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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 18, ISSUE 28 JANUARY 6–12, 2010

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 8

HELP FOR THE NEARLY HOMELESS Funds trickle their way to the needy

FEATURE 9

FICTION 101 Short and sweet

1ST THURSDAY 15

FIRST THURSDAY What’s ahead for 2010 FOOD 24

GRIDDLE ME THIS Good home cookin’ at The Griddle

“... fundamentalist hillbilly teabagging troglodytical swamp-dwelling mugwump ...”

COPE 6

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features/Rec. Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com News Editor: Nathaniel Hoffman Nathaniel@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com Listings: Juliana McLenna calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreaders: Jay Vail, Annabel Armstrong Interns: Andrew Crisp, Kelly McDonald Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Travis Estvold, Jennifer Hernandez, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall ADVERTISING Account Executives: Meshel Miller, Meshel@boiseweekly.com Chelsea Snow, Chelsea@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com, Lindsey Loch, Lindsey@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Mike Flinn, Glenn Landberg, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street, Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2009 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE WELCOME TO BW.2010 At BWHQ this time last year, we were revamping boiseweekly.com, contemplating the great Best of Boise divide and plotting to overthrow our old layout in favor of a new design. So what’s shaping up in the next 12 months of Boise Weekly’s future? Plenty of work, that’s for sure. Every time I glance over the planning calendar outlining my long-term projects this year, I start to break out in a nervous sweat. During the first few months of this year, we’ll embark on a number of firsts in the city guide department and then we’ll reinvent a few that have been around a while. I can’t give away too much just yet, but I’ll leave you with one hint: an annual manual. AKA, your guide to absolutely everything in Boise. This week, we start the year off with Fiction 101, our annual short-short-story contest that’s become one of the most popular things we do at Boise Weekly. Every fall, we ask readers to throw down their most compelling, disgusting, entertaining, brow-raising stories composed of exactly 101 words, and we dig through the deluge of responses for the very best and publish them in the first issue of each year. Sure, we could start off the New Year swinging with some hard-hitting piece of in-depth news in our main feature section or we could start off with a passel of predictions about what the New Year holds in any number of arenas. But starting every year with Fiction 101 is not simply tradition, it’s a way for us to pay an offering to our readers before the next 51 issues. It’s a way for us to turn over pages to those who support us week after week year round. At boiseweekly.com, we’re also starting something new and a little unusual with the start of the new year. Creating and fostering community dialogue is an important part of our mission at Boise Weekly, and one of the most important ways we can accomplish that is by printing letters to the editor and guest opinions. Lately, the paper’s physical page count has been slim and we’ve nixed reader opinions in favor of event coverage. That hasn’t been sitting right with me. You’ll notice an abbreviated Mail section in this week’s pages, but in order to more fully represent readers’ voices at Boise Weekly, we’ll be implementing extensive online publication of letters and guest opinions. Visit “Opinion” at boiseweekly.com. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST SPONSORED BY

BOISE BLUE ART SUPPLY

ARTIST: Alan Stanford TITLE: Winter in Fairfield MEDIUM: Watercolor ARTIST STATEMENT: An exhibit of my paintings featuring Idaho history will be at the Idaho State Historical Museum in Boise’s Julia Davis Park through February. I try to emphasize in my paintings the unique natural and historical elements of every region I have visited in Idaho in the last two years.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 as well as a $25 gift certificate to Boise Blue Art Supply for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. Square formats are preferred and all mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | 3

WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

3

BILL COPE

6

TED RALL

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NEWS Homeless Prevention Fund gets some stimulation

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FEATURE Eighth Annual Fiction 101 9

WANTED: FOOTBALL FANS Idaho resident Kathy Scott made NFL-Monster.com’s finalist cut. Scott, who lives in Hailey, is competing against seven others for the NFL’s “director of fandemonium,” but she needs your votes in order to win. Check out “Ultimate Fan” at boiseweekly.com for details.

DID YOU GET ART FOR CHRISTMAS? Local artist Jany Rae Seda had several prints stolen from the back of her car on Christmas Eve. Seda estimates that the work, which was bound for the Holiday Market Annex on Eighth Street, is worth approximately $1,000. For the full story, see “Thieves Think It’s Better To Steal Than to Receive,” at Cobweb.

LET’S PLAY WAR At Blingo, Bingo Barnes has declared war. In a move that will no doubt irk bookstore employees far and wide, Barnes has called for ever yone to “turn over a magazine or book you are morally opposed to.” Get an explanation (as well as a giggle over the language spat) in “A New Year’s Revolution.”

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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1ST THURSDAY

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SUDOKU

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MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN 2009 in review

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MOVIE TIMES

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FOOD What’s flippin’ at The Griddle in Eagle?

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CLASSIFIEDS

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HOME SWEET HOME

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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MAIL THE GREAT GLOBAL WARMING HOAX We live in strange times. We as citizens are manipulated and taught from a very young age how the government is here to “protect” us, and when something goes wrong, we call out for the government to save us. Whether we’re talking about the senseless corporate bailouts (a giant waste of taxpayer money to reward failing firms for their irresponsible behavior), the complete mishandling of the swine flu vaccine (where shortages were commonplace across America—what if this was a real crisis?), to universal health care (see the swine flu vaccine—do we really want to trust these people with our medical problems?) the government is here to “help” us. So, how will the Obama administration “save” us

from the mega-disaster flying at us, global warming? Cap and trade policies to ruin important industries and destroy thousands of jobs? Check. The reduction of freedom by forcing 1 million hybrid cars on the road by 2015? Check. Having scientists manipulate data to make it look like the Earth is on an unsustainable path of destruction? We eat it up. Thankfully, light has been shed on these scientific inaccuracies. These scientists consider criminally deleting their findings (against Freedom of Information Act guidelines), and one even points out: “The fact is we can’t account for the lack of warming at the moment and it’s a travesty we can’t.” They see that the Earth was actually much warmer from 800-1300 A.D., what is known as the Medieval Warming Period.

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message.

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It’s a shame for them that they can’t blame any sort of industrialization for this period. The truth is that this is all a hoax. A hoax designed to steal from taxpayers and destroy industries we are reliant upon. “The more corrupt the state, the more it legislates.” —Tacitus —Colin Slaughter, College of Idaho student, Caldwell

PUBLIC TRANS: USE A SEMI-TRAIN/ BUS Transportation thought: If semis can haul two or three trailers down the freeway (e.g., Fed Ex), why not set them up to haul specially designed passenger trailers during the morning and evening rush? Run this service between designated freeway access points, and let shuttle/ bus services emerge to get folks from those points to points near their ultimate destinations. Do this until the powers that be get it together at last to fund the construction of a light-rail system through the valley. —Nick Murray, Caldwell

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OPINION/BILL COPE

THE FLUTTER: ISSUE FIVE Another SFMPB Newsletter

LISTEN LOCALLY. THINK GLOBALLY. 6 | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | BOISEweekly

What?! you gasp. Cope has the gall to hand us back-to-back Flutters!? Yeah! That’s right! That’s what I’m doing! And excuse me all to hell if you think two Society For Making People Better newsletters in two weeks is too much. But for those of us who remain eternally committed to SFMPB principles, there is no such thing as over-doing our dedication to making this species something to be proud of. And I can’t think of a better way to end one year and start the next than with a double dose of that dedication. Besides, after our SFMPB comptroller— which is me—did a quick audit of the books to see where all the SFMPB money went during 2009, I discovered that our SFMPB communications officer—which is me, also— managed to get out only two newsletters during the whole of last year. As SFMPB grand marshal, I was stunned. Shocked, I should say. Flabbergasted that our communications officer could have been so negligent. “What happened to all of those suggestions I passed on to you?” I demand. “There were at least enough ideas for a new newsletter every month.” “Beats me,” I shrug. “I guess we put ’em in our regular column. If y’d a wanted ’em used for The Flutter, ya’ should o’ said something.” I tell you, sometimes I don’t know why I put up with myself. U Moving on. There is yet another reason I’ve decided this subsequent newsletter is in order. In last week’s Flutter, I had every intention of telling you the latest developments in SFMPB affairs, but I got so caught up in the matter of Charles Darwin that I used up all the available space. I don’t regret it. Gracious, a man’s 200th birthday comes around only once every … er, once … and I am more than happy to set aside our organization’s interests for however long it takes to properly honor such an eminent fellow. But the SFMPB never stands still. Though it may occasionally appear that the lights are off at SFMPB Headquarters and the phones have been disconnected and the whole outfit looks like it’s been foreclosed on, rest assured, I have not been idle. Over the course of the last year or so, I have been hard at it—“it” being the formulation of a new rule—and shortly, you will know the results. (It will be No. 11 in the Revised SFMPB Rule Book, as soon as I get around to revising the Unrevised SFMPB Rule Book, and I warn you, she’s a doozy.) As longtime members know, I have always maintained that the rules of the Society For Making People Better should be of an organic nature, growing without artificiality or contrivance from the rich soil of our experience, the cooling water of our logic, and the nurturing sunlight of our hopes and dreams. And it is precisely in this manner that our newest rule has evolved. Our experience tells us that for

every impulse, there is a counter-impulse; for every thought, an opposite thoughtlessness; that happiness will always be matched in the final tally by an equal measure of misery; that for every dream achieved, another is lost; that one man’s most noble hope is another’s most ignoble fear. Light, dark; yin, yang; for every action, a reaction—that is a science even the most crazed fundamentalist hillbilly teabagging troglodytical swamp-dwelling mugwump can not sneeze at—ergo, our logic leads us to the inescapable conclusion: As we have undeniable proof there is such a thing as the Society For Making People Better (or why would I be, as we speak, putting together a SFMPB newsletter), there absolutely has to be a Society For Making People Worse. U There’s no way around it. It is basic physics. And it explains a great deal, does it not? There are so many industries and sectors and cultural phenomenon-hawkers that rely on people behaving selfishly, violently, ignorantly, childishly, oafishly and/or stupidly that it’s only reasonable to assume there exists an organized effort to promote such behavior. And what, pray tell, was the year 2009 if not irrefutable evidence that there are people committed to moving Humanity forward, and there are people equally committed to making certain that Humanity moves, if at all, backwards. Now before some of my liberal friends rush to the easy conclusion that this SFMPW I speak of must have disguised itself as one or more of many obvious suspects—e.g., the modern Republican Party or the Fox News organization—think again. Have you seen anything evident in the modern Republican Party or the Fox News organization that would indicate the level of intelligence it would take to conceive of and implement such an insidious and broad conspiracy? No, the Republicans, the Foxies, the teabaggers, Joe Lieberman ... they are mere functionaries in the SFMPW grand scheme, just as we in the SFMPB use teachers, doctors, artists, kind people, thoughtful people and educated people to further our agenda. I suspect we may never discover the ultimate power behind the SFMPW and, indeed, there may not be one. It only makes sense to me—in the purest Newtonian sense—that if our dear SFMPB is held together by our common vision of life and love and fulfillment, then the SFMPW must be driven by a mindless instinct for emptiness, chaos and death. In closing, I present you with Rule 11—and we can only pray that it is not too late for President Barack Obama to take heed: Never try to embrace a member of the Society For Making People Worse. As when matter collides with anti-matter, it is inevitable you will both explode. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

TED RALL/OPINION

THE FEAR DECADE

Since 9/11, we’ve embraced our inner coward NEW YORK—Once, we Americas did brave things: We crossed the English Channel, knowing that most of us would die on the beach in Normandy. We sat at the lunch counter in the Deep South, waiting for white goons to beat us up. We also did brave things that were stupid: When the president sent us to Vietnam, some of us went, risking death. Others went to Canada, sacriďŹ cing everything for principle. We bungee jumped. We tried New Coke. Bravery can be dumb. But it’s still brave. Then came 9/11/01. It was the deďŹ ning event of the decade, a ďŹ n-de-siecle moment for a previously proud nation’s once glorious history. The Fear Decade had begun. Bin Laden wanted the destruction of the World Trade Center to smack oblivious Americans upside their collective heads, to draw their attention to their nation’s toxic foreign policy, maybe to demand the United States stop propping up dictators. It didn’t work. Rather than reassessing the government’s behavior, Americans got angry. Anger comes from fear, and fear makes you do stupid things. Fear of attacks, of Muslims, of anyone wearing a turban. Governments act stupid and mean. That’s normal. What the Fear Decade made different was us. It made us let the government do whatever it wanted. I watched a legless vet, humiliated and detained by a TSA agent as he repeatedly explained why the metal detector kept going off: His body was full of titanium, courtesy of the Iraqi insurgency. I watched. So did other passengers. We said nothing. We were afraid. Not just at the airport. We were afraid at work. Unions were deader than dead, the government was in the hands of gangster

capitalists, and the economy started tanking the instant Bill Clinton began packing his bags. We were overleveraged, maxed out and one paycheck away from losing everything. National Guardskids, all of 20 years old and decked out in their best Kevlar, brandishing automatic weapons taller than they are at women and children as they came out of commuter rail stations. Annoying, sure, but what if something happened? We heard that the government was listening to our phone calls and reading our e-mail, but instead of summoning up outrage at this brazen and illegal violation of privacy, we took cold comfort in that hoary chestnut: “If you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear.� But we were afraid. We still are. Then we elected Barack Obama. We didn’t vote for him because he was accomplished. He wasn’t. Or because we liked his ideas. He hardly had any. We voted for him because he seemed so calm. But he was afraid, too. More than that, he wanted us to keep being scared of the same exact stuff George W. Bush had us so frightened of! Lions and tigers and Muslims, oh my! The Taliban and al-Qaida in Afghanistan, even though the Pentagon said there were fewer than 100 al-Qaida guys in the whole country! Iraq, still, although he couldn’t quite explain why, and the bad guys who didn’t do anything wrong at Guantanamo, just in case. Now it’s all fear, all the time. Fear of diseases (H1N1). Fear of evil banks. We were arrogant once, loud and silly and funny and crazy as hell, and we were Americans. Now we’re timid and pissy, and I don’t recognize, much less like, what we’ve become.



                     



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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | 7

CITYDESK/NEWS IDAHO HANGING BY A THREAD

—Nathaniel Hoffman

8 | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | BOISEweekly

NEWS

STAYING HOME

Boise releases some rental assistance funds NATHANIEL HOFFMAN On Jan. 4, James M. Jones gathered up his files, including a green New Year’s Day eviction notice from the Ada County Sheriff’s Office, and headed to the El-Ada Community Action Partnership offices on Vista Avenue.

Attorneys with Idaho Legal Aid have criticized the delayed rollout of Boise’s homelessness prevention funds, less than half of which have now been released. “Everybody involved has known about NATHANIEL HOFFMAN

Idaho is on the cusp of another political season with the legislative session beginning Monday, Jan. 11, followed by a primary election in May and general election in November. And that means the time for prophesying is nigh. Just ask gubernatorial candidate Rex Rammell, who feels ordained by a Latter-Day Saint prophesy to save the U.S. Constitution. “We are in America’s second Revolutionary War to save our freedom, which we paid for with blood. We need God’s help and I am not ashamed to ask for it!” Rammell declares. Though the Mormon Church has distanced itself from Rammell’s campaign, the large animal veterinarian is meeting with LDS elders to share his interpretation of a former church president’s interpretation of a statement attributed to Joseph Smith. We can help him with one thing, though. The Constitution is housed at the National Archives, 700 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. Go save it, Rex, but don’t sneeze. Another thing not to sneeze at: the debt ceiling. As the U.S. Senate passed a historic but subpar health insurance reform bill, Idaho Sens. Mike Crapo and Jim Risch scoffed at the way this legislation raises the debt ceiling. “It is time the federal government learns from the states and balances its budget instead of placing an ever-growing burden on the backs of future generations. There is a growing sense of fear and anger among Americans,” Risch stated. Crapo, for his part, did not resort to threats: “My hope is that 2010 will bring better cooperation, wiser decisions and policies that restore fiscal responsibility,” Crapo wrote. Even Idaho Gov. C. L. “Butch” Otter jumped on the insurance bandwagon. “I question the wisdom as well as the constitutionality and legality of these bills and will explore all my options, including legal action, to protect Idaho and the U.S. Constitution should Congress adopt and the president sign compromise health care legislation,” Otter wrote. But they were not the only ones decrying the health reform effort. Reformers at the single-payer advocacy group Physicians for a National Health Program wrote to Congress as well: “We have concluded that the Senate bill’s passage would bring more harm than good,” the group said in a statement signed by its president, Dr. Oliver Fein, and two cofounders, Drs. David Himmelstein and Steffie Woolhandler. “We ask that you defeat the bill currently under debate, and immediately move to consider the single-payer approach— an expanded and improved Medicare-for-All program—which prioritizes the advancement of our nation’s health over the enhancement of private, profit-seeking interests.” So we reiterate: don’t sneeze. Over at citydesk, we will ring in the new year with a live blog of Otter’s State of the State speech, starting just before 1 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 11. We promise it will be both informative and entertaining. And we will have more news for you in 2010, more often and in more digitally enhanced ways.

James M. Jones, of Boise, displays his New Year’s Day eviction notice as he waits to apply for stimulusfunded homelessness prevention rental assistance.

Because he was evicted on a federal holiday, Jones got a few extra days at home—a house that had been in his family since 1961. After his mother died, Jones lost the house, though he’s managed to remain there, fighting the new owners—an out-of-state pension fund—through personal bankruptcies and court battles over prior evictions. This time, Jones cobbled together some back payments from an estranged brother and settled with the landlord, but the settlement will not last long. “I’m looking for a way to stay in the house,” Jones said. Jones was at El-Ada to apply for rental assistance on the first day the City of Boise released its Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program, or HPRP, funds. Part of the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced the HPRP requirements last March and handed down $1.5 billion to the states in September. By October, every region of Idaho except Ada County had started distributing rental and utility assistance, according to the Idaho Housing and Finance Association, which manages the bulk of Idaho’s grants.

it for a long time,” said Ritchie Eppink, an attorney with Idaho Legal Aid Services Inc. who represents people at risk of losing their housing. “We’ve been asking them for this money and other money as well.” The City of Boise received $533,000 in HPRP funds directly from the stimulus act. The Boise City/Ada County Housing Authority and El-Ada are now providing that money to people at risk of becoming homeless or who have recently become homeless. But another $730,000 slated for Boise is being held up at the Idaho Housing and Finance Association because the guidelines prevent grants directly to housing authorities that are non-governmental and for profit, as Boise’s housing authority is. Housing providers acknowledge the delay but place the blame on the feds for writing complicated rules for the HPRP money and tracking the grants more vigilantly. “It’s really trying to figure out how to set up a program in a hurry that doesn’t come back and bite you,” said Deanna Watson, executive director at the Boise and Ada County housing authorities. The agency was unsure if it would be part of the HPRP program until late in December. On Monday, representatives of the

housing authority and El-Ada worked through dozens of applicants ranging from Jones, a trained attorney who has been disabled since 1979, to out-of-work secretaries and construction workers and groups of refugees whose resettlement benefits have run out and who remain housed because of the generosity of several Boise landlords. But the first wave of the HPRP funds in Boise will only help 30 to 60 families, said Dalynn Kuster, El-Ada program manager. “The money is going to run out way before we have everybody served,” she said. Janet Lovell-Smith, grants manager for the IHFA, said that the demand for the funds has been high across the state. In the Pocatello region, providers got five to six times the normal requests for rental assistance in November and December. But Eppink said $533,000 should go further than 30 to 60 families and that the IHFA funds should be released immediately as well. Eppink and Legal Aid attorney Zoe Ann Olson helped their clients get HPRP interviews on Monday and raised concerns about some of the questions being asked. The city and housing authorities consider HPRP funds to have a special threshold in that they are targeted to people who have a good chance of getting back on their feet in the near future. “This program in general is for those households that are in imminent risk of eviction or for those who have recently lost their housing and are currently homeless and have a high probability of achieving rent stability,” said Jim Birdsall, manager of Boise’s Housing and Community Development Department. But Eppink argues that the way the standard is being interpreted—the requirement for moderate barriers to rent stability—is too subjective and could be used to screen out certain poor people from receiving the funds. “‘Moderate barriers’ is a way of reading a worthy-poor requirement into the program,” Eppink said, allowing the city to deny funds to deadbeats or the disabled, for example. The city, housing services and Legal Aid have met many times to discuss the program in recent months, but even as it rolled out, Kuster acknowledged that all the kinks had not been worked out. It was unclear how long it would take to make payments once people were approved, she said. Jones heard about the program from a neighbor and got one of the first appointments. So did Chacho Ramirez, who has done construction work for 25 years but was laid off a few months ago and whose rent and $300 electricity bill were coming due. “These guys don’t wait for you,” Ramirez said. “You don’t got the money, you’re out.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

B O I S E W E E K LY ’ S 8 T H A N N U A L

4WQbW]\ 2009 Judges

J

ust 101 words, that’s it, to tell a story that captures the imagination and impresses a distinguished panel of judges. Whether it’s delving into the depths of human emotion or tickling our communal funny bones, writers from across the valley do it every year as part of the annual Boise Weekly Fiction 101 contest. In its eighth year, the contest has again produced a remarkable collection of prose—one that thoroughly astonished our judges with its creativity, talent and vision. Winnowing down the 149 entries into this winning group was no small feat. To our readers: Enjoy. To our winners: Congratulations.

LAURA DELANEY, owner of Rediscovered Bookshop MICHAEL FAISON, executive director of the Idaho Commission on the Arts TOM PEELE, associate professor of English at Boise State BRADY UDALL, author and assistant professor of English at Boise State MITCH WIELAND, editor of The Idaho Review and professor of English at Boise State

—Deanna Darr

LINDSEY LOCH

First Place, $500 | Luke Felt, Boise

BVSAeSZZa The beach was biting cold, but our mom wore a twopiece and swore it was a vacation. I wrestled Andy into the ocean. We toppled in waves, nostrils stinging with salt. Mom lit cigarettes, hugged her arms. “Looks like rain,â€? she said. Clouds smeared like charcoal behind her, Mom’s bikini bright neon against them. A man noticed, too. He waved, ashing his tan-line wedding ring. Mom blew smoke and smiled. Andy and I gasped on the sand. We watched the swells heave like our chests, like the ocean catching its breath. We locked hands, determined to wait out the coming storm.

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | 9

LINDS EY LOC H

Second Place, $300 | Adrian Kien, Boise

3OUZS7ROV] The horses bucked and farted in the early morning. They trotted the fence line as guardians to their own blood. When I pulled up the barbed wire to squeeze in amongst them, I was scared. Their mad, incomprehensible whinnies. My coffee can of oats called—Come to me. Let me pet your muzzle, touch your wildness and believe that this ďŹ eld, this morning is Kingdom Come. But the grass rolled away and they scattered. Suddenly, a man shouted from the barn, “Get the hell off my property.â€? I forgot to mention that—the barn and the little house surrounded by cottonwoods.

LINDSEY LOCH

Th i r d P l a c e , $ 2 0 0 | G r e g L i k i n s , N a m p a

:]ab1]\\SQbW]\ I’m boiling noodles when Christa calls. In the background I hear metal clanking, men hufďŹ ng and grunting. “I’m staying late at the gym,â€? Christa says. “Eat without me.â€? I tried the gym; we used to meet after work and discuss our days, lounging side by side on recumbent bikes. But Christa needed something more exhilarating—she straddled the elliptical trainer one night, pumped dumbbells the next. I couldn’t keep up. At home now, an apron cinches my gut. “Lasagna tonight,â€? I say. “I was hoping ...â€? “Listen, Kyle. I’m spotting my new partner. I’ve gotta run.â€? “Partner?â€? I ask the dead connection.

Honorable Mention, $75 Dene Breakfield, Boise

Cat Fa n cy

10 | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | BOISEweekly

When Mom pulled something big and white out of the gold foil gift bag, we knew she hadn’t scattered Malcolm’s ashes in the woods behind the veterinary clinic like she promised. “You stuffed him?� “Sick!� Unconcerned with family opinion, she planted kisses between the cat’s stiff ears and looked for just the right place to display him. “Purrrrfect,� she giggled, pushing aside our photos to make room for Malcolm atop the TV stand. “Malcolm says it’s time to see what Santa brought you,� Beaming, she turned to face her audience, oblivious to the tuffs of white fur stuck to her lip.

H o n o r a b l e M e n t i o n , $ 7 5 | A n n a Ro sa , B o i s e

Solve: f(life) in terms of x I’m working hard in Calculus this year because the formulas are rigid and permanent, because deďŹ ning my life with X’s and Y’s is easier than ďŹ lling up journals with my varying emotions. The formula to ďŹ x this love-tag—we’re loving each other at the wrong times—is hyperbolas. We need symmetry, mirroring each other. We’re sin(x) and cos(x) graphs, just âˆ? off. We can go to the Math Assistance Center. It’s on Mondays and Thursdays, and on Tuesdays Mrs. Totorica comes. She can make us parallel, similar, proportional or rational. No asymptotes to limit us, we grow for ever: positive inďŹ nity. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

Judges’ Picks Judge: Laura DeLaney $50 Rick Just, Boise

Th e B a n

He didn’t speak up when it was just rap. Who would? When they outlawed jingles a part of him wished them more power. He ignored protest placards with carefully counted syllables in fussy iambic pentameter. It had nothing to do with him. The war on words expanded to metaphor and simile. Alliteration was next to go, though a chance repetition of initial sounds was a mere misdemeanor at ďŹ rst. Scofaws wrote limericks, begging for capital punishment. His transgression was an accidentally acrostic grocery list. When they dragged him away he was yelling, “There is no crime if it does not rhyme!â€?

It was a cold hand that squeezed my nose. A large hand, it smelled of recently cut garlic, cilantro and raw chicken. The other hand pressed ďŹ rmly on my shoulders. To show my acquiescence, I stood very still, then sat straight and true. The hands released me. Looking up into a red face, I allowed my tail to thump three times on the pavement with nary a glance at the bones I’d just liberated from their plastic shroud. “Them’ll kill ya, boy.â€? A boot larger than the hand swung at my ribs. I dodged and trotted away without a backward glance.

J u d g e : To m P e e l e $50 Sa rah Barbe r, B oi se

Metaphors

Judge: Mitch Wieland $50 Matt Larkin, Eagle

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Untitled

Uncertain of my own prospects, it seemed ironic that my 64-year-old father was dead-bolting his future by remarrying tomorrow. Retail therapy with my mom added to my special brand of interpersonal chaos. Standing under deceptive uorescent lighting in Macy’s, I ďŹ ngered a sheer frock, wondering whether it was too risque for Dad’s wedding. “Great piece!â€? opined a gum-chewing saleswoman unconvincingly. “Think about where you’re going,â€? Mom warned, eyebrows raised. “Where ARE you going?â€? Gum-chewer, now interested. I hesitated. Then, with startling honesty, “I don’t know.â€? For the ďŹ rst time, it felt profound, freeing. Gum-chewer’s face alit, “Like a surprise vacation?â€?

“How is it that a Toad can speak?â€? demanded the Judge. The courtroom became silent, the witnesses straining to hear the Toad. “It is the Will of God,â€? he croaked. “And what does a Toad know of the Will of God?â€? “Only this: It was the Will of God that little boys should kill my beloved with a ďŹ recracker jammed down her throat and that I should speak of the boundless cruelty of humans.â€? For heresy the Toad was executed by a ďŹ ring squad of B-B guns, his body tossed into the creek as the dinner bell rang in the distance.

Breakdowns

Ju d g e : M i c h a e l Fa i s o n $50 E l l e n C r o s b y, B o i s e

Jud ge: Brady U dall $50 Mark Peris o n, Bo is e

Tr i a l

“Well ... what do ya think? Can we ďŹ x it?â€? Jack asked, hands in his pockets, awkwardly pawing the dirt with his clumsy work boot. “Damn belt ...â€? his father grumbled to himself, pulling his head out of under the hood. Without the rumble of the engine and the scenery in constant motion, the old truck was useless. It was words or silence. Eventually his father spoke up. “Better start walkin’,â€? he said as he turned south, his heavy boots ďŹ lling the dead air with the sound of crunching gravel. “I’ll stay with the truck,â€? Jack offered, but his father was already gone.

&'PSU4U #PJTFtCPJTFMJUUMFUIFBUFSPSHt Tickets: $11 general, $9 seniors and students BOISEweekly | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | 11

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events JAM ES PER OU

WEDNESDAY JAN. 6 lit CAXTON PRESS LECTURE If you caught December’s feature on self-publishing, you know the road to getting your thoughts printed, bound and stacked neatly on bookstore shelves is a mighty treacherous one. Luckily, the Boise Nonfiction Writer’s group has got your back. This assemblage of aspiring and accomplished Idaho writers meets once a month to schmooze and listen to speakers from the industry. This month’s speaker is Teresa Sales from the long-running Caldwell-based publisher Caxton Press. Founded in 1925, Caxton Press has published thousands of Western Americana nonfiction books, including Boise gallery-owner Mark Lisk’s Owyhee Canyonlands and Doug Copsey’s With Our Good Will: 30 Years of Shakespeare in Idaho. On Wednesday, Jan. 6, from 6:30-8 p.m., head over to Rediscovered Bookshop on Overland Road to hear about the ins and outs of submitting your frontier history or Western-themed nonfiction masterpiece to Caxton Press. While Caxton publishes historical fiction on occasion, they poo poo publishing poetry and specifically request that authors avoid topics like: “Growing up on the farm, in the mountains, in the city, etc. Or ‘My family history.’” They also shy away from publishing self-improvement books, textbooks or books with religious themes. If your next great Western American nonfiction novel doesn’t fall into any of the aforementioned categories, then you should undoubtedly follow the road to Rediscovered this Wednesday. 6:30-8 p.m., FREE, Rediscovered Bookshop, 7079 Overland Road, 208-3764229, rdbooks.org. For more information on the Boise Nonfiction Writer’s group, visit sageecosci.com/Writers.html.

Something smells fishy. Eat your Hart out.

FRIDAY JAN. 8

SATURDAY-SUNDAY JAN. 9-10

skanking REEL BIG FISH In the ’90s, ska once again gave trenchant teens a new outlet. The melodic, horn-accompanied sound and straightfrom-their-angry-little-hearts lyrics allowed teens to sing and skank away their angst. California’s Reel Big Fish were a huge part of the third-wave ska scene, and two decades later, like so many other punk and ska bands, they have stood the test of time. Though probably best known for “Sell Out,” the 1997 single that led them to mainstream success, they also do covers of songs that are so lively, unexpected and funny, they’re often as memorable as the originals. As soon as AHa’s “Take On Me,” Lita Ford’s “Kiss Me Deadly” and Duran Duran’s “Hungry Like the Wolf” received the RBF treatment, they took on a whole new horn-happy, up-tempo life. On their latest album release, 2009’s Fame, Fortune and Fornication, Reel Big Fish do what has become their specialty and play homage to a surprising array of musicians, including Poison (“Nothin’ But a Good Time”), John Mellencamp (“Authority Song”), Van Morrison (“Brown Eyed Girl”) and The Eagles (“The Long Run”). Not to mention, a nod to the second-wave ska fathers, The English Beat (“Twist and Crawl”). Reel Big Fish swim into Boise on Friday, Jan. 8, bringing with them fellow Califor-ska-nians Suburban Legends and a new band from Nevada, One Pin Short. 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show, $12.50-$35. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., boknittingfactory.com.

SATURDAY JAN. 9 ink HENNA TATS 101 Every parent dreads the day when their little

12 | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Sebastian or Mikayla comes home with a sloppily executed barbed-wire or butterfly tattoo. It seems that no matter how many times you school them on the importance of selecting a non-cliche tat and booking a quality artist, they just never pay attention.

wtf THE WEDDING SINGER The Hollywood movie-to-Broadway musical trajectory is common enough—think John Waters’ campy 1980s film Hairspray (and the subsequent 2007 remake) or Mel Brooks’ slapstick 1968 movie The Producers (and the subsequent 2005 remake). Sadly, the Adam Sandler movie-to-musical path went unexplored for far too long. For years, audiences were deprived of golf club-wielding dance numbers culminating in a chorus of “The price is wrong, bitch” or Bobby Boucher’s Bayou antics on the big stage. Fortunately, in 2006 the Wedding Singer made its Broadway debut and satisfied everyone’s singing-Sandler needs. The musical, full of feathered ’80s hair and poppy new wave ballads, follows cheesy New Jersey rocker Robbie Hart as he is left at the altar by his fiancee and proceeds to sabotage every wedding he performs at. But when Hart meets a sweet, encouraging waitress named Julia who is engaged to a slick-haired Wall Street stud, he cranks up his dopey charm to get the girl. This classic, ditch-your-sucky-fiancee-and-get-with-your-true-love story is topped off with a rapping grandma, a bar mitzvah and an impromptu flight to Vegas. On Saturday, Jan. 9, and Sunday, Jan. 10, you can catch all this wackiness live at the Fred Meyer Broadway in Boise premiere of the Wedding Singer musical at the Morrison Center. But you might have to wait a few more years for Happy Gilmore the musical. Saturday, Jan. 9, 8 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 10, 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m., $25-$46, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1609, newspaceentertainment.com/boise.

Well, cool parents, listen up. The Sun Valley Center for the Arts in Hailey wants to help prepare your little ones for a lifetime of inking. On Saturday, Jan. 9, from 10 a.m.-1 p.m., the center is offering a class on the art and history of henna tattoo led by Sonali Shivdasani. The class will go over the traditional art of Indian mehndi, paying particular attention to things like tattoo safety, mixing and application techniques, color, longev-

ity and henna aftercare. Though henna tattoos are temporary—lasting one to three weeks—and made from a plant-based colorant, they are a great way for your teens to map out their future full-arm sleeve. (That way they can go under the gun the day they turn 18.) Or, in the unfortunate event that your little one’s mediumscale pot operation is busted while they’re taking fiber arts classes at the University of Oregon, they will have the

prison tat skills necessary to get them through their six months behind bars. This workshop is part of the center’s Outside In: Indian Art Abroad multi-disciplinary exhibit, which also features a Bollywood movie showing and a lecture by author Salman Rushdie. 10 a.m.-1 p.m., $10 pre-registration required, Sun Valley Center for the Arts in Hailey, 314 Second Ave. S., 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org/arts. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FIND BIG BELLY SOLAR COMPACTOR

Welcome back, Otter.

MONDAY JAN. 11 gov’ment STATING THE OBVIOUS Hey, have you heard? There’s like, record unemployment, people don’t pay taxes anymore, and the gov’ment is too big and does stuff like test our drinking water, sometimes, or pay hospital bills for homeless people. But that’s why we have political leaders like Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter, who, each year, sets the tone for Idaho’s lawmakers as they arrive in Boise for the annual legislative session with his PowerPoint-assisted State of the State speech. It’s always an event, but this year it will be extra special because it’s back in the renovated Idaho State Capitol building. (You may recall that Butch complained about the cost of the renovation in his first State of the State and tried, unsuccessfully, to kill the project.) In the speech, the governor tells legislators and the public what his plans are for the coming year. Last year, he planned a big overhaul of road funding and liquor laws, neither of which happened. His plans this time around are top secret until hours before the big speech, so stay tuned. If you are not an out-of-work National Guardsman widower or homebuilder invited to sit in the VIP galleries and wait for your shout-out from the guv, you can always watch the speech at idahoptv.org or follow our live blog at citydesk.boiseweekly.com. 1 p.m. FREE, Idaho Capitol, House of Representatives chamber. Limited seating in public gallery.

MONDAY JAN. 11 music TICKLING THE BLACK AND WHITES AT THE GREEN AND GOLD It may not be the best name for a jazz combo group, but since pianist Paul Tillotson founded the group back when both he and MTV were still young, the name for the Borah High School choir’s instrumental jazz combo has stuck: The

S U B M I T

Borah Squids. Though he now lives in New York, Tillotson returns to Boise each year not only to visit family and play a week of high-energy shows at Lock, Stock and Barrel, but also to visit his alma mater. On Monday, Jan. 11, Tillotson will share the Borah High auditorium stage with his beloved Squids—a jazz combo made up of some of the best per formers in Borah’s music program—as well as the Borah Jazz Band, the Borah Jazz Orchestra and Contemporar y Directions Vocal

See you later, crater.

TUESDAY JAN. 12 space MOON OVER CALDWELL The Whittenberger Planetarium on the College of Idaho campus is getting prepped to show sky-gazers the dark side of the moon. And, no, we’re not talking about a laser light spectacular fueled by pot brownies. On Tuesday, Jan. 12, at 7:30 p.m., planetarium staff will display moon images that span the last 50 years—including the first photo taken of the back-side of the moon. (Remember that time the moon sat on the photocopier?) In addition, the show will examine the phases of the moon, sleuth out planets in the January night sky and explore winter constellations. All this moon-swooning will only set you back $2 for future astronauts ages 5-18, or $4 for adults. You can find the planetarium in the Boone Science Building near Jewett Auditorium on the corner of 20th Avenue and Fillmore Street in Caldwell. But make sure to call ahead—space in fauxspace is limited, so reservations are required. 7:30 p.m., $4 adults, $2 kids 5-18, The Whittenberger Planetarium, College of Idaho, 2112 Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208-459-5011, collegeofidaho.edu.

Ensemble, an after-school choir run by students. This event is free to attend, so you can take the visiting in-laws along and it won’t cost a thing. You’ll hear one of the best jazz pianists working either side of the Mississippi, and donations are accepted at the door, all of which will go toward the Paul Tillotson Scholarship, also an

Chances are you got some green gifts for the holidays. When you are done with those consumer items, you could put them in the Big Belly Solar Compactor at the corner of Eighth and Bannock streets and feel really good about it. Boise’s only Big Belly—a demo model of the revolutionary new solar-powered trash compactors that are changing the way cities deal with public refuse—has a few really cool features. Thanks to a little solar panel and motor, the black box crushes its garbage about once a day, freeing up downtown crews from checking it all of the time. By crushing trash en situ—Big Belly’s belly fits four or five times as much garbage as a regular public receptacle—you save room in garbage trucks, which saves fuel, which saves money, er, the planet. Philly, which put 500 Big Bellies in its downtown in 2009, expects to save $13 million in trash collection during the next decade. The vessels even notify crews when they are full via a little wireless signal. Boise’s Big Belly could do that too, but since it’s a demo, it isn’t yet broadcasting its fullness. Geoff Hundt of the Downtown Boise Association likes the idea, but thinks it may fit the Greenbelt better, so that remote cans could be more self-sufficient. “Downtown generates quite a bit of trash, but not as much as something like a Disneyland or a football stadium,” Hundt said. Rod McDowell, owner of West-Pak, the Idaho distributor for Big Belly, names one other benefit: Big Belly has a lid, so it doesn’t smell. —Nathaniel Hoffman

annual event. Each year, one Borah High music student is selected by Tillotson from among a group of applicants and awarded a $1,000 scholarship. 7 p.m., FREE, donations accepted. Borah High School Auditorium, 6001 Cassia St., 208-854-4370, borah. schoolfusion.us. For more information, e-mail borahboosters@hotmail.com.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | 13

8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JAN. 6 Food & Drink JULIA CHILD’S COQ AU VIN— Join Julia for a peek at her “rooster in red wine” delicacy. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $40 members, $50 nonmembers, 208-4724500. Boise Co-op, 888 W. Fort St., Boise.

Literature BOISE NONFICTION WRITERS, SPEAKER SERIES—See Picks, Page 12. Teresa Sales from Caxton Press will host a presentation on self-publishing, followed by a question-and-answer forum. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 7079 Overland Road, Boise, 208-376-4229, www. rediscoveredbookshop.com.

Kids & Teens BROADWAY SPLASH—A class designed for children ages 6-9 in which students will interpret and act out a scene from a well-known Broadway play. Kids will incorporate drama, music and dance. 4:15 p.m. Register through the YMCA at 208-3445501 or www.ymcaboise.org. YMCA, 1050 W. State St., Boise, www.ymcaboise.org.

THURSDAY JAN. 7 Literature BRIAN HART—Author Brian Hart discusses his new book Then Came the Evening, in which he narrates the struggles of a family trying to find solace after their father has been sentenced to 18 years in prison. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 7079 Overland Road, Boise, 208-3764229, www.rediscoveredbookshop.com.

his/her awareness through the power of storytelling. 6:30-9 p.m. $15-$35, sliding scale. No one will be turned away for lack of funds. www.jamesodea.com. ICAN Center, 3450 Hill Road, Boise, 208-385-9146.

Odds & Ends AUCTIONEERS COMPETITION— Auctioneers and bid spotters from across the state will gather to compete for their respective 2010 titles. They’ll be serving up a spaghetti dinner to support Boy Scouts of America Troupe No. 62. 6 p.m. FREE, $5 dinner. Dealers Auto Auction, 3323 Port St., Nampa, 208-463-8250, www.daaofidaho.com.

SATURDAY JAN. 9 Festivals & Events DRUMBEAT FOR PEACE IN SUDAN—Boise is participating in a world-wide event aimed to promote peace in Sudan. Bring a drum or any other percussion instrument to participate in the circle. Also featuring two Darfuri speakers following the music. 7 p.m. FREE. Anne Frank Memorial, 770 S. Eighth St., Boise.

Concerts SOUNDS LIKE FUN—Boise Philharmonic presents a series of concerts designed for the whole family with a host of upbeat and interactive musicians. Today’s performance highlights the sounds of percussion. 10:45 a.m. $6-$8. Esther Simplot Center for the Performing Arts, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-345-9116.

Green PLANNING YOUR NATIVE LANDSCAPE—Steven Paulsen shares his knowledge of native plants, including tours of the Foothills native garden, to give participants ideas about what to do with their own spaces. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-5143755, www.cityofboise.org/ parks/foothills.

SUNDAY JAN. 10 Concerts DIXIE MELODY BOYS—A Kinston, N.C.-based quartet, led by Gospel Music Hall of Fame inductee Ed O’Neal. 6 p.m. Canyon Hill Church of the Nazarene, 903 N. Michigan Ave., Caldwell, 208459-7655, www.canyonhill.org.

Sports & Fitness SKATE/CLASSIC CLINIC— Instruction includes drills for balance, proper body positioning and classic Nordic skiing techniques. Reserve a spot by e-mailing bbntclinic@gmail.com. 9:30-11:30 a.m. and 1-3 p.m. $39, cash or check only. Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area: Nordic Center, 2405 Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-332-5390, www.bogusbasin.org.

Odds & Ends SALT AND PEPPER BLACK DOG WALK— Bring out your furry black ones for a snowy walk to raise aware-

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DUDE HOWDY by Steve Klamm

FRIDAY JAN. 8 Festivals & Events PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT—Parents get a night out on the town while children ages 5-11 get to swim, play games, make crafts and more. Snacks are provided. 6-10 p.m. Full-facility member $23, program member $35. 208-344-5502, Ext. 263. YMCA, 1050 W. State St., Boise, www. ymcaboise.org.

Literature AN EXPERIENTIAL EVENING OF CREATIVE STORYTELLING WITH JAMES O’DEA—Following the theme of the Collective Story of Our Time, James O’Dea will explore the extent of our culture’s state of awareness and share how one can best enhance

14 | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Dude Howdy by Steve Klamm was the 1st place winner in the 8th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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8 DAYS OUT ness of the black-dog syndrome. Sponsored by H3Pet Foods and Camp Bow Wow. Free doggy bandannas will be donated by Bandannas Running and Walking. To learn more, visit www.blackpearldogs. com. 1 p.m. FREE. Military Reserve, Mountain Cove Road and Reserve Street, Boise, www. cityofboise.org. 14

MONDAY JAN. 11 Concerts THE PAUL TILLOTSON TRIO—See Picks, Page 13. 7 p.m. FREE. Borah High School, 6001 Cassia, Boise, 208-322-3855.

Workshops & Classes WATERCOLOR WITH BOB FAGEN—A four-week watercolor, demonstration-style course with Bob Fagen. Aimed to teach adults how to paint. Held in the Nampa Senior Center. 6-8 p.m. $60. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, www.nampaparksandrecreation.org.

TUESDAY JAN. 12 Talks & Lectures BROWN BAG LECTURE SERIES—Bart Barbour presents “Captain Bonneville’s Adventures in Idaho and the West.” Noon-1 p.m. FREE for Friends of the Historical Museum; nonmember fees are $3 youth (6-12), $4 seniors; $5 adults; children 6 and younger FREE. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3342120, www.idahohistory.net. THE MOON—See Picks, Page 13. 7:30 p.m. $2 children ages 5-18, $4 adults. Reservations are required. Contact JoAnn Bellon to reserve a spot, 208-459-5211. Whittenberger Planetarium at College of Idaho, Boone Science Hall, corner of 20th Avenue and Fillmore, Caldwell.

WEDNESDAY JAN. 13 Food & Drink FRENCH BISTRO—Join French native and Co-op culinary educator Sylvie Ryan for an evening of authentic Parisian cuisine. The

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

course will be taught en francais. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $40 members, $50 nonmembers. Boise Co-op, 888 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-4724500, www.boisecoopwineshop. com.

Talks & Lectures A CONGRESS ON WESTERN RANGELANDS—A three-day dialogue focusing on various innovative strategies designed to manage the workings of Western landscapes. Speakers will discuss the current and proposed permits affecting federal grazing and much more. Speakers include Dan Dagget, Ed Marston, Courtney White and Bob Budd, as well as various other land managers, writers and scientists. 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $65-$150. Boise Centre on the Grove, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, www.boisecentre.com.

MULTIPLE DAY Festivals & Events WEDDING PARTY SHOW— Calling all brides, designers and fashion-driven folks: the wedding party is here. Featuring local merchants with an array of gowns, flowers and other wedding services. Local musicians and photographers will also be at the show. Fashion shows take place at noon and 3 p.m. on Saturday and at 2 p.m. on Sunday. Sat., Jan. 9, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 10, 11 a.m.4 p.m. $5, www.weddingpartyboise.com. Boise Centre on the Grove, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—Idaho Botanical Garden is glowing with more than 250,000 sparkling lights. Families and friends will enjoy the magic of the valley’s lights with views from the top of the Lewis and Clark Native Plant Garden, holiday music, hot refreshments and roaring bonfires. Proceeds benefit the garden’s education and horticulture programs. Wed. Jan. 6 through Sun. Jan. 10, 6-9 p.m. $6 adults, $4 children ages 4-12, $4 members. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, www.idahobotanicalgarden.org. WINTER BOOK SALE—Selling everything from hardback and trade paperback to media. Book prices top out at a buck. Any books and media items remaining after the sale will sell for $5 per sack. Fri. Jan. 8 and Sat., Jan. 9, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, www.adalib.org.

| EASY

| MEDIUM |

HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

On Stage THE WEDDING SINGER—See Picks, Page 12. The Adam Sandler-Drew Barrymore movie turned Tony-nominated musical features the looks and sounds of the ’80s. Sat. Jan. 9, 8 p.m. and Sun. Jan. 10, 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. $25-$46. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate. edu.

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1ST THURSDAY

FIRST THURSDAY 2010 holds a host of surprises ANDREW CRISP

IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSEUM

BROWN’S GALLERY

Alan Stanford’s work debuted in late 2009 and will extend through Feb. 27. If you haven’t seen his delightful watercolor journey through Idaho, check out this week’s cover of BW, which is Stanford’s work.

Brown’s Gallery has plans for individual artist shows, including the work of David Mensing, who uses thick paint and dramatic brushstrokes to create landscapes that are as full of energy as they are color. COURTESY BOISE ART MUSEUM

As we say goodbye to 2009 and hello to 2010 and all the changes it will bring, one thing that will remain the same is downtown Boise’s interest and emphasis on First Thursday events. BW talked to a host of galleries about the upcoming lineups for the new year that range from robots to recycled materials and paintings of puppies to airplanes.

R. GREY GALLERY R. Grey Gallery steps outside of the circle of rings, necklaces and bracelets with plans for two furniture art exhibitions. International artist Boris Bally “creates awesome chairs, recycled out of metal street signs that have gone to the scrap heap,” said owner and designer Robert Grey Kaylor. The 100 percent recyclable element often ends up corroding—aluminum doesn’t rust like iron does—in a junkyard somewhere, and rather than letting sheet metal become waste, Bally turns it into eye-catching conversation pieces as stop-sign tables and yield-sign chairs. “He’s in museums and art galleries around the world,” said Kaylor. Another furniture maker, Sticks, creates beautiful hand-painted furniture sets, as well as designer bags. The pieces are as beautiful as anything that might have been created on canvas but are functional, too. Kaylor is also expanding a line of his own at the gallery and his work will sit alongside a similar designer, Alex Sepkus, whose incredible geometric gold pieces Kaylor described as “beautiful.”

BOISE ART MUSEUM BAM has a plan extending well into 2011, including the 2010 Idaho Triennial set to open September 4 of this year. The statewide juried exhibition highlights some of Idaho’s best artists. The museum’s continuing “Thread of Perception” series, will showcase the work of Stephen Knapp, who creates breathtaking “light paintings” using metallic coatings and layers of glass to create an orgy of color with the focus on light. BAM also has an amazing exhibition planned, centered on everybody’s favorite sci-fi fixture: robots. Micron Technology teamed up with BAM to showcase robots built by a team of engineers from the FIRST Robotics team. The large-scale androids will be demonstrated in action next to a display titled “Robots: Evolution of a Cultural Icon,” which examines the changing perception of robotics and the iconography of robots that has developed in art.

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-I=HIG::IB6G@:IEA68:#8DB

From “Robots: Evolution of a Cultural Icon,” Eric Joyner’s What We Ought Not, We Do, oil on wood on panel, 64” x 48”, 2006.

“In January and February, we’re going to have First Thursdays related to the watercolors exhibit,” said Anne Schorzman, ISHM’s events coordinator. On Feb. 27-28, ISHM hosts “What’s it Worth?” It’s an event not unlike The Antiques Roadshow that calls on experts to judge the worth of your attic’s contents. “Comforts of Home” follows March 20May 2. Featuring work by African refugees living in Boise, it’s an exhibit that promises to be an eye-opener. Tentatively scheduled to open May 29 is “Rock Art Perspectives,” a traveling exhibit on loan from the High Desert Museum in Bend, Ore. It’s a collection of artist interpretations of the various pictographs that have been found along the Columbia River basin.

ART SOURCE GALLERY While they haven’t quite finalized the full lineup for next year—that process is typically hammered out in January/February—the Art Source Gallery reminded us about its annual juried show in July. Each year, artists from across the country submit their work, at which time Art Source picks a lucky juror to select those to showcase for that month.

In May, Brown’s will hold its annual Artist At Work show, followed by a pastel show in June. Then in July, Brown’s focuses on fish and fishing. A ceramics show is tentatively scheduled for August.

GALLERY 601 Congratulations to Gallery 601; 2010 marks its 30th anniversary. While not positive on the year’s lineup of artists, gallery managers plan to have at least seven different shows by national artists in the works. The month of June will center on Gallery 601’s annual partnership with the Humane Society, which showcases artists who specialize in dog and cat imagery to create interesting—and adorable—art. Gallery 601 also has an upcoming show that will be fun for all ages. The gallery is planning an aviation show and is putting out a call to anyone with a penchant for creating model airplanes. Builders can submit miniatures, which will be hung from Gallery 601’s ceiling and judged. Now is the time to get started on that period-perfect rendition of the Red Baron’s old biplane. For gallery locations, phone numbers and hours, visit boiseweekly.com.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | 15

1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS east side

611 Grove St., Boise, 208-3432671, www.basquemuseum.com.

THE BASQUE MARKET—Purchase delicious tapas for only $8 and be entered to win a traditional gift basket of Spanish treats. 5-7:30 p.m. 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-4331208, www.thebasquemarket.com.

BOISE ART GLASS—Drop in for 2 a light snack and a live glassblowing demonstration. 530 W.

1

THE BASQUE MUSEUM—An opportunity to learn about one of Boise’s unique ethnic groups through art and music. Tours of the historic Cyrus Jacobs/Uberuaga House will be offered. Local musicians will jam at 6:30 p.m. 6:30-8:30 p.m. FREE.

Myr tle, Boise, 208-345-1825, www. boisear tglass.com. CHRONIC TACOS—Featuring new menu items and a hot taco eating contest at 7:30 p.m. 106 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-3711. DRAGONFLY—Browse a massive clearance sale. 414 W. Main St., Boise, 208-338-9234.

FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE— 3 Local ar tist Julia Green presents her collection of illustrations in a new exhibit entitled Wild Wilderness. Her car toonish illustrations of prancing acorns, regal owls and gasping trees speak to the majesty of the forest, all the while acknowledging the wild and unpredictable temperament of the natural environment. For a preview, visit juliagreenillustration. blogspot.com. 500 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-345-4320.

FRONT DOOR NORTHWEST PIZZA AND TAP HOUSE—Drop in for a pairing of winter ales with cheese from Boise Co-op and chocolates from The Chocolat Bar. 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-287-9201, www. thefrontdoorboise.com. PENGILLY’S—With a per formance by Frim Fram Four. 8:45 p.m. 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344. THE RED ROOM TAVERN—An 4 ar t show featuring Wren Van Bockel and Bruce Maurey. 7 p.m. FREE. 601 W. Main St., Boise, 208343-7034.

south side 8TH STREET ARTIST IN RESIDENCE— 5 Featured ar tists-in-residence at 404 S. 8th St. include Ted Apel, with interactive sound sculptures incorporating sonic materials and computer technology; Jess Sanden, using diverse mediums to explore figurative subject matter; and Kate Masterson, working from her own photographs to create three large scale paintings. Ar tists-in-residence in the Alaska Building at 1020 Main St. include Lisa Bufano, multimedia per formance ar tist; and Sue Latta, who uses mixed media, including resin, metal and colored pigments, to sculpt forms. Ar tistsin-residence at 517 S. 8th St. include Erik Sande, with an array of abstract paintings created with acr ylic color and various techniques; and Kristy Albrecht, with paintings that explore lifestyles of the modern woman. Boise, 208338-5212, www.8thstreetmarketplace.com. 8TH STREET BISTRO—Check out the quaint digs of Boise’s new bistro, ser ving up breakfast, brews, lunch, dinner, coffee, milkshakes and tacos. It has it all. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-3660. ATOMIC TREASURES—Featuring graphic 6 designer and ar t enthusiast A.J. Ogden. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-0811, atomictreasures.com. BOISE ART MUSEUM—Drop in from 5-8 7 p.m. for a studio ar t exploration. After viewing the Werner Kramarsky Collection: Works on Paper, par ticipants will get busy with paper and charcoal. An ar t talk discussing the exhibition will be held at 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, www. boisear tmuseum.org. THE COLE/MARR GALLERY COFFEE 8 HOUSE—Presenting Works in Silver, a photo exhibition by David Marr incorporating silver gelatin materials. 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 134, Boise, 208-336-7630. ELLA’S ROOM—Tammi Baliszewski will sign copies of her book Manifesting Love from the Inside Out followed by a guided meditation session. Light refreshments will be ser ved. Doors will close at 7:15 p.m. for a special event that will last until 8:45 p.m. FREE. 413 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-331-3552. HAIRLINES—Drop in for a “new do by Lu.” 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-383-9009. HELLY HANSEN—Featuring killer deals on outdoor apparel. Buy one item and get 10 percent off your purchase. Buy two items, get 15 percent off. Buy three or more items and get a whopping 20 percent off your entire purchase. 860 W. Broad, Boise, 208-342-2888. IDAHO BLACK HISTORY MUSEUM—Free 9 admission to view the current series in the exhibit, The Invisible Idahoan: 200 Years of Blacks in Idaho. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. 508 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-433-0017, www.ibhm.org. IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSEUM— 10 Featuring Alan Stanford’s exhibit “A Watercolor Journey Through Idaho.” Attendees are invited to create their ver y own masterpieces after viewing the exhibit. Also featuring giclee prints by Akiane Kramarik. 5-9 p.m. Donation. 610 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, www.idahohistor y.net. OZZY’S METAL DESIGN—Browse the 11 collection of one-of-a-kind goods made from recycled metal and wood. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise. QUE PASA—Featuring a variety of unique 12 crafts from Mexico, including steel sculptures, mirrors, stoneware and handcrafted jewelr y. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9018. SNAKE RIVER WINERY—Head over to the BODO tasting room for the White and Red Sale and complimentar y tastings. 786 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-345-9463. THE STYLISH STORK—Offering a New Year’s sale, featuring great deals on stylish clothing for both mama and baby. Open until 9 p.m. 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-336-5655.

16 | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS central downtown AMERICAN CLOTHING GALLERY—Toast in the new year with special savings on winter jackets and outdoor accessories. 100 N. Eighth St., Ste. 121A, Boise, 208-4330872. BAD IRISH—Team trivia is on at 8 p.m. 199 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-8939, www. badirish.com. BARBARA BARBARA AND CO.—Warm up with a cup of hot apple cider and cookies. Open late. 834 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-342-2002. BRICK OVEN BISTRO— 13 Featuring works by Karen Hickman and live music by Rebecca Wright. 801 N. Main St., Boise, 208-342-3456, www. brickovenbistro.com.

See the work of Julia Green at Flying M Coffeehouse.

ART WALK

Locations featuring artists

CHOCOLAT BAR—Offering chocolate samples. 805 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-338-7771, www.thechocolatbar.com. DAWSON’S 14 DOWNTOWN—Paintings by Emily Wenner. 219 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-336-5633, www. dawsontaylor.com. THE ECLECTIC ART 15 STORE—Check out all that is new in the co-op galler y

JE F F E R S O N

while enjoying light refreshments. 280 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-703-5149.

BANNO CK

GRAPE ESCAPE—Featuring a special Argentine wine for $4 per glass. 800 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-368-0200.

I DAHO

LA CANTINA SOCIALE—Buy one glass of house wine and get one free. Two person minimum. 707 Bannock St., Boise, 208-377-0224, lacantinasociale.com.

GROV E 5TH

9TH

10TH

11TH

12TH

13TH

G R OV E

6TH

C A P IT OL

MAI N

F RON T BROA D

1. Basque Museum 2. Boise Ar t Glass 3. Flying M Coffeehouse 4. Red Room Tavern

PIE HOLE—Featuring in17 dustrial ar tist Angi Grow and rhythmic melodies from Sleepy Seeds. 205 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-7783, www. pieholeusa.com. REEF—With live music by Nate Fowler. 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-287-9200, www.reefboise. com.

9. Idaho Black Histor y Museum 10. Idaho State Historical Museum 11. Ozzy’s Metal Design

17. Pie Hole 18. Thomas Hammer 19. A Novel Adventure

12. Que Pasa 13. Brick Oven Bistro

21. Basement Galler y

6. Atomic Treasures

14. Dawson’s Downtown

22. Brown’s Galler y

8. The Cole/Marr Galler y Coffee House

15. The Eclectic Ar t Store 16. Lisk Galler y

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THOMAS HAMMER— 18 With paintings by Rick Walter. 298 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-433-8004, www. hammercoffee.com.

20. Ar t Source Galler y

5. 8th Street Ar tist In Residence Program 7. Boise Ar t Museum

OLD CHICAGO—Kids eat free and karaoke is on from 10 p.m. until close. 730 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-363-0037, www. oldchicago.com.

F ULT ON

BAT T ERY

R IV ER

on aluminum by Jerri Lisk, contemporar y chairs by August Johnson, oil paintings by Carl Rowe and brilliant landscapes by photographer Mark Lisk. 850 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3423773, www.liskgaller y.com.

8TH

MYRT L E

LISK GALLERY—Featur16 ing a collection of small works by Erin Ruiz, paintings

23. The Galler y at The Linen Building

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west side A NOVEL ADVENTURE— 19 Featuring works by local ar tist Judy Jewel and music by Willison, Roos and Young. 906 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3448088.

%HUU\KLOO &R5HVWDXUDQWĂ‚%DUĂ‚%DQTXHWVĂ‚&DWHULQJ 1RUWKWK6WUHHW'RZQWRZQ%RLVHZZZEHUU\KLOODQGFRFRP BOISEweekly | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | 17

1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS ART SOURCE 20 GALLERY—According to the Romans, the god Janus was

1ST THURSDAY/NEWS

representative of a door way. So, in honor of Januar y, a new year and the idea of paying tribute to fresh entries, Ar t Source ar tists have incorporated their own interpretations of doors based on the theme “The Door to the Year.” The event also features music by Nancy Kelly, wines by Indian Creek, beer from Brewtopia and an array of refreshments. 5-9 p.m. 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3313374, www.ar tsourcegaller y. com. BASEMENT GALLERY— 21 With a new exhibit, “Noise in the Basement,” featuring collected works by Erin Ruiz, April VanDeGrift, John War fel and Ben Wilson. 5-9 p.m. 928 W. Main St., Boise, 208-333-0309. BERRYHILL & CO. RESTAURANT—Enjoy live music, a sampling of hors d’oeuvres from John Berr yhill and wine tastings from Cinder Winer y’s most recent releases. Tastings will star t at 6:30 p.m. 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208387-3553, www.berr yhillandco. com.

22

BROWN’S GALLERY— Check out new ar tists Christopher Gibson, fused glass; Andrea Jones, jewelr y; Mar tha Shemp, mixed-media encaustic; Karen Lewis, Pleinair oils; and Michael Conger, raku ceramics. The event also features music by pianist Teri Eberlein and wine tasting from Sawtooth Winer y. 5-9 p.m. 1022 Main St., Boise, 208-3426661. EYES OF THE WORLD—With the theme “Pursuit of Joy in Januar y,” Eyes of the World offers 25 percent off your purchase. 1576 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-331-1212, www. eyesoftheworldonline.com. THE GALLERY AT THE 23 LINEN BUILDING—Catch the unveiling of Ward Hooper’s Boise Rec First poster. Live music by Pat Folkner from 5-9 p.m. 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, www.thelinenbuilding.com. THE GAMEKEEPER LOUNGE— Featuring smooth sounds from the Ben Burdick Trio with Amy Weber from 5-10 p.m. Also offering specials on appetizers and wine flights. 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, www. owyheeplaza.com. LOCK, STOCK & BARREL— Acoustic soul, jazz, pop and folk by Dan Costello and Leta Neustaedter. 1100 W. Jefferson, Boise, 208-336-4266, www. lsbboise.com. MODERN HOTEL AND BAR— It’s Mad Men and Mar tinis at the Modern featuring a midcentur y menu and cocktails. Feel free to dress up to suit the mood. 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-424-8244. THE RECORD EXCHANGE— Treat yourself to any 12 oz. espresso drink for only $2, and get $2 off any used CD or DVD $5.99 and up, as well as any gift item over $5.99. The event also features local ar tists’ new releases for in-store play. 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-3448010, www.therecordexchange. com.

18 | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | BOISEweekly

She Dreams Her Hands Are Small by Kate Masterson.

FRESH AIR Last December, a new crop of artists hauled their sharp metal sculptures, table saws and speakers into the Mercantile Building in BODO. Now in its fourth cycle, the 8th Street Marketplace’s Artist-in-Residence program invited mixed-media artist Jess Sanden, large-scale painter Kate Masterson and sound installation artist Ted Apel to occupy rooms in the building for three months. We gave these artists 30 days to burn the midnight oil in their new downtown workspaces before checking in on their progress. Recent University of Idaho BFA grad Jess Sanden makes large cut-out-steel sculptures of the human form. Viewed from the side, the pieces protrude from the wall in an accordion-like mess of unrecognizable sharp edges and painted steel. But standing directly in front of the sculptures reveals the curvy flesh of naked human bodies. Sanden also creates da Vinci-esque acrylic and charcoal paintings of male musculature, as well as new wooden sculptures, which he’s been working on over the last month. Painter Kate Masterson, a Humboldt State University grad, creates colorful large-scale oil paintings, most of which are candid, sweeping-brush-stroke portraits. Masterson spent the last month constructing and stretching large canvases before getting started on a couple of new acrylic and oil pieces. Sun-glinted photos of friends taken in the Foothills provide inspiration for her new work. (Full disclosure, I’m one of her subjects.) Sound sculpture artist and Boise State adjunct professor Ted Apel crafts pieces that “focus on the audio transducing element as the source of visual and sonic material.” His current installation features square panels of natural materials—like steel, cedar and aluminum—which are affixed to the floor and emanate sounds that blend together as you walk throughout the room. The new project Apel has been working on in his space is similar in concept to his current installation, but will focus more on how sound changes depending on physical location. “You think of music as developing in time and changing in time, so this is taking sound and having it change over space instead,” explained Apel. If you missed checking out these new AIR artists last month, or you just want to gauge how productive they’ve been, be sure to poke your head into their studios this First Thursday, Jan. 7, from 5 to 9 p.m. Also be sure to stop by the studios of AIR annex artists Lisa Bufano and Sue Latta in the Alaska Building at 1020 Main Street and Erik Sande and Kristy Albrecht in the Renewal Basement at 517 S. Eighth Street. —Tara Morgan

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LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE

TOO MUCH DISTORTION, JANUARY, VARIOUS Local promoter Justin Cantrell has scheduled a slew of shows in January sure to slay fans of punk, metal and hardcore. On Thursday, Jan. 7, Skate Night at Gusto will roar like a hundred wheels on a well-worn half-pipe with Texas bands Warcola and Scandals and locals NFFU (9 p.m., FREE). On Sunday, Jan. 17, Red Room Tavern hosts Indianapolis’ Bolth, Seattle’s Danny The Champion of the World and locals A New Agenda (9 p.m., $5). On Wednesday, Jan. 27, Skate Night at Gusto takes a turn with Nevada’s Farley Overdose and locals Bone Dance, Ohadi and Jument (9 p.m., FREE). Cantrell has two big shows planned for Thursday, Jan. 28: Missionary Position from Washington headlines at Red Room with Microbabies and Le Fleur opening (9 p.m., $5) and the Metal As Art Tour lands at Gusto with California darlings Revocation—who debuted on Relapse Records in September with Existence Is Futile—Boston’s Hypno5e and New Jersey’s Binary Code. We’ll have to figure out how to be two places at once. ���Amy Atkins Gusto Bar, 509 W. Main St., 208-343-5159; Red Room Tavern, 601 W. Main St., 208-343-7034.

20 | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | BOISEweekly

WEDNESDAY JAN. 6

FRIDAY JAN. 8

SATURDAY JAN. 9

GLORIANA—With the Jeremiah James Gang. 7 p.m. $15 general, $40 platinum skybox. Knitting Factory

BODO BROTHERS CD RELEASE PARTY—Cluster Funk, Black Market Report and Paul Peterson. 8 p.m. FREE. Rose Room

JAMES ORR—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

CARTER FREEMAN—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

BARBARA LAING AND RICHARD SOLIZ—An eclectic mix of songs in a vintage atmosphere. 9 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

MAGNETICS, ZEN ZERO— 8 p.m. $3. Neurolux PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Flatbread

CONTEND, HUMMINGBIRD OF DEATH, BONE DANCE—8 p.m. $2. Myrtle Morgue DJ NOAH HYDE—8 p.m. $3. Neurolux

THE DAMPHOOLS—Get down with Hailey’s homegrown Americana goodness. 10 p.m. $5. Reef ERIC GRAE—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill THE FAV—Alternative rock with country and funk influences. 9 p.m. $2. Terrapin Station

HOT LOCAL KNIGHTS— A five-week Battle of the Bands, featuring 66 local rockers. Tonight features hardcore: Versailles, Boats, For My Own, Jument, Bare Witness, The Vast Domain, Atlantis Falls Under, Bless the Martyr, Pandemic, Brawl, Obscure Beauty, All Hands On and Ohadi. 4 p.m. $8. The Venue JAM FOR THE LADY FUNDRAISER—A benefit show for Susan Chapman featuring Marcus Eaton and Dan Costello. 6 p.m. $25. China Blue KYLER EANON, HAVEN SNOW—9 p.m. FREE. The Plank LEE PENN SKY—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

THURSDAY JAN. 7

JOHN HANSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BATTLE OF THE BANDS—Craving Dawn, M For Outfit and Actual Depiction. 9 p.m. FREE to listen, $1 to vote. Liquid

MCKENNA FAMILY NIGHT— 6 p.m. FREE. Sun Ray Cafe

THE POP CULT KIDS—9 p.m. $1. Liquid

POLYPHONIC POMEGRANATE—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

REX AND BEVERLY—8 p.m. FREE. The Gamekeeper

BEN BURDICK TRIO—7 p.m. FREE. The Gamekeeper DAN COSTELLO AND LETA NEUSTAEDTER—6:30 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

REEL BIG FISH, SUBURBAN LEGENDS, ONE PIN SHORT—See Picks, Page 12. 7 p.m. $12.50-$35. Knitting Factory

ROB PAPER—The winner of Boise’s Got Talent with guests. 7 p.m. 10 adv., $12 door. Visual Arts Collective

NATE FOWLER—Acoustic rock. 8 p.m. FREE. Reef

REX AND BEVERLY—8 p.m. FREE. The Gamekeeper

WARCOLA, SCANDALS, NFFU—See Listen Here, this page. 9 p.m. FREE. Gusto

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

GIZZARD STONE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE ORCHESTRA OF STRANGE TOUR—See Listen Here, Page 21. 9 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

TERI & RICO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

SHON SANDERS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub SOUL SERENE—10 p.m. $5. Reef

The Damphools

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE SUNDAY JAN. 10

SCOTT WALLENBERG AND THE ACOUSTAHOLICS—Classic rock and blues. 7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

THE SIDEMEN—7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WINTER BLACKOUT 2010— With The Expendables, Iration, Passafire, Pour Habit and Roots Down Below. 6 p.m. $12.50$25. Knitting Factory

MONDAY JAN. 11 BILLY BRAUN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE PAUL TILLOTSON TRIO—See Picks, Page 13. 7 p.m. FREE. Borah High School PUNK MONDAY—Third annual Battle of the Bands. Free to listen, 5 bucks to vote. 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid REX MILLER—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

TUESDAY JAN. 12

WEDNESDAY JAN. 13 BRANDI CARLILE—Coming through town as part of her Give up the Ghost tour. 7 p.m. $23 adv., $25 door, $60 platinum skybox. Knitting Factory JON DAVIDSON—4 p.m. FREE. Hastings JON DAVIDSON AND RUSSELL STAFFORD—Energetic, harmonic, acoustic pop rock. 8 p.m. FREE. Reef

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BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—Mondays, 8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge BUD GUDMUNDSON, MATT HARTZ—Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews COUNTRY AND TOP 40—Saturdays, 9 p.m. $5. Cowgirls

JOHN CAZAN—Fridays, 5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel JOHNNY SHOES—Wednesdays, 6 p.m. Lock Stock & Barrel LIVE LOUNGE—Fridays and Saturdays, 8 p.m. FREE. The Gamekeeper LIVE SETS—Fridays, 10 p.m. FREE. Bittercreek; Wednesdays, 7 p.m. FREE. Pitchers and Pints

FRIM FRAM 4—Thursdays, 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

NOCTURNUM WITH DJ BONES—Sundays, 9 p.m. FREE. Terrapin Station

FUEGOGO!—Tuesdays, 9:30 p.m. FREE. Terrapin Station

POLYPHONIC POMEGRANATE—Wednesdays, 9 p.m. Liquid

HIGH DESERT BAND— Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. FREE. Whitewater Pizza

ROBIN SCOTT—Saturdays, 7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s

JAM NIGHT—Wednesdays, 8 p.m. FREE. Montego Bay JAZZ NIGHTS—Mondays-Saturdays, 6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill JEANNIE MARIE—Fridays, 7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s

POLYPHONIC POMEGRANATE—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

JEREMIAH JAMES AND NED EVETT—Tuesdays, 8 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

REVEREND PEYTON’S BIG DAMN BAND—8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

JEREMIAH JAMES GANG— Wednesdays, 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JIM FISHWILD—Wednesdays, 6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

BLAZE ‘N’ KELLY—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye REX MILLER—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

WEEKLY GIGS

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—with DJ Naomi Sioux. Wednesdays and Fridays, 9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s SMOOTH—Tuesdays, 7 p.m. FREE. Liquid SOUL SERENE—Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’Penny SPINDLE BOMB—Fridays and Saturdays, 9 p.m. $3. Tom Grainey’s THOMAS PAUL—Sundays, 10 a.m. and Mondays, 7 p.m. FREE. Red Feather

ORCHESTRA OF STRANGE TOUR, JAN. 9, NEUROLUX It’s cold, it’s dark, the holidays are over, and spring is nowhere in sight. Instead of schlubbing around the house worrying about seasonal affective disorder, trudge to Neurolux for the hippest night of hip-hop this side of the Great Divide. The Orchestra of Strange Tour brings with it Sleep of Oldominion and The Chicharones, DJ Zone, B. Dolan, Doomtree’s Cecil Otter—all on Strange Famous Records—and Rocket One. Although they all blend various music and beats, Sleep is an illuminating example of how a great MC can take sounds from any and every genre, add thought-provoking lyrics and turn the whole thing into something that maintains the vibe of the original music but is also inherently hip-hop. Let neither snow, nor rain, nor gloom of January stay you from the swift completion of a night of hip-hop enlightenment. —Amy Atkins

Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

Saturday, Jan. 9, $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., neurolux.com.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | 21

SCREEN

TOP 10 FROM TWO CRITICS Why 2009 was a cinematic success TRAVIS ESTVOLD AND JEREMIAH ROBERT WIERENGA With the final hours of the decade approaching, Boise Weekly’s dueling screen critics— two mature men with diametrically opposed ideas of on-screen entertainment—sat down to discuss their favorite films that showed in the Treasure Valley in 2009. Here, listed alphabetically because we don’t believe in hierarchies, are the 10 films Estvold and Wierenga felt managed to enliven their year while also enlightening their souls.

A SERIOUS MAN

The quality of a Coen Brothers film can only be measured according to their full filmography. A Serious Man, inspired by the siblings’ Minneapolis upbringing, is a darkly humorous investigation of one man’s spiritual crisis, and it ranks with their best. With a stellar—and mostly unknown—cast and the brothers’ superlative gang of regular contributors, A Serious Man will be an endless source of examination for thoughtful film lovers.

SITA SINGS THE BLUES

GRAN TORINO

Despite approaching his 80th birthday, ageless actor/director/producer Clint Eastwood (Million Dollar Baby, Unforgiven) perennially turns out quality films. This year’s gem is the subtle story of a man whose mileage, like that of the classic Ford stowed in his garage, has been piled on. But with some unsolicited assistance from young neighbors, this hateful old codger and his machine are polished to a high shine. As per his norm, Eastwood provides emotional, thought-provoking fare.

Too often a literary text adapted for the screen diverges from its source. In the case of the ancient Sanskrit epic, The Ramayana, more than 300 versions have emerged through regional bias, cultural interpretation and oral re-imagining. Brooklyn-based animator Nina Paley adds her slant with a riotous retelling focused on the marginalized and maligned character of Sita, whose woes are expressed through the songs of chanteuse Annette Hanshaw. Using multiple animation styles and a hilariously disparate trio of narrators, Sita is a gorgeous visual treat.

UP

Excitement and humor abound in this tale of a grouchy old-timer who, in order to fulfill a childhood dream, flies to a South American adventure locale by suspending his house under hundreds of helium balloons. There’s extra emotion packed into the first 10 minutes, but as always, if you’re looking for fare the entire family will enjoy, go Pixar (WALL-E, Toy Story); the animation studio continues to create lovable favorites year after year.

WATCHMEN

This is a different kind of superhero film based on a different kind of graphic novel— one in which the line between good and evil is thoroughly blurred. Cast, shot and acted beautifully, director Zack Snyder (300) creates the antithesis of the Saturday matinee: an exceedingly dark, profane, violent, R-rated film more than 160 minutes long. Though perhaps not a film for the timid, Watchmen is arguably the most faithful live-action adaptation of a comic book to date.

STAR TREK

MOON

Bowie’s boy done good. While the “Space Oddity” singer’s oldest progeny, Duncan Jones, seems to shares his father’s lunar fixation, his directorial debut forgoes space-glam stylings to tell a stellar story of isolation and alienation. With stunning visual aplomb and a hypnotic, blistering performance by Sam Rockwell as a lonely dark-side ore digger, Moon makes a return to the essence of science fiction—the examination of ordinary people in out-of-this-world situations.

22 | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Elaborating upon the younger lives of iconic characters Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock, director J.J. Abrams (creator of ABC’s Lost and Alias) re-imagines the travels of the famed starship Enterprise and its crew. Some characters perfectly mimic their 1960s TV counterparts and some are reinvented, but all are splendid to watch. Somehow pacifying both Trekkers and the unenlightened, this film—and its big-budget special effects—is an intelligent yet high-octane sci-fi roller coaster not to be missed.

TWO LOVERS

If Joaquin Phoenix’s alleged retirement lasts, this is a great film to go out on. Phoenix plays a shy depressive whose decision of whom to court—the sophisticated party chick or the parent-approved Jewish girl—holds great significance. An impeccably crafted film with spot-on performances and some of the cleverest cinematography this side of the Atlantic, Phoenix’s swan song has much to love.

WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE

Director Spike Jonze is a master of the mind trip, and this PG-rated fable is no exception. While the subtle subtext and languorous pacing might put the kiddies to sleep, Jonze—along with co-writer Dave Eggers and a spot-on vocal cast including James Gandolfini and Forest Whitaker— have created a gentle, heartfelt re-imagining of a children’s classic.

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LISTINGS/SCREEN MOVIE TIMES/SCREEN WEDNESDAY, JAN. 6 - TUESDAY, JAN. 12 A CHRISTMAS CAROL—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:45, 3:20, 5:45

ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS, THE SQUEAKQUEL— Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:50, 4, 7:45, 10; F-Tu: 1:40, 4:35, 7:50, 10:05 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:20, 12:50, 2, 2:45, 3:25, 4:30, 5:10, 5:40, 7:05, 7:35, 9:25, 9:50 AN EDUCATION— AVATAR—

Flicks: W-Th only: 7

Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:30, 3:30, 3:55, 7, 7:20, 10:25, 10:45; F-Tu: 3:50, 7:10, 10:35 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:35, 4:10, 7:45

AVATAR, DIGITAL 3D—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:10, 1:35, 3:45, 5:05, 7:20, 8:30

AVATAR, IMAX 3D—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:50, 3:15, 7, 10:20

THE BLIND SIDE—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:35, 3:45, 7:05, 9:55; F-Tu: 1:05, 3:55, 7:40, 10:30 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:55, 1:40, 4:05, 4:35, 6:50, 7:30, 9:40

BOONDOCK SAINTS II: ALL SAINTS DAY— BROTHERS—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 8:05 Edwards 22: W-Th: 10:20

DID YOU HEAR ABOUT THE MORGANS?— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:05, 3:40, 7:50, 10:10; F-Tu: 9:45 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:40, 2:10, 4:55, 7:15, 9:45 THE IMAGINARIUM OF DR. PARNASSUS— Flicks: F-Su: 1:45, 4:20, 7, 9:35; M-Tu: 4:20, 7, 9:35 INVICTUS—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:20, 4:15, 7:15, 10:40; F-Tu: 1, 4, 7, 9:55 Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:05, 3:50, 6:40, 9:35

IT’S COMPLICATED—

BOLLYWOOD HINDI FILM: 3 IDIOTS—Hurray for Bollywood. Aamir Khan, Kareena Kapoor, Madhavan and Sharmin Joshi star in this Hindi comedy as three friends for whom their time in an institution of higher learning provided far more than book learning; it also offered them a great deal of self-actualization. As is true of Bollywood films, 3 Idiots is full of dance, music, bright colors and a larger message. The film is currently under the political microscope in India, and will go before the censor board for depicting “ragging on freshers,” what we in America refer to as hazing. Directed by Rajkumar Hirani. Sun. Jan. 10. Doors open at 1 p.m. Film begins at 2 p.m. $9. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, www.egyptiantheatre.net. THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LES CONTES D’HOFFMANN ENCORE—Experience the MET on the big screen with a performance of Offenbach’s tale of the life and loves of writer E.T.A. Hoffman. Recorded live on Dec. 19, 2009. Wed., Jan. 6, 6:30 p.m. $9.50 adult, $6.75 children and seniors. Edwards Spectrum 22, 7701 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-377-1700, www. uatc.com.

opening

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1, 4:10, 7:35, 10:15; F-Tu: 1:20, 4:10, 7:45, 10:25 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:30, 1:30, 3:30, 4:20, 6:30, 7:10, 9:10, 9:55

THE MESSENGER—

Flicks: W-Th only: 5, 9

NEW MOON—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:40, 3:35, 6:55, 10:05

NINE—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:20, 2:05, 5, 7:40, 10:25

OLD DOGS—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:20, 3:40

PRECIOUS—

Flicks: W-Th: 5:05, 7:20, 9:30; F-Su: 12:40, 2:55, 5:05, 7:20, 9:30; M-Tu: 5:05, 7:20, 9:30

PRINCESS AND THE FROG—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:15, 4:30, 6:55, 9:50; F-Tu: 1:45, 4:40, 7:05 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:40, 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9

RED CLIFF—

Flicks: W-Th: 4:30, 7:30; F-Su: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30; M-Tu: 4:30, 7:30

SHERLOCK HOLMES—

UP IN THE AIR—

special screenings

Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:45, 4:25, 7:30, 10:30; F-Tu: 1:25, 4:15, 7:25, 10:15 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:05, 1, 1:55, 3:15, 4, 4:50, 6:20, 7, 7:50, 9:20, 10

Edwards 9: F-Tu: 1:10, 4:30, 7:30, 10:10 Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:50, 4:25, 7:25, 8, 9:25, 10:30

THE YOUNG VICTORIA—

YOUTH IN REVOLT—

Flicks: W-Th: 4:50, 7:05, 9:20; F-Su: 12:30, 2:40, 4:50, 7:05, 9:20; M-Tu: 4:50, 7:05, 9:20 Edwards 9: F-Tu: 1:30, 4:20, 7:20, 9:50

T H E AT E R S

Edwards 22 Boise, 208-377-1700, www.regmovies.com; Edwards 9 Boise, 208-338-3821, www.regmovies.com; The Egyptian Theater, 208-345-0454, www.egyptiantheatre.net; The Flicks, 208-342-4222, www.theflicksboise.com; FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: Northgate Cinema, Towne Square Reel, Country Club Reel, Nampa Reel, 208-377-2620, www.reeltheatre.com. Overland Park $1 Cinema, 208-377-3072, www.opcmovies.com. Movie times listed were correct as of press time.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

THE IMAGINARIUM OF DOCTOR PARNASSUS—Born from the drawings and imagination of writer and director Terry Gilliam (Monty Python’s Flying Circus) comes the story of Dr. Parnassus and his magical traveling show, in which visitors are treated to more than entertainment. The good doctor leads viewers to visions of their spirits freed but, not unlike Pandora’s Box, when a door is opened for good, sometimes evil finds a way out as well. The cast includes brooding Johnny Depp, Colin Ferrell, Jude Law and Tom Waits and the film features the final performance of the late Heath Ledger. (PG-13) Flicks YOUTH IN REVOLT—Nick Twisp (Michael Cera) is a shy, socially awkward teen whose life with his trailer park mom (Jean Smart), her pathologically lying boyfriend (Zach Galifianakis) as well as Nick’s father and his trophy girlfriend, is far from his ideal. But when an new neighbor girl captures his heart—only to stomp on it when he learns she has a boyfriend—things have to change. Nick decides the only option is to create an alternate personality: Francois, who is reckless, rebellious and debonair, and determined to get Nick the girl, no matter what. (R) Edwards 9

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | 23

NEWS/FOOD FOOD/REVIEWS On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

THE GRIDDLE - EAGLE Barbacoa, lights ablaze lakeside.

FROM DEMISE TO DEALS IN BOISE’S RESTAURANT SCENE

24 | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | BOISEweekly

GLENN LANDBERG

The big Food News this week is the demise of Barbacoa, but by the time BW hits stands Wednesday, the fire that destroyed the Parkcenter Boulevard restaurant will be old news. The fire appears to have been accidental, however, fire investigators were unable to determine the cause. The two-year-old restaurant had just hit a running stride in the restaurant scene, finally working out opening bugs and putting out food well balanced in both presentation and quality. (If you never had the Hot Rock Filet, you sorely missed out on a beautiful cut of meat served on what could have been the state’s most outrageous plate: a hot rock.) Owners Robert and Martine Castoro announced plans to rebuild and said they’d already started the ball rolling on the process. But until a part two emerges from the ashes, Boise diners are left with one less decent and daring restaurant in town. Pity. Here’s hoping we haven’t seen the last of Barbacoa. So with Barbacoa scratched off the list for now, you may be looking for dinner in an unlikely destination. Check out the new dinner menu at Miss Tami’s Cottage in Meridian. A few months back, the restaurant and tea shop turned BW reviewers’ heads with its uber-feminine approach to lounging lunch and high tea. Miss Tami has added dinner to the meal schedule three nights a week, Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 5-9 p.m., with the comfort calories of meatloaf, lasagna, chicken cordon bleu and stuffed salmon. For more information, visit misstamis.com. 1031 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-888-1770. Last but certainly not least, change is afoot at Berryhill and Co. If you’ve followed news at berryhillandco.com, you know that John Berryhill has been promising a few changes. The time has come. Starting Monday, Jan. 11, happy hour will be an all-new beast at the Ninth Street restaurant. In addition to a $1 break on drinks, you can indulge in free nibbles from the app buffet Monday through Friday from 4-6 p.m. Also new this month is Sunday brunch starting Jan. 24, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. A trip (or several) to the buffet will run you $14 and bottomless mimosas are a super deal at $4. And if you’re in the restaurant biz, your most recent pay stub will get you half off your brunch. 121 N. Ninth St., 208-387-3553. —Rachael Daigle

I’ll admit, when I heard that the Original Pancake House was Don’t let The Griddle’s sign fool you. Though it boasts a cast-iron skillet pulling up stakes after only a brief stay in Idaho, I was a little and the folksy phrase “Good Cookin’,” the joint is most definitely not a weepy. There was already a dearth of places to find a decent greasy diner dive. Opened in 1948 in Winnemucca, Nev., then purchased breakfast in Eagle. by Mike and Betty Aboud in 1960, The Griddle has spent the last halfI wondered what could fill the void. The answer arrived in the century perfecting Betty’s original recipes. In 2005, after son David purform of The Griddle, a mini-chain with locations in Meridian and chased the company, The Griddle expanded into Idaho, opening a location Winnemucca, Nev. In this case, “fill the void” actually means takin Meridian first and then one in Eagle. ing over the vacated location. Though this history isn’t the first thing on your mind as you carve off a I had previously been to The Griddle’s Meridian location off couple squares of crunchy, fluffy waffle and let an avalanche of butter and Overland Road, where I met friends for breakfast amid the cacophhot syrup cascade onto the plate before swirling the bite in the sweet sticky ony of the weekend mess, it’s the backcrowd in the echoing bone of The Griddle confines of the dinerexperience. Everystyle eatery. I didn’t thing from the corned quite know what to beef hash ($9.99), expect in Eagle. which is cooked and The cool blues cubed on-site from and concrete floors scratch, to the butter, of the Meridian lowhich is churned and cation have always clarified in-house, is felt a bit cold to me, done with care and but I was wonderan attention to detail fully surprised to unmistakably born find a warm, welfrom tradition. coming and casual After visiting the atmosphere in Eagle. expansive Griddle Hidden among location in Meridthe maze of cookieian for brunch, and cutter buildings scarfing down a plate filling the southeast of flaky and not-toocorner of Eagle greasy Crabcakes Road and State Benedict ($11.29) Street near Mai Thai with asparagus and and Bardenay, the grated hashbrowns restaurant’s muted and a cup of freshly THE GRIDDLE yellow-gold walls, ground Dawson Tay177 Eagle River St., Eagle timber accents, floor-to-ceiling windows and gas lor coffee, I decided to check out The Griddle’s dinner 208-939-9070 fireplace make it a cozy place to curl up on a frigid chops at the Eagle location. Surrounded by the martinithegriddle.com winter morning. The Griddle has managed to make fueled, TGIF revelry of Mai Thai and Bardenay, The Breakfast/Lunch: Mon.-Sun. 7 a.m.-2 p.m.; Dinner: the space more homey than its previous occupant Griddle’s blazing lights and mostly empty booths Wed.-Sat. 4:30-10 p.m. with the addition of some artwork on the walls and seemed a touch out of place. The atmosphere inside, just a touch of kitsch, as well as jars of homemade a smallish open space with mellow yellow walls and preserves for sale at the front counter. wood flourishes, was welcoming, though notably surreal. But keeping with its established tradition, the restaurant’s Scanning the short menu—all $9.99, including soup or salad—I spotbreakfast menu is full of pages of eggs, omelettes, pancakes, ted something surprising: mushroom barley “meatloaf.” Intrigued by the waffles, french toast and potato concoctions. I was impressed by inclusion of a vegetarian dish, I opted for the loaf and a side salad, while the depth of the menu, with offerings for just about every breakmy dining companion went with the almond-crusted trout and curried fast taste, from simple and savory to hearty and sweet. butternut squash soup. The rich orange soup, adorned with a swirl of The latter was the case with my stuffed french toast ($7.99). creme fraiche, was made heartier by the addition of chicken stock, while Two thick slices of bread arrived sandwiching a layer of cream the simple house salad was transformed by a creamy, yet astonishingly cheese and a strawberry/rhubarb compote. The stack was dusted fresh lemony dressing. Both complemented the warm, homemade multiwith just the slightest flurry of powdered sugar and—in an exgrain bread. The trout, dredged on both sides in almonds, was crisp and ample of simple, yet effective presentation—was garnished with a well-seasoned, although the over-breading took away the fish’s expected sprig of mint in the dead-center of the top piece of toast. pink heartiness. While it came accompanied with a personal-sized metal pitcher What the trout lacked in meatiness, the mushroom barley meatloaf, of maple syrup, the filling alone was enough to satisfy even a sweet oddly, made up for. With a browned, crusty exterior and chewy, nutty tooth like mine. The toast’s exterior was slightly crisp and nary a interior, the dish was filling, without trying to mimic the texture or flavor trace of sogginess was found inside, but it was the compote that of meatloaf. The loaf let the accompanying sinfully rich mushroom gravy left the lasting impression. Big chunks of rhubarb continuously ap- do most of the flavoring work. The sides of mashed potatoes and grilled peared amid the thick, red sauce, giving the entire meal a wonderzucchini formed a sigh-eliciting comfort-food trifecta. Though this dish is fully homemade feel. the best vegetarian meal I’ve had in Boise, it would be incorrect to trumpet The experience was topped off by local Dawson Taylor coffee The Griddle as a new veggie spot. The dish, like everything I sampled on ($1.79), although the cups could stand to be a bit larger, making it the restaurant’s menus, is there solely based on the merit of the recipe. And just a little easier to linger over a lazy morning meal. it’s all good cookin’. —Deanna Darr likes pancakes with inexplicable names.

—Tara Morgan scarfs down veggie meatloaf like a bat out of hell. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

DINING/FOOD Southeast Boise ATZA PIZZA—The pizza place in the Columbia Village Shopping Center uses handmade dough and pizza sauce and fresh ingredients. Hit the salad bar, order jumbo wings, or go for the sandwiches and breadsticks option. Decide between thin or original crust and you’re

halfway done building your own pie, or you may choose one of Atza’s specialty pizza creations. The Pizza Patrol Car even delivers within a cer tain range. 6564 S. Federal Way, 208-433OM . 1112. $-$$ CHEF ROLAND’S—Chef Roland Joseph is ser ving up Cajun fare complete with hushpuppies, locally grown collard greens and

WINE SIPPER/FOOD

TOP WINES OF 2009 New year, new decade, and to be honest, I think most people are happy to see the first 10 years of this millennium behind them. In the past year, this column highlighted almost 100 different wines, and while all the panel’s top picks were worthy, there were standouts. Looking back, I made a list of five wines that ranked as my favorites. Unfortunately, wines sell out and vintages change, so three of those five are no longer available. Here are the two that are left, plus one. 2005 LAN EDICION LIMITADA, $45 Of all the wines tasted, this stands out as my top red. The aromas are amazing, rich and floral with unctuous cherry, anise, light cedar, spice, dark chocolate and plum. Equally amazing and complex in the mouth, the flavors echo the aromas. Elegantly structured, impeccably balanced, exceptionally persistent, this is a benchmark wine that should age well for years to come. 2007 DER POLLERHOF GRUNER VELTLINER, $14.49 It’s like deja vu all over again. This was the only white to make my list last year, and here it is again, drinking beautifully. The aromas offer a nice mix of ripe apple, creamy tangerine, sweet lemon and lime. This richly textured gruner with supple flavors is reminiscent of silky pie crust wrapped around a spicy core of citrus, melon and apple. Lightly sweet fruit and fresh herbs mark the long finish. 2007 PAUL DOLAN ZINFANDEL, $16.99 The 2006 was my top zin last year, notable for its balance and style. It may be history, but if anything, the 2007 is even better. The nose is marked by that same savory dark cherry backed here by chocolate and herb. It’s big but balanced with creamy red fruits in the mouth. Lots of ripe plum and berry carry through from start to finish, with soft tannins rounding things out. A great red at a great price. —David Kirkpatrick AVERAGE PRICE PER PERSON: $ —Less than $8 $$ —$8 to $14 $$$ —$14 to $20 $$$$ —Over $20

—Wine & beer —Full bar —Delivery —Take-out —Open late RE S —Reservations

red beans and rice. Choose between gumbo or jambalaya to go along with fried catfish, Cajun barbecue ribs or savor y brisket. 1221 W. Boise Ave., 208-344-4387. $-$$ SU. COBBY’S—Ser ving up soup, salad, brew and wine since 1978. Enjoy deli meats like pastrami, bologna, mor tadella, colto and genoa, in addition to all the standards. Ever y size soup and sandwich can be combined. 1030 Broadway Ave., 208-345-0990. $ SU OM. FOCACCIA’S—Chef Bill Green transformed his catering business into a full-ser vice restaurant with a rotating menu featuring specialty food items ranging seafood and vegetarian all the way to French Classical, Mexican and Italian cuisine. Soups and salads may be a good choice if a diner is going for the house specialty desser t made in-house by the pastr y chef. Selections include a Chocolate Truffle Ugly Cake best experienced with closed eyes and an open mouth. 404 E. Parkcenter Blvd., 208-322SU OM . 2838. $-$$ LUCKY 13 PIZZA/THE GARAGE—The former Nor th End mainstay has moved essentially “as was” to Harris Ranch, where the best (and best-named) pizzas and sandwiches on the planet are still on the menu. 3662 S. Ecker t Road, 208-344-6967. $ SU OM. MAZZAH—Visit the Med over lunch or drop by for dinner. Gyros, hummus, falafel and baklava on the quick. Tr y the fatoosh salad; you won’t be disappointed. 404 E. Park Center Blvd., 208-3332223. $-$$ OM . ONO HAWAIIAN CAFE—A wide variety of the flavors of Hawaii are offered in the form of pupus, sushi, sandwiches and satays. And where ever Ono’s catering operation, the Kanak Attack van is parked and ser ving, a BW staffer is most likely in the vicinity with money in hand. 2170 Broadway Ave., 208-429-9111. $$-$$$ OM . TAVERN AT BOWN CROSSING—Choose between the first level streetside balcony where all the passersby can watch you enjoy a bottle of wine and a steak, or lounge on the second level patio with a roll of sushi and a mar tini. 3111 S. Bown St., 208-345-2277. $$-$$$ SU OM . THE TROLLEY HOUSE—The only remnant of Boise’s streetcar system and a favorite neighborhood diner. No-frills atmosphere, efficient service and a giant menu with everything from eggs Benedict to burgers to a lo-cal section. BYOB. 1821 Warm Springs Ave., 208-345SU, . 9255. $-$$

needed/recommended —Patio S U —Open on Sunday O M —Online menu —Breakfast —Boise Weekly Card

Boise Weekly Dining Guide offers selective listings of editorial recommendations and advertisers. Listings rotate based on available space.

Updates from diligent readers and listed restaurateurs are heartily encouraged. E-mail to food@boiseweekly.com or fax to 342-4733.

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Although this spacious 1616 PRIMROSE DRIVE, NAMPA mid-century home is not $339,900 terribly ďŹ&#x201A;ashy, its gener5 Bed/2.5 Bath 5,248 Square Feet ously sized rooms, wide Team Realty hallways and family friendly Arlen Gingrich, 208-880-0586 5,200-square-foot ďŹ&#x201A;oor teamrealtyoďŹ daho.com plan make it feel impresMLS #98413873 sive. Located on a 1-acre parcel near Wilson Ponds in Nampa, the dwelling is bargain priced at just less than $65 per square foot. The main level of the two-story home contains a huge kitchen, formal dining room, living room, master suite and two bedrooms. The bedroom at the front of the house has a built-in Murphy bed for guests. The master bedroom is larger than most living rooms. In it, thick wool carpeting cushions bare feet, and double sets of sliding glass doors open to covered outdoor walkways on either side of the room. Down in the walk-out lower level, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ďŹ nd a large family room and three bedrooms. The largest of the lower bedrooms has two built-in twin beds and enough ďŹ&#x201A;oor space to leave toy train tracks and sprawling Lego projects as works in progress for days while providing room to spare for moving around and getting dressed. A long balcony stretches across the back of the house, growing bigger near the kitchen to form a large deck. From the deck, wide stairs and multiple landings descend to a covered patio outside the basement family room. Pros: Spacious mid-century home great for family and entertaining. Cons: Elevated main ďŹ&#x201A;oor not for people with limited mobility.

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With a better job and a degree. Evening, day and online classes start next month. Financial aid is available for those who qualify. Stevens-Henager College, Boise Branch, 800-716-5645 www.stevenshenager.info

FOR SALE BW MASSAGE BW STUFF 8DBEDHI>C<7>CHLDGBH For Gardenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sake is now open for business! Check out our selection of 100% recycled plastic Gusanito composting bins to start turning your kitchen scraps, paper waste and cardboard into soil rich in nutrients that you can use for your garden and household plants. www.GardensSake.com ;G::"=DE86C9N Stop by Nampa Brewerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center for Free Sample of Hop Candy. 468-7724.

CAREERS BW HELP WANTED 7D>H:<GDJE=DB:H Make a difference assisting adults w/ developmental disabilities. Must be 21 w/ clean driving record. Stop by 30 S. Cole Road, 9am-4pm. 8C6$C6 To care for adults with developmental disabilities. Must be 21 with clean driving record. Apply 30 S. Cole Road, 9am-4pm. $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com

BARTER BW HAVE

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Looking for barter? Post what you have, ďŹ nd what you need. Always free at www.boiseweekly.com. IG69:8DCHIGJ8I>DC;DG4444 I am a fully licensed, registered & insured framing, siding, and remodel contractor looking to trade labor for your unwanted items of value. E-mail a description of what you need done and what you have to trade. quickquality3@aol. com. Services available but not limited to: remodels, framing, siding, decks, fences, covered patios, tile, painting, rooďŹ ng, gutter clean out, shops & shelves.

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1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, spa/showers, 24/7. I travel. 8805772. massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Boise & Nampa studios.

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Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/ Wknds.Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. Deep Therapeutic Massage by Muscular Guy. 869-2766. Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577. Thomas. =DJHE6 Steam sauna & massage. Corner Overland & S. Orchard. Open 7 days a week, 9-10pm. 345-2430. B6HH6<: Bali Spa. 401 N. Orchard St. 3751332. Open 9am-10pm. Mention you saw it in the Boise Weekly for $20 Off! Massage Boise Hotels 869-8128. B6HH6<:7N<>C6 Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. B6HH6<: My signature is a slow-soft-soothing-very relaxing sensitive touch. You will love the experience and my techniques. Women ~ Men ~ Couples ~ Call Thomas 208 8631577. * Day or evening* I:6A:6; Massage by Asian at Tea Leaf Spa. 1975 Broadway Ave., Suite B. 344-4188. Stop by.

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BW PSYCHIC

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Psychic Medium: Available for large events, small gatherings & private readings. Call 208-323-2323. We’ve moved. Same great service, new location & freshly remodeled spa. Massage~Bath~Sauna. 1512 Broadway Ave. 713-6142. ULM 340-8377.

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Free Chair Massage for your neck, shoulders & back with an hour Foot Reflexology Massage only $29.99. Full body massage with special technique. Pain relief. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole. ;G::DC"A>C:8A6HH>;>:969H Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

BW SPIRITUAL

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PETS

SERVICES

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;G::DC"A>C:8A6HH>;>:969H Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please. B>HH>C<9D< The lady of the house is missing! Please help us find her, she is white with light shades of brown with blue eyes. Her name is Lady, please help us find her. Contact 208-570-4499.

86GE:I6C9I>A:8A:6C>C< IICRC Certified. We specialize in carpet cleaning, upholstery cleaning, tile and grout cleaning and sealing, Pet Odor Treatment, Carpet Repairs, Red Stain Removal. We also provide 24 Hour Emergency Service. Commercial/Residential. (208) 724-0586. Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

Live the life of inner joy. Half day meditation retreat with Dana Marsh. All are welcome to attend. Jan. 9th, 9:30-1pm. Located at ICAN 3450 Hill Rd, 921-4062. www.heartofdharma.org

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT PENNY: 2-year-old female English pointer. Lively, friendly girl who is smart and highly trainable. Indoor only. (K. 411 - #9324399)

CHLOE: 4-year-old female longhair. Lovely with amazingly long whiskers. Friendly and ready for a new home. (K. 07 - #9317665)

TRIPPER: 8-year-old male Labrador retriever mix. Sweet, mature dog with enthusiasm. Loving, gentle and friendly. (K. 318 - #9066860)

HULA: 8-month-old female hound mix. Joyful, friendly and knows some commands. Likes other dogs. (K. 409 - #9359446)

GINGER: 15-month-old female pit bull terrier/ border collie mix. Happy and goofy. Smart and ready for training. (K. 315 - #6332479)

EARL JAMES: 8-yearold male Basset hound. Good with animals and kids. Happy and affectionate. (K. 312 - #9361437)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

FRAEDEE: Looking for that someone who’s not a “fraedee” to care for FIV+ me. Room 9

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INCA DUE: Do you like bird watching and have a window you wouldn’t mind sharing? Room 7

TZATZIKI: Gorgeous dilute tortie looking for a fellow snugger. Room 5

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | 27

| REAL ESTATE | CAREERS | TRANSPORTATION | FOR SALE | MIND, BODY, SPIRIT | PETS |

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86GE:I8A:6C>C<HE:8>6A Barefoot Cleaning Company will steam clean 3 rooms + halls or stairs for $89. We use natural detergents. Call 830-8215 or visit us at barefootcleaningcompany.com :JGD"EGD8A:6C>C< Family owned business that provides cleaning services for homes, businesses, rentals, and new construction cleanups. Moving in or moving out we will make your home or office shine. We offer long and short term contracts. We guarantee and stand behind our services. A limited trial period of three months is offered with no contract. Contact us at(208)5627832. >CI:G>DGE6>CI>C< Very reasonable prices! Help with colors, inside wall repair, texture, stain blocking and sealing, kitchen cabinets repainting, brush, roll and spray finish, attention to detail, 25 years of experience, dependable, references available! Call Joe-Bohemia Painting for a free written estimate! 208-3458558 or 208-392-2094.

NOTICES

BW PROFESSIONAL 8DBEJI:GEGD7A:BH44 FREE In-Store Computer Diagnostics 50% OFF ANY In-Store Service Virus/Spyware/Malware Removal Onsite/In-Store Service Business and Residential Quick Turnaround Times 100% Satisfaction Guarantee Call 345-3999 The Tech Pros, LLC. FJ6A>IN6GI>C8# Your local art and frame supply warehouse. HUGE selection of art supplies, frames and school craft supplies. Everyday discount of 20% off supplies and 30% off frames. Join us on Facebook and MySpace for up to date events and discounts. Contact our office and join our email list and receive special coupons and promotional offers. 672-0530 Boise ID

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Looking for barter? Post what you have, find what you need. Always free at www.boiseweekly.com.

NYT CROSSWORD | 1 Common toast 7 Be ___ (constantly complain) 12 Sounds accompanying toasts 18 Make sacred 19 Actress Tierney

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GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, active, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484.

COMMUNITY POSTINGS BW MUSICIAN’S EXCHANGE

MUSIC BW MUSICAL INSTRUCTION/OTHER

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38 Prepare for a bodybuilding competition 43 Actress Skye 44 11:59 p.m., e.g. 46 ___ double life 48 Summer shades 49 Later 51 Cream puffs

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Notice of Hearing on Name Change. Case No.: CVNC0918199. A Petition to change the name of Kelson James Hitchcock-Fisse, born 5/29/05 in Boise, ID residing at 2018 S. Cleveland, Boise ID 83705 has been filed in Ada County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Kelson James Fisse, because parents are now married. The child’s father is living. The child’s mother is living. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock pm on January 14, 2010, at the Country Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court good reason against the name changes. Date: Nov. 19, 2009. By C. Barclay, Deputy Clerk. ;G::DC"A>C:8A6HH>;>:969H Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

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BW ANNOUNCEMENTS

;:B6A:9GJBB:GL6CI:9 Female drummer wanted for gigging band. We practice twice a week and having your own equipment is a must. If interested please call or e-mail Heather at 353-3279. ADD@>C<;DG9GJBB:G Boise band is looking for a drummer to complete their ensemble. Must make practice and have your own equipment. If interested please contact me, Trevor at 4099231.

@>AGDN@D;;::@A6I8= Warhawk Air Museum is excited to announce the monthly “Kilroy was Here” coffee klatch. 1st Tuesday of every month. 10-11:30am. Warhawk Air Museum, 201 Municipal Dr, Nampa. >96=D6FJ6G>JB8AJ7 The Idaho Aquarium Club Launched this week check it out ay http:// idahoaquariumclub.com

TOASTING THE NEW YEAR BY ELIZABETH C. GORSKI / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

20 Neighborhood in Queens 21 Store 23 Cousins of Drama Desk Awards 24 Most hopeful 25 Purported cry from 100-Across upon discovering this puzzle’s subject

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Original rock like material needs to be recorded. Looking for an enthusiastic keyboardist to join us. Call Ed, 389-9619.

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Joint seal Sutherland of “24” Titleholder Beverage brewed naturally 59 Hoity-toity 61 Once more: Abbr. 62 Follows the path of 19th-century pioneers 64 Nail the test 65 Sweet talk 67 Sine ___ non 68 Lodge of the Fraternal Order of Eagles 69 Person on the alert for snow? 70 Late choreographer Cunningham 72 Swindle 74 Mechanic’s ___ 75 Alternative to 1-Across 77 Connoisseur of this puzzle’s subject 79 Dressed up, maybe 80 C 81 Name of seven Norwegian kings 84 Thai’s neighbor 85 Beatty of “Superman” 86 Ex-lib, perhaps 90 “___ can survive everything but a misprint”: Oscar Wilde 91 Al dente 92 Terriers’ warnings 94 ___ Lodge 95 Bad end 96 Symbol of strength 97 Pay back? 99 Scientologist ___ Hubbard 100 See 25-Across 108 Fakes 110 Restrained 111 Italian dumplings 114 Genetic material with no known function 115 Japanese porcelain 116 Become enraged, as a comic book figure 117 Miss, e.g.

118 Alcatraz, for one: Abbr. 119 Common overseas toast 120 General name on menus 121 Jump into a pool?

DOWN 1 When said three times, a dance 2 Spy Mata ___ 3 Mrs. Albert Einstein 4 Na, Ne, Ni or No 5 Some Mozart works 6 Hive mentality? 7 Berserk 8 Part of a plane 9 Having certain misgivings 10 “All systems ___” 11 Rope fiber 12 Went with 13 Was beaten by 14 1998 Olympic figure skating gold medalist ___ Kulik 15 D-back, e.g. 16 New Year’s Eve action 17 Grounded flier 22 Napkins and such 24 Up an offer, e.g. 26 “Frasier” role 27 What the Laugh Factory produces 31 Do bad 32 Skipped the subway, say 33 Raskolnikov in “Crime and Punishment,” e.g. 34 100-Across, for one 36 Of the ears 37 Slightest protest 39 Cry before “Happy New Year!” 40 Discovery of the explorer Louis Joliet 41 More restless 42 LAX setting 44 Due 45 Workplace watchdog grp.

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Describe The chills The wonder ___ all Wise Looped handle, in archaeology 56 Flower arrangement 58 Super ___ (water shooter) 59 Office PC hookup 60 Equine 62 Pursued tenaciously 63 Big ___ 66 Of the eyes 67 It may be taken with a bow 70 ___ scale 71 English Derby site 72 Swahili honorific 73 “The Good Earth” wife 76 Carpentry fastener 78 S-shaped molding 81 “Are you ___?” 82 Mil. address part 83 “Funny!” 87 Biodegradable pipe material 88 Lennon’s lady L A S T

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89 French vote 91 Former Saudi king 93 Cold-shoulder 96 Taps, in a way 98 “___ Dei” 101 Skirt length 102 Diamond stats 103 “___ Lama Ding Dong” (1961 hit) 104 Series ender: Abbr. 105 Arequipa is its second-largest city 106 Make a long story short? 107 Start of a plea 108 Comfy evening wear 109 “You talkin’ to me?” 112 Shade 113 Cousin ___ of “The Addams Family” Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

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| REAL ESTATE | CAREERS | TRANSPORTATION | FOR SALE | MIND, BODY, SPIRIT | PETS | | SERVICES | NOTICES | MUSIC | COMMUNITY POSTINGS | CONNECTION SECTION |

BW CLASSES ;G:98=D6I:D>A8A6HH:H At Quality Art Inc in Boise for $20/ class. Students receive 40% off all products they would like to purchase the day of class. Fred currently is teaching Mon. & Tues. mornings. Please contact Quality Art Inc. at 672-0530 for more information. @>G6769O>868GNA>88A6HH:H Kira Badzic holds acrylic classes at Quality Art Inc in Boise for $20/ class. Students receive 40% off all products they would like to purchase the day of class. Class schedule will change after Christmas. Please contact Quality Art Inc at 672-0530 for more information.

A:6GC6C:LA6C<J6<: ;DGI=:C:LN:6G At Puentes! Adult Spanish classes now formiing. Conversational Spanish that really works. 3444270. www.puentes.biz A:6GCIDCDG9>8H@>I=>HL>CI:G Novice, recreational, weekend warrior or advanced skier learn proper skating & classic technique w/ coaches & athletes of the Bogus Basin Nordic Team. Sun., 1/10. 2 sessions, $39/session. Pick one or both 9:30-11:30am & 1-3pm. Reserve now! bbntclinic@gmail. com. All proceeds beneďŹ t BBNT, a nonproďŹ t org.

BW LOST ADHIEG:H8G>EI>DC<A6HH:H ln zippered black case between Record Exchange and The Modern. Dec. 3rd. 336-5482. ADHIL:>B6G6C:G Went missing early evening Dec 27th from Mace Rd. (East of Eagle Island state park, by Two Rivers subdivision) No collar. 2 yr. old neutered male, all light grey in color, rear leg scarred up from past knee surgeries, very friendly loved very much! Microchip #0006-AB99-D9 registered at Intermountain Pet Hospital. Please call Dan 407-5144 or Doniel 860-3190 if found. Three bags of art prints were removed from Seda Studio s Volvo the Friday night before Christmas. The color prints by artist Jany Rae Seda. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ&#x201A;attering to have your art wanted, but not stolen during the night. Any clues of the art bandits or goods please contact 3361438. Art reward.

couraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates.

Hello ladies. I am 38 yrs. old. I have brown hair and blue eyes with an athletic build. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking for 18+ ladies to share friendly correspondence with. I am very fun, outgoing, and like to be spontaneous. Abbott #50326 Unit 9-B-48A I.S.C.I. PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707.

Made some bad decisions. 38 yr. old M, 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;2â&#x20AC;?, 235 lbs., brown hair and eyes seeks pen pal for friendship. Looks are not important but, a friendly outgoing personality is always nice. Christians welcome also. Scott Hernandez #94584 I.S.C.I. 14-D-40-A PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83704.

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Place your FREE on-line classiďŹ eds at www.boiseweekly.com. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy! Just click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Post Your FREE Ad.â&#x20AC;? No phone calls please.

CONNECTION SECTION BW ADULT ENTERTAINMENT BUYER BEWARE Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services. Come Where Single Play. Call 208287-0343 FREE w/code 5500 Call 800-210-1010. HOT GUYS! HOT CHAT! HOT FUN! Call 208-489-2162 or 800-7778000. FREE w/ code 2982.

A:6I=:G A68:

Has All Your Adult Desires, Open 7 Days A Week. 384-5760. MEET HOT LOCAL GUYS Browse & Respond FREE! 208-472-2200, Code 5724. Visit MegaMates. com, 18+. SEEKING SEXY SINGLES. Listen & Reply to Ads FREE! Straight 208345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7343. Visit MegaMates.com, 18+. WHERE SINGLES MEET Browse & Respond FREE! Straight 208345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7261, 18+. WILD LOCAL DATELINE Listen & Respond FREE! 208-345-8855 Code 7262. 888.MegaMates.com 18+.

BW PEN PALS Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are en-

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;12, 2010 | 29

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): According to my reading of the astrological omens, it’ll be a hair-on-fire kind of week for you—and yet also a heart-inrepose kind of week. In other words, you have the potential to be fierce and relaxed, vigorously ambitious and sublimely poised. In fact, this might be one of those rare times when you can be both a justice-dispensing warrior and an enlightenment-seeking magician. Want to turn water into wine when the pressure’s on? Find the pearl of great price in the heat of the battle? Feats like these are quite possible. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Can you pull off a mid-course correction while hurtling through the air across a chasm during a leap of faith? If anyone is capable of such a feat, you are. However, I’d prefer it if that wasn’t necessary. I’d rather see you prepare a little better, like by procuring the help you’d need to create a safety net or sturdy bridge that will stretch across the chasm. Or by getting one of those jet packs to strap across your back and allow you to fly. Or by taking as much guesswork as possible out of the details about how you’re going to get from the edge of one cliff to the edge on the other side. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): This is one of those rare times when you can get abundant access to insider secrets, unauthorized information, taboo knowledge and forbidden wisdom. Proceed carefully. As much as I’m an advocate of you getting to the whole truth and nothing but the truth, it’s also my duty to remind you that it could be disruptive to find out all of the truth in one big swoop. You should ask yourself if you’re fully prepared to change what needs to be changed once the previously hidden stuff emerges. If you’re not, it might be better to wait until you are. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Which metropolitan areas in America have the most brainpower? Not the best spor ts teams or the richest businessmen or the most power ful politicians, but the smar test people? Thedailybeast.com did a study and declared that the top two were the Raleigh-Durham area in Nor th Carolina and the San Francisco Bay Area. Now it so happens that those are the two places where I’ve spent much of my adult life. It doesn’t mean I’m brilliant, but it does suggest I have an instinct for knowing where the brilliant people congregate. And I’m quite sure that they have been a ver y good influence on me. My recommendation to you in 2010, Cancerian, is to cultivate this knack. Gravitate toward genius. Surround yourself with deep thinkers and innovative

30 | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | BOISEweekly

dreamers. Hang out in the vicinity of brainstorms. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “The more you complain,” says an old adage, “the longer God lets you live.” If that’s true, I hope you will be adding many years to your lifespan in the coming week. Would you like to live to the age of 100? There are many rich and colorful opportunities for you to lodge protests right now. You have cosmic permission to rouse a ruckus in the name of improving the way everything works. But try to concentrate on constructive criticism that really helps transform what’s stuck. The Divine Wow is more likely to give credit for that approach than for mere narcissistic grousing. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A reader calling herself Rebellioness collaborated with me to come up with five revolutionized approaches to the art of rebellion. I present them here for your use, as they identify the kinds of behavior that will be most nurturing for you to cultivate in the coming weeks. 1. Experimenting with uppity, mischievous optimism. 2. Invoking insurrectionary levels of wildly interesting generosity. 3. Indulging in an insolent refusal to be chronically fearful. 4. Pursuing a cheeky ambition to be as wide-awake as a dissident young messiah. 5. Bringing reckless levels of creative intelligence to all expressions of love. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I want to tell you about Harj, a character in Douglas Coupland’s novel Generation A. He’s an enterprising young Sri Lankan man who sells “celebrity room tones” over the Internet. Each hour-long recording purports to convey the sound of the silence that per vades the homes of luminaries like Mick Jagger and Cameron Diaz when they’re not there. I think that you Libras are now primed to learn from Harj’s example. Like him, you have the power to capitalize on nothingness and absence and emptiness. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A guy I know broke up with his girlfriend recently. He used a time-honored strategy: making it sound as if he wasn’t worthy of her. “It’s like you’re a grandmaster at a chess tournament,” he told her, “while I just got my first checkerboard and am still figuring out how to play checkers.” He was implying that she was much more skillful than he was in the arts of relationship. I have a feeling that there’s a situation like this in your world, Scorpio—an alliance in which the two parties are at different levels of maturity. I’m not necessarily saying you should sever

the connection. But you should at least acknowledge the gap and decide what to do about it. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In a million years, I would never authorize you to unleash your naked greed and give it unconditional license to careen through the world gobbling and acquiring and appropriating. However, due to an odd blip in the astrological configurations, I am at liberty to give you permission to unleash your discerning, elegant greed and grant it a temporary dispensation to sample more than usual of anything that captivates your ravenous imagination. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “You are what you love, not what loves you,” says the character Charlie Kaufman in the film, Adaptation. (Kaufman is played by Nicolas Cage, who has three planets in Capricorn.) I urge you to work hard to make that perspective your own, Capricorn. Ideally, it will become a permanent addition to your philosophy of life. But please at least try to install it as your primary words to live by for the next three weeks. To do so will smooth out a distortion in your energy field, making it easier for people to love you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I suspect you have to go down into the underworld for a while. But you have a choice about how it will play out. You shouldn’t wait for some random goblin to come along and pull you down into the miserable abyss. Instead, be proactive. Shop around for a more useful abyss—a womb-like pit with half-decent accommodations and a good learning environment—and go there under your own power. That way you won’t have to slog your way through musty fogs and creepy pests and slimy muck. You’ll keep your suffering to a minimum and attract adventures that are more intriguing than demoralizing. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): When my acupuncturist pushes a needle into my chest, my feet sometimes twitch involuntarily. A jab in my earlobe can cause my hand to leap off the table; when she pokes the bridge of my nose, my liver may throb. The lesson for me is that parts of the body are linked in ways that aren’t obvious. I invite you to expand this principle as you use it to evaluate the interconnections between different areas of your life. How do your attitudes about love affect your ability to attract money? (And vice versa.) Are there any ways in which your capacity for happiness is affected by your political views? How do your judgments about other people impact your physical health? More than even you farseeing Pisceans imagine, everything’s linked to everything.

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 6–12, 2010 | 31


Boise Weekly Vol. 18 Issue 28