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PA R E N T READING Events

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Make Your House

A HOME pages 17-19

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FNB Kids with

CLASS pages 6-7

Kids Eat

FREE & CHEAP page 28

Camps Child Care, Private Schools & CAMPS pages 7-9

Bowling Green’s Beauty

Ann-Blair Thornton “Outer beauty attracts, but inner beauty captivates.” After meeting Bowling Green’s own Miss Kentucky, Ann Blair Thornton, I could see the charm that made her different from the rest of the young women eager to win the title as the belle of the Bluegrass! Ann Blair’s parents are Steve and Terri Thornton of Bowling Green where her dad is an attorney and her mother a school teacher. Her school years were spent at St. Joseph School, Bowling Green High School and Western Kentucky University where she is completing a degree in English and economics with future plans for law school. When you ask about her preparation to become Miss Kentucky she readily tells you that her mother wasn’t interested in her entering any beauty contests. “Mom resisted the idea. In fact, I never participated in any contests at all until I was 15, when Mom thought I was old enough to choose.” “I can’t say that I came by my talent naturally,” Ann Blair explained. “But I began piano lessons as a second grader with my neighbor, Mary Lynne Griffin.” When she wouldn’t practice, it’s funny to hear about her mother saying, “Ann Blair, if you are ever going to be Miss America, you’re going to have to have a talent.” That was years before either she or her mother had any interest in pageants.

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“Academics is my strength. My grandmother, Sherry Thornton, shared her love of reading with me when I was very young.” Ann Blair said. “The worst punishment for me as a kid would have been to take my book from me.” “I was so excited when Heather French, Miss Kentucky, won Miss America in 2000. Heather married my Dad’s best friend, Steve Henry. It was Heather who helped me enter my first contest, allowing me to wear the gown she wore when she crowned the new Miss America. I had no idea what I was doing. “ As Miss Kentucky, Ann Blair spent a year working for the Department of Agriculture, visiting the far corners of Kentucky, speaking about Kentucky Proud at over 200 schools during the day and charity events, banquets and meetings at night. “It was a busy but amazing year. I met the most wonderful people from all over the Commonwealth. “ “When I look back on my year as Miss Kentucky, I think most about my Mom. She is so good at keeping me humble,” she said with a laugh. “Right after I was crowned there was a crowd of little girls wanting my autograph and when I excitedly pointed it out it to her, Mom just looked at me and said, ‘I see that! And I was thinking that you are still just Ann Blair from Bowling Green who can’t keep her room clean!’” <

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from the editor

in this issue

BG Parent magazine would like to thank you for being such supportive, loyal readers and Facebook fans. Without you, there would be no need to publish our family magazine for the community. That being said, we also wish to thank our advertisers for your continued support. Without you, we would not be able to print this compilation of community family-friendly info for our readers to enjoy. Each of you is greatly appreciated and valued in our eyes. Our magazine is something we love to do with regional people. None of our content has been purchased by advertisers. The covers, stories, events and spotlights are all contributed to or written by unpaid area experts. For our efforts, Bowling Green Parent Magazine was awarded the 2012 “Markie” in the category of Best Newsletter by the Professional Marketing Association of Bowling Green. The Professional Marketing Association is an organization that provides networking, professional development, peer recognition and community involvement for marketing professionals in the Bowling Green / Warren County area. The award category recognizes a recurring publication with news/feature articles distributed by print or electronic means. Thanks, again, to our readers, advertisers and contributors! This magazine is truly a community effort. Cara & Katie On the cover: Ann-Blair Thornton with our “My Kid Rocks” Photo Contest Winners Jenelle Kimmel, 3-year old daughter of Matt and Elizabeth Kimmel of Morgantown and Harrison Kerr, 2-year old son of Neil and Emily Kerr of Russellville. Photograph taken at Riverview at Hobson Grove by Rina Marie Photography.

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4 Community Spotlight 13-15 Calendar 26 Consignment Area Happenings & Events

Events & Activities Tips & Events

health & safety

10 Child Abuse 11 Dyslexia 16 Colic 22 Alzheimers

Recognition & Prevention

A Learning Roadblock A Family Cry-Sis

Losing Memories

arts & crafts

27 Easter

Fun Crafts & Activities

education

8 Learning to Love 7-9 Care & Camps 11-12 Book Nook 23 Chinese

Daycare, Private Schools & More

Bowling Green Parent is a quarterly publication for Bowling Green / Warren County and surrounding areas. We generate 10,000 free copies of this issue which can be picked up at over 200 local familyfriendly businesses in six counties. For a list of locations: www.bgparent.com/about/distribution To inquire about advertising, call 270-792-7228 or email info@bgparent.com. Carolyn Cossey Pitchford, Editor-in-Chief

All material and information, which appears in Bowling Green Parent Magazine, is presented for informational purposes only. Always consult your physician or child care expert if you have any questions concerning you or your Family’s well being. Bowling Green Parent Magazine presents all data as is, without any warranty of any kind, express or implied, and is not liable for its accuracy, for mistakes, errors, or omissions of any kind, nor for any loss or damage caused by a user’s reliance on information obtained in the magazine. Bowling Green Parent Magazine takes no responsibility as to the accuracy of statements in any of our articles or segments. We rely on independent writers and reader responses to present us with ideas and informational material.

THANKS to our supporters & contributors! Without the advertisers in BG Parent, we would not be able to bring this FREE publication to you! Please thank them by visiting their business, and tell them you saw them in BG Parent! We are also thankful for our talented writers and contributors who volunteer their time to bring you fresh stories. If you are interested in contributing, please email your idea to info@bgparent.com. bowling green

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events

Loving to Learn

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Katie Frassinelli, Publisher and Creative Director

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& I Love to Read Events Classes and Activities

features

6-7 Kids with Class 17-19 Home Sweet Home 20-21 Yummy Mommy 24 Travel: Atlanta 28 Family Dining

presented by Farmer’s Nat’l Bank Improvement & Sales Tips

Look & Feel Your Best

Quick Getaway Ideas

Kids Eat Free & Cheap!

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Community Spotlight & News Area Attractions Offering $6 Sundays Local attractions are coming together to offer deep winter discounts to local residents. Five of the area’s top venues including Diamond Caverns, Dinosaur World, Historic Railpark and Train Museum, Kentucky Down Under and Lost River Cave invite locals to see the treasures lying in their own backyard for only $6 per person on Sundays with local ID in both January and February. The $6 admission reflects big discounts. Regular adult admission rates are listed below. •Diamond Caverns $16 •Dinosaur World $12.75 •Historic Railpark & Train Museum $12 •KY Down Under $22 •Lost River Cave $15.95

Free Online Magazines The Warren County Public Library is offering over 80 full, digital copies of an assortment of magazines for download. Patrons have unlimited access to the library’s entire collection. These magazines are available for use on most portable devices as well on desktop and laptop computers. Each issue is available for checkout to any registered library patron at any time – there is no waiting! Outdoor enthusiasts will enjoy Backpacker, Bicycling, Women’s Adventure, Canoe and Kayak, and Field and Stream. Decorating buffs will like Martha Stewart Living, Country Living, Elle Décor, and House Beautiful. Several women’s favorites will be available for download including O, The Oprah Magazine, Marie Claire, and Good Housekeeping. News, entertainment, business, and Spanish language magazines are also available in the library’s collection. A full listing of all the titles offered will be found in the digital magazine site. For more information about this free service, call 781-4882 or visit www.warrenpl.org.

American Idol Phillip Phillips Coming to BG

American Idol Season 11 winner and Interscope Records recording artist Phillip Phillips will take to the stage at WKU’s Van Meter Auditorium on Monday, April 8 at 7pm. Phillips is best known for his hit song, “Home” while his album The World from the Side of the Moon debuted at No. 4 in the Billboard 200 last year. Phillips’ style is often compared to that of the Dave Matthews Band, and in addition to his solo gigs he is touring this year with Matchbox Twenty. Tickets will go on sale February 4-10 for WKU students only, and then to the general public on February 11. Prices start at $25 and will be available through Ticketmaster and the WKU Ticket Office in Diddle Arena. For more information, please call 270-745-2497.

“Dream Out Loud Challenge” Offers Scholarships Kentucky students in grades K-6 have a chance to win $1,500 toward college and $500 for their school in the “Dream Out Loud Challenge.” Students are invited to submit an original drawing, poem, essay or video answering the question: “How will I change the world after I go to college?” The challenge, sponsored by the Kentucky Education Savings Plan Trust (KESPT), is intended to remind families that it is never too early to start saving and planning for higher education. Six winning entries will be selected by a panel of judges. One winner will be chosen from each of two submission categories — drawing or video, and essay or poem — in grades K-2, grades 3-4 and grades 5-6. The winning students will receive a $1,500 KESPT college savings account, and their schools will win $500. The contest runs from Jan. 21 through March 22, 2013. KESPT is Kentucky’s official college savings plan and is administered by the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority and managed by TIAA-CREF Tuition Financing. The plan helps parents, grandparents and others invest in a child’s future college education. Visit www.kysaves.com to learn more about the challenge, including official rules and a complete description of entry requirements.

SKyPAC Youth Theatre Performances Don’t miss SKyPAC Youth Theater’s production of School House Rock Live, JR. Auditions will be held March 4 and 5, 4-8 p.m. at the SKyPAC Studio Theater, 601 College Street. Kids, ages 6-12, planning to tryout should prepare a one minute selection from any Broadway musical to perform.

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EXCLUSIVE CONTESTS!

Facebook.com/BGParent

fan banter Q. What’s the best Valentine’s gift you’ve ever received? Almost 30 years ago, I married my best friend on Valentines Day! -Lori My husband took me on a surprise weekend getaway. He had the room all ready for our entrance... rose petals everywhere, candles, a jacuzzi and a bottle of wine waiting for me. We went out on the town and had a nice romantic dinner. It was so very thoughtful, and it was an amazing weekend! I might add, he ALWAYS makes Valentine’s Day very special! -Shelley

Instead of opting for the generic pack of Valentine’s Day cards, why not give kids something more creative that will also help them stand out from the rest of the class? Kiwi Crate introduces Handmade Valentines, a special offering to help families celebrate friendship and caring in a creative and engaging way. The crate, (available in the Kiwi Crate Celebration Shop at kiwicrate. com/shop for $14.95), includes all the materials and inspiration needed to create 24 fun and easy personalized DIY pop-up cards in assorted designs and ladybugs. Kids can create, personalize and decorate their cards – no scissors required! One lucky Facebook Fan will win a Kiwi Crate! Just respond to our post on Facebook with what your favorite Valentine you’ve receive was, and we will randomly pick a winner on Friday, February 8!

Advertising Sales Rep. Bowling Green Parent Magazine is seeking a motivated, outgoing, self-starter for advertising sales. Qualifications include good verbal and written communication skills, knowledge of the Bowling Green area, be self-motivated, have reliable transportation and a friendly personality. Prior sales experience not required but is a plus. Set your own hours, work from home and on the road. Commission-based pay. To apply, email a resume and tell us why you want to join the BG Parent team to info@bgparent.com.

My son. -Cheryl My husband proposed to me on Valentine’s. -Paula 12 years ago, my then fiance’ made me a homemade poster-sized Valentine’s Day card. It’s so big the only place we can keep it is under the bed! He’s definitely a keeper! - Karen My husband proposed to me on Valentine’s Day in 2006 and then last year on Valentine’s we received our first child. - Paula My best Valentine’s gift was last Valentine’s Day; my husband and I spent it together with our then a little over one month old. - Jennifer bowling green

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Farmer’s National Bank Kids with Class

Kyle Acres is an 18-year-old senior at Allen County- Scottsville High School. Kyle is a dedicated artist in many mediums including recording engineering/producing, orchestral composition/ arrangement, and video game music direction. His musical diversity spans a broad spectrum from numerous awards at juried recitals/competitions as a gifted lead guitarist of heavy rock to being section leader and first chair trumpet in the ACSHS Patriot Band where he has served in its concert, pep, marching and jazz capacities. A member of his school’s History Club, he is also the newest recruit to a historical music endeavor to Allen County; The Scottsville Merchant Band. Kyle is the son of Lee and Donna Acres. < Dakota Duncan is 12-year-old seventh grader at South Warren Middle School. Dakota has been very active with the Warren County Democrats and put in countless hours volunteering at the headquarters before the

presidential election. He made upwards of 600 phone calls on behalf of Representative Jody Richards, and also encouraged Ohio voters to vote Democrat. Recently, Dakota participated in KYA. He is extremely motivated, and has recently been named one of KY’s youngest Colonels, an honor presented to him last month by Representative Richards. Dakota is the son of Jill Urbsaitis Duncan and Larry Duncan. < Aaron Holder is an 18-year-old senior at Allen County- Scottsville High School where he was a Kentucky Governor’s Scholar. Aaron is an exceptionally talented and involved youth. Scholar, athlete, civic volunteer, performance/recording artist are among his many hats. He has won numerous juried recitals and talent shows, represented our region annually at the International Youth Blues Showcase in Memphis, given freely of his time and talents for countless recordings and live performances, and is the youngest board member of the Allen CountyScottsville Arts Council. Aaron is the son of Steve and Terri Holder. <

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Ava Kate Lich is a 4th grader at South Edmonson Elementary School. She used an international trip to Central America to develop a project for her class. The class worked together to collect gently used school supplies for an impoverished elementary school in a remote village in Guatemala. Because of her efforts, Ava Kate’s classmates learned more about community support and philanthropy, while the international students received much-needed supplies to further their education. Ava Kate is the daughter of Stewart and Amanda Lich of Brownsville. < Ah Sa Ma is an 11-year-old sixth grade student at Lost River Elementary School originally from Burma. Ah Sa Ma shows exemplary leadership skills looking for ways to serve others. She helps bring preschoolers in the mornings and walking them to their classrooms. She is very responsible and is a member of Lost River’s leadership team. A fine student, she is a member of Beta and as a member of STLP she bowling green

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runs the school twitter account. Her parents are MuMu Shee and A Con. < Makenzie McIntyre is a nineyear old fourth grade student at McNeill Elementary. Makenzie is full of energy and spirit, thinking of others in the community who are less fortunate than her. She is always looking for toys, clothes and items than can be donated to and used by the children who belong to the Boys and Girls Club and others in the community who need it the most. Makenzie volunteers at the Humane Society where she walks the dogs and cares for cats. She is the daughter of Eric and Pam McIntyre. < Maura Rippy is a 12-year-old seventh grade student at Drakes Creek Middle School. After losing her grandfather who stayed at Hospice of Southern Kentucky, to cancer, Maura wanted to turn her grief into something positive. She decided to help Hospice and other families. Over the past two years Maura has raised more than $8,000 through several fundraisers. She also bakes and takes her gifts to patients and their families at the Hospice. In December 2011 Maura was a BG Hometown Hero. Her parents are Scott and Tashina Rippy. <

Logan West is a 17-year-old senior at Bowling Green High School. Logan has faithfully shared his time and talent the last four years with the Living Hope Baptist Church pre-school class, many of whom speak English as a second language. Logan has also gone to the aid of people from other places. He spent time assisting a church in Colorado build a retaining wall and walking trail. He has also helped a church in Scotland while visiting. Logan shares his time with the Hope House, organizing donations and assisting those in need. Logan is the son of Jennifer Davis and Mike West. <

Help BGP uncover hidden treasure by nominating that special kid you know to be a Farmer’s National Bank Kid with Class. We want to highlight kids of any age who go beyond the norm by being great leaders, citizens, athletes, musicians or scholars and also share their time and talent through projects, volunteer efforts, youth groups, clubs and/or organizations. To nominate a child, go to our website, bgparent.com, and click the link on our homepage. Or you can send an email to Cara@BGParent.com with complete details about your nominee.

Jordan Upton is an 18-yearold senior at South Warren High School where he is the Student Council president. He plans to attend WKU in the fall where he will be in the Honors College. Jordan’s credentials are many. One teacher remarked that, “Jordan is the most responsible person I’ve ever met (not just student, person).” He is reported to respectful, creative and a young man who puts that extra into everything he does. He is the Academic Team captain, a Beta Club officer, will graduate with six Advanced Placement credits and, as it stands, will be the SWHS valedictorian. Jordan is the son of John and

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Jennifer Upton. <

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Learning to Love Loving to Learn

One of my best childhood memories is of the many books my parents read with me. Long car rides became great opportunities because my mother would read marvelous chapter books to my sister and me. Since I’m a librarian, reading to my daughter Claire came as second nature. I never forced her to sit and read with me, fearing that at her young age being pentup to sit still and read with me, she would resent storytime. When she showed an interest, we cuddled up with book after book. Reading using different voices for characters is one way to hook children on listening to stories. You can also engage your child by visiting library or bookstore story-time. Reading many types of books is important. Picture books allow children to develop their imagination while non-fiction books help them learn more about the world. I hear parents complain they always read the same books over and over. My solution was to have an “already-read book basket.” This is a basket where we place books after we have read them. On Sundays we re-shelve those books. This ensures more of our stories get read. Dr. Seuss said it best, “The more that you read, the more words that you’ll know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”

I’m the first to admit there are many wonderful shows on television and games on iPads and other forms of technology. The trick is not tuning out your child as they tune-in. Claire and I watch shows together. We talk about what is happening in the shows. She makes predictions of what she thinks will happen. Shows that teach about reading, science, and math are an excellent springboard to learning. Learning happens best though when the devices are turned off. When children see their parents are excited about learning, they too will become excited. One thing we do with Claire instead of saying, “You’re so smart” when she learns something new is to say, “You’re a great thinker!” or “You’re really working hard at school!” This lets her know learning takes effort and we value the time and energy she is putting in to learning. Whenever possible, take a trip to a children’s museum, play a variety of music, and encourage your kiddo to interact with other children. Having fun learning together while your child is growing up will teach your child to love learning. <

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Pictured: Claire, daughter of Mark & Julie Boggess.

About the author: Julie Roberts Boggess is an elementary librarian at Pearre Creek Elementary School in Williamson County, TN. She enjoys working with elementary and middle school students in Saturday and summer programs offered by The Center for Gifted Studies at WKU. Julie has earned multiple degrees from WKU. She lives in Tennessee with her husband, Mark, and her delightful daughter, Claire.

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Child Abuse Prevention Ties that Bind and Heal Community Action of Southern Kentucky’s (CASOKY) Community Collaborations for Children (CCC), 921 Beauty Ave. in Bowling Green, offers child abuse prevention programs for adults who struggle with parenting. Parents can be referred by an agency or can refer themselves. Services include in home services for a minimum of six to eight weeks or parent groups which meet weekly for 6-8 weeks. The CCC focuses on the prevention of child abuse and neglect while strengthening the power of families. An example of how we can help struggling families can be shown through our work with Rebecca, her husband and three children. The Department of Community Based Services (DCBS) Protection and Permanency referred her for services and temporarily placed her children with relatives because of environmental concerns including keeping the house clean and organized, time management, finances, and discipline. Rebecca was receptive to working with CCC. When the case opened, her family had already addressed the environmental concerns. Rebecca told me she was “so ashamed of the way they found the house and at herself for letting it get that way.” She thought she may have been depressed at that time because she “slept a lot.” She is proud of the improvements and works to keep the house clean. CCC provided information, modeling, and

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coaching on setting up a routine for the household including a cleaning schedule, appointment calendar, budgeting, goal setting and rules and responsibilities for all household members. Rebecca shared with the CCC team her history of drug abuse and felony charges. She repeatedly told us “I would do anything to keep from losing my children again.” Rebecca participated in parenting curriculum 1,2,3,4, Parents! Parenting your 1 to 4 year old and Active Parenting of Teens. Rebecca received needed dental treatment through CCC before the case closed. When I arrived at the home on the day her case closed, she stated “I feel like I have done something.” Rebecca has faced other challenges during the time CCC worked with her and her family. However, she demonstrated the skills to make good decisions and be assertive with her children and community resources. Her goal is to go back to school. We look forward to doing the six month follow-up because we feel confident this family will continue to grow safely together. Parenting is not easy and CASOKY wants those who need help to know that there are programs and services available. Child abuse is preventable – learning more about appropriate parenting is one sure way to help prevent child abuse. <

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the

book nook

Local book lovers are incredibly lucky to have the Southern Kentucky Book Fest in Bowling Green every year. The 2013 Book Fest will take place on April 19 and 20 at the Knicely Conference Center on Campbell Lane, and it will spotlight many wonderful authors. Book Fest weekend kicks off on Friday the 19th with Children’s Day, an opportunity for educators, students, and community members to meet and purchase books by the children’s authors and illustrators who will be at Book Fest the next day. Activities on Saturday the 20th will include a breakfast on with Mary McDonough (better known as Erin Walton from the television show The Waltons) during which Mary will present “Body Branding: Getting Comfortable with the Skin You’re In.” This talk will be geared toward pre-teen and teen girls and their parents, and its focus will be on positive body image. Other children’s activities on Saturday the 20th will include

a writing workshop for kids presented by author/ illustrator Jarrett Krosoczka, characters from favorite children’s television shows in costume, and a makeand-do area. More details about these events and many more will be on the Book Fest website: www. sokybookfest.org. The headliner at the 2013 Book Fest will be Henry Winkler (yes, the Fonz is coming to Bowling Green!), and he will be doing a presentation on the morning of the 20th and signing books that day as well. Many people don’t realize that Henry is an author, but he and his co-author, Lin Oliver, have teamed up since 2003 to create the Hank Zipzer series of books. The series starts when Hank Zipzer is in 4th grade, and it illustrates the title character’s difficulties at school with humor and sensitivity. Henry Winkler grew up with many learning challenges, and the Hank Zipzer books reflect his struggles in the education system because of

them. As an adult, Henry was diagnosed with Dyslexia, and this has led him to be a crusader and advocate for children who learn differently. I’ve read some of the Hank Zipzer books, and they definitely deserve the rave reviews they receive. They’re entertaining for readers of all ages, and they offer great insight into what it’s like to be a child who has learning challenges. As one of the Zipzer reviews in Booklist says, “Boys who struggle in school will especially appreciate the story, but this enjoyable, fast-paced novel will draw other children as well.”<

About the author: Kristie Lowry is the Literary Outreach Coordinator for WKU Libraries. She has four children ranging in age from 22 to 11, and she will become a grandmother to twin girls this summer. Kristie’s untidy home is typically filled with people and books, and she decided long ago to call cooking a hobby so that she can pretend she has one.

Special Minds: Dyslexia Do you know what the minds of Woodrow Wilson, Leonardo Da Vinci, Walt Disney, and Thomas Edison have in common? These individuals all had dyslexia… and clearly a drive to do something bigger and better. Dyslexia is a learning disorder that primarily affects a person’s ability to read, write, and spell. However, children with dyslexia are often highly capable, creative, and bright. Some may even grow up to have successful writing careers – look at Henry Winkler! Unlike what is commonly thought, dyslexia is not caused by vision problems. Instead, it is suspected to be related to the language center part of the brain. If you are wondering if your child has dyslexia, ask yourself - does my child: • Read at a level below what is expected for their age • Have difficulty rhyming, recognizing letters, matching letters to sound, and blending sounds into speech • Struggle with spelling • Spell/write letters or words in reverse (“b” for “d” or “was” for “saw”) – this is typical of many young children, but may last longer for children with dyslexia • Struggle to remember facts and numbers • Have difficulty processing information or directions • Have problems with sequencing • Rush through and guess unknown words when

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reading • Have trouble summarizing a story If you have concerns that your child is having difficulty learning to read or showing signs of dyslexia, talk to your child’s teacher. A pediatrician or school psychologist can be other helpful resources. Keep in mind, there is no one test to diagnose dyslexia and be wary of businesses that sell “quick fixes.” If your child has been diagnosed with dyslexia, here are some things you can do: • Talk to your child. Explain what dyslexia is. Give them tips for coping. • Support learning at home. Read to your child from very early on. Provide a calm, organized environment to encourage reading and a place to do homework. Consider signing your child up for tutoring. • Stay in contact with your child’s teachers. Ask questions and give input on how your child learns best. • Seek modifications in the classroom. This might include extra time to complete assignments, help with note taking, tests being read aloud, books on tape, etc. • Be supportive. Focus on your child’s strengths and talents. Recognize and validate the frustration they must be feeling. Remember all minds are special. Even with feb / mar / apr 2013

challenges, a child with dyslexia could be the next great author, artist, or scientist! <

About the author: Christy Bryce is a School Psychologist in Warren County Schools. She spends her days experiencing life with her untiring, endearing husband and entertaining, vivacious children. Her personal endeavors include serving on the Board of the Family Enrichment Center striving to prevent child abuse; reading with her book club; and spending time with her family. page

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Area Schools Celebrate

READING

Jody Richards Elementary Spring Book Fair Feb. 7-15. Read Across America Read-AThon Feb. 25-Mar. 1, collecting money for students in need McNeill Elementary I Love to Read Week (Feb. 11-15) community volunteers will read a favorite book to classes and share how they use reading in their daily lives in addition to other planned activities. Read Across America (week of March 2) – celebrating Dr. Seuss’ Birthday with activities and the Spring Book Fair. DEAR Day (Apr. 12) – Students & teachers will drop everything and read for a 30 minute time period. Parker Bennett Curry April 11-19 – Spring Book Fair Warren East Middle School Feb. 12 - Girl’s Night Out for mothers and daughters with bonding activities using book titles as themes for the activities. March 12 - Guy’s Night Out for fathers and sons. April - “Book Fair” where students will set up with books they have read from the Kentucky Bluegrass Award list, much like a Science Fair, only with books.

Oh, The Places You’ll Go! with Books from the Library

The best guarantee for future academic success is both simple and fun, and you don’t have to spend anything but time to make a great investment in it – reading! Parents love it, librarians live by it, and research proves it: readers make great learners. And when books and reading are used as springboards for conversation and play, families can make their own stories as words leap from the page into imaginations forever. Since learning and reading are so vitally interconnected, parents who want to put their children on the path to academic success can follow this simple strategy: visit the library, read together, savor the stories, repeat. It’s never too soon to start the process, it’s never too late to make a difference, and your friends at Warren County Public Library would love to see every child’s story start at their library. Reading celebrations are in full gear this season – with Love Your Library month taking place in February, Read Across America in March, and National Library Week in April –- and the public library is excited to offer numerous activities for all ages during those times. In About the author: Ashley Fowlkes is the addition to weekly programs for school Assistant Director at Warren County age children, preschoolers, toddlers, Public Library. She loves to read, as do and babies, all library locations will her three children, ages 4, 7, and 13. be hosting special events, so take some Graduate school brought her husband time to coordinate your calendar and and her to Kentucky; they have called ours ( warrepl.org/calendar2.html). < Bowling Green home since 1998.

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area events & activities Festivals & Major Events

Feb. 3 KY First LEGO League State Robotics Championship, E.A. Diddle Arena, 9am-6pm, orgs. wku.edu/kyfll/2012/ Feb. 8-10 31st Annual Lone Star Rodeo, WKU Ag Expo Center, Fri 8pm, Sat 2pm & 8pm, Sun 2pm, 270-745-2578, wku.edu/expo Feb. 13 Empty Bowls, St. James United Methodist Church, 5-9pm, $10, emptybowlsbg.com Feb. 24 Hospice Chocolate Festival, Sloan Convention Center, 2-5pm, booths, kids candy store, celebrity cooking eating, vendors, $10 adult, $5 children 6-12, $20 VIP for early access at 1pm, 270782-3402, hospicesoky.org Mar. 1-3 Home Expo 2013, Sloan Convention Center, presented by the Builders Assoication of South Central Kentucky, over 100 exhibitors of products for your home, 270-781-3375, bascky.com Mar. 1 Penguin Plunge, Sloan Convention Center, 10:30am, benefitting Junior Achievement, 270-7820280, jaforkids.com

Feb. 1-28 $5 Open Play, Hopscotch’s Playplace Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24 $6 Sundays, reduced price admission at Dinosaur World, Ky Down Under, Lost River Cave, Diamond Caverns, Historic Railpark & Train Musuem with local id Mar. 29-31 Easter Eggstravaganza Weekend, Jellystone of Mammoth Cave, crafts, games, egg decorating contest, egg hunt, parade and more. Apr. 20 Pioneer Cemetery Lantern Tour, Living History event, part of Civil War commemoration, 45-minute walking tours begin at 7, 8, and 9pm, $10 adults, $5 seniors/ students, 12 & under free, 270745-7317, visitbgky.com/civilwar Music & The Arts Feb. 8-24 Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, PTK Mainstage Theater, Phoenix Theater, Thurs 7 pm, Fri/Sat 8 pm, Sun 3 pm, 270-781-6233, www.ptkbg.org/ Feb. 9 Mark Nizer in 3-D, SKyPAC, 7:30 pm, 270904-1880, theskypac.com

Apr. 5-7 Giant Lego Expo, Kentucky Expo Center, Louisville, Fri. 4-8:30pm, Sat. & Sun. 9am-7:30pm, www.legokidsfest.com

Feb. 11 Carmina Burana, Orchestra Kentucky VIP Series, SKyPAC, 7:30pm, 270-846-2426, orchestrakentucky.com

Apr. 19-21 BG Civil War Commemoration, Living History event, Downtown, reenactors, artillery drills, demonstrations, period food, Military Ball and more, 270-745-7317, visitbgky.com/civilwar

Feb. 19 DRUMLINE Live, SKyPAC, 7:30 pm, 270904-1880, theskypac.com Feb. 21 A Chorus Line, Broadway Series, SKyPAC, 7:30 pm, 270-904-1880, theskypac.com

Apr. 20 Mini Corvette Challenge, National Corvette Museum, 270-782-0820, jaforkids.com

Feb. 23 Kidz on Stage, Capitol Arts Center, 6:30pm, $5 (children 3 and under are free)

Apr. 20-21 SOKY Book Fest, Knicely Conference Center, 270-745-4502, sokybookfest.org

Feb. 25 Experience The Beatles with RAIN, SKyPAC, 7:30 pm, 270-904-1880, theskypac.com

FAMILY FUN

Feb. 28-Mar 3 The Pirates of Penzance, Van Meter Hall, Thur. Fri. Sat. Mon. 8pm, Sun. 3pm, Adults $18/Students $15, 270-745-5845, wku.edu/theatreand-dance

Jan. 26-May 5 “Moneyville” Exhibit presented by PNC Bank, National Corvette Museum, 270-7817973, corvettemuseum.org

Mar. 2 Disco Fever, Orchestra Kentucky Retro Series,

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SKyPAC, 7:30 pm, 270-846-2426, orchestrakentucky. comSKyPAC Mar. 2-Apr 6 US Bank Celebration of the Arts, Kentucky Museum, M-Sat. 9am-4pm, 745-2592, wku.edu/museum Mar. 7-17 A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, PTK Sunburst Theater, Phoenix Theater, Thurs/Fri/Sat 7 pm, Sun 3 pm, 270-781-6233, www. ptkbg.org/ Mar. 11 The Rite of Spring @ 100, Ochestra Kentucky VIP Series, SKyPAC, 7:30pm, 270-8462426, orchestrakentucky.com Mar. 19-20 Cathy Rigby is Peter Pan, SKyPAC, 7:30 pm, 270-904-1880, theskypac.com Mar. 22 Famous Fifth; The Symphony at WKU, Van Meter Hall, 7:30pm, 270-745-7681, bgwso.org Mar. 28-31 “Bridge to Terabithia”, Fountain Square Players, Phoenix Theater, Thur-Sat 8pm, Sun 3pm, 270-782-3119, fountainsquareplayers.org Apr. 11-16 Dead Man’s Cell Phone, Gordon Wilson Lab Theatre, Thur. Fri. Sat. Mon. & Tues. at 8pm, Sun. at 3pm, Adults $15/Students $12, 270-7455845, wku.edu/theatre-and-dance Apr. 13 Jack Hanna’s Into the Wild, SKyPAC, 7:30pm, 270-904-1880, theskypac.com Apr. 18 DREAMGIRLS, Broadway Series, SKyPAC, 7:30 pm, 270-904-1880, theskypac.com Apr. 19-May 5 Five Women Wearing the Same Dress, PTK Mainstage Theater, Phoenix Theater, Thurs 7 pm, Fri/Sat 8 pm, Sun 3 pm, 270-781-6233, www.ptkbg.org/ Apr. 20-21 Menopause the Musical, Capitol Arts Center, Sat. 3pm/8pm, Sun. 2pm, $45-60, 270-9041880, theskypac.com, menopausethemusical.com Apr. 22 Broadway in Love, Orchestra Kentucky VIP Series, SKyPAC, 7:30pm, 270-846-2426, orchestrakentucky.com

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Apr. 23 STOMP, SKyPAC, 7:30 pm, 270-904-1880, theskypac.com Apr. 25-29 Evening of Dance, Russell H. Milller Theatre, Thur. Fri. Sat. & Mon. at 8pm, Sun. at 3pm, all tickets $12, 270-745-5845, wku.edu/theatre-anddance Apr. 26 Choral Finale; The Symphony at WKU, Van Meter Hall, 7:30 pm, 270-745-7681, bgwso.org Education Feb. 15 Spell-a-Bration, Sloan Convention Center, food, music, silent auction, costume contests & table decorations, commed.us, 270-842-4281 Feb. 18 Lego Camp, 8am-4:30pm, National Corvette Museum, K-6th grade, $35, pre-reg. required, 270467-8852 or www.corvettemuseum.org/science Feb. 18-Mar. 21 Foster Parenting & Adoption training, Glasgow, Mon. & Thur., 270-746-7447 Feb. 21 Hair and Skin Care for Minority Children, 6-8pm, First Christian Church, 270-842-9032 Mar. 2 Powder Puff Mechanics, 10am-2pm, National Corvette Museum, basic car care and maintenance seminars geared towards women, pre-reg. required, 270-467-8852, www.corvettemuseum.org Mar. 2-Mar. 30 Foster Parenting & Adoption training, Bowling Green, Saturdays, 270-746-7447 Mar. 7 Better U Series: Stress Management, Warren Co. Public Library Main Branch, 6pm, 270-7814882, warrenpl.org Mar. 14 Better U Series: Personal Safety, Warren Co. Public Library Main Branch, 6 pm, 270-781-4882, warrenpl.org Mar. 17, 24 Junior Naturalist Program, Lost River Cave, pre-reg required, 270-393-0077, lostrivercave. com Mar. 21 Better U Series: Tai Chi, Warren County Public Library Main Branch, 6pm, 270-781-4882, warrenpl.org Mar. 21 From Darkness to Light: Child Sexual

Abuse, 6-8pm, First Christian Church, 270-842-9032 Mar. 28 Better U Series: Chinese Calligraphy, Warren Co. Public Library Main Branch, 6pm, 270781-4882, warrenpl.org Apr. 11-Jun. 20 Foster Parenting & Adoption training, Bowling Green, Thursdays, 270-746-7447 Apr. 18 Bullying: Help for You and Your Child, 6-8pm, First Christian Church, 270-842-9032 SportS & Recreation Feb. 9 Cupid’s Chase 5K, Bowling Green High School, 10am, 270-780-9330, comop.org/cupidschase Mar. 1 2nd Annual Race for a Wish 5K Run and 1.5 Mile Walk, Kereiakes Park, 5pm, $25 registration, supports the Make-A-Wish Foundation Mar. 13-16 Houchens Industries/ KHSAA Girls’ Sweet 16 Basketball Tournament, WKU E.A. Diddle Arena, khsaa.org Mar. 23 Total Fitness Connection Mini Marathon 5k Run & Walk for Children to benefit Family Enrichment Center, 8am, Basil Griffin Park, runwalkky.com, Nickie Jones 270-781-6714 SHopping Feb. 8-10 Macy’s 2013 Used Book Sale, benefitting the Soky Book Fest, L & N Depot, Fri. 7am-7pm, Sat. 8am-5pm, Sun. 1pm-5pm, 270-745-4502, sokybookfest.org/MacysUsedBookSale Feb. 25 Matilda Jane Resale Event, Jack & Jill’s Children’s Consignment, 3-8pm (seller drop off Feb. 24 or 25, 12-2pm), 270-796-4100 Mar. 1-2, Lil’ Angels Attic Children’s Consignment Sale, 9am-7pm Fri, 8am-12pm Sat., Broadway United Methodist, lilangelsattic.org, 270-843-3942 x3003 Mar. 20-23 Duck Duck Goose Consignment, Potter Children’s Home Gymnasium, open daily 10am-8pm, 1/2 price Saturday, www.dkdkgoose.com Apr. 13 Girl’s Day Out, Sloan Convention Center Ballrooms B, C & D, 10am-4pm, door prizes, giveaways, samples, shopping, 270-791-4873

Note: While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this information, all information is subject to change. Please call ahead to verify dates, times and schedules! bowling green

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Educational Offerings Free Activities at Warren Co. Public Library Smiths Grove Branch Too Cool Activity Hour (grades K-5) Tue. 3pm Preschool Storytime (age 3-5) Wed. 10:30am Teen Library Club (grades 6-12), Thurs. 5pm Graham Drive Afterschool Activities (all ages) Mac Lab Tues. 3-5pm Graham Troopers (School-Age) Wed. 3:30pm Teen Tuesdays (grades 6-12) Tues. 4pm Main Library Toddler Time (18-36mos.) Mon. 10:30am, Tue. 9:30am Preschool Storytime (age 3-5) Thur. & Fri. 10:30am Preschool Spanish (age 3-5) Tue. 10:30am Spanish Explorers (grades K-6) Tue. 4pm Peek-a-Boo Babies (6-18mos.) Fri. 9:30am Ky Youth Drama Society (grades 5-12) Wed. 4pm Kirby Branch Toddler Time (18-36mos.) Mon. 10am Kirby Kids (grades K-6) Mon. 3:30pm Kirby Babies (6-18mos.) Wed. 10am Preschool Storytime (age 3-5) Wed. & Fri. 11am Preschool Spanish (age 3-5) Fri. 10am Free Offerings from The Medical Center Medical Center Expectant Parent Fair (Apr. 28) 1-3pm Medical Center Auditorium. Free and open to all expectant parents. Preparing and Caring for Baby, Classes offered by The Medical Center. Info and registration at 270-796-2495 or themedicalcenter.org A New Baby’s Coming (Mar. 21) 6-8pm Breast is Best (Mar. 18) 6-8pm C-Section Class (Mar. 19) 6-8pm Fatherhood 101 (Mar. 19) 7pm, Classroom 2 Grandparents Class (Feb. 12) 6-8pm Newborn Care & Safety Class Feb. 7 & 28, Mar. 4&28, Tucker, 6-8pm; Feb. 22, Mar. 22, Fairview, 2-4pm Nutrition During Pregnancy (Feb. 19) 5:30-6:30pm Prepared Childbirth Classes Five Week Series (Tuesdays Mar. 5-Apr. 9), 6pm One-Night Refresher (Mar. 12) 6pm One-Day (Feb. 23, Mar. 23) 9am-1pm Ready, Set, Go! (Feb. 11, Mar. 11) 6-8pm Twins or More (Feb. 13) 6-8pm

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Baby has Colic

Congratulations on the birth of your child! Now that you have that beautiful gift from heaven home with you, you might be wondering why your infant is crying for no apparent reason. Chances are, your precious bundle has colic, one of the most mysterious of infant ailments. It is certainly a strain on new mothers and the families that must listen to tiny babies cry for extended periods of time. Colic is a term used to describe uncontrollable crying in up to 10-15% of otherwise healthy babies. If your baby is younger than five months old and cries for more than three hours in a row on three or more days a week for at least three weeks (phew!), chances are that infant is colicky. Colic isn’t a disease and won’t cause your baby any long-term harm, but it’s a tough thing to go through for both babies and their parents. Many times the episodes seem to occur at the same time every day. Term babies usually begin symptoms in the first month. Premature babies often may be “older” when they develop colic. Breastfed babies are 50% less likely to have colic. • If you’re breastfeeding, you can try to eliminate milk products, caffeine, onions, spices and other irritating foods from your diet. If you’re feeding formula to

your baby, a small percentage improves with the use of Nutramigen/Alimentum formula. • Keep your baby dry, warm and fed • Try walking or rocking your baby. Motion and body contact will reassure her. • Lay your baby tummy-down across your knees and gently rub her back. • Swaddle her in a large, thin blanket so that she feels secure and warm. • Gas drops (simethicone) may help some babies There are Red Flags which require further investigation: 1. Green/yellow spit up and/or vomiting which occurs more than 5x day 2. Change in stool especially with blood or mucus 3. Abnormal rectal temperature above 100 4. Irritability with few calm periods 5. Lethargy-excessive sleepiness, lack of smile, weak sucking lasting more than six hours 6. Poor weight gain (less than half ounce per day) Try not to worry too much about whether or not you’ll be able to calm your baby during the ‘fussies.’ Hold him, feed him, and change his diaper. The bottom line is colic more than a nuisance. Work with your

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Photo by Red Elephant Studio

Cry-Sis for the Whole Family

Pictured: Leighton Boler, daughter of Jamie & Lindsey Boler pediatrician’s office to help cope and/or treat that small percentage of cases where diet change may help.<

About the author: Dr. Debra Sowell, a pediatrician at the Graves Gilbert Clinic, is a BG High School and Western Kentucky University alum who received her medical degree at the University of Kentucky. She enjoys needlework and watching BGHS, WKU and UK sporting events.

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Making Your House a Home After the holidays are over, I always see a surge of people trying to make their homes feel as cozy as they did when all of their holiday decorations were in place. Whether the homes are 1,500 or 6,000 square feet, there are some common items and design methods that would help make everyone’s home more polished and warm. One common problem I see is a lack of rugs in rooms. We are a society that has gone to mostly hard wood because of the amount of people with allergies, animals, and kids, but people forget to infuse rugs in whenever they can. When choosing a rug, there are a few variables that would help take the guess work out of size. There are two ways to look at furniture placement on a rug: either the rug surrounds the furniture and envelops the whole area to make a defined space, or you make the rug the focal point of the center of the furniture placement. I recommend that you put the front legs of the chairs or couch on the rug, and that it be a colorful, vibrant rug...like the Company C rugs or Surya rugs that I find at Bowling Green Home Furnishings. Another issue I am presented with is the lack of larger home accessories that people choose for their house. This varies from the size of art on the wall,

(The Gallery at 916 always has ample sized, original art) the size of books in their rooms, to the size mirrors in their bathrooms or bedrooms. Don’t be afraid to go bigger in the house. I have a large mirror that I found in BGHF and it looked enormous in the store, but once I got it home and hung it (in a stud, with an anchor that supported up to 255 lbs.), it became the one thing everyone in my house commented on and lusted after. I also recommend doing a grouping of pictures, either of family, friends, or that favorite city that makes you smile with amazing frames, like the Dryads Dancing frames I get from Lucy’s Gifts in Bowling Green. Lastly, I have always been a fan of perfumes and smells, but too much is well...too much. I buy The Nest candles from Seagrass Spa in Downtown BG. You have to have a balance of large and small, mute and bright to make a home work. I just try to remember what my high school algebra teacher taught me....whatever you do to one side you have to do to the other. Continuity is essential, and organization is the key.<

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About the author: Laura Gilbert started her love of interiors and gifts at Werner-Lowe as a floor sales/wrapper/bank goer extrodenaire. She opened On the Dot in The Pines and after being open 4 years, found herself solely in houses day after day and didn’t see the point of a retail space. In 2013 she juggles, billboards, advertising, and interiors along with her soon to be 5 year old son, Garrard.

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Preparing Your Home for SALE It is many words; Abode, Pad, Domicile, Dwelling, Home. Laura Ingalls Wilder said, “Home is the nicest word there is.” Dorothy from the Wizard of Oz proclaimed, “There’s no place like home.” It can be said that one of the most warm, nostalgic words in the English language is home. It is where memories are made, visions are forged and the proverbial wagons are circled. It is simply the American Dream. A home is one of the biggest investments and largest purchases in a person’s lifetime. The process of selling or buying a home ranks as one of the most stressful things a person encounters, right behind divorce and dealing with a death. The good news is there are professional people trained and experienced to assist you in your quest for a new home or selling where you currently live. As a seller, the flow of the real estate transaction begins before you hire a real estate professional. The first step is to get your home ready for sale. Have your REALTOR walk through your home and decide on things that fall into 4 categories.

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One category is to de-clutter and create space. Clean closets, get rid of piles and move or remove some furniture to showcase the size

of rooms.

The second category is to clean, deep clean. Windows need to glean, bathrooms need to shine and the home needs to have a showroom quality in every aspect. Make sure that your home is in “retail” condition. The third category is repairs. It is finally time to repair the light fixture that has listed to one side for the last 10 years. It is important to fix loose doorknobs, change blown lightbulbs and oil squeaky doors. The final category is possible replacement ideas. Carpet that is worn and stained needs to be replaced, old bathroom and kitchen fixtures warrant a new shiny, trendy look and cabinets may need re-facing. A seller may need to spend some time compiling a cost analysis to determine if repair or replacement is more beneficial to the sale of the home. Sometimes spending a little money on a home before listing the home with a professional may net you more money in the end. Always remember that the ultimate goal is to complete the real estate transaction with a happy buyer and a happy seller.. <

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About the author: Stacey Fergerson with Coldwell Banker Legacy Real Estate works daily with sellers helping them get there home ready for listing. She has unique experience in staging homes for a successful sale. Call her for additional ideas.

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Flatter Your

FACE

No matter your face shape—round, oval, heart, square, diamond or long there will be haircuts that look best on you and some that aren’t so flattering. You don’t want to highlight your problems. Long hair tends to drag a LONG face down. This is a basic rule of finding a great haircut for your face shape. You can get away with it if you cut in some long layers that hit at the cheekbones and chin. If you have a ROUND face you don’t want short curly hair that makes your round face appear rounder. If you have a SQUARE face you’ll want to play down your strong, angular jaw line. Texture or choppy ends will do this brilliantly! These styles also accommodate the DIAMOND face. OVAL faces tend to look well in just about anything, but these faces can appear long, so be careful not to add height on top of the head. HEART shaped faces tend to come with pointy chins, so you’ll want to draw attention to your eyes and cheek bones. If you are over 55, must you cut off all your hair? This beauty rule puts women in a box! The rule of thumb for older women remains: find a cut that flatters your best features and downplays you’re not-so-good (hello, big nose or large ears). < About the author: Tammy York is a hairdresser at Sun Suites with 11 years experience. She is a Redken color specialist, certified in Platinum Seamless Extensions. In her quest to become the best hairstylist she can be, she has traveled to Chicago, New York, Orlando, and Ft. Lauderdale to further her education and learn the latest in cutting edge styles.

YUMMY MOMMY

Get a Beach Ready Body with Yoga A strong core may help give you that beach-ready bikini body; but more importantly, it provides greater stability and protects the spine from injury. Just 15 minutes a day can create lasting effects for a pain-free, beautiful body. Boat Pose – Start sitting with knees bent and feet flat. Inhale, lift your sternum and lean back, then extend your arms out beside your knees. For more of a challenge, lift your feet so that your shins are parallel to the floor or extend your toes upward so that your body forms a V. Stay here for three breaths then release and hug your knees into your chest. Repeat this posture three more times. Locust – Lying flat on your stomach, extend your arms down towards your hips. Reach out into your heels and lift your feet off the floor. Simultaneously lift your chest off the floor and outstretch your arms reaching overhead. Release any extra tension in the glutes, neck or shoulders. Hold for three breaths then release and

About the author: Shanda Packard is a Certified Yoga Therapist and owner of Harmony Therapeutic Yoga, located in Cambridge Market Square. Find out more about Shanda and Harmony Therapeutic Yoga at www.HarmonyTheraYoga.com or on Facebook at Harmony Therapeutic Yoga.

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push your hips back towards your heels. Repeat this posture three more times. Forearm Plank – Come onto your forearms, with heels extended into a forearm plank. Focus on keeping your pelvic bones pulled up into the core, and forming a straight line from the crown of the head to the heels. Hold for three breaths then release and push your hips back towards your heels. Repeat this posture three more times. Knee-to-Chest Plank – Starting in a plank, come up on the tip-toes, press into the palms, bring the right knee into the chest, pull the navel in toward the spine, and round the back body. Hold for three breaths, then return to plank and repeat on the left side. Hold for three breaths then release, bring your knees to the floor and push your hips back towards your heels. Repeat this posture three more times.

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Nutrition is the building block of tomorrow and our future lies in the hands of children. So why do we feel it is so convenient to feed these children foods that can compromise our future? “Junk food” has become the norm in our country, especially with children. Yet, these foods are filled with sugars and fats; which can make your child feel bad. According to the Center for Disease Control, obesity rates among children have increased from 7% to 20%. As you look at a map of the United States showing the growing trend of obesity, Kentucky has one of the highest rates. Yet, we still feed our children “junk.” So how can we fix this problem? What can we do to make a change in not only our future but in our children’s future? The first step to a brighter future is to teach our children the value of fit eating. The best way to do this is to lead by example. I know what you’re thinking though, “what about those picky eaters, who only want pop-tarts?” Well for kids like this, there is no one special way to get a child to eat and try new things; however, don’t give up trying. The next step is to think about what you are buying for your child. What you purchase for your child is what they are more likely to eat. So next time instead of buying high sugar, high fat foods for your kids to “chow down” on, take a few extra minutes to buy more

nutritious foods. Consider things such as nonsweetened cereals, fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grain breads, and 100% juices; making sure to avoid sodas, candies, snack cakes, potato chips, etc. Even though these sound like simple guidelines, sometimes when surrounded by products and labels it’s easy to get lost. But don’t fret because you can do this! If you have problems finding healthy items, start with fresh fruits and vegetables. If you buy packaged products, be sure to look at the Nutrition Facts Panel, choosing the lower calorie items. If your child is a picky eater and avoids certain foods you can give them a children’s vitamin, but do not use this as an excuse for not eating healthy. With your help you can change our future by giving your child a healthy start.< About the author: Chelsea Napier is a recent graduate of Western Kentucky University, majoring in Nutrition and Dietetics. She is currently doing her internship through WKU as well.

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Hot Spring Fashion Must Haves Bermuda Shorts: Cute, chic and even family friendly, these shorts will not bear your bum, or be too warm! Black & White: Great for wearing year-round, items available to fit every budget, and stylish enough for work or date night Statement Sunglasses: The bigger and louder the better! Bold Stripes: Another spring fashion item that’s sure to carry over into other seasons. Short Suits: Office-appropriate yet stylish, you’re sure to find these at shops in various price ranges. Beautiful Beading: From dresses to blouses, the beading creates a glam look on the simplest apparel. Sporty Dresses: These are great because you can dress them up or down with shoes. Pair them with canvas sneakers, wedges or high heel sandals. Flats and Low Heels: Designers are keeping features like the stylish pointy toe and dainty ankle straps, putting them on a short, lady-like heel.

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Cupcake Photo: Lauren daughter of Melissa and Nick Tabbert taken by Red Elephant Studio

You Are What You EAT

Alzheimers: Memories Matter doctors, pharmacists, therapists, support groups, and anyone who has experienced Alzheimer’s in their own family. Try to expose your loved one to as many other family members and friends as possible. It is important for both the person diagnosed and the family and friends to feel as if they are still connected to each other. Family caregivers should not feel as if they have to handle every moment of care themselves. Caregiving services provide companionship, personal care, and emotional support. Finding the right caregiver to

Pictured: Laura Wren and grandfather Ray Cossey, a victim of alzheimers.

provide some respite for the family caregiver adds another dimension to your loved one’s life and allows a family caregiver to recharge their own batteries. Alzheimer’s is no one’s fault, and families should recognize that time spent together is more important than ever before – time not filled with regret or what ifs, but with remember whens and love you forevers. Those eyes and those hands still belong to someone you love, someone who loves you, whether or not they remember your first birthday or your college graduation. The time is now for you to engage, record memories, treasure their recollections, and expose your own children to the person who loved and raised you. Balancing your own life and your incarnation as a caregiver is not simple, but those eyes and those hands deserve your best effort. < About the author: Elizabeth Downing is a Bowling Green native and the Executive Director of Timesavers Concierge, Caregiving and Chauffeur, a relationship-based service providing non-medical inhome personal care, personal assistant services, transportation services, and a comprehensive referral network to help families deal with the aging process.

Photo courtesy of Red Elephant Studio

Look at her hands - hands that changed your diaper, stroked your forehead when you were sick, helped you dye Easter eggs, prepared your meals, clapped for your achievements, sewed on your buttons, wrapped your Christmas gifts, and embraced you in times of pain and sorrow. Look at his eyes – eyes that watched you grow from baby to adult, cried tears of happiness and despair when you were exultant or hurt, and telegraphed pride at your contributions to the world. When those hands and those eyes begin to lose their connection to you, it is a difficult idea to accept that the path upon which you were traveling together has evolved into a journey that could end with a feeling of being alone. Alzheimer’s has become one of the most frightening words we know. It is essential, however, for those diagnosed and their families to face the illness head-on. An Alzheimer’s or dementia diagnosis does not change who a person is – they remain repositories of memories and experiences. So when the diagnosis is made, everyone can benefit from immediately beginning to talk about those memories and experiences and recording them for future generations. Families are, by necessity, in it together when Alzheimer’s is diagnosed. And it is the togetherness that can make the progression of the illness easier to bear. Family caregivers should ask lots of questions – of

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Photo by Leslie Peek, BG City Schools

Internationally Speaking Area Children Welcome Culture Walking down the halls of many local schools, parents and visitors may hear students singing “一个, 两个...”The students are learning Chinese numbers to the familiar tune of “one little, two little…” The Confucius Institute at Western Kentucky University has, for the third consecutive school year, brought teachers from China to teach Chinese language and culture. Currently, 33 teachers, of which 17 are certified Kentucky educators, are teaching in 12 school districts throughout the Commonwealth. Four of the Bowling Green City Elementary Schools, Parker-Bennett-Curry, McNeill, Potter Gray and T.C. Cherry include Chinese language and culture class in the student’s elective rotation. In addition, Bowling Green High and Bowling Green Junior High have added Chinese Culture Clubs so students may learn calligraphy, paper cut or make Chinese knots in an informal setting. In the Warren County Public School District, many students continue to select Chinese as their foreign language of choice. Numerous students attending South Warren, Warren East and Greenwood also participate in WKU Dual credit program for Chinese. It’s not unusual for the high school students to learn

to write hundreds of Chinese characters each semester! For the first time this year, many homeschooled middle and high school students are taking Chinese language classes offered weekly at the Chinese Learning Center located in WKU Helm Library. Visitors to the Library could see a group of students playing jian zi, Chinese hackey sac while counting in Chinese. Some learning experiences may also include using chopsticks and tea tasting. The Confucius Institute at Western Kentucky University offers the unique opportunity for thousands of students in rural Kentucky to learn about a different culture and embrace diversity. This program creates a global exchange between China and United States and aligns perfectly with WKU’s mission of becoming “A leading American university with international reach!” Located in WKU Helm Library is the Chinese Learning Center, over 4,000 square feet of space ready for visitors to explore. Children of all ages and adults are welcome and this offers a chance to all to experience China without leaving Bowling Green. Upcoming workshops for children at WKU Helm 100 include Chinese Learning Club: Chinese Calligraphy 1/26, 9:30-11, (adult $20/child $10);

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Chinese Paper Cutting, 2/2, 9:30-11 (adult $20/child $10); Creating Chinese Knots , 2/9, 9:30-11 (adult $20/child $10); Basics of Tai Chi, 2/16, 9:30-11 (adult $20/child $10); Adult Chinese Language Classes: 1/10 – 3/28 Thursday evening 5-7 (adult $80), Registration Deadline: 1 day prior to each workshop. Please email betty.yu@wku.edu. <

About the author: Betty Yu is the Assistant Director for Confucius Institute at WKU and an Ed.D. student at WKU. Betty is the proud mother of Jonathan, Meghan, Teaghan and Reaghan Chen. Betty Yu is married to Dr. Dennis Chen, professor at Belmont University.

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Travel: Atlanta Whether you are looking for a quick weekend getaway, or a Spring Break spot that’s close to home, Atlanta offers a variety of attractions, shopping and dining that your family is sure to enjoy. At a mere 5-6 hours away, your kids won’t get too bored in the car, either! Here are some of our recommendations: Georgia Aquarium In terms of aquatic exhibits, this wasn’t my top aquarium - but the dolphin show... wow! You don’t want to miss this. Once you buy your admission ticket, there’s a special info desk you have to go to for the dolphin tickets. Do this first thing as it fills up. The aquarium is divided into sections you can go in and out of, and there were several hands-on activities the kids will enjoy plus a 4-D film. The tickets are a little pricey ($39.50/adult, $29.50/ child age 3-12) but wotth it. Plan on spending 4 hours or more there to see it all. Visit georgiaaquarium.org for info. The World of Coca-Cola The tour begins with a weird film, probably to make you subliminally want a Coke, and when you exit there are a number of themed rooms you can tour at your own

pace. They also have a 4-D film with some interaction (seats move, etc) that’s neat but might startle a young child. What will probably be everyone’s favorite part is the tasting room. They have tons of flavors of Coke products from all over the world that you can sample. Some good, some not so much. You can try all you want. They also have regular Coke products that you can add flavors to. Admission is $16/adults, $14/ seniors, $12/youth age 3-12, Toddlers 2 and under are free. You do have to pay $10 to park. Save on parking by doing this museum and the Aquarium on the same day as they are right next to each other. Check their website, worldofcocacola.com for hours as they vary. American Girl Doll Store If your child doesn’t already have an American Girl Doll, you will definitely be coming home with one after a visit to this store. There are only 14 stores in the country, and this one is located north of Atlanta at the North Point Mall in Alpharetta. In addition to having tons of clothing and accessories for the dolls, there are also matching outfits for your child, a doll ‘salon’ and even a cafe where you can enjoy brunch, lunch, dinner or afternoon tea. The cafe

Shopping: After hitting the American Girl Doll store, continue north on the GA-400 to the North Georgia Premium Outlets. Visit their website and signup for the free VIP Club before you go. This will give you access to a voucher for a coupon book filled with great deals. If you have AAA, your membership card will also get you this book at their information desk located in the food court. If you are in need of housewares, decoratives or just like looking at that stuff, you’ll want to visit the IKEA in Atlanta. The store is huge and even has a cafeteria with great prices on meals and snacks. Dining About 20 minutes north of the outlet mall is a family style restaurant called The Smith House. If you love good southern food, you won’t want to miss it. Another favorite for soul food in Atlanta is Mary Macs, and for dessert, don’t miss Cafe Intermezzo with gigantic portions of homemade cheesecakes and other sweet treats. <

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does book up in advance so make your reservations early.

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Travel: Staycation If you don’t have the luxury of traveling during Spring Break or one of the school mini breaks, no worries! We have some ideas of things you can do from the comfort of your own home, or right here in our community! Turn your home into a spa. If you have daughters, this will be especially fun. A foot bath can be purchased for about $10 at many discount stores and be sure to stock up on nail polish, face masks, bath salts, lotion, scrubs and other salon type items. Go on a cycling adventure. We’re lucky to have several bicycle trails in Bowling Green - like at Lost River Cave. Or venture to Mammoth Cave National Park where you can “ride the rails” - old train tracks that have been converted to paths. Have a picnic. Pack up some sandwiches and drinks and venture to one of our many great public parks. Basil Griffin has the lake with ducks you can feed, while Keriakes has walking trails and a shaded playground. Plant a garden. Spring is the perfect time to start this hobby. If you don’t want to dig up your yard, Pinterest and other online sites offer tips for using things like pallets to create a planter. The local Extension Office also has some great brochures and tips on gardening. Host a neighborhood field day. Invite kids on your street to have sack races, freeze tag, red rover, 3-legged races and other favorites. End the day with a fun cookout or potluck meal.

Start a book club. Invite some friends to join the club, distribute a schedule and pick the first book. At your first club meeting, be sure to have some snacks and have everyone share what they liked about the book. Plan a pizza and movie night. Homemade pizza is the best... just pickup a ready-made crust or a roll of pizza crust dough, sauce, toppings and cheese and let the kids help make the pizza. You can also use canned biscuit dough for individual servings the kids will love. Swing by Redbox, Family Video or even the public library for a favorite film. Have ‘water days’ in your yard. Water balloons, buckets of water with sponges and even your garden sprinkler can create hours of entertainment. If you want to go all out, most discount stores now carry various water games and toys for very reasonable prices. Camp in the backyard. Grab a tent, some sleeping bags, flash lights and bug spray for an evening under the stars. To make it even more fun, use a grill or firepit to roast hot dogs and marshmellows. Book a local hotel room. Most pools don’t open until May, but many of our local hotels have indoor pools. The Visitors Bureau and Corvette Museum lobby each have lodging coupon books, so check there for deals, and free breakfast is a bonus! Go letterboxing or geocaching. These are both scavenger hunt-type activities and will get you out

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Letterboxing at the National Corvette Museum and about in the community. Best of all - it’s free! Just Google either one to find websites on how to located these planted treasures. These are just a few ideas of things you can do with the kids or grandkids. Most of all - enjoy the time spent making memories with your family! <

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HOT ITEMS There are always certain items that sell faster than others when consigning. High chairs, pack-n-plays, exersaucers, and walkers seem to sell the quickest when placed in a consignment store. Baby equipment can be quite pricey and generally is not used long enough to wear down which makes it an excellent product to offer in a consignment shop. Name brand jeans that are in great condition such as Justice, Levi’s, Gap, Old Navy sell quickly as well. We all know how expensive jeans are in the retail stores, and being able to purchase these among other great items at a fraction of the price at a consignment store is definitely a win-win. Consignment shopping has become very prominent in this day and time with the economy in its current shape.

About the author: Chrissy Anderson is a new owner of Jack & Jill’s Children’s Consignment in Bowling Green, specializing in the the best gently used items for children at affordable prices.

Consigning Tips from the Experts For clothing: • Make items look as new as possible. Spray and Wash, OxyClean, Mother’s Miracle and sometimes a little bleach go a long way! • Be aware of fading, stains, hole and excessive wear & tear. These don’t make good consignment items. • Iron & replace missing buttons on any garment. • Zip up zippers and button all buttons. • Sets sell better. Pair up a cute top and bottom to make an outfit. • Shoes should not show excessive wear. Laces should be clean and not frayed. For toys: • Make sure its in good condition and looks like its in good condition! • Non-acetone nail polish remover can help remove ink or permanent marker. • All parts are present and packaged in a way that the buyer can see the parts. • If its battery operated, have batteries in place so the buyer may “test” the toy. • Books should not have torn pages or covers, or markings on pages. • Games should have all parts accounted for and

A good rule of thumb when gathering items is to ask yourself, “Would I buy this for my child if I saw it at a sale?”

About the author: Laura Childers is the publicity chair for Lil’ Angels Attic. The bi-annual event is a ministry of Broadway United Methodist Church, offering quality children’s clothing and toys as well as maternity and infant clothes and accessories. Profits from the sale are donated to local charities that benefit children and families in our community, with over $500,000 in cash and merchandise being donated since 2002.

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instructions are a bonus! • If assembly is required, a picture of the assembly, or finished product helps the buyer see the final product and not feel like it can’t be purchased because it’s an “impossible” toy.

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Easter Crafts Easter First it’s Thanksgiving … then Christmas. When you’re not looking Valentine’s Day sneaks up on you only to be followed by Easter. It’s the friendly holiday “Mompetitions”. You know. When all the “Ultra Moms” effortlessly whip up the most lavish of holiday crafts, then flood your Facebook feed with pictures of their handy work … all while you’re just sitting … on Facebook. It’s ok. No judgment from this Mom. I’m here though to arm you and tell you, “You too can be an “Ultra Mom” this Easter”! Now before you make a mad dash to Hobby Lobby frantically stock piling glitter, hot glue and craft supplies, let me share this economical and ingenious craft with you. All you will need is string or yarn, balloons, water, Elmer’s glue and candy of your choice. 1. You’ll start by placing your desired candy in a

balloon, blow the balloon up and tie off the end making a balloon with the candy inside. 2. Mix two parts Elmer’s glue to one part water in big bowl. = Mache mixture. 3. Fully cover/soak your uncut yarn in your mache mixture. 4. Wrap the balloon with the saturated yarn (leaving enough space to extract the deflated balloon when finished. 5. Let the balloon form dry completely. Pop balloon dry and carefully pull the deflated balloon from the inside of the yarn form leaving the candy! Don’t you know everyone will wonder how you got the candy INSIDE that fancy little egg (and where did you find the time to do it). And just think of all the mache possibilities: mache pumpkins for halloween,

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mache Christmas advent ornaments, birthday mache. The options are endless and inexpensive! So go, you newly appointed Ultra Moms (and Dads and grandparents and friends). Craft away knowing you have my full permission to gloat proudly on your social media of choice. And this Easter remember to enjoy your family, the return of white linen clothing and most importantly Jesus’ resurrection. Mache away my friends and Happy Easter Friends!<

About the Author: Marissa Brown works in Domestic Affairs and Management (stay at home mother) for the Brown household. She and husband John have two young children 14 mos. apart. In her free time, Marissa expresses her creativity through her business Swanky Soirees – helping people make every event special.

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Kids Eat Free Area Free and Cheap Eats for Children Anna’s Greek Restaurant | 270-846-2662 535 Three Springs Rd, Bowling Green Free kid’s meal with adult meal purchase on Tuesdays. Applebee’s | 270-782-6981 2545 Scottsville Rd, Bowling Green Tuesdays 5-9pm, 1 free kid’s meal with each paying adult. $1 each additional kid’s meal. Bob Evans | 270-781-3799 145 Three Springs Rd., Bowling Green Family Night Tuesdays, free kid’s meal with each adult purchase 4pm-close, dine-in only. Captain D’s | 270-781-3485, 270-842-4808 2634 Scottsville Rd, Bowling Green 1626 US 31W Bypass, Bowling Green Two free kid’s meals with purchase of adult meal at regular price on Thursdays (dine in only). Chick-fil-A | 270-782-6807 1766 Campbell Ln, Bowling Green $.99 Kid’s Meal with purchase of any adult meal (limit 2 per adult, dine-in only) on Tuesdays from 5-7pm. Cici’s Pizza | 270-843-9299 760 Campbell Ln, Bowling Green Kids 3 and under eat free. Kids eat for 99 cents on scheduled school fundraising nights. Denny’s | 270-782-9827 4700 Scottsville Rd, Bowling Green Kid’s age 10 and under eat free 4-10pm Tuesdays and Saturdays with adult purchase of $2.50 or more. Fazoli’s | 270-796-3934 2915 Scottsville Rd, Bowling Green Tuesdays 5-8pm kid’s meals are 99 cents (dine in).

Gatti’s Pizza | 270-393-0333 600 US 31W Bypass, Bowling Green Free kid’s buffet (age 10 & under) with purchase of adult buffet on Wednesdays. Kids age 3 and under are free everyday.

Sonic $1.99 Wacky Packs all day Wednesdays

Geno’s Italian Deli | 270-904-3676 1751 Scottsville Rd, Bowling Green Kids meals are 99 cents after 4pm daily. Dine in only.

Steak-n-Shake | 270-783-9260 1680 Scottsville Rd, Bowling Green 1 free kids meal for every $8 spent on Saturdays and Sundays.

Griff’s Deli | 270-904-4743 1640 Scottsville Rd, Bowling Green Kids eat free every day after 4pm and all day on Sundays with purchase of kid’s cup for 95 cents.

Taco Del Mar | 270-746-8453 553 Duntov Way, Bowling Green Sundays - Free kids meal with purchase of any favorite

Linzie’s | 270-393-9666, 270-904-4127 2435 Nashville Rd, Bowling Green 430 31W By-Pass, Bowling Green Kids under 10 eat free Wednesdays & Saturdays, dinein only, with each adult purchase of $5.00 or more. Lost River Pizza | 270-746-0255 2440 Nashville Rd., Bowling Green Kids Eat Free Mondays with adults purchasing a large pizza. (Dine in only, limit 2 free kids meals per pizza) Mancino’s | 270-783-3131, 270-782-9400 2710 Nashville Rd, Bowling Green 4665 Scottsville Rd, Bowling Green Kids eat free all day every day with kid drink purchase. Moe’s Southwest Grill | 270-782-9898 2020 Scottsville Rd, Bowling Green Kids eat free all day Sat. with purchase of adult meal. Pizza Hut | 270-782-9056 2631 Scottsville Rd, Bowling Green Kids 3 & under eat free (buffet) Mon.-Fri. 11am1pm, Sun. 11am-2pm, Thurs. 5-8pm.

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Ryan’s Buffet | 270-843-1439 1920 Mel Browning St., Bowling Green Family Night Thursdays, kid’s buffet 99 cents 5-8pm. Two kids age 11 or under per adult.

Toot’s | 270-843-2335 2500 Scottsville Rd, Bowling Green Tuesdays – 1 child eats free with adult purchase. Free hot dogs and ice cream everyday. Wendy’s All participating US locations $1.99 kid’s meals after 4pm everyday. Wha-Bah Family Steakhouse | 270-782-6400 2361 Russellville Rd, Bowling Green Tuesdays & Thursdays – Kids eat free. Zaxby’s | 270-796-8300, 846-0000, 781-1866 1801 US 31W Bypass, Bowling Green 1651 Campbell Ln, Bowling Green 100 Cherry Farms Ln (off Scottsville Rd) 99 cent kid’s meals Mon. 5-8pm with adult meal. We found various restaurants listed online that in some cities offer a kid deal, but upon checking locally that deal is not offered in Bowling Green. Please call first if you are unsure.Visit www.bgparent.com for our online directory. And if you know of any we missed, email us at info@ bgparent.com!s! <

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February/March/April 2013 Bowling Green Parent Magazine