s post was that his road kill dinner was a rattlesnake that he’d run over in the Owhyees, bagged, skinned, sliced, soaked in buttermilk and then pan-fried. It takes a special kind of human to eat road kill. It takes a very special kind of human to eat road kill rattlesnake. I had to ask him about it. Though it’s the first time he’s eaten road kill, King told me he’s eaten snake plenty of times. Usually he pan-fries them like his dad taught him to, and, he said, they’re better eating near the winter when they’re fat and ready to hole up for a few months. If you caught a more recent post from King on Anthony Bourdain’s new book, you know he’s a fan of the New York chef. And like Bourdain, while traveling in Asia, King hosted his own private little episode of No Reservations with a cobra snake. “I drank the blood, the venom and the bile. Then I watched them chop the snake up, fry it and feed it to me in a curry basil sauce. It was wonderful,” said King. Catch King’s food musings at boiseweekly.com every week on Cobweb. In other Southeast Asian cuisine news, downtown Boise Vietnamese restaurant Pho Nouveau celebrates its one-year anniversar y Saturday, July 10. Your party favor is half-priced apps and two-for-one drinks all day long. No gifts necessar y. No cobra snakes present. The final word in this week’s food news is on all the hammering happening in Hyde Park. Parrilla Grill owner Scott Graves has leased the former Bungalow location, gutted it and started putting it back together as something completely different. The 13th Street Pub and Grill will be a ... pub and grill. Stay tuned for details. —Rachael Daigle

I’ve been in Boise long enough now to remember when there was no My first introduction to Hawaiian cuisine came in my freshman dorm Hawaiian food in town. These days, we actually have enough choices via a hot plate upon which one of my dear friends was frying slabs of to be discerning about which place makes the best Spam musubi and Spam before flopping them on a bed of sticky white rice. which place does the most succulent kalua pig. Hell, even manapua I was a bit skeptical of the canned meat, but she assured me it was has more than one local maker these days. daily fare among Hawaiians. While I still can’t quite stomach the idea of Kana Girl’s Hawai’ian BBQ takes its place in the lineup where you’d Spam, I’ve learned to appreciate the distinct flavors of Hawaiian food, expect a joint sporting an Idaho specialty plate on the wall reading “Bu born from a mix of cultures and history that can only be found on the Laia” to be. (Quick aside for the uninitiated: Bu La’ia is a Hawaiian islands. Look closely and you’ll find bits of Polynesia, Asia and middle comedian known for his thick pidgin and silly stunts, including twice America all thrown into a blender and set on frappe. The results are running for governor, once in the ’90s while my sister and I—then based creations that are at once exotic and comfortingly familiar. in Honolulu—were wearing out his False Crack in our tape decks.) In Even as universal as Hawaiian food can feel, it’s still a surprise to other words, Kana find it in an off-theGirl’s is so close to beaten path strip mall being over the top, in Meridian. it’s almost a caricaOn a recent weekture of itself. But just day afternoon, Kana when you think it Girl’s Hawai’ian BBQ can’t get any more was packed with island kitschy, nosdiners scarfing down talgia starts oozing huli huli chicken, out of everything and mixed plates, chicken you’re hooked. katsu and teriyaki The menu is thick chicken, all alongside with choices, not just the requisite sticky for the lau lau- and rice and mac salad poi-loving crowd (the staples of every (no poi on the menu, Hawaiian meal). though), but also for The small space the vegetarian and is light and airy, the gluten-free diners. with little memenCook and owner toes of the islands Keoni comes out of everywhere you look: the kitchen to chat up from the decades-old diners in pidgin and Hawaiian newspateach kids how to say pers framed on the “happy birthday” in wall and surfboards KANA GIRL’S Hawaiian. His wife in the window to the HAWAI’IAN BBQ “Kana Girl” mans the register and delivers food while “Proud to be Hawaiian” bumper sticker and array of 1735 W. Franklin Rd., Keoni’s voice sings out—literally—from the kitchen Hawaiian travel and cultural books on the front counter. Meridian along with Bruddah Iz. Kana Girl herself took our order, her friendly, laid208-891-0813 kanagirl.com On a recent visit, the lau lau was long gone for the back style proving that you don’t have to be on an island Tues.-Sat., day, but Kana took down my name and phone number to have an island mindset. The menu is surprisingly 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and promised to add me to both the manapua and lau extensive, offering an impressive list of Hawaiian comlau text message distribution lists. The next morning, as fort foods including Spam musubi and ahi poke. Even I wrote this review, I got a picture message with a ti-leaf wrapped ball more surprising was the page-long vegetarian menu next to the almost and a handwritten note saying, “Aloha ‘lakeli’ ’dis lau lau stay fo’ you!” equally long gluten-free menu. As for the rest of the food, we feasted. Chicken katsu ($6.95) comes My favorite dining companion went with the beef and broccoli plate with homemade katsu sauce and the pounded-thin chicken is the best ($6.95), which despite the name, is a very different dish than the ChiI’ve had in town. The three-plate teri chicken, teri beef and kalua pig nese standard. This one uses a simple brown gravy, and even though ($9.95) was heavy on the smoky flavor. The manapua ($2.95) is stuffed some of the beef was a bit grisly, it was a satisfying accompaniment with char siu and baked, the mac salad is extra creamy and Spam to the generous heaps of rice. The mac salad was the hit of the plate musubi ($3.95) has a thin slick of sauce on the fried Spam. Kim chee though, its slightly sweet heartiness making us forget about calories. ($2.95) is homemade rather than from a Noh packet, so be prepared for I went for one of my favorite dishes, the kalua pig—slow-cooked an unfamiliar recipe. smoked pork so tender you almost don’t have to chew. I opted to have As we traded bits and pieces of food among each other’s plates, my it on a sandwich ($6.95), largely for the chance to try the handcut taro dad reminisced about having to work the malasada booth at my high fries. Granted, at first the word “taro” made me flash to the bitter nastischool’s annual carnival, my mom remembered back to one of my May ness that is poi. But I’m glad I took the chance because the meaty strips Day hula performances, and I quietly sang along to the Makaha Sons of deep-fried taro were earthy with just a touch of sweetness. of Niihau. After a series of exchanges between my dad and Keoni, we I finished the meal with a real treat—manapua ($2.95). The brilliant ended up with a box of hot malasadas—fried “potagee” bread rolled red char siu pork that filled the sweet bun was so hot, steam came bilin sugar—for dessert. They’re not on the menu, but Keoni makes them lowing out with each forkful. The creation was classic Hawaiian. up special for those who know to ask. Once they catch on—and catch The only thing I could have wished for was to walk out onto sandon they will—I wouldn’t be surprised to find myself on a text message strewn sidewalk in a lazy island town. A Meridian strip mall may not distribution list for them as well. have the same vibe, but it’s a hell of a lot closer with Kana Girl’s. —Rachael Daigle has much aloha for landlocked lau lau.

—Deanna Darr loves ... you know, da kine. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEweekly | JULY 7–13, 2010 | 37

FOOD/DINING Downtown + Fringe ADDIE’S—The language of breakfast is spoken here. You’ve never seen so many meats followed by “& Eggs” on one menu. Go early to beat the rush for Boise’s best gravy. 510 W. Main St., 208-338-1198. $ SU OM . ALIA’S COFFEEHOUSE—Freshmade bagels daily for breakfast and lunch, the best looking dessert case in town with chocolate chip cookie dough bars, and for those who must, a selection of salads. 908 W. Main SU St., 208-338-1299. $ . ALI BABA—Middle Eastern cuisine from shish kebab to shawarma. 111 S Broadway Ave., SU . 208-343-4536. $-$$$ ANGELL’S—Upscale dining in a casual and relaxed atmosphere. Featuring such tasty delights as duck empanadas, prime rib and Idaho trout. In warmer weather, Angell’s patio is a lush respite in the concrete jungle. 909 Main St., 208-342-4900, www. angellsbarandgrill.com. $$-$$$ RES SU OM. ASIAGO’S—Innovative Italian pastas, salads, sandwiches, soups and seasonal specials served amidst rustic Italian countryside decor. 1002 W. Main St., 208-336-5552, www. asiagos.com. $$-$$$ RES SU OM. BAR GERNIKA—Basque favorites in a dark and cozy little bar. Croquettas, chorizo, paella and a simple cheese plate that is one of the most popular in town. Don’t miss dish: spicy lamb grinder or Beef Tongue Saturday. www.bargernika.com. OM. $-$$ BARDENAY—The atmospheric, cavernous interior (with visible distillery) and huge patio is the place to eat, drink and be seen downtown. This business casual joint specializes in alcohol but can provide a great meal (plus brunch on weekends) and plenty of atmosphere. The country’s first restaurant distillery and home to one of the country’s best mixologists. 610 Grove St., 208-426-0538, www.bardenay. com. $-$$ SU OM . THE BASQUE MARKET—The market’s shelves are stocked with Basque food and wine (and often, you’ll find take-and-bake croquettas in the cooler), but there’s also a small cafe space for lunch. A list of sandwiches on the market’s freshmade baguette all come with a side and if you’re lucky, a cookie. 608 W. Grove St., 208-433-1208, www.thebasquemarket.com. $ OM .

BERRYHILL & CO. RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR—In its downtown location, Berryhill is open for lunch and dinner. The lunch menu offers finer casual food like a fig and feta grilled cheese sandwich, a buffalo burger and a crab melt of focaccia. A separate hors d’oeuvre menu features nibbles like baked escargot, and entrees include everything from rack of lamb to fish and steaks to both the white meats. 121 N. Ninth St., 208-387-3553. $$$-$$$$ RES SU OM . BIG CITY COFFEE—This coffee shop serves a variety of hot drinks for your on-the-go life and well-proportioned meals for the times when you slow down. The menu is surprisingly large and creative for both breakfast and lunch and the deli case has an assortment of bakery sweets and savory items. 1416 Grove St., 208-345-3145, www.bigcitycofSU OM . feeld.com. $ BITTERCREEK ALE HOUSE—Bittercreek is always classy and busy with an eclectic bunch of patrons. A beer selection listed by geographical proximity and a menu with a serious local focus. This Northwestern pub is a favorite among those looking to relax with friends, and the summer street-side patio offers prime people-watching opportunities. 246 N. Eighth St., 208-345-1813, www.bittercreekalehouse.com. $$ SU OM.

BLUE SKY BAGELS—A variety of house-made bagels ranging plus soups, morning egg combos and lunchtime sandwiches. The real steal is the veggie sandwich stacked high with all the roughage you want (including avocado). 407 W. Main St., 208-388-4242, www.blueskybagels.com. $ SU OM . BOMBAY GRILL—Northern Indian food in the historic Idanha Hotel. Get a samosa, curry, daal quick fix over lunch, or settle in for a properly homemade meal at dinner. 928 W. Main St., 208-345-7888, www.bombaygrillonline.com. $-$$ OM. BRICK OVEN BISTRO—Lovingly called the Beanery by longtime patrons, this Grove hot spot with everything homemade has some of the best comfort food around. 801 N. Main St., 208-342-3456. SU OM. $ THE BRIDGE CAFE—Continental breakfast and coffee, build-yourown wraps and sandwiches, hot lunch and a rack of snacks for the in-between times. 123 N. Sixth St., 208-345-5526. CAFE OLE—Boise’s original Mexican restaurant has been serving for the last 28 years. 404 S. Eighth St., 208-3443222. $-$$ SU OM. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—Sustainable community connections are made and both nutritious and delicious local products are offered at the

FOOD/RECENTLY REVIEWED COPPER CANYON 113 13th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-461-0887, coppercanyonnampa.com “The braised breast of duck ($18.95) was not only wonderfully tender, but coated in a port wine and sun-dried cherry sauce that made me glad I had chosen the garlic mashed potatoes as a side—all the better to soak up the extra.” —Deanna Darr

TWIG’S CELLAR 816 Bannock St., 208-344-8944, twigscellar.com “The wine-by-the-glass list currently offered has something to please just about every taste. There are some 30 reasonably priced choices, most for under $8 a glass.” —David Kirkpatrick

THE GYRO SHACK 6619 Ustick Road, 208-378-1325 “The deluxe gyro becomes super: super big, super meaty, super-duper spicy. Even big, throaty gulps of soda didn’t completely quell the burn or stop beads of forehead sweat.” —Amy Atkins

AVERAGE PRICE PER ENTREE: $ —Less than $8 $ $ —$8 to $14 $ $ $ —$14 to $20 $ $ $ $ —Over $20

—Wine & beer —Full bar —Delivery —Take-out —Open late RES —Reservations

needed/recommended —Patio SU —Open on Sunday OM —Online menu —Breakfast —Boise Weekly Card

Boise Weekly Dining Guide offers selective listings of editorial recommendations. Listings rotate based on available space.

Updates from diligent readers and listed restaurateurs are heartily encouraged. E-mail to food@boiseweekly.com or fax to 208-342-4733.

38 | JULY 7–13, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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DINING/FOOD weekly farmers’ and artisans’ market. Every Saturday (mid April-Nov.) between 9:30 a.m.1:30 p.m., shop for fresh, local produce, specialty foods, wines, cheeses and baked goods. Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, 208-345-9287.

EMILIO’S—With Chef Chris Hain in charge of preparing cuisine and over 450 wines in this restaurant in the Grove Hotel, you’ll think you’re in some big city, not downtown Boise. 245 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-333-8002. $$$-$$$$ RES SU OM .

GUIDO’S ORIGINAL NEW YORK STYLE PIZZA-DOWNTOWN— There’s nothing like a slice (or three) of Guido’s New York-style pizza for lunch. Their giant pies are inexpensive and addictive. 235 N. Fifth St., 208-345-9011. $ SU OM.

CARRE CHOCOLATES—This is the place in town for genuine, handcrafted Belgian chocolates that (drumroll, please) melt in your mouth. 733 W. Broad St., 208-342-7697. $.

ELI’S ITALIAN DELI—For the sandwich lover for whom a sandwich is a work of love. With fresh ingredients, homemade bread and artful touches, Eli’s turns out sandwiches, soups and pastas for the hungry masses. A recent second location in downtown Boise, in addition to the Nampa landmark is earning more fans. 219 N. 10th St., 208-473OM . 7161. $-$$

HA’ PENNY IRISH PUB AND GRILL—An Irish pub with beautiful dark wood seating offering a delicious mixture of American bar fare and classics from the Emerald Isle. 855 Broad St., Ste. 250, 208-3435568. $$ SU OM.

CAZBA—Cazba transports you to the Eastern Mediterranean with cloud-painted walls, elegant décor and food from Greece, Egypt, Lebanon, Turkey and Iran (with a few Indian, Japanese and American dishes). Brunch on weekends. 211 N. Eighth St., 208-381-0222. $$ SU. CHANDLERS STEAKHOUSE—Chandler’s is for the fine-diner in you. With melt-in-your-mouth filet mignon, porterhouse and Kobe cuts, as well as an appetizer menu that deviates from the red meat and offers oysters, lobster cakes, escargot and mussels. It’s as popular a stop for cocktails as it is for a fine dinner. 981 Grove St., 208-342-4622. $$$$ RES SU OM. CHOCOLAT BAR—For all you chocolate-obsessed purists out there, the Chocolat Bar makes batches of sinful delicacies daily. 805 W. Bannock St., 208-3387771. $. COTTONWOOD GRILLE—The food and ambiance here share a terrific, tasteful symbiotic relationship. Inside, it’s like a big hunting lodge; outside, it’s watching the world go by on the Greenbelt. 913 W. River St., 208-333-9800. $$$-$$$$ RES SU OM. DARLA’S DELI—The menu at Darla’s Deli includes breakfast and lunch ciabatta sandwiches, chef salad with bacon and avocado halves stuffed with tuna salad plus daily specials. Best find on the menu? Half a grilled cheese and tomato sandwich for $2.83. 250 S. Fifth St. OM 208-381-0034. $ . DAWSON’S—The interior of Dawson’s is almost as tasty as their hand-picked beans (from everywhere from Sumatra to Ethiopia to Mexico) roasted the old-fashioned way. Owners Dave and Cindy Ledgard know where to find the best fair trade, organic, shade grown and just plain excellent coffees. 219 N. Eighth St., 208-336-5633. $ SU. DELI AT THE GROVE—Head in and enjoy a classic deli-style menu equipped with sandwiches, salads and soup. 101 S. Capitol . Blvd., 208-336-3500. $-$$ DONNIE MAC’S TRAILER PARK CUISINE—Located in the developing Linen District, Donnie Mac’s Trailerpark Cuisine may be downhome, but it’s certainly not from the trailer park. Burgers, chicken sandwiches, o-rings, fries, some very tasty fry sauce, the valley’s only frozen custard, mac-n-cheese and breakfast. Yowza! 1515 W. Grove St., 208-384-9008. $-$$ OM . THE EDGE—Get a cup of joe in between shopping for music at The Record Exchange and knick knacks at The Edge gift shop. 1101 W. Idaho St., 208-3445383. $ SU.

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FALCON TAVERN—This upscale downtown tavern has become “Boise’s neighborhood pub.” Known for their hand-pressed Kobe burger and ample beer selection, Falcon Tavern also has a variety of appetizers, soups, salads and sandwiches. 705 W. Bannock St., 208-947-3111. OM. $-$$ THE FIXX—Serving the needs of coffee drinkers hunkered down in the western end of downtown, The Fixx brews up locally roasted coffee from Eagle Coffee Roasting, and the eats are all provided courtesy of Le Cafe de Paris. Live music Friday and Saturday nights. 224 10th St., SU . 208-331-4011. $ FLICKS—Movie and a meal from a killer kitchen. Food good enough to bring you in without a ticket includes burgers, chicken and brie on ciabatta, lasagna, gyro wraps, salads and daily soups. 646 Fulton St., SU. 208-342-4222. $ FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE—In addition to a fantastic atmosphere (cool tunes, friendly employees, art on the walls and comfy seating), “the M” makes killer coffee drinks. Don’t forget the Art-O-Mat. 500 W. Idaho St., 208-345-4320. $ SU. FRONT DOOR NORTHWEST PIZZA AND TAP HOUSE—Offering tasty pizza, sandwiches, soups and salads. Features a stellar line of beers, including 14 rotating beer taps, 20 bottles of Belgian Ale and more to comprise over 60 beers to choose from. Eat -in or take-out. 105 S. Sixth St., SU. 208-287-9201. GANDOLFO’S DELI—The Georgia based franchise of New York delicatessens provides sandwich fans with New York style hot and cold deli sands, specialty selections and side salads. 401 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338. 7827. $ GOLDY’S BREAKFAST BISTRO—A desperately popular breakfast destination and with good reason. Generous portions of eggs, hash, cinnamon rolls and more. Good gravy! Can’t make it for breakfast? They’ve got lunch, too. 108 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-345-4100. $ SU . GRAPE ESCAPE—Fine wine, delicious lunch and dinner, delectable desserts and light bites make this little bistro a great place to meet with great friends. And, if you can’t get to Grape Escape, they’ll bring their casual elegance to you at any of your functions or events with their fabulous catering. 800 W. Idaho St., 208-368-0200. $-$$ SU.

HAPPY FISH SUSHI & MARTINI BAR—It is a happy fish, indeed, that becomes an entree here. With a wide array of sushi rolls, sashimi and more including several creative vegetarian options and perhaps an even wider array of cocktails, kick back in this chichi restaurant and enjoy. 855 Broad St., SU OM. 208-343-4810. $$$ JAVA—Three words: Bowl of Soul. This coffee/espresso/ chocolate concoction is liquid redemption. In addition to all things coffee, Java also serves scones, muffins and tasty lunch offerings. 223 N. Sixth St., . 208-345-0777. $ SU JENNY’S LUNCH LINE—The menu, which changes every day, always features fresh soups, salads and sandwiches made daily. Vegetarian and healthy options are the mainstay with a single yummy dessert treat for the times when your sweet tooth needs a little loving, too. Get a menu by e-mailing Jenny at orders@jennyslunchline.com. Call the lunch line at 208433-0092, the catering line at 338-7851 or fax your order in to 208-433-0093. 106 N. Sixth St., OM. 208-433-0092. $-$$ KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE—While you wait for the show to start, you can dig into a heaping plate of nachos, sink your teeth into a stacked sandwich and fries or wrap your mouth around a pile of buffalo wings; you’ll be eating like a rock star. Open Sunday (show nights). 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212. . $-$$ LA VIE EN ROSE—Enjoy fresh baked croissants, brioches, tarts, eclairs and more from chef Patrick Brewer. Check out their breakfast menu, featuring everything from omelets and frittatas to biscuits and gravy and pancakes. Lunch features a selection of homemade soups, sandwiches and salads, and Illy coffee is available all day, every day. 928 W. Main St., SU 208-331-4045. $-$$ OM. LE CAFE DE PARIS—The display case offers a glimpse of the height of French pastry baking. The food is among Boise’s culinary elite—lush, buttery cooking. 204 N. Capitol Blvd., 208-336-0889. $$-$$$ OM. LEKU ONA—Step into a little piece of traditional Basque home, family and heaven when you visit Leku Ona. Relax in the friendly atmosphere with lunch or dinner, either inside or out on the patio on warm days. 117 S. Sixth St., 208-345-6665. $$$-$$$$ RES OM.

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FOOD/DINING LOCK, STOCK & BARREL—A Boise staple featuring some of the most well-reputed steaks and prime in town. 1100 W. Jefferson, 208-336-4266. $$-$$$$ SU OM. LUCY’S COFFEE AND ESPRESSO—No-nonsense coffee on Broadway with homemade pastries and desserts. Brewing Cafe Mam coffee from native Mayan farmers that’s free of contaminants and is Certified Fair Trade. Lucy’s is committed to providing quality coffee, as to well as being a green business. 1079 Broadway Ave., 208-3445907. $ SU. MAI THAI—Daily lunch specials, an always superior list of noodle dishes and wicked cocktails. This place is great day or night, hungry or just in the mood to nibble. 750 Idaho St., 208-344-8424. $$ SU. THE MELTING POT—Delicious, savory and sweet, here’s fondue for every course. A cozy, classy place to repast. Order a drink from their extensive selection of wines and linger over a romantic dinner. 200 N. Sixth St., 208-383-0900. $$$-$$$$ RES SU.

PHO NOUVEAU—Vietnamese comfort food: cha gio with a mound of cellophane noodles, lily blossom salad of young lotus root, shrimp and pork, shaken beef salad and big bowls of pho. If strong brew is your thing order some Vietnamese coffee. 780 W. Idaho, 208-3671111. $-$$ SU . PIAZZA DI VINO—As an art gallery and wine bar, Piazza di Vino offers an extensive collection of wines from around the world and art from around town. But that’s not all they offer: savory soups, chocolates, cheeses, salads, fondue and pizza (try the Italian hard salami and provolone) will bring you back again and again. 212 N. Ninth St., 208-336-9577. $-$$ . PIEHOLE—Pizza plain and simple. Nineteen-inch pies by the slice or by the pie and calzones everyday. Try their infamous potato and bacon, or go cheap with the special of the day for two bucks. 205 N. Eighth St., 208-344-7783. SU. $-$$

PIPER PUB & GRILL—Perched high on 8th Street with a wraparound patio, “the Piper” serves up yummy, creative pub fare. The extensive apps menu is perfect for those who like to graze all night long while slinging back cocktails. 150 N. Eighth St., 208-343-2444. $-$$ SU OM. PITA PIT—Pitas galore: meats, veggies, cheeses and any combination thereof. Cheap, healthy fast food tucked into the heart of downtown Boise. Open late to satisfy those nocturnal hankerings. 746 Main St., 208-388-1900. $ SU. POLLO REY—A downtown lunch hot spot offering burritos and tacos and juicy, perfectly spiced, grilled and rotisserie-cooked chicken. There is a second location in the Edwards Theater complex. 222 N. Eighth St., SU. 208-345-0323. $

FOOD/EXTRA

OLD CHICAGO—Delicious pizza, sandwiches, pasta, calzones and strombolis and beer. Some 110 varieties of beer. What more do we need to say? Try the $2 pizza at happy hour or check out the pool tables. 730 W. Idaho St., 208-363-0037. $$-$$$ . OLD SPAGHETTI FACTORY— This Portland-based Italian restaurant in the heart of downtown Boise has pasta lovers abuzz with its heaping plates of noodles. They have red sauce and white sauce; go with pesto or mizithra, the nectar of the gods. 610 W. Idaho Street, , RES, 208-336-2900. $-$$ SU. ORIENTAL EXPRESS—In the heart of downtown, Oriental Express offers fresh, hot, delicious Chinese food seven days a week at very affordable prices. Open late, you can stop by after a night on the town for take-out or dine in and enjoy the really friendly service. 110 N. 11th St., 208-345-8868. $-$$ . P.F. CHANG’S CHINA BISTRO—Corporate Chinese on the finer side of other local favorites. They’ll mix you up a special sauce tableside that’s suited to your tastebuds. 391 S. Eighth St., 208-342-8100. RES SU.

40 | JULY 7–13, 2010 | BOISEweekly

LEILA RAMELLA-RADER

MOON’S KITCHEN CAFE—Get pancakes, biscuits and gravy and eggs for breakfast, or just go straight to dessert and enjoy one of Moon’s famous milkshakes. Founded in 1955, Moon’s has the best breakfast and milkshakes in town, plus an online ordering option, check it out at www.moonskitchen.com. Another exciting development is the new selection of beer and wine which makes the latest addition to the milkshake flavors possible—a milkshake made with Guinness Stout. 712 W. Idaho St., 208-385-0472. $-$$ SU OM .

PHO NOUVEAU: SUMMER ROLLS Though it may feel energizing at first, Boise’s summer heat has no doubt jumped on the vampire train: It’s a big fat energy sucker. Big burger-and-fries lunches make getting through an afternoon even more difficult, and if your job is on the line, falling asleep at work is just the excuse someone will need to send your big butt to the unemployment line. But just because it’s hot doesn’t mean you’re not hungr y. Pho Nouveau’s aptly named fresh summer rolls are light and refreshing, but plentiful enough to quiet the grumbling hunger monster. Soft, rubber y rice paper is wrapped around long, noodly PHO NOUVEAU rice vermicelli, lettuce, bean 780 W. Idaho St. 208-367-1111 sprouts, herbs and your choice phonouveau.com of pork and shrimp, grilled salmon, grilled pork, grilled shrimp or tofu. Each order consists of two big rolls halved and is accompanied by a peanut chunk-filled hoisin sauce that almost begs for a spoon. Top off an order with a frosty glass of iced Vietnamese coffee with condensed milk or a Thai iced tea and dine on the small patio—prime-people watching real estate—and you might find your whole mood elevated for the rest of the day. The most you’ll drop for the summer rolls is $6.95, and when you’re finished with lunch, you won’t be wiping fr y sauce off your tie or hoping your coworkers don’t rat you out when you star t snoring at your desk. —Amy Atkins WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

DINING/FOOD POT BELLY DELI—We think the name says it all. Satisfy your belly from morning til night with breakfast burritos, gourmet sandwiches, salads and a selection of veggie choices. 216 W. Front St., 208-336-2030. $ . PROTO’S PIZZERIA NAPOLENTA—Unlike traditional pizzerias, Proto’s serves pizza and nothing but pizza in a hip joint with an indoor/outdoor bar that’s all the rage during summer. 345 S. Eighth St., 208-331-1400. $-$$ SU. RED FEATHER LOUNGE— Red Feather Lounge is all about wine and good food. You can get great macaroni and cheese for lunch, and for dinner, the menu turns deliciously swanky. If you can snag a seat in the cellar, count yourself especially lucky. 246 N. Eighth St., 208-429-6340. $$-$$$ .

THE RED ROOM TAVERN—Lowslung couches and dark, moody walls make for a dramatic backdrop while you throw back a couple of cocktails or a can of PBR with a plate of deep-fried bacon. Live music, snowboard movie screenings and prime corner patio space at Sixth and Main, it’s definitely a place to watch and be watched. 601 W. Main St., 208-343-7034. $ SU. REEF—You can almost hear the waves lapping against the shore. An island retreat with an amazing rooftop patio in the middle of downtown Boise that serves up nuevo latino fare. 105 S. Sixth St., 208-287-9200. $$-$$$ SU.

BEER GUZZLER/FOOD

SHIGE—Watching sushi master Shige create his masterpieces is almost as awesome as chopsticking a portion, dunking it in a wasabi/ soy mix and popping it in your mouth. Umami! 100 N. Eighth St., Ste. 215, 208-338-8423. $-$$ . TABLEROCK BREWPUB AND GRILL—Great sandwiches, salads and entrees complemented beautifully by one of their signature brews. 705 Fulton St., SU. 208-342-0944. $-$$ TEPANYAKI JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE—Japanese style steak house where food is cooked at your table. A nice place to buddy up with your neighbors and get a fresh off the grill meal. Beer and wine selections. 2197 N. Garden St., 208-343-3515. $-$$ SU. TAJ MAHAL RESTAURANT— Great food, daily lunch buffet and a seriously impressive beer selection. For the faint at heart when it comes to Indian food, there’s also a menu with Greek choices. 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 222, 208-473-7200. $-$$ OM. THOMAS HAMMER—With all the coffee and sweet goodies necessary to keep you moving during the day, all served up in eco-friendly cups. Order up a heaping stack of the infamous Hammer T-shirts and mugs, or some beans and merchandise in stores or online. The Web site lists different organic, fair trade and even rare varietals coffees. 298 N. Eighth St., 208-4338004. $ SU.

CALDERA CANS The canned offerings from this Ashland, Ore., brewery have been available in the valley since before Christmas, but somehow they slipped under my “new brew” radar. Better late than never, and with the hiking and river-rafting season in full swing, it seems like an appropriate time to check them out. Hop heads should love the IPA, while those who prefer sweet malt will lean toward the amber. For me, the pale ale strikes the perfect balance. CALDERA ASHLAND AMBER In the glass, it’s a deep-amber color with a light head that fades quickly. The aroma is subdued but offers grainy touches of honeyed malt and spice. Toasty, just sweet malt dominates the palate but citrusy hops add balance along with a subtle bitterness that is felt more than tasted. The finish is very smooth with hints of creamy caramel and citrus zest. CALDERA IPA This hazy, copper-colored brew weighs in at 94 International Bitterness Units, so it comes as no surprise that it is hops-driven. What is surprising is the overall balance—citrusy hop aromas laced with nuances of grapefruit, grass, herb and subtle malt. The palate is filled with fruity hops that are rich but not overly aggressive and smooth malt on the back end keeps things in line. Bet you can’t drink just one. CALDERA PALE ALE A light golden pour with a thin but persistent head, the beer’s aromas have a nice floral component that’s colored by soft citrus and grain. Beautifully balanced in the mouth, there’s a much bigger hop presence than you would expect from a pale ale. It’s all backed by lightly toasted malt, citrus and biscuit with a nice, edgy bitterness on the oh-so-refreshing finish. This ale is a great choice for summer. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

TONY’S PIZZERIA TEATRO— European-style cafe serving salad, soup and brick oven Napolean-style pizza. Slices sold 11 a.m.-3 p.m., with pies available any time. 103 Capitol Blvd., 208-343-1052. $-$$ SU. TWIN DRAGON—No fuss, no frills—just delicious Americanstyle Chinese food at prices that won’t cripple your wallet. This place doesn’t need any bells and whistles to satisfy a hungry diner. 200 Fairview Ave., SU. 208-344-2141. $-$$ YEN CHING—Yummy Chinese food at a decent price, with all the usual favorites one looks for in a menu, and then some. This is one of Boise’s favorite Chinese restaurants. 305 N. Ninth St., 208-384-0384. $-$$ SU OM. WILLIB’S SANDWICH SALOON—Hide out in the maze of wooden booths, plunk down at a table or saddle up at the full bar. WilliB’s specializes in bunkhouse cooking which means dishes that can be made just as easily in a kitchen or by Dutch oven. Lunch specials are homemade daily and rotate between hefty hot and cold sandwiches, side salads and soups and irresistible sweets. 225 N. Fifth St., 208-331-5666, www.willibs.com. OM . $ ZEPPOLE—Nothing beats the low prices and fresh-baked goodness of Zeppole on a lunch break, unless it’s taking home a loaf of their near-legendary bread to enjoy later. 217 N. Eighth St., 208-345-2149. $ OM.

BOISEweekly | JULY 7–13, 2010 | 41

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MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

REAL ESTATE BW SHARED HOUSING ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com WANTED-REALLY ZEN ROOMMATE In a 4BD home near Greenbelt and BSU. $325/mo. $150 deposit. Call 340-8350.

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BW FOR RENT ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com AVAILABLE JULY 1ST Centrally located large 2BD, 1BA upstairs in small quiet apt. complex with AC, W/D, DW, lots of storage space. Please call Quail Glen Apartments 495-2484 or stop by & pick up an application. 4025 W. State St.

EAST BOISE DUPLEX Spacious 1300 sq. ft. above ground basement apt. with huge windows, lots of light must see inside! Available immediately! Fresh paint throughout; new hall & living room flooring and new DW. Large rooms 3BD, 1.5BA, 16x12 living room-decent size kitchen, W/D hook-up, small fenced back yard. No pets, no smoking. 2 available parking spots. $695/mo. plus deposit. W/S/T paid by owner. Call Tonya 407-7407 or Chuck 8906898. GARRETT STREET APTS 5859-5859 N. Garrett St. 1/2 free rent with a 6 mo. lease. Starting at $450/mo. (Limited Time Only). 1BD & 2BD. Includes: Stove, Fridge, DW, Vaulted Ceiling, WD, A/C. Pool and Common area laundry. 376-1616.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW BEAUTY

BW HEARING *** ARE YOU SUFFERING FROM TINNITUS *** (Ear Ringing or Buzzing) We have the solution! Try It Risk FREE !!! Call Now: 1-800840-6404 www.EarPerfect.com

BW MASSAGE

*AMATEUR MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, spa/showers, 24/7. I travel. 8805772. massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Boise & Nampa studios.

HOME SWEET HOME

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

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BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com

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DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

This 30-year-old residence 1945 S. CREEKSIDE LANE, BOISE is surrounded by tall trees, a $370,000 thick lawn and lush landscap3 bed/2 bath ing, giving it a retreat-like 2,526 square feet feel. Homeowners in the Red Pheasant Realty River Run subdivision are Mary Holden, 208-850-4771 redpheasantrealty.com not permitted to build privacy MLS #98438792 fences, so the use of foliage between homes instead of dog-eared cedar planks makes this .21-acre property and the surrounding houses appear both interconnected and private. A ribbon of clerestory windows pops up from the top of this house to bring light into a narrow loft, the only upper room in the dwelling. The rest of the home’s open floor plan is located at ground level. From the front door, a living room with a vaulted ceiling flows into the formal dining room. The spacious kitchen is hidden just beyond a stand-alone bookcase. From the kitchen sink there are views of unhurried neighborhood traffic. It’s easy to imagine watching morning dog-walkers through the floor-to-ceiling atrium window in the roomy breakfast nook while eating fresh fruit and sipping coffee. In the sizable master bedroom, a white brick fireplace provides ambiance for snuggling, and there is also a door leading to the verdant back yard. The master bathroom has clerestory windows above the vanity mirror to naturally illuminate the bathroom counter where morning beautification rituals take place.

REAL ESTATE - APARTMENTS FOR RENT

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/ Wknds.Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577. Thomas. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. Prof. therapeutic massage only by trained & exp. masseur. New client spec. Robert 484-6251. ULM 340-8377.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - BEAUTY

PROS: Open floor plan in desirable River Run neighborhood. CONS: No fence permitted around yard, limiting pet ownership. —Jennifer Hernandez Open House: Saturday, July 10, 1-3 p.m.

42 | JULY 7–13, 2010 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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| REAL ESTATE

NEED A MASSAGE? If you answered yes to this question then you need to call Michelle at 761-7240 for a massage. I’m a licensed therapist. If you are looking for anything besides a therapeutic massage, please don’t bother calling because you won’t get it here! 1150 W State St., Boise Health & Wellness Chiropractic Center Suite #220. Across the street from the downtown YMCA, behind Subway. Free parking in grg. Swedish and Deep Tissue massage: 30 min./$30, 60 min./$55, 90 min./$80. Packages & gift certificates available. Mon.Sat. 9am-6pm. Same day massages available. I require draping. Cash only.

CAREERS BW HELP WANTED

RAPUNZEL SALON

Now has stations for lease. Great amenities, people and terms. Call 336-5008 for appointments.

BW CAREER INFO.

VIP MASSAGE

Free Foot Bath for Body Detox with 1 hr. foot massage. Treatments for acute and chronic cold hands & feet. Body Massage with special techniques. Pain Relief. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com

BW CAREER EDUCATION

RIGHT SCHOOL, RIGHT DEGREE, RIGHT NOW!

Healthcare, Graphic Arts, Technology, Business & Accounting. Financial Aid is available for qualified students. Day, Evening and online classes start next month. Stevens-Henager College, Boise Branch, 800-716-5645. www.stevenshenager.info

BW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES ALL CASH VENDING! Be the boss of your own local route with 25 new machines and candy for $9,995. Call today 1-800-920-9563. Multivend, LLC. BO#200003.

FOR SALE

WANT TO BUY

ANTIQUES

BW STUFF 9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 888-1464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

TUBBY: 2-month-old black female kitten. Friendly and feisty petite girl. Litterboxtrained. (Cat Colony Room - #10451767)

MAX: 1-year-old male cat. Grooms his coat to sheen and is very soft. Loving, gentle cat. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 77 - #10830177)

KOJAK: 1-year-old male cat. Masculine featured, athletic cat who likes to play with toys. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 50 - #10828857)

RUEGER: 1-year-old purebred male bloodhound. Well mannered and walks well on a leash. (Kennel 304 #10789995)

DAKOTA: 10-month-old purebred male chocolate Lab. Has lots of energy. Does well with other dogs. (Kennel 419 - # 10838856)

POE: 2-month-old male kitten. This kitten melts in your arms and would do great in a busy family with kids. (Kennel 66 - #10567992)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

Hey there, I’m Dylan, the cat of the month. I can be kind of a shy fella but with some patience and love, I can turn into the biggest love bug you’ll ever meet. I enjoy sun-bathing and nibbling on my treats. Won’t you come meet me today?

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JULY 7–13, 2010 | 43

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BW COLLECTIBLES

SERVICES

SERVICES BW CHILD

SARA’S SECONDHAND

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois).

We buy your quality goods & furniture for CASH. Call 331-2366.

COMMUNITY

BW WANT TO BUY

BW HOME

BEE XPRESS CONSIGNMENT STORE

FETCH! PET CARE Dog Walking & Pet Sitting. Locally Owned - Fully Bonded & Insured 208-629-7274. GONE GREEN LAWNCARE All Electric, No Emissions. Services incl. spring cleanup, mowing, trimming & pruning, organic fertilization & weed control. Mention this ad for 15% disc. Call 208861-3017.

We buy brand name & stylish clothing for in store credit or CASH. Brand name jeans for men & women. Specializing in replica handbags, sunglasses & accessories. On the Bench at 116 N. Latah, across from Morris Hill Cemetery. 433-9065.

NYT CROSSWORD | 1 Low-lying land 6 “Dirty rat,” e.g. 10 Moves quickly 15 Take the edge off? 19 Tower city resident 20 Ensure that a G is actually a G, say

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58 Elton John and Paul McCartney 59 Miró Museum architect José Luis ___ 60 Word of greed 61 In ___ (unmoved) 63 What most Mormons do 66 Breaks up 68 Rout 71 Naproxen, commercially 73 Double-breasted winter wear 74 Greatly desires 76 Moran and Gray 78 Think, in olden times 79 Financial aid factor 80 One taking a bow? 82 When the tempest occurs in “The Tempest” 84 Grandson of Adam 87 Bit of video gear, for short 88 Iran 92 When written three times, fraternity in “Revenge of the Nerds” 93 Lets off 95 Hinduism, e.g.: Abbr. 96 Dentist’s request 97 Swedish toast 98 Actress Hatcher and others 99 Large planes have two 101 Attorney general under Reagan 103 Like some investments 106 “___ the picture!” 108 Rose and rose and rose 109 iPhone 113 Word with kilowatt or business 115 Mix 116 “___ no?” 117 Ibid. 122 Certain Scot 123 Cat-tails connector 124 Trident feature 125 Bush with the memoir “Spoken From the Heart” 126 Title girl on the first Beatles album

127 Baja babies 128 Suffix with hip 129 Madrid misses: Abbr.

DOWN 1 Lotion letters 2 What to play Super Mario Galaxy on 3 Communication for the deaf: Abbr. 4 St. Louis airport 5 City near Sherman Oaks 6 Mix 7 Ukrainian city in W.W. I fighting 8 College, across the pond 9 Close again, as a wine bottle 10 Event depicted in “Saving Private Ryan” 11 Drawers in some college dorm rooms? 12 Make wrinkly 13 Crumbs, in “Hansel and Gretel” 14 Makes match up 15 Private greetings? 16 Awestruck 17 Actress Campbell 18 A couple of bucks? 24 Part of Eritrea’s border 29 Christopher of “Back to the Future” 30 Recipient of Jesus’ healing 31 Alfalfa’s sweetie 32 Google or Yahoo! service 33 Icon 35 Area in Queens 38 Earth and moon 40 What a dog might “shake” with 42 Ideal 43 Outline of a sort 44 What the weary get, in a saying 47 Got off 49 Off the bottom, as an anchor 50 Words before “go” 52 South American monkeys

53 Basketry fiber 54 Roadside bomb: Abbr. 57 Competed in a velodrome 60 “Heart of Georgia” 62 Like a mild earthquake, maybe 64 Every other hurricane 65 Fiji competitor 67 Less furnished 68 Surgeon’s tool 69 Sherpa’s tool 70 Al et al. 72 Pen 75 ___-A-Fella Records 77 Pull over 81 Call from home? 83 Therapist’s reply 85 Part of many an action movie 86 In hiding, with “up” 88 English racing town 89 Suffix with pant 90 Half of an old comedy duo 91 Becomes 94 Long Island town where the Wright Brothers experimented L A S T

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97 Ocean dweller with five points 99 Is a polite host to 100 Marsh sights 102 Fable teachings 104 Silky material 105 “Me, Myself & ___,” 2000 Jim Carrey movie 107 “The ___ of Fife had a wife”: Shak. 109 “Spartacus” attire 110 Panache 111 Certain claim 112 Square root of nueve 114 Open hearing, in law 118 Drill part 119 Cause of a bump in the road 120 “… boy ___ girl?” 121 “If I Ruled the World” rapper Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BW MUSICAL SERVICES

MUSIC BW INSTRUCTION

Keyboardist to play original material wanted. Ed 389-9619.

NOTICES

COMMUNITY POSTINGS

BW NOTICES BW FUNDRAISERS GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-2898484. This is not a job offer.

BW LEGAL NOTICES TRANSPORTATION NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE No.: CV NC 1011578. A Petition to change the name of Miguel Navarro, born February 4th, 1996 in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico residing at 5838 N. Applebrook Way, Boise, ID 83713, has been filed in Fourth County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Michael Miguel Navarro, because he has only a first name and wants to have a first and middle name. The child’s father is living. The child’s mother is living. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on August 17, 2010 at the County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name changes. Date: Jun. 15, 2010. By Debra J. Urizar. Deputy Clerk. June 30, July 7, 14 & 21, 2010. NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE Case No.:CV NC 1011073. A Petition to change the name of Jyotismita Ghosh, born 01/23/1994 in Kolkata, WB India residing at 2980 S. Zach Place, Boise, ID 83706, has been filed in Ada County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Johlea Gewhas, because the old name is not a balanced name, but the new name will be a balanced name, it will have a stronger intrinsic quality as mentioned in the balanced report. The child’s father is living. The child’s mother is living. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on August 10, 2010, at the County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name changes. Date: Jun. 07, 2010. By Debra J. Urizar, Deputy Clerk. June 30, July 7, 14 & 21, 2010. NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE Case No.:CV NC 1011071. A Petition to change the name of Bhaswati Guha, born 10/11/1958 in Kolkata, WB India residing at 2980 S. Zach Place, Boise, ID 83706, has been filed in Ada County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Bhasweti Gewhas, because the old name is not a balanced name, but the new name will be a balanced name, it will have a stronger intrinsic quality as mentioned in the balanced name report. The petitioner’s father has died and the names and addresses of his closest blood relatives are: No one is alive. The petitioner’s mother has died and the names and addresses of her closet blood relatives are: No one is alive. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on August 12, 2010, at the County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name changes. Date: Jun. 08, 2010. By D. Price, Deputy Clerk. June 30, July 7, 14 & 21, 2010.

HELP BOISE MENTAL HEALTH All Together Now, a community mental health agency, is in the running to win the Boise Co-Op’s “Shop for Good” day. We are a non-profit serving the most vulnerable in the Treasure Valley. Go to boisecoop.com and vote for us to win! 4% of sales on July 15th will go to the winner. Learn more about us at www.alltogether-now.com

BW CLASSES WATERCOLOR CLASS IN BOISE Watercolor Sketching in Boise with Mark W. McGinnis July 19-23, plein air sketching in Boise parks, foothills, and zoo. $200 class fee, beginning to advanced levels. For more details call 208-921-7189.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Have you added some bulk and stability to your foundation any time recently? Have you grown your roots deeper and asked for more from your traditional sources and recommitted yourself to your primal vows? I hope so, because this is a perfect time, astrologically speaking, to strengthen your link to everything that sustains you. You have a sacred duty to push harder for access to the stuff that builds your emotional intelligence and fuels your long-range plans. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I like the way you’ve been contradicting yourself, Taurus. I appreciate your ability to be inconsistent, paradoxical and upside-down. It has allowed you to wriggle free of the rut you had been stuck in. You’ve stirred the affections of people who had been frustrated about your narrow focus. Yes, it’s true that you have also sown a bit of confusion in a situation that had formerly been clear and concise, and that may have rankled the sticklers. But in my opinion, this is a fertile, healthy confusion that will ultimately lead to an unexpected breakthrough. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “We’re all in ‘sales,’ selling our personalities, our accomplishments, our charms.” That’s a quote from Richard Grossinger’s new book 2013. I share his view of human nature. Is there any interaction between people that doesn’t involve a bit of hustling? The subtext of every encounter includes at least one of the following: 1. “I want you to like me.” 2. “I’m trying to get you to believe I am who I say I am.” 3. “I’d really like you to see how interesting and important and unique I am.” Given the fact that this is a ubiquitous phenomenon, there’s no need to be embarrassed or secretive about it. That’s especially true for you these days. So get out there and sell yourself, Gemini. With brazen innocence and relaxed enjoyment, show the world who you are and why you matter. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Have you ever observed the rising moon with such a steady gaze that you’ve actually seen it move? Have you ever sat yourself down in front of a rose bud during the hour it exploded into full bloom? Those experiences have resemblances to a slow-motion burst of graceful growth that’s unfolding in your own sphere. I hope you have the patience to give it your full attention, because that way it’s more likely to express its potential completely. To enhance your chances of nurturing the subtle magic, remember and ruminate on the images your nightly dreams give you.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I’m not necessarily saying that you have superhuman levels of courage these days, but you do have more than usual. What’s even more important is the fact that you have an exceptional capacity for identifying the fantasies that frighten you and finding fresh and practical ways to deal with them. That’s why I say that you now have an excellent opportunity to achieve a major victory over your fears. To get started on this quest, chant the following 10 times: “I am a crafty, compassionate warrior who finds amusement in every challenge.” VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Mariann, one of my Virgo readers is conducting a research project rooted in two assumptions. The first is an idea of mine: Everyone alive has an inalienable right to a steady supply of fresh omens. The second assumption comes from the writer Angus Stocking: “Always interpret every omen favorably.” With these two ideas as her theses, Mariann is testing the following approach: “Interpret absolutely everything that happens as a favorable omen.” This would be an excellent game for you to play in the coming week, Virgo. Synchronicities are about to rain down upon you. Judging from the astrological configurations, I’d say it really does make sense to regard each as meaningful, useful and invigorating. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): It’s high time to banish the excuses you have for not doing your best. There is no longer any reason to hide from your true calling. You are ready to see that the supposed “obstacles” to your success are actually instrumental to your success—prods that will make you so much smarter and stronger that you cannot be defeated by circumstances. Why is this happening now? It’s because a force working behind the scenes—you can imagine it as God or destiny or karma if you like—is clearing the illusions that have held you in thrall to false ideas about who you are. If I were you, I’d shout “hallelujah!” as I pinch myself in the butt and pat myself on the head. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): For the foreseeable future, it’s fine with God (and with Nature, too) if you put all your eggs in one basket—as long as the basket is well-woven and beautiful. You’ve also got cosmic permission to forget about all but one of the tempting targets—as long as the bull’s-eye you choose is very worthy of your sacred longing. To sum up, Scorpio, be single-mindedly focused almost to the point of manic obsession—as long as you’re reasonably sure that the object of your devotion is your personal version of the Holy Grail.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In the next few weeks, the odds are higher than usual that you’ll inherit an amusement park or a tropical island or a profitable pig farm. There’s also a slight chance that you will win a Dutch lottery, find a diamond ring on the sidewalk, or be picked to star in a new reality TV show, How Would You Use a Gift of $10 Million? But what’s far more likely than any of those possibilities is that you will be able to capitalize on a legacy whose cash value is hard to estimate. Is there any birthright you’ve been neglecting to exploit? Any part of your heritage that may be ready to bring you a boost? CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): So it turns out that the “blemish” is actually essential to the beauty. The “deviation” is at the core of the strength. The “wrong turn” was crucial to you getting you back on the path with heart. I have rarely seen a better example of happy accidents, Capricorn. You may not realize it quite yet—although I hope this horoscope is bringing it all into focus—but you have been the beneficiary of a tricky form of divine intervention. One good way of expressing your gratitude is to share with friends the tale of how you came to see that the imperfections were perfect. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Your anger is potentially a valuable resource. At least in theory, it can be a motivating force that gives you the clarity and stamina you need to make constructive changes. But how can you make sure that your anger serves your generous urges? What should you do to keep it from being just a self-indulgent thrash that leads to no productive action? Here’s one thing you can do: Express your rage very selectively; don’t let it leak all over everything. Here’s another thing: Cultivate loads of empathy, joy and appreciation for beauty. Then when you do unleash your rage, it will be conditioned by love. Now would be an excellent time to try out these ideas. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Have you fallen in omnidirectional love these past few weeks? Are you swooning with such reckless splendor that at times you feel like you’re swimming in midair? By my reckoning, you have an urgent need to be caught up in a vortex of free-form affection. Your receptivity to being tickled and spun around by an almost insane outpouring of libidinous empathy is crucial to your education. If for some reason this has not been the case, please find out what you’ve been doing to obstruct the boisterously tender feelings the cosmos is aching to fill you up with.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 19 Issue 02