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Record-breaking Enrollment p. 4 | Homecoming 2009 p. 6 | Tour the President’s Office p. 26

Fall 2009

WHOLLY NURSING

Teaching students to care for patients physically, socially, spiritually

College of Arts & Sciences | College of Adult & Professional Studies | Graduate School | Bethel Seminary

2

From the Pre sident

Goodbye Bethel, Hello World In May and June, 2009, some 1,200 students graduated from all of Bethel’s schools, ready to be adventurous Christ-followers.

Fall 2009 Volume 59 Number 1

Stronger Together

Senior Vice President for Communications and Marketing Sherie J. Lindvall ’70

In your hands is evidence of change at Bethel University. After many years of publishing two magazines, Heart & Mind (for friends of Bethel Seminary) and Focus (for friends of the College of Arts & Sciences, the College of Adult & Professional Studies, and the Graduate School), we concluded that there was a high degree of overlap in our audiences and that all friends of Bethel should have the opportunity to hear about the whole institution. We want to celebrate what God is doing in all parts of the university. The change in the magazine mirrors the administrative changes we have made. Recently appointed Executive Vice President and Provost David Clark brings strong leadership and seminary background to our team. Under his leadership, all the curricular and co-curricular programs of the university come together for the first time. Dan Nelson, our new vice president for admissions, financial aid, and retention, brings all the enrollment functions together into one team under David’s leadership, as well. Bruce Anderson, vice president for development, is consolidating development functions, creating a strong central team to connect with friends who have a special affinity for parts of the university. In these areas and others, through consolidation, we are finding increased effectiveness, efficiency, and shared knowledge that make these teams stronger. When things change, however, it is fair to ask, “What remains the same?” The most important “constant” is our anchor point, captured in the words of I Peter 4:11 carved in slate in the Lundquist Community Life Center: “In everything honor and praise to God through Jesus Christ.” Our commitment to Christ-centered, high quality, wholeperson education is unshakable. You’ll hear that in many of the pieces that follow. The Pietism in our roots gave birth to the evangelical movement that has defined our place in the Christian family. Bethel’s forebears were persecuted for devotion to God’s Word and their desire to read it unmediated by others. Like them, we believe that Scripture was “God breathed.” Like them, we believe that reconciliation with God comes through a commitment to Jesus as Savior and Lord under the prompting of the Holy Spirit. By doing good in the name of Jesus and by speaking the truth in love, we share our faith with others. The excitement of Bethel today is living out this good news in 21st-century ways through the more than 100 programs of the university. Whether oriented toward the marketplace, the church, or the neighborhood, our programs are meant to change lives and prepare graduates to change the world. So, put your feet up and enjoy the big picture of what God is doing at Bethel University as you read this inaugural issue of Bethel Magazine!

Editor Heather Johnson

Senior Consulting Editor for Bethel Seminary Scott Wible S’02 Contributors

Barb Carlson Holly Donato ’78 Dale Eng ’00 Steffanie Lindgren ’10 Cindy Pfingsten Scott Streble Amanda Wanke ’99 Michelle Westlund ’83 Suzanne Yonker

Design Darin Jones ’97

Staff Photographer Woody Dahlberg ’69

President James (Jay) H. Barnes III Vice President for Constituent Relations Ralph Gustafson ’74, S’78

Editorial Offices

3900 Bethel Drive St. Paul, MN 55112-6999 651.638.6233 651.638.6003 (fax) bethel-magazine@bethel.edu

Address Corrections

Office of Alumni and Parent Services 651.638.6462 alumni@bethel.edu

Bethel Magazine is published three times a year by Bethel University, 3900 Bethel Drive, St. Paul, MN 55112-6999. Postage paid at St. Paul, Minnesota, and additional mailing offices. Printed in the USA. Copyright © 2009 Bethel University. All Rights Reserved. Bethel University is sponsored by the churches of Converge Worldwide, formerly known as the Baptist General Conference. It is the policy of Bethel not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, gender, or disability in its educational programs, admissions, or employment policies as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act and Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments. Inquiries regarding compliance may be directed to: Compliance Officer, Bethel University, 3900 Bethel Drive, St. Paul, MN 55112-6999.

DEPARTMENTS

President Jay Barnes

Hear from Jay on a regular basis. Check out his blog, Just Jay, at bethel.edu/president/blog.

16

Wholly Nursing

8

20

We are Christ-Followers…

15

28

A University with Merit

33

Home Sweet Home

Homecoming 2009; Welcome Class of 2013; Meet the new provost; CAPS/GS turns 20; Bethel brings clean water to Iraq

a Prof

A Bethel professor answers your vexing leadership questions

NewBookmarked

Recently published books by Bethel faculty members

NewPlace

Meant

26

A tour of a significant space at Bethel—this issue, President Jay Barnes’ office

Profile

Just Jay

2

Campus News NewAsk

32

Theola Campbell, Director of Admissions, Bethel Seminary San Diego

AlumNews

FEATURES

37

Students learn to care for patients physically, socially, and spiritually—here and abroad.

A look at Bethel’s first value and what it means to be evangelical

An increasing number of National Merit Scholars are choosing Bethel. Hear why.

Alumni share timeless stories of Bethel’s fun and faith-filled campus life. Look for this icon to find Bethel New Magazine exclusives on the web! Head to bethel.edu/magazine for more.

Bethel University

1

2

From the Pre sident

Goodbye Bethel, Hello World In May and June, 2009, some 1,200 students graduated from all of Bethel’s schools, ready to be adventurous Christ-followers.

Fall 2009 Volume 59 Number 1

Stronger Together

Senior Vice President for Communications and Marketing Sherie J. Lindvall ’70

In your hands is evidence of change at Bethel University. After many years of publishing two magazines, Heart & Mind (for friends of Bethel Seminary) and Focus (for friends of the College of Arts & Sciences, the College of Adult & Professional Studies, and the Graduate School), we concluded that there was a high degree of overlap in our audiences and that all friends of Bethel should have the opportunity to hear about the whole institution. We want to celebrate what God is doing in all parts of the university. The change in the magazine mirrors the administrative changes we have made. Recently appointed Executive Vice President and Provost David Clark brings strong leadership and seminary background to our team. Under his leadership, all the curricular and co-curricular programs of the university come together for the first time. Dan Nelson, our new vice president for admissions, financial aid, and retention, brings all the enrollment functions together into one team under David’s leadership, as well. Bruce Anderson, vice president for development, is consolidating development functions, creating a strong central team to connect with friends who have a special affinity for parts of the university. In these areas and others, through consolidation, we are finding increased effectiveness, efficiency, and shared knowledge that make these teams stronger. When things change, however, it is fair to ask, “What remains the same?” The most important “constant” is our anchor point, captured in the words of I Peter 4:11 carved in slate in the Lundquist Community Life Center: “In everything honor and praise to God through Jesus Christ.” Our commitment to Christ-centered, high quality, wholeperson education is unshakable. You’ll hear that in many of the pieces that follow. The Pietism in our roots gave birth to the evangelical movement that has defined our place in the Christian family. Bethel’s forebears were persecuted for devotion to God’s Word and their desire to read it unmediated by others. Like them, we believe that Scripture was “God breathed.” Like them, we believe that reconciliation with God comes through a commitment to Jesus as Savior and Lord under the prompting of the Holy Spirit. By doing good in the name of Jesus and by speaking the truth in love, we share our faith with others. The excitement of Bethel today is living out this good news in 21st-century ways through the more than 100 programs of the university. Whether oriented toward the marketplace, the church, or the neighborhood, our programs are meant to change lives and prepare graduates to change the world. So, put your feet up and enjoy the big picture of what God is doing at Bethel University as you read this inaugural issue of Bethel Magazine!

Editor Heather Johnson

Senior Consulting Editor for Bethel Seminary Scott Wible S’02 Contributors

Barb Carlson Holly Donato ’78 Dale Eng ’00 Steffanie Lindgren ’10 Cindy Pfingsten Scott Streble Amanda Wanke ’99 Michelle Westlund ’83 Suzanne Yonker

Design Darin Jones ’97

Staff Photographer Woody Dahlberg ’69

President James (Jay) H. Barnes III Vice President for Constituent Relations Ralph Gustafson ’74, S’78

Editorial Offices

3900 Bethel Drive St. Paul, MN 55112-6999 651.638.6233 651.638.6003 (fax) bethel-magazine@bethel.edu

Address Corrections

Office of Alumni and Parent Services 651.638.6462 alumni@bethel.edu

Bethel Magazine is published three times a year by Bethel University, 3900 Bethel Drive, St. Paul, MN 55112-6999. Postage paid at St. Paul, Minnesota, and additional mailing offices. Printed in the USA. Copyright © 2009 Bethel University. All Rights Reserved. Bethel University is sponsored by the churches of Converge Worldwide, formerly known as the Baptist General Conference. It is the policy of Bethel not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, gender, or disability in its educational programs, admissions, or employment policies as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act and Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments. Inquiries regarding compliance may be directed to: Compliance Officer, Bethel University, 3900 Bethel Drive, St. Paul, MN 55112-6999.

DEPARTMENTS

President Jay Barnes

Hear from Jay on a regular basis. Check out his blog, Just Jay, at bethel.edu/president/blog.

16

Wholly Nursing

8

20

We are Christ-Followers…

15

28

A University with Merit

33

Home Sweet Home

Homecoming 2009; Welcome Class of 2013; Meet the new provost; CAPS/GS turns 20; Bethel brings clean water to Iraq

a Prof

A Bethel professor answers your vexing leadership questions

NewBookmarked

Recently published books by Bethel faculty members

NewPlace

Meant

26

A tour of a significant space at Bethel—this issue, President Jay Barnes’ office

Profile

Just Jay

2

Campus News NewAsk

32

Theola Campbell, Director of Admissions, Bethel Seminary San Diego

AlumNews

FEATURES

37

Students learn to care for patients physically, socially, and spiritually—here and abroad.

A look at Bethel’s first value and what it means to be evangelical

An increasing number of National Merit Scholars are choosing Bethel. Hear why.

Alumni share timeless stories of Bethel’s fun and faith-filled campus life. Look for this icon to find Bethel New Magazine exclusives on the web! Head to bethel.edu/magazine for more.

Bethel University

1

Campus News

Pomp, Circumstance…and a Degree! Across all schools of Bethel University, some 1,000 students graduated in seven commencement ceremonies in May and June: 555 students from the College of Arts & Sciences on May 23; 312 students from the College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School on May 23; and 144 students from Bethel Seminary St. Paul on May 30. On the coasts, 31 students graduated from Bethel Seminary San Diego on June 13 and 10 from Bethel Seminary of the East on June 20. “Each graduate is proof that Bethel continues to fulfill its mission to train and equip adventurous Christ-followers to go out and change the world,” says President Jay Barnes.

95%

Percentage of Bethel seniors who said their entire educational experience was good or excellent.

91%

Percentage of first-year Bethel students who said “yes” or “definitely yes” when asked: “If you could start over again, would you go to the same institution you are now attending?” Source: The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), conducted by the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research

2

Fall 2009

A Fourth Hello to South Africa Project “Heita! South Africa” took its fourth trip to South Africa in July. Twentyseven Bethel staff, faculty, students, and community partners encountered the country’s diversity and learned about its culture firsthand during the two-week immersion experience offered through the Office of Reconciliation Studies. Translated “Hello! South Africa,” the project is designed to provide an ethos to engage the diversity of South Africa on matters of ethnicity, race, class, gender, religion, economics, and politics, explains Seth Naicker, former 2008 Heita South Africa! program and projects participants in the Nelson Mandela Square director in Bethel’s Office of Reconciliation Studies. “South Africa continues to provide the world with a model of the process of reconciliation, in its successes as well as its failures,” he adds. Naicker and his family moved back to their native South Africa in June, but will continue to work with the program. This year, project participants visited with Ismail Vadi, a parliamentary dignitary of the African National Congress, among other prominent South African leaders in the reconciliation movement. They also visited historic sites and museums, such as the Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg and the Slavery Museum in Cape Town, children’s homes, AIDS hospices, and universities. Read two first-person accounts of the 2009 trip from senior Naomi Thorson, a journalism and reconciliation studies major, and Sara Jane Benson, a student in the seminary’s Master of Divinity program.

Meet the Class of 2013! (College of Arts & Sciences)

Heard on Campus Are we crazy enough here at Bethel to believe that God will show up in our lives in radical ways? Are we willing to let Him surprise us even when we’re in pain and/or in doubt? I think we are. For God’s people, living a life beyond belief is not some pie-in-the-sky concept. It’s a reality. It’s a testimony of many witnesses. Campus Pastor Laurel Bunker, Kicking off the 2009-2010 chapel year—themed “Life Beyond Belief”—for the College of Arts & Sciences

727 freshmen (163 transfers) 42% male 58% female 25 is the average ACT score 19 students have the last name Johnson; 15, Anderson; and 9, Olson 11 sets of twins and 4 other sibling pairs 80% from Minnesota 29 states represented 21 students come from Minnehaha Academy in Minneapolis 5% were homeschooled Most were born in 1991, when the average cost of gas per gallon was $1.12 and the Dow Jones average topped 3,000 for the first time; or 1992, the year Bill Clinton became President and the Twin Cities’ Mall of America was built. See more Welcome Week photos.

A Royal Welcome

Bethel’s newest faculty members, from left to right: Corey Hobbins (social work), Greta Schutte (health and physical education/athletic training), Kent Gerber (university library), Margaret Johnson (nursing), Will Keillor (university library), Kathy Tilton (nursing), John Rudberg (business and economics), Carol Hargate (nursing), Connie Clark (nursing), Jessica Samens (communication studies).

During Welcome Week, President Jay and Barb Barnes welcomed students and their families to campus; many first-year students moved into residence halls and met their roommates for the first time.

Bethel University

3

Campus News

Pomp, Circumstance…and a Degree! Across all schools of Bethel University, some 1,000 students graduated in seven commencement ceremonies in May and June: 555 students from the College of Arts & Sciences on May 23; 312 students from the College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School on May 23; and 144 students from Bethel Seminary St. Paul on May 30. On the coasts, 31 students graduated from Bethel Seminary San Diego on June 13 and 10 from Bethel Seminary of the East on June 20. “Each graduate is proof that Bethel continues to fulfill its mission to train and equip adventurous Christ-followers to go out and change the world,” says President Jay Barnes.

95%

Percentage of Bethel seniors who said their entire educational experience was good or excellent.

91%

Percentage of first-year Bethel students who said “yes” or “definitely yes” when asked: “If you could start over again, would you go to the same institution you are now attending?” Source: The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), conducted by the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research

2

Fall 2009

A Fourth Hello to South Africa Project “Heita! South Africa” took its fourth trip to South Africa in July. Twentyseven Bethel staff, faculty, students, and community partners encountered the country’s diversity and learned about its culture firsthand during the two-week immersion experience offered through the Office of Reconciliation Studies. Translated “Hello! South Africa,” the project is designed to provide an ethos to engage the diversity of South Africa on matters of ethnicity, race, class, gender, religion, economics, and politics, explains Seth Naicker, former 2008 Heita South Africa! program and projects participants in the Nelson Mandela Square director in Bethel’s Office of Reconciliation Studies. “South Africa continues to provide the world with a model of the process of reconciliation, in its successes as well as its failures,” he adds. Naicker and his family moved back to their native South Africa in June, but will continue to work with the program. This year, project participants visited with Ismail Vadi, a parliamentary dignitary of the African National Congress, among other prominent South African leaders in the reconciliation movement. They also visited historic sites and museums, such as the Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg and the Slavery Museum in Cape Town, children’s homes, AIDS hospices, and universities. Read two first-person accounts of the 2009 trip from senior Naomi Thorson, a journalism and reconciliation studies major, and Sara Jane Benson, a student in the seminary’s Master of Divinity program.

Meet the Class of 2013! (College of Arts & Sciences)

Heard on Campus Are we crazy enough here at Bethel to believe that God will show up in our lives in radical ways? Are we willing to let Him surprise us even when we’re in pain and/or in doubt? I think we are. For God’s people, living a life beyond belief is not some pie-in-the-sky concept. It’s a reality. It’s a testimony of many witnesses. Campus Pastor Laurel Bunker, Kicking off the 2009-2010 chapel year—themed “Life Beyond Belief”—for the College of Arts & Sciences

727 freshmen (163 transfers) 42% male 58% female 25 is the average ACT score 19 students have the last name Johnson; 15, Anderson; and 9, Olson 11 sets of twins and 4 other sibling pairs 80% from Minnesota 29 states represented 21 students come from Minnehaha Academy in Minneapolis 5% were homeschooled Most were born in 1991, when the average cost of gas per gallon was $1.12 and the Dow Jones average topped 3,000 for the first time; or 1992, the year Bill Clinton became President and the Twin Cities’ Mall of America was built. See more Welcome Week photos.

A Royal Welcome

Bethel’s newest faculty members, from left to right: Corey Hobbins (social work), Greta Schutte (health and physical education/athletic training), Kent Gerber (university library), Margaret Johnson (nursing), Will Keillor (university library), Kathy Tilton (nursing), John Rudberg (business and economics), Carol Hargate (nursing), Connie Clark (nursing), Jessica Samens (communication studies).

During Welcome Week, President Jay and Barb Barnes welcomed students and their families to campus; many first-year students moved into residence halls and met their roommates for the first time.

Bethel University

3

Campus News

Beginning with a Bang

Thinker, Teacher, Builder by Holly Donato ’78

Bethel University has much to celebrate as the 2009-2010 academic year gets off to a great start.

Bethel University’s new executive vice president and provost is David K. Clark, Ph.D., Bethel Seminary professor and dean for 21 years, founder and lead faculty for the Christian Thought program at the seminary, and an articulate defender of the faith. In office since July, Clark is charged with nurturing cohesive growth across all four schools of Bethel. What will a well-known author, speaker, and scholar bring to the task?

Breaking Records

Movin’ on Up

With 2,827 students, Bethel University’s College of Arts & Sciences broke its enrollment record. Up 1.3 percent from last fall’s enrollment of 2,792, it includes 1,914 students who are continuing enrollment from the previous semester, 727 new freshmen, 23 students returning after an absence, and 163 students transferring from other higher education institutions. This fall also marks a new retention high: 92 percent of last semester’s students returned. Furthermore, The Office of Financial Aid responded to a record number of family financial appeals this past spring and summer—nearly 300, compared with less than 100 in a normal year. Helping enrollment numbers was the additional money awarded in financial aid—nearly $3 million.

Bethel University ranked 14th (up from 16th last year) among Midwestern Universities in U.S. News & World Report’s “America’s Best Colleges” guide, released in August. The Midwestern Universities category includes Midwest colleges and universities that offer master’s programs. Some statistics used in determining the ranking include Bethel’s freshman retention rate of 85 percent, a graduation rate of 74 percent, and an 11:1 student-tofaculty ratio.

Construction Zone It has been a little loud between the Academic Complex and Clauson Center this fall as construction is underway on new biology labs to support the growing sciences programs. The labs are scheduled to be completed and ready for use by the time spring semester begins January 31, 2010. This project is being funded entirely with designated and estate gifts from generous donors—not from Bethel’s operating budget. 4

Fall 2009

Benson Great Hall Calendar of Events November 6

Bethel Jazz Orchestras concert

7

Department of Music Fall concert

14 Minnesota Collegiate Choral Festival

December 3-5 53rd Festival of Christmas “Sing We Now of Christmas: A Festival of Carols”

January 24 The St. Paul Chamber Orchestra and the Minnesota Orchestra For a complete listing of events, to order tickets, or to request email updates, visit bethel.edu/benson-great-hall.

Even as a six-year-old growing up with missionary parents in Tokyo, David Clark was a thinker. He sensed something big had happened the day he received Christ in a Sunday church service. Fast forward 10 years to his sophomore year at Christian Academy in Japan. When a math teacher had to leave midsemester for an emergency, the principal asked Clark to step in. So for 10 weeks, the lanky 16-year-old taught geometry to his classmates. “I absolutely loved the experience. Teaching came easily,” he says. Discovering his God-given teaching gift would shape Clark’s career as a theology professor, author of 10 approachably written books, popular conference and church speaker, and frequent guest of the media—including WCCO’s Don Shelby— when matters of faith are a hot topic.

Faith challenges Clark majored in religion and philosophy at Houghton College in New York, where he met his wife, Sandy Bernlehr, an English major at the time and now director of corporate and foundation relations in the Office of Development at Bethel. With an M.A. in philosophy of religion from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University, he taught theology and philosophy for 10 years at Toccoa Falls College, a school affiliated with the Christian and Missionary Alliance, prior to joining Bethel Seminary in 1988.

In August, David Clark and his wife, Sandy, celebrated the marriage of their youngest son Ryan ’08 to Rachel (Stensrud) ’08 along with their daughterin-law Renee and son Tyler ’03, S ’06 (left). David has been his own general contractor on three homes, including the current Clark residence in White Bear Lake, Minn. (below).

But even adult missionary kids have doubts. And for Clark, it happened during doctoral work at Northwestern, where in a class on the problem of evil, no one else believed in the God of the Bible. The struggle with doubt drove him back into classical philosophical works and set the stage for Clark’s success in founding the M.A. in Christian Thought at Bethel Seminary. More than 30 seminarians are enrolled in the program today, gaining a sense of their own faith and preparing to be more effective Christian thinkers.

Owned faith

my colleagues on the college faculty to thank for that,” he says.

Under construction

For four years from 2004 to 2008, Clark stepped away from full-time teaching at His own time of questioning has given Clark valuable conviction about the special Bethel to pastor Faith Covenant Church in Burnsville, Minn. He gained valuable task of Bethel. “We’re not just training or indoctrinating students to believe what their insight into a role many seminary students will fill—and came away with parents believe,” he says. “We’re educating them. And that means challenging them to a softer heart. “I’ve become much more compassionate and empathetic. Emotions think for themselves.” now flow more easily,” he says. That process, he says, requires the It’s a great balance for a man who also academic freedom of Bethel faculty “to wears a tool belt. Clark taught himself explore ideas as they emerge and at the home construction, and has been his own same time do it with the wisdom of general contractor on three homes—hiring biblical revelation.” The non-negotiables, his sons as crew members on the current he contends, are “a supernatural, miracleworking, living God of the universe; a Bible Clark residence in White Bear Lake, Minn. “I’m a builder—not just a builder of inspired by God and authoritative in a way buildings, but of teams, of intellectual not true of any other text; and the need for a relationship with the Father by the Spirit’s architecture … of people, of ideas,” Clark reflects. “I love to build stuff—to think grace through faith in Jesus Christ—lived good ideas through strategically and to see out verbally and behaviorally.” Clark has seen sons Tyler ’03, S ’06 and if we can turn them into reality.” Ryan ’08 graduate from Bethel with this kind of examined and active faith. “I have Bethel University

5

Campus News

Beginning with a Bang

Thinker, Teacher, Builder by Holly Donato ’78

Bethel University has much to celebrate as the 2009-2010 academic year gets off to a great start.

Bethel University’s new executive vice president and provost is David K. Clark, Ph.D., Bethel Seminary professor and dean for 21 years, founder and lead faculty for the Christian Thought program at the seminary, and an articulate defender of the faith. In office since July, Clark is charged with nurturing cohesive growth across all four schools of Bethel. What will a well-known author, speaker, and scholar bring to the task?

Breaking Records

Movin’ on Up

With 2,827 students, Bethel University’s College of Arts & Sciences broke its enrollment record. Up 1.3 percent from last fall’s enrollment of 2,792, it includes 1,914 students who are continuing enrollment from the previous semester, 727 new freshmen, 23 students returning after an absence, and 163 students transferring from other higher education institutions. This fall also marks a new retention high: 92 percent of last semester’s students returned. Furthermore, The Office of Financial Aid responded to a record number of family financial appeals this past spring and summer—nearly 300, compared with less than 100 in a normal year. Helping enrollment numbers was the additional money awarded in financial aid—nearly $3 million.

Bethel University ranked 14th (up from 16th last year) among Midwestern Universities in U.S. News & World Report’s “America’s Best Colleges” guide, released in August. The Midwestern Universities category includes Midwest colleges and universities that offer master’s programs. Some statistics used in determining the ranking include Bethel’s freshman retention rate of 85 percent, a graduation rate of 74 percent, and an 11:1 student-tofaculty ratio.

Construction Zone It has been a little loud between the Academic Complex and Clauson Center this fall as construction is underway on new biology labs to support the growing sciences programs. The labs are scheduled to be completed and ready for use by the time spring semester begins January 31, 2010. This project is being funded entirely with designated and estate gifts from generous donors—not from Bethel’s operating budget. 4

Fall 2009

Benson Great Hall Calendar of Events November 6

Bethel Jazz Orchestras concert

7

Department of Music Fall concert

14 Minnesota Collegiate Choral Festival

December 3-5 53rd Festival of Christmas “Sing We Now of Christmas: A Festival of Carols”

January 24 The St. Paul Chamber Orchestra and the Minnesota Orchestra For a complete listing of events, to order tickets, or to request email updates, visit bethel.edu/benson-great-hall.

Even as a six-year-old growing up with missionary parents in Tokyo, David Clark was a thinker. He sensed something big had happened the day he received Christ in a Sunday church service. Fast forward 10 years to his sophomore year at Christian Academy in Japan. When a math teacher had to leave midsemester for an emergency, the principal asked Clark to step in. So for 10 weeks, the lanky 16-year-old taught geometry to his classmates. “I absolutely loved the experience. Teaching came easily,” he says. Discovering his God-given teaching gift would shape Clark’s career as a theology professor, author of 10 approachably written books, popular conference and church speaker, and frequent guest of the media—including WCCO’s Don Shelby— when matters of faith are a hot topic.

Faith challenges Clark majored in religion and philosophy at Houghton College in New York, where he met his wife, Sandy Bernlehr, an English major at the time and now director of corporate and foundation relations in the Office of Development at Bethel. With an M.A. in philosophy of religion from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University, he taught theology and philosophy for 10 years at Toccoa Falls College, a school affiliated with the Christian and Missionary Alliance, prior to joining Bethel Seminary in 1988.

In August, David Clark and his wife, Sandy, celebrated the marriage of their youngest son Ryan ’08 to Rachel (Stensrud) ’08 along with their daughterin-law Renee and son Tyler ’03, S ’06 (left). David has been his own general contractor on three homes, including the current Clark residence in White Bear Lake, Minn. (below).

But even adult missionary kids have doubts. And for Clark, it happened during doctoral work at Northwestern, where in a class on the problem of evil, no one else believed in the God of the Bible. The struggle with doubt drove him back into classical philosophical works and set the stage for Clark’s success in founding the M.A. in Christian Thought at Bethel Seminary. More than 30 seminarians are enrolled in the program today, gaining a sense of their own faith and preparing to be more effective Christian thinkers.

Owned faith

my colleagues on the college faculty to thank for that,” he says.

Under construction

For four years from 2004 to 2008, Clark stepped away from full-time teaching at His own time of questioning has given Clark valuable conviction about the special Bethel to pastor Faith Covenant Church in Burnsville, Minn. He gained valuable task of Bethel. “We’re not just training or indoctrinating students to believe what their insight into a role many seminary students will fill—and came away with parents believe,” he says. “We’re educating them. And that means challenging them to a softer heart. “I’ve become much more compassionate and empathetic. Emotions think for themselves.” now flow more easily,” he says. That process, he says, requires the It’s a great balance for a man who also academic freedom of Bethel faculty “to wears a tool belt. Clark taught himself explore ideas as they emerge and at the home construction, and has been his own same time do it with the wisdom of general contractor on three homes—hiring biblical revelation.” The non-negotiables, his sons as crew members on the current he contends, are “a supernatural, miracleworking, living God of the universe; a Bible Clark residence in White Bear Lake, Minn. “I’m a builder—not just a builder of inspired by God and authoritative in a way buildings, but of teams, of intellectual not true of any other text; and the need for a relationship with the Father by the Spirit’s architecture … of people, of ideas,” Clark reflects. “I love to build stuff—to think grace through faith in Jesus Christ—lived good ideas through strategically and to see out verbally and behaviorally.” Clark has seen sons Tyler ’03, S ’06 and if we can turn them into reality.” Ryan ’08 graduate from Bethel with this kind of examined and active faith. “I have Bethel University

5

Homecoming: “All Roads Lead Home” Throughout Homecoming Weekend, more than 1,500 Bethel alumni took a road trip back to their alma mater, participating in one or more of the many festivities, including Homecoming chapel and the alumni prayer breakfast. Some 800 alumni enjoyed reunion dinners with their class years in the new Monson Dining Center Friday and Saturday night; 80 enjoyed the Royal Stadium Club breakfast Saturday morning; and many See more Homecoming 2009 photos.

cheered on the Royals football team to a Gustafson, vice president for constituent 29-10 win over Concordia-Moorhead on a relations. “Alumni laughed, cried, prayed, warm, sunny Saturday afternoon. worshipped, and gave thanks together “It was an awesome time for our alumni, as they staff, and students to celebrate Bethel’s reflected legacy, mission, and future,” says Ralph upon the many ways God has blessed and prospered Bethel.” Paula and Kevin Johnson ’94

In June, the Seminary Alumni Council and the Office of Alumni and Parent Services presented the 2009 Bethel Seminary Alumnus of the Year Award to Doug Fagerstrom. A 1983 Bethel Seminary alumnus and current president of Grand Rapids Theological Seminary, he has served congregations in four different churches in Michigan, Colorado, and Minnesota as a youth pastor, minister of music, single adult pastor, adult ministry pastor, and executive pastor. He also worked as an adjunct faculty member at three colleges and one seminary, teaching courses in discipleship, education, leadership, church planting, and creative communications. Fagerstrom has trained and/or coached more than 50 church planters since 2000, and was executive director of the Network of Single Adult Leaders for 12 years. He is author, co-author, or editor of 14 publications, and is a frequent keynote speaker and 6

Fall 2009

Kent Apostol (biology, adjunct) coauthored articles in Annuals of Forest Science and Plant and Soil. Apostol is a scientific reviewer for Agroforestry Systems and Acta Physiologiae Plantarum. Greg Bourgond (CAPS/GS, adjunct) was appointed to the 2009 Board of Examiners for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award—presented annually by the U.S. Department of Commerce to recognize role-model organizations for performance excellence. Peggy Kendall (communications) presented the keynote address and two workshops on youth and technology at the St. Paul School of Theology’s YouTheology conference for youth pastors (Kansas City, Mo.). Kendall also spoke to middle school students, high school students, and their parents at Trinity Christian Academy (Jackson, Tenn.). Juan Li (music, adjunct) was accepted into the Piano Texas International Academy and Festival as a teacher and performer. Piano Texas is held in collaboration with the Van Cliburn Piano Competition. Ben Lim (seminary, San Diego) and his wife Soh Leong Lim presented at the International Counseling and Social Work Symposium (University Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia). They also wrote an article for the California Spring American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy newsletter, conducted a family counseling workshop for the Penang Association for Counselors and Psychologists in Malaysia, provided training for the staff of Compassion for Migrant Children (Beijing), and taught a course on Marriage and Family Therapy at Singapore Bible College. Michelle Louis (general education, adjunct), in collaboration with Shane Lopez of Clifton Strengths Institute/Gallup, published “The Principles of Strengths-Based Education” in the April edition of The Journal of College and Character.

Alumni of the Year Seminary

Faculty Asides

Campus News

workshop leader at conferences and retreats, often in partnership with his wife Donna. In presenting the award, retired Bethel Seminary Provost Leland Eliason stated, “We commend you for advancing the gospel and instilling a global vision in the next generation of servant-leaders.”

College of Arts & Sciences While visible as First Lady of Minnesota, it has been Mary Anderson Pawlenty’s quiet life of service that garnered the 2009 Alumna of the Year Award from Bethel’s College of Arts & Sciences during a Homecoming convocation on September 25. The 1983 political science graduate became an attorney but left a successful partnership to serve for 12 years as a judge in the state’s First Judicial District based in Hastings. “Mary never judged anyone on the basis of why they were in court,” says The Honorable Edward Lynch, Chief Judge of the First Judicial District. “She realized that few people are as good as their best deed, and no one is as bad as their worst.” Pawlenty balanced her duties on the bench with parenting two daughters and

serving as First Lady; she also served Bethel University for nine years as a trustee. In addition to teaching school children about the three branches of government as a guest in elementary schools, today Pawlenty is director of Medical Diplomacy for Children’s HeartLink, a nonprofit organization dedicated to treating and preventing pediatric heart disease in underserved regions of the world. She also has been honored by the National Guard for founding the First Lady’s Military Family Care Initiative, a web-based program designed to unite community organizations with military families to provide simple volunteer services during times of deployment. “Mary doesn’t offer simple platitudes,” says her former law partner Greg Weyandt. “She is a disciple of [the apostle] St. James: It is important to hear the Word, but she believes you have to do something to help the community— you live the Word.” 

Dennis Port (music) led the Evangelion Chorale on a tour of Ukraine this summer. The adult chorale of 40 singers, many Bethel choir alumni, sang eight concerts for about 4,000 listeners. Don Postema (philosophy) published the article “Justice Emerging? Ethics Committees Go Beyond the Clinical Context” in the May issue of Minnesota Physician. In August, Postema presented on ethics at Regions Hospital (St. Paul, Minn.) and Westfields Hospital (New Richmond, Wis.). Jay Rasmussen (education) published a scholarly work on service-learning titled “Teaching and Learning in Guadalajara” in the book Quick Hits for Service-Learning: Successful Strategies from Award-Winning Educators. Rasmussen also presented workshops as part of the Traveling Workshop Series offered by the Collaboration for Teaching and Learning and spoke at San Jacinto College (Houston) and Northwest Iowa Community College. James Romaine (New York Center for Art & Media Studies) wrote “Re-emergence,” a section of a Christianity Today article addressing James Elkins’ book The Strange Place of Religion in Contemporary Art. Read the article on christianitytoday.com. Kristen Sandau (nursing) presented a paper in April at the Florida Conference of the International Society for Computerized Electrocardiology. Marge Schaffer (nursing) recently published “A Virtue Ethics Guide to Best Practices for Community-Based Participatory Research” in Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action. Schaffer, in collaboration with Barbara Gale ’04, CAPS ’07, also published “Organizational Readiness for Evidence-Based Practice” in the Journal of Nursing Administration. She recently received a Fulbright Specialist Award, which will fund a trip to Oslo for a presentation at an international public health nursing conference and to consult with Diakonova University on the development of a Master’s in Public Health program (see “Wholly Nursing,” p. 16). Ripley Smith (communications) published “The Role of Trust in International Crisis Areas: A Comparison of German and USAmerican NGO Partnership Strategies” in Organization Trust: A Cultural Perspective. Smith also gave presentations to the Academy of International Research Conference (Honolulu) and the National Communication Association as well as at the Faith and Thought Lecture Series at Northwestern College and the 2008 Religious Communication Pre-Conference.

Bethel University

7

Homecoming: “All Roads Lead Home” Throughout Homecoming Weekend, more than 1,500 Bethel alumni took a road trip back to their alma mater, participating in one or more of the many festivities, including Homecoming chapel and the alumni prayer breakfast. Some 800 alumni enjoyed reunion dinners with their class years in the new Monson Dining Center Friday and Saturday night; 80 enjoyed the Royal Stadium Club breakfast Saturday morning; and many See more Homecoming 2009 photos.

cheered on the Royals football team to a Gustafson, vice president for constituent 29-10 win over Concordia-Moorhead on a relations. “Alumni laughed, cried, prayed, warm, sunny Saturday afternoon. worshipped, and gave thanks together “It was an awesome time for our alumni, as they staff, and students to celebrate Bethel’s reflected legacy, mission, and future,” says Ralph upon the many ways God has blessed and prospered Bethel.” Paula and Kevin Johnson ’94

In June, the Seminary Alumni Council and the Office of Alumni and Parent Services presented the 2009 Bethel Seminary Alumnus of the Year Award to Doug Fagerstrom. A 1983 Bethel Seminary alumnus and current president of Grand Rapids Theological Seminary, he has served congregations in four different churches in Michigan, Colorado, and Minnesota as a youth pastor, minister of music, single adult pastor, adult ministry pastor, and executive pastor. He also worked as an adjunct faculty member at three colleges and one seminary, teaching courses in discipleship, education, leadership, church planting, and creative communications. Fagerstrom has trained and/or coached more than 50 church planters since 2000, and was executive director of the Network of Single Adult Leaders for 12 years. He is author, co-author, or editor of 14 publications, and is a frequent keynote speaker and 6

Fall 2009

Kent Apostol (biology, adjunct) coauthored articles in Annuals of Forest Science and Plant and Soil. Apostol is a scientific reviewer for Agroforestry Systems and Acta Physiologiae Plantarum. Greg Bourgond (CAPS/GS, adjunct) was appointed to the 2009 Board of Examiners for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award—presented annually by the U.S. Department of Commerce to recognize role-model organizations for performance excellence. Peggy Kendall (communications) presented the keynote address and two workshops on youth and technology at the St. Paul School of Theology’s YouTheology conference for youth pastors (Kansas City, Mo.). Kendall also spoke to middle school students, high school students, and their parents at Trinity Christian Academy (Jackson, Tenn.). Juan Li (music, adjunct) was accepted into the Piano Texas International Academy and Festival as a teacher and performer. Piano Texas is held in collaboration with the Van Cliburn Piano Competition. Ben Lim (seminary, San Diego) and his wife Soh Leong Lim presented at the International Counseling and Social Work Symposium (University Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia). They also wrote an article for the California Spring American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy newsletter, conducted a family counseling workshop for the Penang Association for Counselors and Psychologists in Malaysia, provided training for the staff of Compassion for Migrant Children (Beijing), and taught a course on Marriage and Family Therapy at Singapore Bible College. Michelle Louis (general education, adjunct), in collaboration with Shane Lopez of Clifton Strengths Institute/Gallup, published “The Principles of Strengths-Based Education” in the April edition of The Journal of College and Character.

Alumni of the Year Seminary

Faculty Asides

Campus News

workshop leader at conferences and retreats, often in partnership with his wife Donna. In presenting the award, retired Bethel Seminary Provost Leland Eliason stated, “We commend you for advancing the gospel and instilling a global vision in the next generation of servant-leaders.”

College of Arts & Sciences While visible as First Lady of Minnesota, it has been Mary Anderson Pawlenty’s quiet life of service that garnered the 2009 Alumna of the Year Award from Bethel’s College of Arts & Sciences during a Homecoming convocation on September 25. The 1983 political science graduate became an attorney but left a successful partnership to serve for 12 years as a judge in the state’s First Judicial District based in Hastings. “Mary never judged anyone on the basis of why they were in court,” says The Honorable Edward Lynch, Chief Judge of the First Judicial District. “She realized that few people are as good as their best deed, and no one is as bad as their worst.” Pawlenty balanced her duties on the bench with parenting two daughters and

serving as First Lady; she also served Bethel University for nine years as a trustee. In addition to teaching school children about the three branches of government as a guest in elementary schools, today Pawlenty is director of Medical Diplomacy for Children’s HeartLink, a nonprofit organization dedicated to treating and preventing pediatric heart disease in underserved regions of the world. She also has been honored by the National Guard for founding the First Lady’s Military Family Care Initiative, a web-based program designed to unite community organizations with military families to provide simple volunteer services during times of deployment. “Mary doesn’t offer simple platitudes,” says her former law partner Greg Weyandt. “She is a disciple of [the apostle] St. James: It is important to hear the Word, but she believes you have to do something to help the community— you live the Word.” 

Dennis Port (music) led the Evangelion Chorale on a tour of Ukraine this summer. The adult chorale of 40 singers, many Bethel choir alumni, sang eight concerts for about 4,000 listeners. Don Postema (philosophy) published the article “Justice Emerging? Ethics Committees Go Beyond the Clinical Context” in the May issue of Minnesota Physician. In August, Postema presented on ethics at Regions Hospital (St. Paul, Minn.) and Westfields Hospital (New Richmond, Wis.). Jay Rasmussen (education) published a scholarly work on service-learning titled “Teaching and Learning in Guadalajara” in the book Quick Hits for Service-Learning: Successful Strategies from Award-Winning Educators. Rasmussen also presented workshops as part of the Traveling Workshop Series offered by the Collaboration for Teaching and Learning and spoke at San Jacinto College (Houston) and Northwest Iowa Community College. James Romaine (New York Center for Art & Media Studies) wrote “Re-emergence,” a section of a Christianity Today article addressing James Elkins’ book The Strange Place of Religion in Contemporary Art. Read the article on christianitytoday.com. Kristen Sandau (nursing) presented a paper in April at the Florida Conference of the International Society for Computerized Electrocardiology. Marge Schaffer (nursing) recently published “A Virtue Ethics Guide to Best Practices for Community-Based Participatory Research” in Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action. Schaffer, in collaboration with Barbara Gale ’04, CAPS ’07, also published “Organizational Readiness for Evidence-Based Practice” in the Journal of Nursing Administration. She recently received a Fulbright Specialist Award, which will fund a trip to Oslo for a presentation at an international public health nursing conference and to consult with Diakonova University on the development of a Master’s in Public Health program (see “Wholly Nursing,” p. 16). Ripley Smith (communications) published “The Role of Trust in International Crisis Areas: A Comparison of German and USAmerican NGO Partnership Strategies” in Organization Trust: A Cultural Perspective. Smith also gave presentations to the Academy of International Research Conference (Honolulu) and the National Communication Association as well as at the Faith and Thought Lecture Series at Northwestern College and the 2008 Religious Communication Pre-Conference.

Bethel University

7

Campus News

Ask a Prof

In Practice

Ever wish you had access to the advice of an expert Bethel professor? Now you do. Through Bethel Magazine’s new column, Ask a Prof, you can submit a vexing leadership question that you’ve faced in your church, ministry, or office. We’ll select one that applies to the greatest share of our readers and provide an answer from the appropriate expert. Here’s a question about an ethical problem at the office. Answering it is David Schuelke, who teaches leadership and communication courses in the College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School. My boss exaggerates truths to our superiors, and I’m not even sure she realizes she’s doing it. It makes me uncomfortable, and I can’t always keep up with which “truth” is the current version. I think it’s diminished the level of trust in our office. How should I deal with this issue?

Camie Melton Hanily is one of the 60 students currently enrolled in the Master of Arts in Communication program at Bethel’s Graduate School. She and her classmates are learning the principles of effectively communicating with others— like those Professor David Schuelke cites in his response (left). Hanily used to be a television reporter, viewing her job as a way to make people’s lives better. “I wanted to help people become more financially wise, more physically fit, more educated about the news of the day,” she explains. Hanily, who resides in Victoria, Minn., now makes a difference as the director of communications for the Eden Prairie, Minn., School District. “The better I can communicate to families, the more connected they are to our schools, which hopefully translates to higher achievement for our students,” she explains. Hanily has found great support from her cohort. “The Bethel program is three-dimensional,” she explains. “Not only does Bethel give you information, they also support you with this amazing group of fellow students and instructors. I didn’t expect to have new friends—but now I do.”

The Catholic priest and early theologian Thomas Aquinas wrote that “jocose” lies or “lies that do no harm” may be permissible, depending upon the circumstances. The Leadership Bible also points out that effectiveness in leadership is driven by what “the followers need.” With these caveats in mind, you have a duty not to confront, but to express to the boss your concerns regarding how the department may be perceived by colleagues and superiors. You can then discuss ways in which you may be able to help your department improve its communication in the future. In that meeting and others that may follow, you can learn what “the current version” of David Schuelke the department’s story is, and perhaps clarify Schuelke, who has a Ph.D. in and influence the formation of the story itself. organizational communication In this way, you may be able to help your boss from Purdue University, has taught hold more closely to the standard of truth communication and leadership at Bethel as you see it to be. All of this presupposes for 20 years, first as a visiting professor that the boss’s messages are not intentional For more information on the M.A. in and then as an adjunct. He teaches misstatements of hard facts regarding income Communication, visit gs.bethel.edu/ graduate courses in conflict management, and expenditures, etc., which, of course, communi. organizational analysis, and quantitative are not only unethical but also illegal! If and qualitative research methods in misrepresentation of facts is the case, then you communication. Schuelke has also served have no alternative but to consider the role of as a part-time mediator for the Minnesota whistleblower.

Have a question for Bethel’s profs? Email bethel-magazine@bethel.edu.

photo by Scott Streble

8

Fall 2009

Bureau of Mediation, and authored or co-authored numerous textbooks and articles on communication and organizational behavior.

4 Ways to Support Bethel The economy may be down, but the Bethel community’s commitment is high! “Even though everyone has felt the constraints of the recession, our donors have been generous,” says President Jay Barnes. “Contributions to Bethel exceeded expectations! I am so grateful for those who have stood beside me and Bethel throughout the past year.” While other institutions suffered a considerable drop, Bethel’s Annual Fund declined 17 percent, ending at $2.5 million—a modest decrease when compared with the fall-off other private institutions have suffered in the past year. Furthermore, total giving, including gifts to the Annual Fund, specific projects, and endowment, exceeded $9.3 million at the close of Bethel’s fiscal year on May 31. This makes 2008-2009 Bethel’s third-highest year in terms of all donor contributions. “We are grateful for the strong support,” says Bruce Anderson, Bethel’s vice president for development. “We also look forward to inviting alumni, parents, and friends to sustain Bethel’s vital educational mission in the coming year.” Here are four ways you can help sustain Bethel—financially and otherwise.

1 3

Contribute to the Annual Fund.

Next year’s Annual Fund goal is set for $3.025 million, the level sustained by donors in three of the past four years. Give $1 or give $1,000. Every bit helps, say alumni donors Karen ’74 and Dan ’71 Larson. “We are excited that Bethel is continuing its commitment to being a Christian institution that not only educates its students with excellence, but also challenges them to personalize their faith and integrate it into their majors and prospective fields,” says Karen. “We appreciate that Bethel’s mission is not just about a four-year liberal arts degree, but training students for life’s real mission and purpose.”

Pray. Nearly 1,000 people pray regularly for Bethel and its mission in small groups or individually through the National Prayer Initiative (NPI). They believe strongly in the power of prayer and the way it fosters Bethel’s mission to equip and train adventurous Christfollowers. “Prayer is essential for Bethel to be all that God intends it to be. It is a great privilege to pray faithfully together,” says Judy Moseman, NPI coordinator. Each month, NPI participants receive new—and specific—“prayer points” to help focus their intercession. For more information about NPI, visit bethel.edu/prayer-initiative.

4

2

Plan your Giving.

Designate your retirement plan. Leave a life insurance policy. Make a bequest through your will. Take out an annuity. These are all ways you can help support Bethel and leave a lasting legacy. In the past year, Bethel has acquired nearly $3 million in new planned gifts—new gift agreements and gift plans that often benefit the donor now, but eventually are distributed to Bethel through wills, trusts, or beneficiary designations. “Financial advisors say there may not be a better time than now to think about charitable planned giving,” says Dan Wiersum, associate vice president and director of planned giving. “Many strategies remain viable under the current economic conditions.”

Recruit!

Dollars for advertising and marketing are scarce and admissions offices have limited resources to recruit students—especially the best ones. In order for Bethel to reach its enrollment goals, continue becoming a nationally recognized university, and maintain its established tradition of excellence, all hands must be on deck. “The ‘Bethel story’ is a powerful one, and no one knows Bethel better than our alumni,” says Jay Fedje, director of It’s easy to respond to any of admissions for the College of Arts & Sciences. these invitations to support “Our alumni alliances can provide nearly Bethel. Simply fill out and return the appropriate panels limitless opportunities for those stories to be of the enclosed envelope. told and for the best and brightest students to Appearing in each Bethel become familiar with Bethel University.” Magazine, this insert will help Know potential students who should receive you refer students, request information about admission to Bethel? They information about Bethel might be at your church, in your neighborhood, schools, report alumni news, at the local high school, at your family reunion, or give financially to Bethel in or even at your kitchen table. Refer them to a number of ways. www.bethel.edu for more information. Bethel University

9

Campus News

Ask a Prof

In Practice

Ever wish you had access to the advice of an expert Bethel professor? Now you do. Through Bethel Magazine’s new column, Ask a Prof, you can submit a vexing leadership question that you’ve faced in your church, ministry, or office. We’ll select one that applies to the greatest share of our readers and provide an answer from the appropriate expert. Here’s a question about an ethical problem at the office. Answering it is David Schuelke, who teaches leadership and communication courses in the College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School. My boss exaggerates truths to our superiors, and I’m not even sure she realizes she’s doing it. It makes me uncomfortable, and I can’t always keep up with which “truth” is the current version. I think it’s diminished the level of trust in our office. How should I deal with this issue?

Camie Melton Hanily is one of the 60 students currently enrolled in the Master of Arts in Communication program at Bethel’s Graduate School. She and her classmates are learning the principles of effectively communicating with others— like those Professor David Schuelke cites in his response (left). Hanily used to be a television reporter, viewing her job as a way to make people’s lives better. “I wanted to help people become more financially wise, more physically fit, more educated about the news of the day,” she explains. Hanily, who resides in Victoria, Minn., now makes a difference as the director of communications for the Eden Prairie, Minn., School District. “The better I can communicate to families, the more connected they are to our schools, which hopefully translates to higher achievement for our students,” she explains. Hanily has found great support from her cohort. “The Bethel program is three-dimensional,” she explains. “Not only does Bethel give you information, they also support you with this amazing group of fellow students and instructors. I didn’t expect to have new friends—but now I do.”

The Catholic priest and early theologian Thomas Aquinas wrote that “jocose” lies or “lies that do no harm” may be permissible, depending upon the circumstances. The Leadership Bible also points out that effectiveness in leadership is driven by what “the followers need.” With these caveats in mind, you have a duty not to confront, but to express to the boss your concerns regarding how the department may be perceived by colleagues and superiors. You can then discuss ways in which you may be able to help your department improve its communication in the future. In that meeting and others that may follow, you can learn what “the current version” of David Schuelke the department’s story is, and perhaps clarify Schuelke, who has a Ph.D. in and influence the formation of the story itself. organizational communication In this way, you may be able to help your boss from Purdue University, has taught hold more closely to the standard of truth communication and leadership at Bethel as you see it to be. All of this presupposes for 20 years, first as a visiting professor that the boss’s messages are not intentional For more information on the M.A. in and then as an adjunct. He teaches misstatements of hard facts regarding income Communication, visit gs.bethel.edu/ graduate courses in conflict management, and expenditures, etc., which, of course, communi. organizational analysis, and quantitative are not only unethical but also illegal! If and qualitative research methods in misrepresentation of facts is the case, then you communication. Schuelke has also served have no alternative but to consider the role of as a part-time mediator for the Minnesota whistleblower.

Have a question for Bethel’s profs? Email bethel-magazine@bethel.edu.

photo by Scott Streble

8

Fall 2009

Bureau of Mediation, and authored or co-authored numerous textbooks and articles on communication and organizational behavior.

4 Ways to Support Bethel The economy may be down, but the Bethel community’s commitment is high! “Even though everyone has felt the constraints of the recession, our donors have been generous,” says President Jay Barnes. “Contributions to Bethel exceeded expectations! I am so grateful for those who have stood beside me and Bethel throughout the past year.” While other institutions suffered a considerable drop, Bethel’s Annual Fund declined 17 percent, ending at $2.5 million—a modest decrease when compared with the fall-off other private institutions have suffered in the past year. Furthermore, total giving, including gifts to the Annual Fund, specific projects, and endowment, exceeded $9.3 million at the close of Bethel’s fiscal year on May 31. This makes 2008-2009 Bethel’s third-highest year in terms of all donor contributions. “We are grateful for the strong support,” says Bruce Anderson, Bethel’s vice president for development. “We also look forward to inviting alumni, parents, and friends to sustain Bethel’s vital educational mission in the coming year.” Here are four ways you can help sustain Bethel—financially and otherwise.

1 3

Contribute to the Annual Fund.

Next year’s Annual Fund goal is set for $3.025 million, the level sustained by donors in three of the past four years. Give $1 or give $1,000. Every bit helps, say alumni donors Karen ’74 and Dan ’71 Larson. “We are excited that Bethel is continuing its commitment to being a Christian institution that not only educates its students with excellence, but also challenges them to personalize their faith and integrate it into their majors and prospective fields,” says Karen. “We appreciate that Bethel’s mission is not just about a four-year liberal arts degree, but training students for life’s real mission and purpose.”

Pray. Nearly 1,000 people pray regularly for Bethel and its mission in small groups or individually through the National Prayer Initiative (NPI). They believe strongly in the power of prayer and the way it fosters Bethel’s mission to equip and train adventurous Christfollowers. “Prayer is essential for Bethel to be all that God intends it to be. It is a great privilege to pray faithfully together,” says Judy Moseman, NPI coordinator. Each month, NPI participants receive new—and specific—“prayer points” to help focus their intercession. For more information about NPI, visit bethel.edu/prayer-initiative.

4

2

Plan your Giving.

Designate your retirement plan. Leave a life insurance policy. Make a bequest through your will. Take out an annuity. These are all ways you can help support Bethel and leave a lasting legacy. In the past year, Bethel has acquired nearly $3 million in new planned gifts—new gift agreements and gift plans that often benefit the donor now, but eventually are distributed to Bethel through wills, trusts, or beneficiary designations. “Financial advisors say there may not be a better time than now to think about charitable planned giving,” says Dan Wiersum, associate vice president and director of planned giving. “Many strategies remain viable under the current economic conditions.”

Recruit!

Dollars for advertising and marketing are scarce and admissions offices have limited resources to recruit students—especially the best ones. In order for Bethel to reach its enrollment goals, continue becoming a nationally recognized university, and maintain its established tradition of excellence, all hands must be on deck. “The ‘Bethel story’ is a powerful one, and no one knows Bethel better than our alumni,” says Jay Fedje, director of It’s easy to respond to any of admissions for the College of Arts & Sciences. these invitations to support “Our alumni alliances can provide nearly Bethel. Simply fill out and return the appropriate panels limitless opportunities for those stories to be of the enclosed envelope. told and for the best and brightest students to Appearing in each Bethel become familiar with Bethel University.” Magazine, this insert will help Know potential students who should receive you refer students, request information about admission to Bethel? They information about Bethel might be at your church, in your neighborhood, schools, report alumni news, at the local high school, at your family reunion, or give financially to Bethel in or even at your kitchen table. Refer them to a number of ways. www.bethel.edu for more information. Bethel University

9

Campus News

First off-campus graduate cohort (M.Ed. in Special Education in North Branch, Minn.)

First off-campus undergraduate cohorts in Organizational Studies offered in Austin and Mankato, Minn., and San Diego

The first cohort in the Program in Adult College Education begins, serving 31 adult learners with a degreecompletion program in Organizational Studies (now Organizational Leadership). To date, this major has the highest number of graduates—1,152 and counting.

13 adult programs running M.A. in Counseling Psychology launches

M.A. degrees in Organizational Leadership and Communication begin; A.A. degree in General Studies starts

9 20 0

20 05

4 20 0

20 01

19 96

19 94

Light the candles! The College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School celebrates its 20th birthday and its growing number of learners—currently 2,500.

19 92

19 91

19 89

CAPS/GS Turns 20

MBA program launches; as of October 2009, this is the largest program with 281 students currently enrolled. M.Ed. in Instructional Leadership K-12 in the Dominican Republic begins (the farthest face-to-face cohort); Doctor of Education degree program begins with primarily online format

The schools now boast 13 graduate degrees and seven undergraduate degrees, along with numerous licenses and certificates. Classes meet at the Bethel campus and in several Twin Cities metropolitan locations including the new Bloomington site.

New Degree for Healthcare Professionals The College of Adult & Professional Studies/Graduate School now has a B.A. in Healthcare Leadership program, combining course work in organizational leadership and courses specifically designed for the healthcare professional. Drawing from experience in the medical, public health, social services, and insurance industries, students explore leadership specific to the healthcare field,

10

Fall 2009

including teamwork, communications, and principles of accounting and budgeting. “People are often promoted in healthcare regardless of interest or knowledge of management or leadership,” says Pete Erickson, one of the creators of the initiative, explaining the need for such a program. “Maybe they are technicians, first responders, EMTs, or nurses, but they

have never been trained in leadership. We need to develop them so they have the tools and skills to succeed.” Erickson, also one of the program’s lead instructors, has an M.A. in organizational leadership from Bethel and wrote his thesis on training healthcare leaders.

Fair Value A record 2009 Minnesota State Fair attendance of more than 1.7 million people August 27-September 7 made an impact on the Bethel University booth, too. Here are the goods that approximately 25,000 visitors took to learn about and remember Bethel:

New Seminary Leader

After serving as acting vice president and dean of Bethel Seminary for several 22,000 grocery totes 6,000 “Tell Me More” cards (including months, David Ridder was officially 300 filled out and left at the booth, confirmed as such by the Board of Trustees. 8,000 rulers indicating immediate interest) In this role, Ridder reports to Provost Clark and parallels 6,000 “Who Will You Become?” 27,000 wristbands imprinted with one of David the vice presidents and brochures describing typical Bethel Bethel’s seven core values deans of the College of students across all four schools Arts & Sciences and “People loved the wristbands,” says Senior Vice President for Communications and the College of Adult & Marketing Sherie Lindvall, noting the supply ran out most days. “It was amazing to Professional Studies and see them stop and ponder Graduate School. which value they identified “I think of Dave as a …It’s What’s with most,” choosing from persistent, mindful, collaborative leader,” for Dinner Christ-follower, charactersays Clark. “I’m deeply grateful to Dave Potato-crusted builder, truth-seeker, for his flexible spirit, his understanding walleye with sautéed learner, reconciler, salt and of the current world, his commitment to leeks, carrots, and light, and world-changer. the church, his leadership savvy, and his red peppers topped “Whether they’re people of consistent, godly heart. I feel confident with a balsamic honey faith or not,” Lindvall adds, that he is the right person to help lead the reduction. “there seems to be a value seminary during this critical time.” It’s what Bethel’s cook Brian Henning chose to with which everyone can From 1981 to 2007, Ridder who received make at the Minnesota State Fair, where he and 15 resonate.” his B.A. from Wheaton College, and other Minnesota chefs were featured at a sustainable About 80 student and M.Div. and D.Min. degrees from Trinity and local food event. They “created delicious fare staff volunteers kept the Evangelical Divinity School, was a pastor. with fresh ingredients” all grown by local farmers. booth staffed 12 hours a He joined Bethel in 1996 and has served Henning’s food selection was easy. After all, he day for 12 days. The effort in many different roles: a faculty associate says, Minnesota is the state of walleye. You can taste was coordinated by student in pastoral theology; dean and executive some of his other selections in Bethel’s own Monson employee Eva Rodelius ’10. officer for Bethel Seminary of the East Dining Center. He’s been part of the Sodexo Dining (2000-2002); two stints on the Bethel Service team for seven years. University Board of Trustees (1997-2000 and 2004-2007); dean of the Center for Transformational Leadership (2007-2008); and dean of Bethel Seminary St. Paul (since 2008). “It is a privilege to build on the legacy Bethel Seminary San Diego now has the only seminary program in the state of of Leland Eliason who was used by God California with an accredited master’s degree program in Marital and Family Therapy to put Bethel Seminary on the cutting (MFT). With accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and edge of theological education,” says Family Therapy Education, it also becomes one of only four seminary programs in the Ridder. “I covet the prayers of all who love nation to merit this accreditation. Other accreditations come from the Association of Theological Schools and the regional North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Bethel as we work to discern how best to Collectively, these accreditations assure prospective students that their academic and prepare the next generation of pastors and Christian leaders to advance the gospel of practical training will equip them for success in kingdom service as licensed marriage Jesus Christ in a rapidly changing world.” and family therapists. Started in 1997, the MFT program is expected to draw about 60 students in San Diego this fall.

Accredited in San Diego

Bethel University

11

Campus News

First off-campus graduate cohort (M.Ed. in Special Education in North Branch, Minn.)

First off-campus undergraduate cohorts in Organizational Studies offered in Austin and Mankato, Minn., and San Diego

The first cohort in the Program in Adult College Education begins, serving 31 adult learners with a degreecompletion program in Organizational Studies (now Organizational Leadership). To date, this major has the highest number of graduates—1,152 and counting.

13 adult programs running M.A. in Counseling Psychology launches

M.A. degrees in Organizational Leadership and Communication begin; A.A. degree in General Studies starts

9 20 0

20 05

4 20 0

20 01

19 96

19 94

Light the candles! The College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School celebrates its 20th birthday and its growing number of learners—currently 2,500.

19 92

19 91

19 89

CAPS/GS Turns 20

MBA program launches; as of October 2009, this is the largest program with 281 students currently enrolled. M.Ed. in Instructional Leadership K-12 in the Dominican Republic begins (the farthest face-to-face cohort); Doctor of Education degree program begins with primarily online format

The schools now boast 13 graduate degrees and seven undergraduate degrees, along with numerous licenses and certificates. Classes meet at the Bethel campus and in several Twin Cities metropolitan locations including the new Bloomington site.

New Degree for Healthcare Professionals The College of Adult & Professional Studies/Graduate School now has a B.A. in Healthcare Leadership program, combining course work in organizational leadership and courses specifically designed for the healthcare professional. Drawing from experience in the medical, public health, social services, and insurance industries, students explore leadership specific to the healthcare field,

10

Fall 2009

including teamwork, communications, and principles of accounting and budgeting. “People are often promoted in healthcare regardless of interest or knowledge of management or leadership,” says Pete Erickson, one of the creators of the initiative, explaining the need for such a program. “Maybe they are technicians, first responders, EMTs, or nurses, but they

have never been trained in leadership. We need to develop them so they have the tools and skills to succeed.” Erickson, also one of the program’s lead instructors, has an M.A. in organizational leadership from Bethel and wrote his thesis on training healthcare leaders.

Fair Value A record 2009 Minnesota State Fair attendance of more than 1.7 million people August 27-September 7 made an impact on the Bethel University booth, too. Here are the goods that approximately 25,000 visitors took to learn about and remember Bethel:

New Seminary Leader

After serving as acting vice president and dean of Bethel Seminary for several 22,000 grocery totes 6,000 “Tell Me More” cards (including months, David Ridder was officially 300 filled out and left at the booth, confirmed as such by the Board of Trustees. 8,000 rulers indicating immediate interest) In this role, Ridder reports to Provost Clark and parallels 6,000 “Who Will You Become?” 27,000 wristbands imprinted with one of David the vice presidents and brochures describing typical Bethel Bethel’s seven core values deans of the College of students across all four schools Arts & Sciences and “People loved the wristbands,” says Senior Vice President for Communications and the College of Adult & Marketing Sherie Lindvall, noting the supply ran out most days. “It was amazing to Professional Studies and see them stop and ponder Graduate School. which value they identified “I think of Dave as a …It’s What’s with most,” choosing from persistent, mindful, collaborative leader,” for Dinner Christ-follower, charactersays Clark. “I’m deeply grateful to Dave Potato-crusted builder, truth-seeker, for his flexible spirit, his understanding walleye with sautéed learner, reconciler, salt and of the current world, his commitment to leeks, carrots, and light, and world-changer. the church, his leadership savvy, and his red peppers topped “Whether they’re people of consistent, godly heart. I feel confident with a balsamic honey faith or not,” Lindvall adds, that he is the right person to help lead the reduction. “there seems to be a value seminary during this critical time.” It’s what Bethel’s cook Brian Henning chose to with which everyone can From 1981 to 2007, Ridder who received make at the Minnesota State Fair, where he and 15 resonate.” his B.A. from Wheaton College, and other Minnesota chefs were featured at a sustainable About 80 student and M.Div. and D.Min. degrees from Trinity and local food event. They “created delicious fare staff volunteers kept the Evangelical Divinity School, was a pastor. with fresh ingredients” all grown by local farmers. booth staffed 12 hours a He joined Bethel in 1996 and has served Henning’s food selection was easy. After all, he day for 12 days. The effort in many different roles: a faculty associate says, Minnesota is the state of walleye. You can taste was coordinated by student in pastoral theology; dean and executive some of his other selections in Bethel’s own Monson employee Eva Rodelius ’10. officer for Bethel Seminary of the East Dining Center. He’s been part of the Sodexo Dining (2000-2002); two stints on the Bethel Service team for seven years. University Board of Trustees (1997-2000 and 2004-2007); dean of the Center for Transformational Leadership (2007-2008); and dean of Bethel Seminary St. Paul (since 2008). “It is a privilege to build on the legacy Bethel Seminary San Diego now has the only seminary program in the state of of Leland Eliason who was used by God California with an accredited master’s degree program in Marital and Family Therapy to put Bethel Seminary on the cutting (MFT). With accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and edge of theological education,” says Family Therapy Education, it also becomes one of only four seminary programs in the Ridder. “I covet the prayers of all who love nation to merit this accreditation. Other accreditations come from the Association of Theological Schools and the regional North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Bethel as we work to discern how best to Collectively, these accreditations assure prospective students that their academic and prepare the next generation of pastors and Christian leaders to advance the gospel of practical training will equip them for success in kingdom service as licensed marriage Jesus Christ in a rapidly changing world.” and family therapists. Started in 1997, the MFT program is expected to draw about 60 students in San Diego this fall.

Accredited in San Diego

Bethel University

11

Campus News

And the Winner Is… Thank you to those of you who participated in the recent survey regarding Bethel University’s new website. Chicago-based design firm mStoner emailed 35,000 prospective students, current students, employees, parents, and alumni and received a record-breaking response rate. Furthermore, the responses provided a clear consensus: Concept No. 2 wins! Respondents shared that the design and messaging of Concept No. 2 tell people that Bethel is about “the transformation journey” and “community,” among other things. For more on the survey results, visit redesign.bethel.edu.

Filtering Water in Iraq They used to drink water contaminated with sewage bacteria, but now some Iraqi high schoolers in Najaf, Iraq, are refreshed with pure H20, thanks to several Bethel students. World Challenge, a student group that promotes missions and biblical justice on Bethel’s campus, raised $1,100 during the 2008-09 school year to donate and install a water filter at the Najaf high school. “A project like this seemed a very tangible way we students could be involved with the reconciliation process in Iraq,” says Maren Anderson ’09. “For years now, we have seen images of devastation in Iraq, and I think many of us have felt helpless. As Christians, this was an opportunity to take a stance for justice, inter-faith partnership, and living generously.” The students first learned of the desperate need for water filtration systems in Iraq when the founder of the Muslim Peacemaker Teams came to speak in a reconciliation studies course at Bethel. In response, students raised funds through a Christmas Fair Trade market, during which students sold products either certified as Fair Trade or acquired directly from the producer, and a campaign urging Bethel students and employees to give $1. Muslim Peacemaker Teams installed the filter in May. “Through projects like this, God is moving students to real transformation—for their lives and for the lives of others in the world. They are not only becoming competent Christ-like activists and scholars, they are living out the biblical mandates to ‘love sacrificially’ and ‘do justice,’” says Associate Campus Pastor Matt Runion, who works with the World Challenge group. “I think it was a successful project,” explains Bethel senior Elisabeth Geschiere, “not because of any individual student’s efforts, but because of the simple fact that a few more Iraqi students have clean water.”

12

Fall 2009

Care to Share? Bethel University will have guests February 8-10, 2010. The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools will send a visiting team to review Bethel’s ability to meet the commission’s accreditation criteria. The College of Arts and Sciences and College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School must undergo the comprehensive evaluation every 10 years. To prepare, the commission is collecting “third-party comments,” comments from the public, regarding Bethel. Care to share? Submit a comment. Comments must: • address substantive matters related to Bethel’s quality and/or academic programs • be in writing and signed • be mailed to: The Higher Learning Commission, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60602, by Jan. 8, 2010 • include your name and address Note: Individuals with a specific dispute or grievance with Bethel should request the separate Policy on Complaints document from the Commission office (hlcommission.org). The Higher Learning Commission cannot settle disputes between institutions and individuals, whether those individuals are faculty, students, or others. Complaints will not be considered third-party comment.

Support for Tomorrow’s Church Leaders Seven Bethel Seminary students—all in the M.Div. program intending to do pastoral ministry in a local church— were awarded New Kern Scholars prestigious Kern scholarships. Zachary Howland Sponsored by Megan Percy the Kern Family Jeremy Lindy Foundation of Waukesha, Wis., Sarah Anderson these students Todd Asper receive full tuition Elyse Levinskas for three years and Seth Ingersoll have opportunities to connect with other Kern scholars across the nation during their seminary careers. Founded in 1998 to improve society’s values, the foundation seeks to equip well-prepared leaders for tomorrow’s churches. In total, Bethel has 17 Kern scholars with the possibility of up to 12 scholarships added next year. Bethel was originally among more than 200 seminaries nationwide to be considered for a specific, yearly partnership with the Kern foundation, and one of just eight seminaries to be selected.

Runs in the Family Three families, four Bethel generations… The family of Ole Larson (S ’18) His three children and many of their children attended Bethel, most recently Rick A. Sturm, who received his M.A. in 2006—a span of 88 years. The family of Axel Rendahl (S ’12) His two children and many of their children attended Bethel, most recently Aaron ’00 and Tessa Rendahl ’99—a span of 87 years. The family of Amy Lambert Christenson (’30) Two of her children, seven of her nine grandchildren, and one of her greatgrandchildren have graduated from Bethel. Her great-granddaughter Caitlyn Bettger graduates this year. Her cousin Millard Erickson was dean of Bethel Seminary from 1984 to 1992, and her grandson, Jeff Port, has been a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences since 2001. Does your family have a deep, longstanding connection to Bethel? Tell us about your clan at bethel-magazine@ bethel.edu.

To Bloomington and Beyond The building at 8201 Norman Center Drive, near the intersection of 494 and 100 in Bloomington, Minn., is now Bethel. The College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School have begun offering classes at the 11,000-square foot facility—including seven classrooms and office space—in the latest expansion of Bethel’s adult program. “We have seen a desire among adult students to use this economic downturn to better prepare themselves for the next steps in their current careers or for new careers altogether,” explains Michael Price, director of admissions for the College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School. “They want to improve their experience and resumes in order to weather this and other economic downturns and make them invaluable to employers.” Bethel University

13

Campus News

And the Winner Is… Thank you to those of you who participated in the recent survey regarding Bethel University’s new website. Chicago-based design firm mStoner emailed 35,000 prospective students, current students, employees, parents, and alumni and received a record-breaking response rate. Furthermore, the responses provided a clear consensus: Concept No. 2 wins! Respondents shared that the design and messaging of Concept No. 2 tell people that Bethel is about “the transformation journey” and “community,” among other things. For more on the survey results, visit redesign.bethel.edu.

Filtering Water in Iraq They used to drink water contaminated with sewage bacteria, but now some Iraqi high schoolers in Najaf, Iraq, are refreshed with pure H20, thanks to several Bethel students. World Challenge, a student group that promotes missions and biblical justice on Bethel’s campus, raised $1,100 during the 2008-09 school year to donate and install a water filter at the Najaf high school. “A project like this seemed a very tangible way we students could be involved with the reconciliation process in Iraq,” says Maren Anderson ’09. “For years now, we have seen images of devastation in Iraq, and I think many of us have felt helpless. As Christians, this was an opportunity to take a stance for justice, inter-faith partnership, and living generously.” The students first learned of the desperate need for water filtration systems in Iraq when the founder of the Muslim Peacemaker Teams came to speak in a reconciliation studies course at Bethel. In response, students raised funds through a Christmas Fair Trade market, during which students sold products either certified as Fair Trade or acquired directly from the producer, and a campaign urging Bethel students and employees to give $1. Muslim Peacemaker Teams installed the filter in May. “Through projects like this, God is moving students to real transformation—for their lives and for the lives of others in the world. They are not only becoming competent Christ-like activists and scholars, they are living out the biblical mandates to ‘love sacrificially’ and ‘do justice,’” says Associate Campus Pastor Matt Runion, who works with the World Challenge group. “I think it was a successful project,” explains Bethel senior Elisabeth Geschiere, “not because of any individual student’s efforts, but because of the simple fact that a few more Iraqi students have clean water.”

12

Fall 2009

Care to Share? Bethel University will have guests February 8-10, 2010. The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools will send a visiting team to review Bethel’s ability to meet the commission’s accreditation criteria. The College of Arts and Sciences and College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School must undergo the comprehensive evaluation every 10 years. To prepare, the commission is collecting “third-party comments,” comments from the public, regarding Bethel. Care to share? Submit a comment. Comments must: • address substantive matters related to Bethel’s quality and/or academic programs • be in writing and signed • be mailed to: The Higher Learning Commission, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60602, by Jan. 8, 2010 • include your name and address Note: Individuals with a specific dispute or grievance with Bethel should request the separate Policy on Complaints document from the Commission office (hlcommission.org). The Higher Learning Commission cannot settle disputes between institutions and individuals, whether those individuals are faculty, students, or others. Complaints will not be considered third-party comment.

Support for Tomorrow’s Church Leaders Seven Bethel Seminary students—all in the M.Div. program intending to do pastoral ministry in a local church— were awarded New Kern Scholars prestigious Kern scholarships. Zachary Howland Sponsored by Megan Percy the Kern Family Jeremy Lindy Foundation of Waukesha, Wis., Sarah Anderson these students Todd Asper receive full tuition Elyse Levinskas for three years and Seth Ingersoll have opportunities to connect with other Kern scholars across the nation during their seminary careers. Founded in 1998 to improve society’s values, the foundation seeks to equip well-prepared leaders for tomorrow’s churches. In total, Bethel has 17 Kern scholars with the possibility of up to 12 scholarships added next year. Bethel was originally among more than 200 seminaries nationwide to be considered for a specific, yearly partnership with the Kern foundation, and one of just eight seminaries to be selected.

Runs in the Family Three families, four Bethel generations… The family of Ole Larson (S ’18) His three children and many of their children attended Bethel, most recently Rick A. Sturm, who received his M.A. in 2006—a span of 88 years. The family of Axel Rendahl (S ’12) His two children and many of their children attended Bethel, most recently Aaron ’00 and Tessa Rendahl ’99—a span of 87 years. The family of Amy Lambert Christenson (’30) Two of her children, seven of her nine grandchildren, and one of her greatgrandchildren have graduated from Bethel. Her great-granddaughter Caitlyn Bettger graduates this year. Her cousin Millard Erickson was dean of Bethel Seminary from 1984 to 1992, and her grandson, Jeff Port, has been a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences since 2001. Does your family have a deep, longstanding connection to Bethel? Tell us about your clan at bethel-magazine@ bethel.edu.

To Bloomington and Beyond The building at 8201 Norman Center Drive, near the intersection of 494 and 100 in Bloomington, Minn., is now Bethel. The College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School have begun offering classes at the 11,000-square foot facility—including seven classrooms and office space—in the latest expansion of Bethel’s adult program. “We have seen a desire among adult students to use this economic downturn to better prepare themselves for the next steps in their current careers or for new careers altogether,” explains Michael Price, director of admissions for the College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School. “They want to improve their experience and resumes in order to weather this and other economic downturns and make them invaluable to employers.” Bethel University

13

Sports News

Football

Soccer

Bethel’s football team is off to a 5-2 start after convincing wins over ConcordiaWisconsin, Carleton, and Concordia Moorhead. Logan Flannery (Jr., Lakeville, Minn.) is one of the top rushers in the conference and Reid Velo (Sr., Nashwauk, Minn.) was named to the American Football Coaches Association Good Works Team (see below).

five years by going 10-6-2, doubling their win total from last season. They had Women’s landmark wins against St. Thomas and The women’s soccer team continues to Macalester—two teams they hadn’t beaten set new records for wins and shutouts, in a decade or more. Andreas Scott (Jr., and in the first seven games of this season, Cedar, Minn.) led the team with 26 points they scored more goals than all of last on eight goals and 10 assists. season. Brittany Griffore (So., Maple Grove, Minn.) leads the team with 29 Golf points on 11 goals and seven assists. The men’s team placed sixth at the Men’s MIAC Championship at Bunker Hills The men’s soccer team just finished Golf Course in Coon Rapids, Minn. their most successful season in the last Mason Swenson (So., Eagan, Minn.) was Bethel’s top men’s golfer by finishing in eighth place, which earned him All-MIAC honors. He shot a collective 10-over par in the 54-hole tournament. On the women’s side, Paige Lemieux (So., Fargo, N.D.) was Bethel’s best golfer in the conference championship. In just their second full season as a varsity sport, the women’s team continues to bring their cumulative scores down as they increase their competitiveness.

Volleyball Royals celebrate after 2-1 victory over Macalester

Team Player

14

Bethel’s volleyball team is currently 12-15 after winning five of their last seven matches. Earlier this season, head coach

Reid Velo was named to the American Football Coaches Association Good Works Team. The Royals’ starting wide receiver will graduate in spring 2010 with a psychology major and a philosophy minor. He’s a member of Antioch Way; spent last semester studying in Nicosia, Cyprus; interned at Wooddale Church in Eden Prairie, Minn., this past summer; and is currently serving as a resident assistant in Heritage Hall.

Kelly Otto Sr., Plymouth, Minn.

Recently published books by Bethel University’s faculty Being Present: A Nurse’s Resource for End-of-Life Communication by Bethel University Professor of Nursing Marjorie Schaffer and end-of-life care expert Linda Norlander (Sigma Theta Tau International) This book offers strategies to help nurses talk with patients and families about their needs, hopes, and wishes as they face their own death or that of a loved one. Each chapter presents a real-life account of nurses dealing with near-death patients and their families and includes the best communication techniques.

Patron Saints for Postmoderns: Ten from the Past Who Speak to Our Future Gretchen Hunt earned her 150th career win—all with the Royals. She is just the second Bethel coach to reach that plateau. The team is led by Nicole Wriedt (So., Pewaukee, Wis.), who has 281 kills.

Cross-country The women’s cross-country team has been ranked as high as 10th in the nation, while the men’s team has been ranked as high as 9th in the region heading into the MIAC Championships. Two-time NCAA All-Americans Marie Borner (Sr., Cottage Grove, Minn.) and Dan Greeno (Sr., St. Michael, Minn.) have earned MIAC Athlete of the Week awards three times, most recently for their finishes at the Brooks Invitational, hosted by UWOshkosh.

“As a sophomore, I traveled with the football team to Canton, Ohio, to play Mount Union in the National Semifinals. It was one of the most enjoyable and influencing events, even though we didn’t win. One thing that stands out in my mind was the way our team interacted with others. Football players have the stereotype of being loud and obnoxious. But people were amazed at how we as ‘God guys’—as Coach J says—interacted with each other and those around us.

Visit athletics.bethel.edu to:

We’re a bunch of brothers who love each other, God, and football. When people notice that, it strikes a chord. Countless times during our trip, I heard people talking about what a special group we were. I observed people light up with smiles and laughter at our humor, and I noticed puzzled faces that showed amazement at our quick response to helping people. Living together as the church has a ripple-effect on our surroundings, and it also has the power to drastically transform for good.”

• Get game schedules.

Fall 2009

Bookmarked

• Watch Royal Recap: a three- to five-minute Royals sports highlight segment by Sports Information Director Dale Eng.

by Bethel Seminary Associate Professor of Church History Christopher Armstrong (IVP Books) Feeling discouraged in your efforts to reflect Christ each day in our broken world? The saints can help you. Armstrong has chosen Armstrong was recently Antony of Egypt, Gregory the Great, and Margery interviewed about this Kempe, to name a few, for the ways they’ve inspired book on the Los Angeles and deepened his own faith. “Knowing their stories drive-time KKLA show buoys our own,” says Armstrong, “and observing by Christian radio host their steps gives us lived-out action to go with our Frank Pastore. Listen to theology.” the interview.

International Advances in Adoption Research for Practice by Bethel University Professor of Psychology Gretchen Miller Wrobel and University of East Anglia Senior Lecturer Elsbeth Neil (Wiley-Blackwell) Interest in the role of legal adoption as both a child welfare solution and a means of alternative family formation is increasing worldwide; this compilation of 13 papers from a multidisciplinary community of distinguished and emerging adoption researchers shows cross-cultural and international attitudes towards adoption research and outcomes. For many other books by Bethel faculty, visit the Campus Store at bookstore.bethel.edu and click on “Bethel Authors.”

• Watch webcasts. Also, become a Royals Fan on Facebook.

Bethel University

15

Sports News

Football

Soccer

Bethel’s football team is off to a 5-2 start after convincing wins over ConcordiaWisconsin, Carleton, and Concordia Moorhead. Logan Flannery (Jr., Lakeville, Minn.) is one of the top rushers in the conference and Reid Velo (Sr., Nashwauk, Minn.) was named to the American Football Coaches Association Good Works Team (see below).

five years by going 10-6-2, doubling their win total from last season. They had Women’s landmark wins against St. Thomas and The women’s soccer team continues to Macalester—two teams they hadn’t beaten set new records for wins and shutouts, in a decade or more. Andreas Scott (Jr., and in the first seven games of this season, Cedar, Minn.) led the team with 26 points they scored more goals than all of last on eight goals and 10 assists. season. Brittany Griffore (So., Maple Grove, Minn.) leads the team with 29 Golf points on 11 goals and seven assists. The men’s team placed sixth at the Men’s MIAC Championship at Bunker Hills The men’s soccer team just finished Golf Course in Coon Rapids, Minn. their most successful season in the last Mason Swenson (So., Eagan, Minn.) was Bethel’s top men’s golfer by finishing in eighth place, which earned him All-MIAC honors. He shot a collective 10-over par in the 54-hole tournament. On the women’s side, Paige Lemieux (So., Fargo, N.D.) was Bethel’s best golfer in the conference championship. In just their second full season as a varsity sport, the women’s team continues to bring their cumulative scores down as they increase their competitiveness.

Volleyball Royals celebrate after 2-1 victory over Macalester

Team Player

14

Bethel’s volleyball team is currently 12-15 after winning five of their last seven matches. Earlier this season, head coach

Reid Velo was named to the American Football Coaches Association Good Works Team. The Royals’ starting wide receiver will graduate in spring 2010 with a psychology major and a philosophy minor. He’s a member of Antioch Way; spent last semester studying in Nicosia, Cyprus; interned at Wooddale Church in Eden Prairie, Minn., this past summer; and is currently serving as a resident assistant in Heritage Hall.

Kelly Otto Sr., Plymouth, Minn.

Recently published books by Bethel University’s faculty Being Present: A Nurse’s Resource for End-of-Life Communication by Bethel University Professor of Nursing Marjorie Schaffer and end-of-life care expert Linda Norlander (Sigma Theta Tau International) This book offers strategies to help nurses talk with patients and families about their needs, hopes, and wishes as they face their own death or that of a loved one. Each chapter presents a real-life account of nurses dealing with near-death patients and their families and includes the best communication techniques.

Patron Saints for Postmoderns: Ten from the Past Who Speak to Our Future Gretchen Hunt earned her 150th career win—all with the Royals. She is just the second Bethel coach to reach that plateau. The team is led by Nicole Wriedt (So., Pewaukee, Wis.), who has 281 kills.

Cross-country The women’s cross-country team has been ranked as high as 10th in the nation, while the men’s team has been ranked as high as 9th in the region heading into the MIAC Championships. Two-time NCAA All-Americans Marie Borner (Sr., Cottage Grove, Minn.) and Dan Greeno (Sr., St. Michael, Minn.) have earned MIAC Athlete of the Week awards three times, most recently for their finishes at the Brooks Invitational, hosted by UWOshkosh.

“As a sophomore, I traveled with the football team to Canton, Ohio, to play Mount Union in the National Semifinals. It was one of the most enjoyable and influencing events, even though we didn’t win. One thing that stands out in my mind was the way our team interacted with others. Football players have the stereotype of being loud and obnoxious. But people were amazed at how we as ‘God guys’—as Coach J says—interacted with each other and those around us.

Visit athletics.bethel.edu to:

We’re a bunch of brothers who love each other, God, and football. When people notice that, it strikes a chord. Countless times during our trip, I heard people talking about what a special group we were. I observed people light up with smiles and laughter at our humor, and I noticed puzzled faces that showed amazement at our quick response to helping people. Living together as the church has a ripple-effect on our surroundings, and it also has the power to drastically transform for good.”

• Get game schedules.

Fall 2009

Bookmarked

• Watch Royal Recap: a three- to five-minute Royals sports highlight segment by Sports Information Director Dale Eng.

by Bethel Seminary Associate Professor of Church History Christopher Armstrong (IVP Books) Feeling discouraged in your efforts to reflect Christ each day in our broken world? The saints can help you. Armstrong has chosen Armstrong was recently Antony of Egypt, Gregory the Great, and Margery interviewed about this Kempe, to name a few, for the ways they’ve inspired book on the Los Angeles and deepened his own faith. “Knowing their stories drive-time KKLA show buoys our own,” says Armstrong, “and observing by Christian radio host their steps gives us lived-out action to go with our Frank Pastore. Listen to theology.” the interview.

International Advances in Adoption Research for Practice by Bethel University Professor of Psychology Gretchen Miller Wrobel and University of East Anglia Senior Lecturer Elsbeth Neil (Wiley-Blackwell) Interest in the role of legal adoption as both a child welfare solution and a means of alternative family formation is increasing worldwide; this compilation of 13 papers from a multidisciplinary community of distinguished and emerging adoption researchers shows cross-cultural and international attitudes towards adoption research and outcomes. For many other books by Bethel faculty, visit the Campus Store at bookstore.bethel.edu and click on “Bethel Authors.”

• Watch webcasts. Also, become a Royals Fan on Facebook.

Bethel University

15

Wholly

Bethel’s fast-growing nursing program teaches students to care for patients physically, socially, and spiritually—both here and abroad.

In sixth grade, Rachel Matz’s classmate was diagnosed with cancer. Matz spent a lot of time with her friend during the treatments and quickly learned that a “good” or “bad” nurse could make or break her friend’s day. This relational aspect of providing care—and its impact on patients—is one of the main reasons Matz decided to pursue nursing. “As a nurse, you can do so much,” she explains. “Not just physically, but socially and spiritually. It’s holistic care. It’s the whole package.” Now a senior wanting to go into missionary nursing, Matz is one of the 160 students learning how to blend healthcare and ministry in Bethel’s fast-growing pre-licensure undergraduate nursing program.

Nursing

Expanding Space

Changing Curriculum

With 2.5 million jobs, registered nurses constitute the largest healthcare occupation in the United States. And 587,000 new jobs are projected over the 2006-16 period, one of the largest numbers among all occupations, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Perhaps this is one reason why more than one-seventh of Bethel’s undergrad population is in the nursing program. Accommodating the growth in student enrollment, 39 percent over the past five years, the undergraduate nursing program at Bethel looks much different now than it did just two semesters ago, when it borrowed computer space from the library and tore down a wall between two faculty offices for a simulation lab. This fall, you’ll find nursing students taking blood pressure and other vital signs in what used to be the Dining Center (below). During the summer, the recently vacated dining area was reconstructed and now includes a classroom for up to 45 students; a computer lab; two general purpose labs that can be used for teaching, practicing, and testing; rooms for videorecording student performance; and three high-tech simulation labs. One of these labs is set up as an acute care environment, while the others simulate community, pediatric, obstetric, or psychiatric care settings. “We’re also purchasing new patient simulators,” says Sandy Peterson, chair of the nursing department. “‘Noel’ and ‘Baby Hal’ will allow us to simulate maternal-child clinical experiences.” Peterson was hired in 1981 to help develop the pre-licensure program, now accredited through the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education and approved by the Minnesota Board of Nursing. She oversees the department’s faculty members—now more than 20 full-time and 18 part-time.

But more than facilities are changing. In a major curriculum shift, nursing majors will begin specific nursing classes during the spring of their sophomore year, rather than fall of their junior year, as in the past. This affords nursing students five semesters in which to complete their necessary course work, instead of just four. In addition to increasing the length of the program, the number of students admitted has been intentionally and incrementally expanded from a maximum of 63 to 90 per year. “Interest has been ever-increasing, and we got to the point where we were unable to admit qualified Bethel students,” explains Peterson. Senior Chris Luedeman started in the program last fall. Previously a construction worker, the healthcare field never crossed his mind until freshman biology class. “I knew I liked science, and I really wanted to do something to help people,” he explains. So, he gave nursing a try and hasn’t looked back. “My love for nursing has increased exponentially,” he says. “The profession’s values, beliefs, and actions align so completely with what I’m called to do as a Christ follower.” As a male nurse, he is an anomaly. Less than 10 percent of Bethel’s nursing students are male, but Peterson says the

by Heather Johnson photos by Scott Streble 16

Fall 2009

Bethel University

17

Wholly

Bethel’s fast-growing nursing program teaches students to care for patients physically, socially, and spiritually—both here and abroad.

In sixth grade, Rachel Matz’s classmate was diagnosed with cancer. Matz spent a lot of time with her friend during the treatments and quickly learned that a “good” or “bad” nurse could make or break her friend’s day. This relational aspect of providing care—and its impact on patients—is one of the main reasons Matz decided to pursue nursing. “As a nurse, you can do so much,” she explains. “Not just physically, but socially and spiritually. It’s holistic care. It’s the whole package.” Now a senior wanting to go into missionary nursing, Matz is one of the 160 students learning how to blend healthcare and ministry in Bethel’s fast-growing pre-licensure undergraduate nursing program.

Nursing

Expanding Space

Changing Curriculum

With 2.5 million jobs, registered nurses constitute the largest healthcare occupation in the United States. And 587,000 new jobs are projected over the 2006-16 period, one of the largest numbers among all occupations, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Perhaps this is one reason why more than one-seventh of Bethel’s undergrad population is in the nursing program. Accommodating the growth in student enrollment, 39 percent over the past five years, the undergraduate nursing program at Bethel looks much different now than it did just two semesters ago, when it borrowed computer space from the library and tore down a wall between two faculty offices for a simulation lab. This fall, you’ll find nursing students taking blood pressure and other vital signs in what used to be the Dining Center (below). During the summer, the recently vacated dining area was reconstructed and now includes a classroom for up to 45 students; a computer lab; two general purpose labs that can be used for teaching, practicing, and testing; rooms for videorecording student performance; and three high-tech simulation labs. One of these labs is set up as an acute care environment, while the others simulate community, pediatric, obstetric, or psychiatric care settings. “We’re also purchasing new patient simulators,” says Sandy Peterson, chair of the nursing department. “‘Noel’ and ‘Baby Hal’ will allow us to simulate maternal-child clinical experiences.” Peterson was hired in 1981 to help develop the pre-licensure program, now accredited through the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education and approved by the Minnesota Board of Nursing. She oversees the department’s faculty members—now more than 20 full-time and 18 part-time.

But more than facilities are changing. In a major curriculum shift, nursing majors will begin specific nursing classes during the spring of their sophomore year, rather than fall of their junior year, as in the past. This affords nursing students five semesters in which to complete their necessary course work, instead of just four. In addition to increasing the length of the program, the number of students admitted has been intentionally and incrementally expanded from a maximum of 63 to 90 per year. “Interest has been ever-increasing, and we got to the point where we were unable to admit qualified Bethel students,” explains Peterson. Senior Chris Luedeman started in the program last fall. Previously a construction worker, the healthcare field never crossed his mind until freshman biology class. “I knew I liked science, and I really wanted to do something to help people,” he explains. So, he gave nursing a try and hasn’t looked back. “My love for nursing has increased exponentially,” he says. “The profession’s values, beliefs, and actions align so completely with what I’m called to do as a Christ follower.” As a male nurse, he is an anomaly. Less than 10 percent of Bethel’s nursing students are male, but Peterson says the

by Heather Johnson photos by Scott Streble 16

Fall 2009

Bethel University

17

From Nurses to Better Nurses

Bethel’s nursing program does more than educate new nurses for basic licensure. Other degree options within the university are designed to qualify nurses already in the profession. Some 220 adult students are completing their bachelor of science degree in nursing in the College of Adult & Professional Studies or their M.A. in Nursing from the Graduate School. Together, these two schools for working adults provide outreach in Christ’s name during times of significant life transition. Many nurses employed in hospitals and clinics across the Twin Cities choose Bethel for its Christ-centered curriculum; others receive a refresher course in the Christian faith or are introduced to a Christian community for the first time. Available from the College of Adult & Professional Studies:

A Bachelor of Science in Nursing In the average hospital today, about 60 percent of nurses have only two-year associate’s degrees, and 40 percent have fouryear bachelor’s degrees. Increasingly, hospitals want to transpose those ratios, explains Diane Dahl, director of the nursing program in the College of Adult & Professional Studies. “A lot of nurses are coming back to school,” she says, “because they’re feeling the pressure of that situation.” Indeed, enrollment in the degree-completion program has remained steady despite the stressed economy. Currently, about 160 students in eight cohorts are working towards their bachelor’s degrees. These in-career nurses take their courses at night and will usually finish within two years. And they’re motivated to finish. In fact, the program’s completion rate has held fast at a high 97 percent since the adult B.S. program was introduced in 1990. These cohorts make up a uniquely diverse corner of Bethel because they often include nonChristians, such as Muslims from African countries. “When I interview them prior to enrollment, I’m very open about what we do here at Bethel,” says Dahl. “We have people who believe in different types of gods. We respect that, but we continue to teach from our Christian faith perspective.” In addition to word of mouth in immigrant communities, Bethel’s partnership with Uganda Christian University (see p. 19) has given a cross-cultural reputation to the program, says Dahl. “We care outside of the walls of this school.” Other adult students are nominal Christians, but come to Bethel to be reintroduced to their faith and receive an education within a Christian community. “We have people who say ‘we have really moved away from God and our beliefs. We hope being at Bethel will help us reconnect,’” Dahl observes. “And I think ‘wow, what a great opportunity!’”

Available from the Graduate School:

A Master of Arts in Nursing

(with concentrations in Nursing and Healthcare Leadership and Nursing Education) Many practicing nurses with a bachelor’s degree want to take their careers to the next level—to enhance the profession in some way. Bethel serves these nurses through an advanced degree in the Graduate School. Some 60 nursing students are working toward master’s degrees—either to become nurse administrators or educators. These distinct goals are served through concentrations in nursing and healthcare leadership, or in nursing education. In 2011, the nursing department hopes to add a Doctor of Nursing Practice option. Like the degree-completion program, the graduate program draws some who are curious about spiritual issues. “Maybe they’re not totally in agreement with where Bethel is coming from, but they’re certainly open to looking at the Christian worldview,” explains Pam Friesen, director of the graduate program, who’s been at Bethel since 1985. At Bethel they can see and participate in a Christian community, and the reality of what that’s all about.” The biblical basis of the Bethel program has also created a reputation for patient-centered nursing—an approach that is resurgent in the healthcare marketplace. “With the increase of technology in the nursing profession, we can tend to stray from the care and compassion that characterizes good nursing,” says Friesen. “That’s the difference between a Bethel grad and a grad from somewhere else.”

18

Fall 2009

department’s three male professors provide great opportunities for peer mentoring and guidance. And Luedeman hasn’t minded the ratio. “One time I was the only guy in class, and a girl leaned over and told me I was pretty lucky,” Luedeman jokes. “But I tell my friends that I get to go to school every day with so many amazing women, many of whom I’m blessed to have as friends.” Perhaps the biggest curriculum change for the undergraduate nursing program is its focus. “We looked at our mission statement and decided to more closely look at patients caught in the gaps of healthcare,” explains Professor Diane Dahl. “We wanted to focus more on social justice issues from a biblical perspective.” At Bethel for 11 years, Dahl is director of the nursing degree-completion program in the College of Adult & Professional Studies, and also teaches in the traditional undergraduate program. The curriculum now has a much stronger emphasis on community engagement. Teams of five nursing students will work with diverse, and often underserved, populations at nonprofit agencies, in addition to spending time in acute care settings focused on specialties such as medical, surgical, pediatrics, maternal, and psychiatric/mental health. “Their degree of involvement and their ability to understand at a deeper level what nurses can contribute to a community-based health program will be intensified,” says Peterson. All of this is distinguishing Bethel’s nursing program from others, believes Vice President and Dean Deb Harless. “One concrete measure of this program’s excellence is seen in the rates at which graduates pass the nursing licensure exam,” she says. “We’ve consistently been above 90 percent—several times at 98 percent.”

Beyond Campus An emphasis on social justice nursing means working abroad. Another addition to the curriculum is the opportunity for students to study nursing overseas alongside a Bethel faculty member during the fall semester of their senior year. This past summer, Matz spent 10 weeks with her Bethel roommate and fellow nursing student Katrina Anderson, caring for patients at a hospital in Indonesia. “It was really challenging to see the poverty. We were in the middle of a jungle, miles from the nearest city, and I learned how to function and spread God’s love,” she says. The patients she cared for often believed in witch doctors and called on tribal spirits for healing. “Sometimes you couldn’t tell if the problem was physical or spiritual,” she explains. “They’d come for physical care, and while we were working with them, they’d be very attentive and listen to what we said.”

Bethel’s nursing professors encourage such cross-cultural experiences. “Nursing is a global enterprise. We can learn so much from others,” says Peterson. To that end, Bethel was selected for a partnership with Diakonova University College in Oslo, through which faculty members will collaborate to conduct research in sub-specialties such as community health, end-oflife health, and parish nursing. This partnership, also funded by the Norwegian government, grew out of the efforts of Fulbright Scholar Marge Schaffer, a Bethel nursing professor since 1984. She also recently received a Fulbright Specialist Award and will present at an international public health nursing conference, as well as consult with Diakonova University on developing a master’s in public health program there. Bethel has also partnered with Uganda Christian University (UCU) since 2005, thanks to nursing professor Karen Drake and the Fulbright Scholar Program. She explored the partnership opportunities with UCU; spent an academic year teaching in the school’s nursing baccalaureate degree-completion program; and is now coordinating the creation of Uganda’s only master’s of nursing program. This January will mark the fourth year that a group of Bethel senior nursing students have studied cultural diversity and healthcare in Uganda during interim. And as Bethel heads to Uganda in January, seven UCU master’s students will travel to Minnesota for several months. They will be preceptored by Bethel faculty members and engage in clinical experiences alongside Bethel students. Alum Heidi Bredemeier ’08 studied at UCU for a semester during her time at Bethel. Although she is currently a triage phone nurse for family practice doctors at Fairview Clinic in Columbia Heights, Minn., she would like to get her degree in nursing education through Bethel’s graduate nursing program and return to UCU. “I still keep in touch with some of my Bethel professors, meeting them for coffee or lunch,” Bredemeier says. “We talk about nursing, Uganda, and my faith, and how they can all intertwine together to serve God.” Indeed, Bethel’s experienced and committed nursing faculty is one of the program’s strongest attributes. “I appreciate the academic push that they are not afraid to press upon us,” says Luedeman. “Sometimes I’d rather not have to stay up studying, but I know they care deeply about us and the people we care for. So they’ll provide us with the best training possible.” Matz agrees. “The [nursing] faculty is the number one reason the department is so great,” she says. “They’re so interested in knowing you personally but also working on ways to share God and bring Jesus into your ministry—in the U.S. and abroad.” BU See more nursing department photos. Bethel University

19

From Nurses to Better Nurses

Bethel’s nursing program does more than educate new nurses for basic licensure. Other degree options within the university are designed to qualify nurses already in the profession. Some 220 adult students are completing their bachelor of science degree in nursing in the College of Adult & Professional Studies or their M.A. in Nursing from the Graduate School. Together, these two schools for working adults provide outreach in Christ’s name during times of significant life transition. Many nurses employed in hospitals and clinics across the Twin Cities choose Bethel for its Christ-centered curriculum; others receive a refresher course in the Christian faith or are introduced to a Christian community for the first time. Available from the College of Adult & Professional Studies:

A Bachelor of Science in Nursing In the average hospital today, about 60 percent of nurses have only two-year associate’s degrees, and 40 percent have fouryear bachelor’s degrees. Increasingly, hospitals want to transpose those ratios, explains Diane Dahl, director of the nursing program in the College of Adult & Professional Studies. “A lot of nurses are coming back to school,” she says, “because they’re feeling the pressure of that situation.” Indeed, enrollment in the degree-completion program has remained steady despite the stressed economy. Currently, about 160 students in eight cohorts are working towards their bachelor’s degrees. These in-career nurses take their courses at night and will usually finish within two years. And they’re motivated to finish. In fact, the program’s completion rate has held fast at a high 97 percent since the adult B.S. program was introduced in 1990. These cohorts make up a uniquely diverse corner of Bethel because they often include nonChristians, such as Muslims from African countries. “When I interview them prior to enrollment, I’m very open about what we do here at Bethel,” says Dahl. “We have people who believe in different types of gods. We respect that, but we continue to teach from our Christian faith perspective.” In addition to word of mouth in immigrant communities, Bethel’s partnership with Uganda Christian University (see p. 19) has given a cross-cultural reputation to the program, says Dahl. “We care outside of the walls of this school.” Other adult students are nominal Christians, but come to Bethel to be reintroduced to their faith and receive an education within a Christian community. “We have people who say ‘we have really moved away from God and our beliefs. We hope being at Bethel will help us reconnect,’” Dahl observes. “And I think ‘wow, what a great opportunity!’”

Available from the Graduate School:

A Master of Arts in Nursing

(with concentrations in Nursing and Healthcare Leadership and Nursing Education) Many practicing nurses with a bachelor’s degree want to take their careers to the next level—to enhance the profession in some way. Bethel serves these nurses through an advanced degree in the Graduate School. Some 60 nursing students are working toward master’s degrees—either to become nurse administrators or educators. These distinct goals are served through concentrations in nursing and healthcare leadership, or in nursing education. In 2011, the nursing department hopes to add a Doctor of Nursing Practice option. Like the degree-completion program, the graduate program draws some who are curious about spiritual issues. “Maybe they’re not totally in agreement with where Bethel is coming from, but they’re certainly open to looking at the Christian worldview,” explains Pam Friesen, director of the graduate program, who’s been at Bethel since 1985. At Bethel they can see and participate in a Christian community, and the reality of what that’s all about.” The biblical basis of the Bethel program has also created a reputation for patient-centered nursing—an approach that is resurgent in the healthcare marketplace. “With the increase of technology in the nursing profession, we can tend to stray from the care and compassion that characterizes good nursing,” says Friesen. “That’s the difference between a Bethel grad and a grad from somewhere else.”

18

Fall 2009

department’s three male professors provide great opportunities for peer mentoring and guidance. And Luedeman hasn’t minded the ratio. “One time I was the only guy in class, and a girl leaned over and told me I was pretty lucky,” Luedeman jokes. “But I tell my friends that I get to go to school every day with so many amazing women, many of whom I’m blessed to have as friends.” Perhaps the biggest curriculum change for the undergraduate nursing program is its focus. “We looked at our mission statement and decided to more closely look at patients caught in the gaps of healthcare,” explains Professor Diane Dahl. “We wanted to focus more on social justice issues from a biblical perspective.” At Bethel for 11 years, Dahl is director of the nursing degree-completion program in the College of Adult & Professional Studies, and also teaches in the traditional undergraduate program. The curriculum now has a much stronger emphasis on community engagement. Teams of five nursing students will work with diverse, and often underserved, populations at nonprofit agencies, in addition to spending time in acute care settings focused on specialties such as medical, surgical, pediatrics, maternal, and psychiatric/mental health. “Their degree of involvement and their ability to understand at a deeper level what nurses can contribute to a community-based health program will be intensified,” says Peterson. All of this is distinguishing Bethel’s nursing program from others, believes Vice President and Dean Deb Harless. “One concrete measure of this program’s excellence is seen in the rates at which graduates pass the nursing licensure exam,” she says. “We’ve consistently been above 90 percent—several times at 98 percent.”

Beyond Campus An emphasis on social justice nursing means working abroad. Another addition to the curriculum is the opportunity for students to study nursing overseas alongside a Bethel faculty member during the fall semester of their senior year. This past summer, Matz spent 10 weeks with her Bethel roommate and fellow nursing student Katrina Anderson, caring for patients at a hospital in Indonesia. “It was really challenging to see the poverty. We were in the middle of a jungle, miles from the nearest city, and I learned how to function and spread God’s love,” she says. The patients she cared for often believed in witch doctors and called on tribal spirits for healing. “Sometimes you couldn’t tell if the problem was physical or spiritual,” she explains. “They’d come for physical care, and while we were working with them, they’d be very attentive and listen to what we said.”

Bethel’s nursing professors encourage such cross-cultural experiences. “Nursing is a global enterprise. We can learn so much from others,” says Peterson. To that end, Bethel was selected for a partnership with Diakonova University College in Oslo, through which faculty members will collaborate to conduct research in sub-specialties such as community health, end-oflife health, and parish nursing. This partnership, also funded by the Norwegian government, grew out of the efforts of Fulbright Scholar Marge Schaffer, a Bethel nursing professor since 1984. She also recently received a Fulbright Specialist Award and will present at an international public health nursing conference, as well as consult with Diakonova University on developing a master’s in public health program there. Bethel has also partnered with Uganda Christian University (UCU) since 2005, thanks to nursing professor Karen Drake and the Fulbright Scholar Program. She explored the partnership opportunities with UCU; spent an academic year teaching in the school’s nursing baccalaureate degree-completion program; and is now coordinating the creation of Uganda’s only master’s of nursing program. This January will mark the fourth year that a group of Bethel senior nursing students have studied cultural diversity and healthcare in Uganda during interim. And as Bethel heads to Uganda in January, seven UCU master’s students will travel to Minnesota for several months. They will be preceptored by Bethel faculty members and engage in clinical experiences alongside Bethel students. Alum Heidi Bredemeier ’08 studied at UCU for a semester during her time at Bethel. Although she is currently a triage phone nurse for family practice doctors at Fairview Clinic in Columbia Heights, Minn., she would like to get her degree in nursing education through Bethel’s graduate nursing program and return to UCU. “I still keep in touch with some of my Bethel professors, meeting them for coffee or lunch,” Bredemeier says. “We talk about nursing, Uganda, and my faith, and how they can all intertwine together to serve God.” Indeed, Bethel’s experienced and committed nursing faculty is one of the program’s strongest attributes. “I appreciate the academic push that they are not afraid to press upon us,” says Luedeman. “Sometimes I’d rather not have to stay up studying, but I know they care deeply about us and the people we care for. So they’ll provide us with the best training possible.” Matz agrees. “The [nursing] faculty is the number one reason the department is so great,” she says. “They’re so interested in knowing you personally but also working on ways to share God and bring Jesus into your ministry—in the U.S. and abroad.” BU See more nursing department photos. Bethel University

19

A look at Bethel’s first value and what it means to be evangelical

D|i|s|s|e|c|t|e|d

Christ-followers...

We are

The Word Defined

20

Fall 2009

Chris Armstrong: The British scholar David Bebbington [professor of history at the University of Stirling, Scotland] gave a famous quadrilateral definition of evangelicalism in his 1989 study. First, [evangelicals emphasize] conversionism, a focus on the conversion experience. Second, biblicism: a particular regard for the Bible. Third, crucicentrism: a stress on the sacrifice of Christ on the cross. And lastly, activism— whatever’s in people’s hearts, they just got to go out and tell somebody and do something about it. And this,

Editors: Scott Streble S’02, Heather Johnson, Holly Donato ’78

Vision for a 21 -Century Evangelical University st

By David Clark

Wonder…Transformation…Calling A Bethel University education starts with wonder and ends with calling. And in between, transformation happens. A community awed by the Triune God is the seedbed of a Bethel education. We’re Christ-followers, deeply committed to Scripture. We celebrate the evangel—the Good News: through Jesus and by the Spirit, God planted his kingdom in our broken world. And by God’s grace, through our faith, God invites each of us to join that kingdom, to receive redemption for our past

and equipping for our future. Our passion to live and share this Good News shapes Bethel, as does a passion to serve God’s kingdom. This service goes far beyond jumping on the latest trend in social activism. We hope all Bethel grads—not just pastors or missionaries—will respond to divine “calling.” They live out their callings in elementary school principal’s offices, in remote

Bethel University

continued on p.22

Webster and Wikipedia are not going to cut it. In fact, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a sharp, concise definition of the word “evangelical” among members of the same evangelical church, let alone the experts. For the past 60 years, it’s a term that has served as shorthand for born-again or Bible-believing, or to describe someone more open-minded than a fundamentalist—or some combination of all three definitions. But what does it mean now? And what does it mean at Bethel University? After all, the term is part of Bethel’s core values: “We are Christ-followers—orthodox, conversionist, and evangelical, rooted in the authority of Scripture.” Bethel Magazine went to its own experts for some answers. David Clark, new provost and former seminary professor, shares his vision for an evangelical pietistic university in the 21st century, and how it can transform students for a lifetime. And Professors Phyllis Alsdurf, Chris Armstrong, and Bernard Walker, representing the three Bethel schools, converse on the meaning of the word “evangelical,” its role in politics, postmodernism, and what they’re seeing at Bethel in the younger generation.

Rooted in the Greek “eu” and “angelion” meaning good news, the term “evangelical” first surfaced when Martin Luther differentiated himself and his movement from the Catholic church during the Reformation in the 1500s. The doctrines of these first Protestants included justification by faith, a high view of Scripture, and the priesthood of believers—all of which are still important to evangelicalism today. Then, during the 17th century, the term became associated with the revivalist movement, led by John Wesley, George Whitefield, and Jonathan Edwards, among others. In preaching, these theologians emphasized evangelism and social activism, which laid the groundwork for Baptists, Methodists, and many other denominations. In the later 1800s, institutions like Wheaton College and Moody Bible Institute were founded with missions committed to evangelical Christianity. Along came the National Association of Evangelicals in the 1940s and Billy Graham in the 1950s, collectively responding to the antiintellectual fundamentalism of the time. It’s this response that’s often referred to as the evangelical movement. In fact, in a 1982 [Newsweek] article titled “The Split-Up Evangelicals,” historian Martin Marty said that an evangelical was anyone who followed Graham. Now, some 70 years later…

21

A look at Bethel’s first value and what it means to be evangelical

D|i|s|s|e|c|t|e|d

Christ-followers...

We are

The Word Defined

20

Fall 2009

Chris Armstrong: The British scholar David Bebbington [professor of history at the University of Stirling, Scotland] gave a famous quadrilateral definition of evangelicalism in his 1989 study. First, [evangelicals emphasize] conversionism, a focus on the conversion experience. Second, biblicism: a particular regard for the Bible. Third, crucicentrism: a stress on the sacrifice of Christ on the cross. And lastly, activism— whatever’s in people’s hearts, they just got to go out and tell somebody and do something about it. And this,

Editors: Scott Streble S’02, Heather Johnson, Holly Donato ’78

Vision for a 21 -Century Evangelical University st

By David Clark

Wonder…Transformation…Calling A Bethel University education starts with wonder and ends with calling. And in between, transformation happens. A community awed by the Triune God is the seedbed of a Bethel education. We’re Christ-followers, deeply committed to Scripture. We celebrate the evangel—the Good News: through Jesus and by the Spirit, God planted his kingdom in our broken world. And by God’s grace, through our faith, God invites each of us to join that kingdom, to receive redemption for our past

and equipping for our future. Our passion to live and share this Good News shapes Bethel, as does a passion to serve God’s kingdom. This service goes far beyond jumping on the latest trend in social activism. We hope all Bethel grads—not just pastors or missionaries—will respond to divine “calling.” They live out their callings in elementary school principal’s offices, in remote

Bethel University

continued on p.22

Webster and Wikipedia are not going to cut it. In fact, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a sharp, concise definition of the word “evangelical” among members of the same evangelical church, let alone the experts. For the past 60 years, it’s a term that has served as shorthand for born-again or Bible-believing, or to describe someone more open-minded than a fundamentalist—or some combination of all three definitions. But what does it mean now? And what does it mean at Bethel University? After all, the term is part of Bethel’s core values: “We are Christ-followers—orthodox, conversionist, and evangelical, rooted in the authority of Scripture.” Bethel Magazine went to its own experts for some answers. David Clark, new provost and former seminary professor, shares his vision for an evangelical pietistic university in the 21st century, and how it can transform students for a lifetime. And Professors Phyllis Alsdurf, Chris Armstrong, and Bernard Walker, representing the three Bethel schools, converse on the meaning of the word “evangelical,” its role in politics, postmodernism, and what they’re seeing at Bethel in the younger generation.

Rooted in the Greek “eu” and “angelion” meaning good news, the term “evangelical” first surfaced when Martin Luther differentiated himself and his movement from the Catholic church during the Reformation in the 1500s. The doctrines of these first Protestants included justification by faith, a high view of Scripture, and the priesthood of believers—all of which are still important to evangelicalism today. Then, during the 17th century, the term became associated with the revivalist movement, led by John Wesley, George Whitefield, and Jonathan Edwards, among others. In preaching, these theologians emphasized evangelism and social activism, which laid the groundwork for Baptists, Methodists, and many other denominations. In the later 1800s, institutions like Wheaton College and Moody Bible Institute were founded with missions committed to evangelical Christianity. Along came the National Association of Evangelicals in the 1940s and Billy Graham in the 1950s, collectively responding to the antiintellectual fundamentalism of the time. It’s this response that’s often referred to as the evangelical movement. In fact, in a 1982 [Newsweek] article titled “The Split-Up Evangelicals,” historian Martin Marty said that an evangelical was anyone who followed Graham. Now, some 70 years later…

21

photos by Scott Streble

22

African AIDS clinics, in Fortune 500 boardrooms, and in obscure mission outposts. Something subtle and mysterious saturates a Bethel education. A transforming recipe of classroom study, modeling and mentoring, international study, outside-the-classroom experiences, and interpersonal dialogues produces multi-layered results: it nurtures sharp, inquisitive minds; develops mature, selfless character; fosters self-aware cultural maturity; and cultivates robust, storm-hardy faith. As a university, we do tenaciously safeguard the life of the mind against multiple temptations to compromise. We do aspire to academic excellence. Still, God created persons, not computers. God designed people who love, think, relate, work, and worship. This means faculty members are person developers, not just information dispensers. This requires unique faculty members. Why? Because we teach what we know, but we Fall 2009

reproduce who we are. Our vision is to become the university of choice for more and more learners who seek evangelical, whole-person, transformative education—to honor and serve the Lord by becoming everything God has for them cognitively, relationally, culturally, and spiritually.

Conceptual depth Our goal for college, adult, and seminary graduates is bigger than job training. An educated person is broadly aware of the world and deeply informed in her specialty. But beyond gaining information, educated persons hone conceptual skills. They develop skills in critical thinking, problem-solving, conceptual analysis, synthetic integration, and mature evaluation. They acquire intellectual virtues: they love truth, treat evidence

Phyllis Alsdurf: The very first editorial in Christianity Today magazine talked about evangelicals as this poor, despised group outside the cultural mainstream. They were subjected to prejudice, misunderstood. Does that apply to evangelicals today? Many people in mainstream culture today would say that [they are] the ones who are misunderstood, [not evangelicals]. [Secularists fear] evangelicals are this army, this force, so the dynamics have changed—the definition has changed. There are lots of ways to define it, but my point is that [the definition of evangelicalism is] a moving target and it’s changing. It’s a living entity in a sense—Christian faith should be! The evangelical movement is moving, and it’s difficult to put boundaries on it. But I do believe there is a center.

Voting Blocs Blurred It’s a fact that Hispanics—the United States’ largest minority group—are the fastest-growing population within evangelicalism. Although 68 percent of the Hispanic population is Roman Catholic, 15 percent of the nation’s nearly 15 million Hispanics identify themselves as born-again or evangelical Christians. It’s also a fact that Hispanics as a people group do not vote Republican. In the 2008 presidential

with integrity, remain open to new data, and willingly hear fair criticism. These go beyond preparation for a job: they sustain alums for a lifetime.

Personal strength We hope Bethel alums develop personal virtues. Moral choices coagulate into habits; habits, in turn, solidify into virtues. It’s right and good to pursue virtues like love, justice, humility, patience, courage, kindness, and joy. In addition, we hope graduates grow emotional intelligence. The soil of

election, Hispanics voted Democrat over Republican by a margin of more than two-to-one, according to the Pew Hispanic Center. So, although the media may portray otherwise, evangelicalism is theologically conservative, but this does not neatly parallel with political conservatism. There’s no question though that the term has found itself more and more in the speeches of political leaders and the headlines of political pieces… CA: We have a media image of evangelicals as being about theocracy [a nation ruled by God through priests], and we do have a few extreme conservative evangelicals. But I think there’s still a deep-rooted stance of personal liberty and individualism, even among those Falwell-type contemporary fundamentalists. So I’m not sure if I buy that kind of stereotype of evangelicals. Certainly we want morality legislated in some sense, but theocracy? Are we really going that far? Bernard Walker: While the fundamentalist end of the movement may embrace history—theological history—it in some sense ignores history on most other matters. So you look at, say, the civil rights movement in this country back in the 1950s, Christianity Today published very few articles about that particular issue, which was very pivotal in our country. So evangelicalism as a whole did not engage the world in terms of the historical issues of the black community. For Bible-believing, African-American Christians, there’s a tendency, for obvious reasons, to be more progressive socially and thus embrace the [political] liberalism of the Democratic Party; whereas with white evangelical churches, the tendency is

healthy relationships fertilizes emotional growth. A healthy educational community creates multiple pathways for students to experience emotionally mature relationships with caring persons who both support and challenge them. For students who lack healthy relational instincts and suffer from deeper struggles, we offer more direct assistance even though a university is not a therapist’s practice. Still, great education seeks whole-person transformation so that graduates become persons of strength.

continued on p.24

continued from p.21

Phyllis Alsdurf is director of the Johnson Center for Journalism and Communication and an associate professor of English in the College of Arts & Sciences. Her dissertation research was on the role of Christianity Today magazine in the development of modern evangelicalism. Sharing worship with her young adult daughter, she attends Substance Church in Fridley, Minn.

Chris Armstrong teaches church history at Bethel Seminary. He has been managing editor of Christian History & Biography and continues to write for that publication as well as for Christianity Today, Leadership Journal, and www.christianhistory. net. His doctoral research focused on the 19th-century holiness movement. Armstrong attends Woodland Hills Church in St. Paul, Minn., and has recently written a “group biography” titled Patron Saints for Postmoderns (IVP, 2009).

Bernard Walker teaches philosophy and ethics in the College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School. His philosophical interest in the evangelical movement is aimed at separating “what is the work of the Spirit from the work of human tradition” through a process of dialogue among the movement’s diverse voices. His home congregation is Church of All Nations in St. Anthony, Minn.

I think, is a pretty good definition still today. David Neff, current editor of Christianity Today, asks whether we’re losing ground on conversionism, biblicism, crosscenteredness, because we’re so concerned with being in the culture for evangelistic purposes and dialogue purposes. Are we becoming increasingly of the culture? I think that’s a very important question.

“Our vision is to become the university of choice for more and more learners who seek evangelical, whole-person, transformative education.” Bethel University

23

photos by Scott Streble

22

African AIDS clinics, in Fortune 500 boardrooms, and in obscure mission outposts. Something subtle and mysterious saturates a Bethel education. A transforming recipe of classroom study, modeling and mentoring, international study, outside-the-classroom experiences, and interpersonal dialogues produces multi-layered results: it nurtures sharp, inquisitive minds; develops mature, selfless character; fosters self-aware cultural maturity; and cultivates robust, storm-hardy faith. As a university, we do tenaciously safeguard the life of the mind against multiple temptations to compromise. We do aspire to academic excellence. Still, God created persons, not computers. God designed people who love, think, relate, work, and worship. This means faculty members are person developers, not just information dispensers. This requires unique faculty members. Why? Because we teach what we know, but we Fall 2009

reproduce who we are. Our vision is to become the university of choice for more and more learners who seek evangelical, whole-person, transformative education—to honor and serve the Lord by becoming everything God has for them cognitively, relationally, culturally, and spiritually.

Conceptual depth Our goal for college, adult, and seminary graduates is bigger than job training. An educated person is broadly aware of the world and deeply informed in her specialty. But beyond gaining information, educated persons hone conceptual skills. They develop skills in critical thinking, problem-solving, conceptual analysis, synthetic integration, and mature evaluation. They acquire intellectual virtues: they love truth, treat evidence

Phyllis Alsdurf: The very first editorial in Christianity Today magazine talked about evangelicals as this poor, despised group outside the cultural mainstream. They were subjected to prejudice, misunderstood. Does that apply to evangelicals today? Many people in mainstream culture today would say that [they are] the ones who are misunderstood, [not evangelicals]. [Secularists fear] evangelicals are this army, this force, so the dynamics have changed—the definition has changed. There are lots of ways to define it, but my point is that [the definition of evangelicalism is] a moving target and it’s changing. It’s a living entity in a sense—Christian faith should be! The evangelical movement is moving, and it’s difficult to put boundaries on it. But I do believe there is a center.

Voting Blocs Blurred It’s a fact that Hispanics—the United States’ largest minority group—are the fastest-growing population within evangelicalism. Although 68 percent of the Hispanic population is Roman Catholic, 15 percent of the nation’s nearly 15 million Hispanics identify themselves as born-again or evangelical Christians. It’s also a fact that Hispanics as a people group do not vote Republican. In the 2008 presidential

with integrity, remain open to new data, and willingly hear fair criticism. These go beyond preparation for a job: they sustain alums for a lifetime.

Personal strength We hope Bethel alums develop personal virtues. Moral choices coagulate into habits; habits, in turn, solidify into virtues. It’s right and good to pursue virtues like love, justice, humility, patience, courage, kindness, and joy. In addition, we hope graduates grow emotional intelligence. The soil of

election, Hispanics voted Democrat over Republican by a margin of more than two-to-one, according to the Pew Hispanic Center. So, although the media may portray otherwise, evangelicalism is theologically conservative, but this does not neatly parallel with political conservatism. There’s no question though that the term has found itself more and more in the speeches of political leaders and the headlines of political pieces… CA: We have a media image of evangelicals as being about theocracy [a nation ruled by God through priests], and we do have a few extreme conservative evangelicals. But I think there’s still a deep-rooted stance of personal liberty and individualism, even among those Falwell-type contemporary fundamentalists. So I’m not sure if I buy that kind of stereotype of evangelicals. Certainly we want morality legislated in some sense, but theocracy? Are we really going that far? Bernard Walker: While the fundamentalist end of the movement may embrace history—theological history—it in some sense ignores history on most other matters. So you look at, say, the civil rights movement in this country back in the 1950s, Christianity Today published very few articles about that particular issue, which was very pivotal in our country. So evangelicalism as a whole did not engage the world in terms of the historical issues of the black community. For Bible-believing, African-American Christians, there’s a tendency, for obvious reasons, to be more progressive socially and thus embrace the [political] liberalism of the Democratic Party; whereas with white evangelical churches, the tendency is

healthy relationships fertilizes emotional growth. A healthy educational community creates multiple pathways for students to experience emotionally mature relationships with caring persons who both support and challenge them. For students who lack healthy relational instincts and suffer from deeper struggles, we offer more direct assistance even though a university is not a therapist’s practice. Still, great education seeks whole-person transformation so that graduates become persons of strength.

continued on p.24

continued from p.21

Phyllis Alsdurf is director of the Johnson Center for Journalism and Communication and an associate professor of English in the College of Arts & Sciences. Her dissertation research was on the role of Christianity Today magazine in the development of modern evangelicalism. Sharing worship with her young adult daughter, she attends Substance Church in Fridley, Minn.

Chris Armstrong teaches church history at Bethel Seminary. He has been managing editor of Christian History & Biography and continues to write for that publication as well as for Christianity Today, Leadership Journal, and www.christianhistory. net. His doctoral research focused on the 19th-century holiness movement. Armstrong attends Woodland Hills Church in St. Paul, Minn., and has recently written a “group biography” titled Patron Saints for Postmoderns (IVP, 2009).

Bernard Walker teaches philosophy and ethics in the College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School. His philosophical interest in the evangelical movement is aimed at separating “what is the work of the Spirit from the work of human tradition” through a process of dialogue among the movement’s diverse voices. His home congregation is Church of All Nations in St. Anthony, Minn.

I think, is a pretty good definition still today. David Neff, current editor of Christianity Today, asks whether we’re losing ground on conversionism, biblicism, crosscenteredness, because we’re so concerned with being in the culture for evangelistic purposes and dialogue purposes. Are we becoming increasingly of the culture? I think that’s a very important question.

“Our vision is to become the university of choice for more and more learners who seek evangelical, whole-person, transformative education.” Bethel University

23

“We share a common goal, and that is to affect people’s lives to bring the kingdom to earth.” Bernard Walker to be socially conservative and embrace the Republican Party. Contrary to popular thought, the normative political party for Christians is not the Republican Party. But this talk or what’s normative may be changing with younger evangelicals. Critically reflecting on the issues should cause evangelicals to avoid taking party lines in the name of Christ. Our focus should be on justice, not political parties.

Postmodernism Played Out Modernism was a period of thinking that sought absolutes—in science, religion, and philosophy. Following on its heels came postmodernism in the late 20th and early 21st century; postmodern thinkers reject universal, absolute truths and don’t believe anyone can know anything “for sure.” The word “postmodern” is often used to describe art, literature, architecture—and yes, evangelicalism. It’s a slippery adjective, and when brought into the Christian faith, often aligned with the Emergent Church. Emerging churches, it is said, strive to better understand the postmodern culture—and all its shifts—in order to make Christianity more relevant for younger generations.

continued from p.23

PA: One of the things I sometimes do with students is [to] ask them to write down some slang expressions they use. Part of it is to poke fun at me and show how out of it I am! But one word

Cultural agility Our passionate desire is that graduates understand both their own cultural heritage and others’ cultural traditions. In today’s world, they need cross-cultural skills: readiness to listen, willingness to learn, and humility to compromise. We hope they learn mature self-criticism, not fixating on their own culture’s strengths or others’ shortcomings. Cultural agility requires insight into how social structures benefit some groups and hurt others. When cultural factors lead to social injustice, those with

that comes up is “whatever.” I talk about how “whatever” was not an expression when I was growing up. Everything mattered. Expressions can be an outlook on the world, and is “whatever” the one we want to express? I think that “whatever” has really infused our theology: “This is true for me, but maybe not for you. Whatever.” BW: Our culture says there’s no truth with a capital T on most things, unless, of course, it deals with science. So for issues of values, ethics, and religion, our culture says “of course you can’t use truth with a capital T.” You have this younger generation that says, “We can’t even discuss those issues because we don’t have access to how things really are even when the issue is about the historicity of Jesus and his resurrection.” I find this amazing at best and absurd at worst! Sure, much of what we believe is a reflection of our culture. This goes without saying. But we tread on troubled waters when we embrace postmodernism unreflectively. We do have individuals, though, who are saying, “If we cannot resolve certain theoretical issues or form a consensus in the Body, at least we can definitely get out there and change the world for Christ. We share a common goal, and that is to affect people’s lives to bring the kingdom to earth.” As those in the black church once would say to their white brothers and sisters during Jim Crow days, “Look, [heaven] may be promised to me by-and-by, but I got about 80 years before that happens, so in the meantime I need to change some things here now.”

cultural agility follow Christ’s teaching to work sacrificially for social transformation that promotes others’ well-being.

Spiritual passion We pray that graduates develop mature faith in Jesus Christ. For younger students, this includes letting go of parents’ faith and owning their faith. Graduates allow trust in Christ to guide and motivate every aspect of life. A relationship with God interacts with relationships with others. So a healthy

“We trust students will grow in their intimate love for God. This both honors God and promotes effective, lifelong service to Christ’s kingdom.” 24

Fall 2009

Hungering for God at Bethel Bethel University’s mission has not wavered since the school was originally founded as a seminary for Swedish immigrants in 1871. “Boldly informed and motivated by the Christian faith, Bethel University educates and energizes men and women for excellence in leadership, scholarship, and service. The school prepares graduates to serve in strategic capacities to renew minds, live out biblical truth, transform culture, and advance the gospel.” During the 2009-2010 academic year, Bethel will strive to do this for its 2,827 young people—mostly between the ages of 18 and 24—enrolled in the College of Arts & Science, as well as the 1,543 learners in the College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School and the 1,101 students in the Seminary. The evangelicalism of these future leaders, pastors, and teachers may look different than yours… CA: In 2000, Robert Webber put out his book The Younger Evangelicals, which discerns three distinct phases within evangelicalism. The first one he calls “traditional,” which was much more doctrinally focused. The second he labels “pragmatic,” in which a concern for numbers and seeker sensitivity predominated—the Christian contemporary music movement, everything in the world having a parallel in evangelicalism, trying to look like the surrounding culture so we can get a bigger piece of the demographic pie. But even in 2000, Webber began discerning a third movement within evangelicalism. This is a movement of younger evangelicals who are tired of the apologetic arguments of the traditionalists and the big shopping-mall-like churches and rock-concert worship

services of the pragmatists. People in this phase, said Webber, are trying to reconnect with stuff that’s distinctively Christian. They want to go back into Christian history and tradition and at least cherry-pick some aspects of what makes Christianity distinctive. Stained glass may be okay now; it’s okay to light candles. Maybe there’s some value to those traditional symbols because they train us and allow us to be more fully Christian. To me, if that’s true, then it at least allays some of my concern. I think maybe there’s some movement away from a relativistic outlook to, maybe, a revivalistic outlook—but a new revivalism that draws from our spiritual heritage. PA: A place like Bethel is so important. It’s such a privilege to have influence with this generation and to help students struggle through some of these issues. I think of a student who is in South Africa as we speak, and she’s there as someone with a very alive, concrete, centered faith. She’s trying to understand herself as a future journalist and an advocate for the poor. How does she live that out? I find many examples of this approach among this generation. Students may come in with a pretty thin theological veneer, but then as faculty members, we have the challenge and privilege to push them to dig deeper into what separates plain activism from an activism motivated by a deeply held evangelical faith. So, I would just say the fact that a place like Bethel is thriving in the postmodern world tells me there’s still a hunger for something more—a hunger for rootedness you’re not going to find in other kinds of institutions. I think there will always be this hunger, because of the power of God working in the world and that the core of our evangelical faith will be preserved. BU

relationship with God promotes healing of damaged human relational patterns. This healing in turn reinforces deeper intimacy with the Father. The person who rightly relates to God can enter human relationships, including work relationships, with greater strength. So, we trust students will grow in their intimate love for God. This both honors God and promotes effective, lifelong service to Christ’s kingdom. The magic of a Bethel education is integrating worship and calling, mind and heart, for all learners. Evangelical faith— personal trust in the Triune God whose kingdom has come— grounds this education. As it soaks in the marinade of faith, a Bethel education gains natural strength, conceptual shape, tactical purposes, and ultimate meanings. Harvard and Oxford can’t do what Bethel does. Our passion for Bethel University is to be the best in the world at doing what God asks of us, through divine grace and strength. That’s our truest measure of excellence. BU Bethel University

25

“We share a common goal, and that is to affect people’s lives to bring the kingdom to earth.” Bernard Walker to be socially conservative and embrace the Republican Party. Contrary to popular thought, the normative political party for Christians is not the Republican Party. But this talk or what’s normative may be changing with younger evangelicals. Critically reflecting on the issues should cause evangelicals to avoid taking party lines in the name of Christ. Our focus should be on justice, not political parties.

Postmodernism Played Out Modernism was a period of thinking that sought absolutes—in science, religion, and philosophy. Following on its heels came postmodernism in the late 20th and early 21st century; postmodern thinkers reject universal, absolute truths and don’t believe anyone can know anything “for sure.” The word “postmodern” is often used to describe art, literature, architecture—and yes, evangelicalism. It’s a slippery adjective, and when brought into the Christian faith, often aligned with the Emergent Church. Emerging churches, it is said, strive to better understand the postmodern culture—and all its shifts—in order to make Christianity more relevant for younger generations.

continued from p.23

PA: One of the things I sometimes do with students is [to] ask them to write down some slang expressions they use. Part of it is to poke fun at me and show how out of it I am! But one word

Cultural agility Our passionate desire is that graduates understand both their own cultural heritage and others’ cultural traditions. In today’s world, they need cross-cultural skills: readiness to listen, willingness to learn, and humility to compromise. We hope they learn mature self-criticism, not fixating on their own culture’s strengths or others’ shortcomings. Cultural agility requires insight into how social structures benefit some groups and hurt others. When cultural factors lead to social injustice, those with

that comes up is “whatever.” I talk about how “whatever” was not an expression when I was growing up. Everything mattered. Expressions can be an outlook on the world, and is “whatever” the one we want to express? I think that “whatever” has really infused our theology: “This is true for me, but maybe not for you. Whatever.” BW: Our culture says there’s no truth with a capital T on most things, unless, of course, it deals with science. So for issues of values, ethics, and religion, our culture says “of course you can’t use truth with a capital T.” You have this younger generation that says, “We can’t even discuss those issues because we don’t have access to how things really are even when the issue is about the historicity of Jesus and his resurrection.” I find this amazing at best and absurd at worst! Sure, much of what we believe is a reflection of our culture. This goes without saying. But we tread on troubled waters when we embrace postmodernism unreflectively. We do have individuals, though, who are saying, “If we cannot resolve certain theoretical issues or form a consensus in the Body, at least we can definitely get out there and change the world for Christ. We share a common goal, and that is to affect people’s lives to bring the kingdom to earth.” As those in the black church once would say to their white brothers and sisters during Jim Crow days, “Look, [heaven] may be promised to me by-and-by, but I got about 80 years before that happens, so in the meantime I need to change some things here now.”

cultural agility follow Christ’s teaching to work sacrificially for social transformation that promotes others’ well-being.

Spiritual passion We pray that graduates develop mature faith in Jesus Christ. For younger students, this includes letting go of parents’ faith and owning their faith. Graduates allow trust in Christ to guide and motivate every aspect of life. A relationship with God interacts with relationships with others. So a healthy

“We trust students will grow in their intimate love for God. This both honors God and promotes effective, lifelong service to Christ’s kingdom.” 24

Fall 2009

Hungering for God at Bethel Bethel University’s mission has not wavered since the school was originally founded as a seminary for Swedish immigrants in 1871. “Boldly informed and motivated by the Christian faith, Bethel University educates and energizes men and women for excellence in leadership, scholarship, and service. The school prepares graduates to serve in strategic capacities to renew minds, live out biblical truth, transform culture, and advance the gospel.” During the 2009-2010 academic year, Bethel will strive to do this for its 2,827 young people—mostly between the ages of 18 and 24—enrolled in the College of Arts & Science, as well as the 1,543 learners in the College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School and the 1,101 students in the Seminary. The evangelicalism of these future leaders, pastors, and teachers may look different than yours… CA: In 2000, Robert Webber put out his book The Younger Evangelicals, which discerns three distinct phases within evangelicalism. The first one he calls “traditional,” which was much more doctrinally focused. The second he labels “pragmatic,” in which a concern for numbers and seeker sensitivity predominated—the Christian contemporary music movement, everything in the world having a parallel in evangelicalism, trying to look like the surrounding culture so we can get a bigger piece of the demographic pie. But even in 2000, Webber began discerning a third movement within evangelicalism. This is a movement of younger evangelicals who are tired of the apologetic arguments of the traditionalists and the big shopping-mall-like churches and rock-concert worship

services of the pragmatists. People in this phase, said Webber, are trying to reconnect with stuff that’s distinctively Christian. They want to go back into Christian history and tradition and at least cherry-pick some aspects of what makes Christianity distinctive. Stained glass may be okay now; it’s okay to light candles. Maybe there’s some value to those traditional symbols because they train us and allow us to be more fully Christian. To me, if that’s true, then it at least allays some of my concern. I think maybe there’s some movement away from a relativistic outlook to, maybe, a revivalistic outlook—but a new revivalism that draws from our spiritual heritage. PA: A place like Bethel is so important. It’s such a privilege to have influence with this generation and to help students struggle through some of these issues. I think of a student who is in South Africa as we speak, and she’s there as someone with a very alive, concrete, centered faith. She’s trying to understand herself as a future journalist and an advocate for the poor. How does she live that out? I find many examples of this approach among this generation. Students may come in with a pretty thin theological veneer, but then as faculty members, we have the challenge and privilege to push them to dig deeper into what separates plain activism from an activism motivated by a deeply held evangelical faith. So, I would just say the fact that a place like Bethel is thriving in the postmodern world tells me there’s still a hunger for something more—a hunger for rootedness you’re not going to find in other kinds of institutions. I think there will always be this hunger, because of the power of God working in the world and that the core of our evangelical faith will be preserved. BU

relationship with God promotes healing of damaged human relational patterns. This healing in turn reinforces deeper intimacy with the Father. The person who rightly relates to God can enter human relationships, including work relationships, with greater strength. So, we trust students will grow in their intimate love for God. This both honors God and promotes effective, lifelong service to Christ’s kingdom. The magic of a Bethel education is integrating worship and calling, mind and heart, for all learners. Evangelical faith— personal trust in the Triune God whose kingdom has come— grounds this education. As it soaks in the marinade of faith, a Bethel education gains natural strength, conceptual shape, tactical purposes, and ultimate meanings. Harvard and Oxford can’t do what Bethel does. Our passion for Bethel University is to be the best in the world at doing what God asks of us, through divine grace and strength. That’s our truest measure of excellence. BU Bethel University

25

Place Meant

By Heather Johnson

9

3

8 10 1

2 5

6 Where does Jay Barnes get his work done? Not where you might expect. Yes, it’s in CLC 234, the Office of the President, where administrative assistants Carolyn Barr and Lois Jacobs warmly greet you and offer chocolate as you wait. But when you’re invited down the hallway through the door into an expansive space overlooking a vista of Lake Valentine with leather seating and floor-to-ceiling bookshelves, you won’t always find Jay. Where there once was an executive desk, now there’s a long conference table—a place for group discussion. So where’s the president? To your left. A door opens to a small, inner sanctum. There he is, tapping on the keyboard of his PC at a modest workstation, where priorities are set and tough decisions made. What can we learn about Bethel’s chief executive from the artifacts on his desk and walls? He and Barb share the meaning and inspiration behind a few of the items—some from his 14 years at Bethel, others from long before. 26 FallFall 26 2009 2009

4 7 11

1 Model of a tugboat. This most unassuming of ships has always been Jay’s favorite—perhaps from reading Scuffy the Tugboat as a child. Now, the tugboat reminds Jay of the kind of leader he strives to be—coming alongside people in quiet ways to help them achieve their potential. Jay bought the model at a store in Maine that sells items made by inmates in the Maine State Prison system. 2 A shepherd figurine. Carved of wood, this figure carrying a sheep was a gift from the College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School in gratitude for Jay’s gentle, decisive leadership as provost when the fast-growing adult program was between deans in the late 1990s. 3 Drawings of the prophets Daniel, Ezekiel, and Isaiah. For more than three decades, these portraits have hung in Jay’s various offices, reminding him to follow God’s call—even when there’s a sacrificial price to be paid. 4 A chrome bulldog hood ornament for a Mack truck, engraved with Jay’s grandfather’s name, James H. Barnes Sr., who sold axles to the semi manufacturer. It represents Jay’s love for heritage and his deep respect for family: “I’ve always been glad I carry my grandpa’s and dad’s name. They were outspoken Christians, businessmen actively involved in the life of the church.” 5 The book How the Mighty Fall by Jim Collins, one of Jay’s current reads. He often reads books on effective leadership: “I don’t want to take the passion God has given me for top-quality, life-transforming Christian higher education, or our rank as an institution, and make that the most important thing. If it’s not about life change at the bottom, then I need to recalibrate my internal compass.” 6 The Expanded Bible is the work of three scholars, including two of Bethel’s own: Daniel Taylor, English professor in the College of Arts & Sciences; and Mark Strauss, New Testament professor at Bethel Seminary San Diego. This edition openly cites the challenges and complexities involved in translating some biblical texts into modern English. Jay’s quick review? “It’s like reading multiple translations at one time, with study helps thrown in for good measure.” 7 Bookend replicas of The Man at the Wheel sculpture, a prominent memorial to the fishermen of Gloucester, Mass., where Jay’s grandparents had a summer cottage. Erected in 1923 on the 300th anniversary of the town (also featured in the George Clooney film The Perfect Storm), the sculpture is inscribed with part of Psalm 107: “They that go down to sea in ships.” 8 Family photo. Married since 1971, Jay and Barb have three adult children, Rebecca, James, and Mark, and eight grandchildren. Grandson Max spoke at Jay’s inauguration, remembering time together at Deerfoot Lodge in the Adirondacks of upstate New York. 9 A yellow hard hat, worn by former Dean Virgil Olson during frequent visits to construction sites on the “new” Arden Hills campus in the early 1970s. Two other hard hats nearby are from Mortenson Construction, builder of the most recent campus addition, Brushaber Commons. 10 Purell hand sanitizer. A president’s good friend! 11 A large hand-thrown vase created by Bethel’s pre-eminent ceramics artist, Professor Kirk Freeman. He and Jay used it as an illustration of Ephesians 2:10 when they spoke together in chapel two years ago.

Bethel University

27

Place Meant

By Heather Johnson

9

3

8 10 1

2 5

6 Where does Jay Barnes get his work done? Not where you might expect. Yes, it’s in CLC 234, the Office of the President, where administrative assistants Carolyn Barr and Lois Jacobs warmly greet you and offer chocolate as you wait. But when you’re invited down the hallway through the door into an expansive space overlooking a vista of Lake Valentine with leather seating and floor-to-ceiling bookshelves, you won’t always find Jay. Where there once was an executive desk, now there’s a long conference table—a place for group discussion. So where’s the president? To your left. A door opens to a small, inner sanctum. There he is, tapping on the keyboard of his PC at a modest workstation, where priorities are set and tough decisions made. What can we learn about Bethel’s chief executive from the artifacts on his desk and walls? He and Barb share the meaning and inspiration behind a few of the items—some from his 14 years at Bethel, others from long before. 26 FallFall 26 2009 2009

4 7 11

1 Model of a tugboat. This most unassuming of ships has always been Jay’s favorite—perhaps from reading Scuffy the Tugboat as a child. Now, the tugboat reminds Jay of the kind of leader he strives to be—coming alongside people in quiet ways to help them achieve their potential. Jay bought the model at a store in Maine that sells items made by inmates in the Maine State Prison system. 2 A shepherd figurine. Carved of wood, this figure carrying a sheep was a gift from the College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School in gratitude for Jay’s gentle, decisive leadership as provost when the fast-growing adult program was between deans in the late 1990s. 3 Drawings of the prophets Daniel, Ezekiel, and Isaiah. For more than three decades, these portraits have hung in Jay’s various offices, reminding him to follow God’s call—even when there’s a sacrificial price to be paid. 4 A chrome bulldog hood ornament for a Mack truck, engraved with Jay’s grandfather’s name, James H. Barnes Sr., who sold axles to the semi manufacturer. It represents Jay’s love for heritage and his deep respect for family: “I’ve always been glad I carry my grandpa’s and dad’s name. They were outspoken Christians, businessmen actively involved in the life of the church.” 5 The book How the Mighty Fall by Jim Collins, one of Jay’s current reads. He often reads books on effective leadership: “I don’t want to take the passion God has given me for top-quality, life-transforming Christian higher education, or our rank as an institution, and make that the most important thing. If it’s not about life change at the bottom, then I need to recalibrate my internal compass.” 6 The Expanded Bible is the work of three scholars, including two of Bethel’s own: Daniel Taylor, English professor in the College of Arts & Sciences; and Mark Strauss, New Testament professor at Bethel Seminary San Diego. This edition openly cites the challenges and complexities involved in translating some biblical texts into modern English. Jay’s quick review? “It’s like reading multiple translations at one time, with study helps thrown in for good measure.” 7 Bookend replicas of The Man at the Wheel sculpture, a prominent memorial to the fishermen of Gloucester, Mass., where Jay’s grandparents had a summer cottage. Erected in 1923 on the 300th anniversary of the town (also featured in the George Clooney film The Perfect Storm), the sculpture is inscribed with part of Psalm 107: “They that go down to sea in ships.” 8 Family photo. Married since 1971, Jay and Barb have three adult children, Rebecca, James, and Mark, and eight grandchildren. Grandson Max spoke at Jay’s inauguration, remembering time together at Deerfoot Lodge in the Adirondacks of upstate New York. 9 A yellow hard hat, worn by former Dean Virgil Olson during frequent visits to construction sites on the “new” Arden Hills campus in the early 1970s. Two other hard hats nearby are from Mortenson Construction, builder of the most recent campus addition, Brushaber Commons. 10 Purell hand sanitizer. A president’s good friend! 11 A large hand-thrown vase created by Bethel’s pre-eminent ceramics artist, Professor Kirk Freeman. He and Jay used it as an illustration of Ephesians 2:10 when they spoke together in chapel two years ago.

Bethel University

27

by Michelle Westlund ’83

merit

A University with

Find out why an increasing number of National Merit Scholars from around the nation are choosing Bethel University for more than academics.

You’re a high school senior. You take a full load of advanced placement classes and have an exceptionally high GPA. Your standardized test scores have earned you National Merit Finalist status. You receive stacks of mail from colleges and universities nationwide, all courting you with promises of a life-changing experience. Where will you go?

28

Fall 2009

For a growing number of National Merit students, the answer is Bethel University. Enrollment in 2008-09 included 18 National Merit scholars, with four more enrolling this fall. With all the opportunities available to them, why did these students choose Bethel? Their reasons are as diverse as the scholars themselves.

the university’s many assets when making her choice, too, but she had some help with the final decision. “Why did I choose Bethel?” she reflects. “It has respected academics, professors who take an interest in your life, a fun atmosphere, and a commitment to its students—mentally, physically, and spiritually. But the real reason I chose Bethel? God led me here.”

A clear choice

Since 1955, the National Merit Scholarship program has Academics plus faith served as an academic competition providing recognition The union of faith-based education and strong academics is and scholarships for high school students. Students enter one that Bethel administrators strive to emphasize. “Students the program by taking the Preliminary SAT/National Merit and parents are often not aware of the outstanding opportunities Scholarship Qualifying Test, which screens approximately 1.5 they have for an excellent education in a context that will also million entrants each year. Of these, about 15,000 advance to encourage them to grow and thrive in their Christian faith,” finalist standing, and only 8,200 of these eventually receive a says Deb Harless, vice president and dean of Bethel University’s Merit Scholarship award from the National Merit Scholarship College of Arts & Sciences. “Parents don’t need to choose program or participating corporate and college sponsors. between a college with high academic standards and a faithThough not the only means for identifying academically gifted based college. They can have both.” students, the scholarship program certainly spotlights students Most incoming Bethel students cite the institution’s with high academic potential. National Merit scholars are drawn, commitment to spiritual values as the primary reason they chose with good reason, to the nation’s top academic institutions; Bethel, with academic strength coming second, according to about 25 percent of the 2008 entering classes of Harvard and the results of the Higher Education Research Institute survey Yale were made up of these scholars. given in alternate years to freshmen. These results demonstrate On a lesser scale, but an impressive one nonetheless, Bethel that “students who are looking for an academic challenge are too is attracting National Merit scholars for many reasons. hopeful that their lives as Christians will be strengthened and Interviewed for this article, some scholars mention Bethel’s deepened,” explains Rich Sherry, executive assistant to the respected academic reputation or strength of curriculum in the president. “And students who are believers looking for avenues of area of their intended major. Several were recruited for athletics; growth are also seeking to study in a faith-filled context.” others have family ties or completed college courses here during Both Harless and Sherry see the quality and commitment of high school as Post-Secondary Enrollment students. faculty as central to the institution’s mission. “Increasingly, Bethel But the most frequent and passionate reasons for choosing faculty are becoming recognized as scholars who bring a Christian Bethel are spiritual in perspective to their work,” says Sherry. “We’re seeing a nature. Matthew Nelson, “Compared to the other schools I cascade of scholarship that’s new to Bethel: education and a junior studying in visited, the feeling on campus and nursing faculty known internationally for their Fulbright Australia this fall, says, the attitudes of the students really teaching and research; professional presentations and “I was accepted to all the publications across the sciences; literature and writing stood out at Bethel.” schools I applied for and faculty publishing frequently; psychology faculty known as —junior Hannah Parks researchers across a range of fields; biblical studies faculty I chose Bethel. It’s hard to explain, but Bethel felt adding several books a year to their fields; and art faculty right in a way that the other schools didn’t. I wanted a place exhibiting work nationally.” where I could grow in my faith as well as academically.” Bethel faculty members are scholars who are “without Likewise, junior Hannah Parks, a varsity volleyball player, question experts in their fields,” agrees Harless. “But they also visited several schools in the Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic really want to work with undergraduate students. They are here Conference (MIAC) before choosing Bethel. She explains, because they want to be with students and explicitly explore and “I knew that I would be challenged in my faith by attending model the integration of faith and learning.” a school like Bethel that is committed to a Christ-centered This commitment to developing and nurturing students community and putting Jesus first in every area of life. holistically creates opportunities for Bethel students that are Compared to the other schools I visited, the feeling on campus more atypical at other institutions. Students compete in national and the attitudes of the students really stood out at Bethel.” mathematics competitions alongside their professors. They And sophomore Christa Rheingans carefully considered participate in research with faculty, often leading to publication Bethel University

29

by Michelle Westlund ’83

merit

A University with

Find out why an increasing number of National Merit Scholars from around the nation are choosing Bethel University for more than academics.

You’re a high school senior. You take a full load of advanced placement classes and have an exceptionally high GPA. Your standardized test scores have earned you National Merit Finalist status. You receive stacks of mail from colleges and universities nationwide, all courting you with promises of a life-changing experience. Where will you go?

28

Fall 2009

For a growing number of National Merit students, the answer is Bethel University. Enrollment in 2008-09 included 18 National Merit scholars, with four more enrolling this fall. With all the opportunities available to them, why did these students choose Bethel? Their reasons are as diverse as the scholars themselves.

the university’s many assets when making her choice, too, but she had some help with the final decision. “Why did I choose Bethel?” she reflects. “It has respected academics, professors who take an interest in your life, a fun atmosphere, and a commitment to its students—mentally, physically, and spiritually. But the real reason I chose Bethel? God led me here.”

A clear choice

Since 1955, the National Merit Scholarship program has Academics plus faith served as an academic competition providing recognition The union of faith-based education and strong academics is and scholarships for high school students. Students enter one that Bethel administrators strive to emphasize. “Students the program by taking the Preliminary SAT/National Merit and parents are often not aware of the outstanding opportunities Scholarship Qualifying Test, which screens approximately 1.5 they have for an excellent education in a context that will also million entrants each year. Of these, about 15,000 advance to encourage them to grow and thrive in their Christian faith,” finalist standing, and only 8,200 of these eventually receive a says Deb Harless, vice president and dean of Bethel University’s Merit Scholarship award from the National Merit Scholarship College of Arts & Sciences. “Parents don’t need to choose program or participating corporate and college sponsors. between a college with high academic standards and a faithThough not the only means for identifying academically gifted based college. They can have both.” students, the scholarship program certainly spotlights students Most incoming Bethel students cite the institution’s with high academic potential. National Merit scholars are drawn, commitment to spiritual values as the primary reason they chose with good reason, to the nation’s top academic institutions; Bethel, with academic strength coming second, according to about 25 percent of the 2008 entering classes of Harvard and the results of the Higher Education Research Institute survey Yale were made up of these scholars. given in alternate years to freshmen. These results demonstrate On a lesser scale, but an impressive one nonetheless, Bethel that “students who are looking for an academic challenge are too is attracting National Merit scholars for many reasons. hopeful that their lives as Christians will be strengthened and Interviewed for this article, some scholars mention Bethel’s deepened,” explains Rich Sherry, executive assistant to the respected academic reputation or strength of curriculum in the president. “And students who are believers looking for avenues of area of their intended major. Several were recruited for athletics; growth are also seeking to study in a faith-filled context.” others have family ties or completed college courses here during Both Harless and Sherry see the quality and commitment of high school as Post-Secondary Enrollment students. faculty as central to the institution’s mission. “Increasingly, Bethel But the most frequent and passionate reasons for choosing faculty are becoming recognized as scholars who bring a Christian Bethel are spiritual in perspective to their work,” says Sherry. “We’re seeing a nature. Matthew Nelson, “Compared to the other schools I cascade of scholarship that’s new to Bethel: education and a junior studying in visited, the feeling on campus and nursing faculty known internationally for their Fulbright Australia this fall, says, the attitudes of the students really teaching and research; professional presentations and “I was accepted to all the publications across the sciences; literature and writing stood out at Bethel.” schools I applied for and faculty publishing frequently; psychology faculty known as —junior Hannah Parks researchers across a range of fields; biblical studies faculty I chose Bethel. It’s hard to explain, but Bethel felt adding several books a year to their fields; and art faculty right in a way that the other schools didn’t. I wanted a place exhibiting work nationally.” where I could grow in my faith as well as academically.” Bethel faculty members are scholars who are “without Likewise, junior Hannah Parks, a varsity volleyball player, question experts in their fields,” agrees Harless. “But they also visited several schools in the Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic really want to work with undergraduate students. They are here Conference (MIAC) before choosing Bethel. She explains, because they want to be with students and explicitly explore and “I knew that I would be challenged in my faith by attending model the integration of faith and learning.” a school like Bethel that is committed to a Christ-centered This commitment to developing and nurturing students community and putting Jesus first in every area of life. holistically creates opportunities for Bethel students that are Compared to the other schools I visited, the feeling on campus more atypical at other institutions. Students compete in national and the attitudes of the students really stood out at Bethel.” mathematics competitions alongside their professors. They And sophomore Christa Rheingans carefully considered participate in research with faculty, often leading to publication Bethel University

29

Academic Recognition • According to the American Enterprise Institute study Diplomas and Dropouts, Bethel University has the highest graduation rate in the Midwest and stands among the five highest in the nation in the “Competitive” category— schools with moderately difficult admissions standards. • Bethel is ranked 19th in the nation for number of students studying abroad in the “Master’s Institutions” category, according to the 2008 Open Doors Report on International Educational Exchange. • Four faculty members and one student have received Fulbright grants in the last five years. • Department of Physics was chosen by The National Task Force for Undergraduate Physics as one of the 21 “Thriving” Physics Departments in the United States (out of 780). • Consistent success by teams of Bethel students in the Mathematical Contest in Modeling (MCM) and

(COMAP) with students usually placing in the first or second tier.

Award for its extensive involvement in promoting scholarship and biological research, service, convention participation, and social activities.

• Bethel forensics team is highly recognized, with participants earning national championships at the Christian College Nationals and All-American Awards from the National Parliamentary Debate Association.

• Bethel University is consistently

ranked among

• Athletes consistently named to academic all-star teams. Bethel had 76 All-MIAC All-Academic athletes, four alldistrict athletes, and two academic All-Americans in 2008-09.

• Bethel University is listed in “Top Colleges Students” in Peterson’s Competitive Colleges.

top Midwestern Universities in the “America’s Best Colleges” issue of U.S. News & World Report—this year 14th in the Master’s category.

for Top

• The Clarion student newspaper in 2008 received second place “Best of Show” honors from the Associated College Press in the four-year, non-weekly competition category. • The Gamma Omega chapter of the Tri-Beta National Honor Society (for the biological sciences) at Bethel received the

2007 Lloyd M. Bertholf “Outstanding Chapter”

while still in college. They study abroad in large numbers through partnerships Bethel has developed with other institutions around the world. They are trained to be leaders and servants, making positive and lasting contributions to their communities and churches during their college years and after graduation. National Merit scholars thrive at Bethel, where there are just 11 students to each faculty member, allowing an unusual degree of personal attention. “I have found professors that push me and want me to grow and succeed,” says senior Jessica Nordman, an elementary education major. Likewise, senior Benjamin Boycott, a teaching assistant in the finance department, has become close to a number of his Bethel instructors and says he found academic success through their guidance. “I have been impressed with the manner in which the business and economics faculty have integrated Christ, morality, and truth into a line of work that is starved for these things,” he explains. “Their passion has helped shape my future plans, and has given me a drive to use my skills for the glory of God.” BU

Christa Rheingans

Benjamin Boycott

Hannah Parks

Jessica Benham

Matthew Nelson

Stephen Seaberg

Jessica Nordman

Jonathan Seaberg

Sophomore undecided major from Madison, Minn.

Senior economics/business major from Kenai, Alaska

Junior biochemistry/molecular biology major from Plymouth, Minn.

Senior elementary education major from Owatonna, Minn.

In my free time, I…work part time as a marketing consultant and am a teaching assistant in the finance department. I played Bethel hockey for one year, and now play in a Christian men’s league, where we travel to northern Canada each winter for a mission/hockey trip. Being from Alaska, I’m also really into hunting and fishing, and last spring I finally got that big grizzly bear! I also enjoy spending time with my wife and cat.

In my free time, I…play varsity volleyball, work with Shift (a freshman Bible study/mentorship program), tutor for biology and chemistry, serve as a teaching assistant in chemistry and an intern with Medtronic. I like to relax outside, play any sort of sport, and spend time with friends.

Sophomore theatre major from Minnetonka, Minn., currently studying in Australia

Sophomore music education major from Eagan, Minn.

In my free time, I…participate on the Global Prayer Team and in Twin Cities Outreach, work in the Math Lab, volunteer as a youth mentor, and have adventures!

Freshman international relations/ communications studies major from Pittsburgh In my free time, I…plan to participate on the forensics team. I love swimming, especially the 100-yard butterfly. And taking time to visit and listen to the elderly is one of my passions.

In my free time, I…act in Bethel productions and in a performance piece at Wesley Institute in Sydney, Australia, where I’m studying this semester. I play pick-up sports like broomball and ultimate Frisbee, and I work with a local youth group every week. I love studying abroad and traveling on mission trips.

In my free time, I…play trumpet in a variety of bands, including the Minnesota Youth Symphony. I was a drum major in my high school marching band, and was on the cross country, baseball, table tennis, and math teams. I plan to be in the band, orchestra, and jazz band at Bethel and play some intramural sports.

In my free time, I…read classic novels and listen to music.

Senior mathematics/Spanish major from Eagan, Minn., currently studying in Mexico

Hardest Bethel class: Humanities I and II Dumb thing I’ve done: I’ve done too many to pick just one. But it most likely happened at four in the morning when I should have been in bed!

Hardest Bethel class: Believe it or not, ILA (Introduction to Liberal Arts)! Dumb thing I’ve done: Giving this interview. There’s a good chance I’ll never live it down!

30

International Mathematical Contest in Modeling

Fall 2009

Hardest Bethel class: Calculus II When I graduate, I…might go to medical school or enter a physician assistant program. Dumb thing I’ve done: I do lots! But I’m probably too quick to speak and say stupid things without thinking.

When I graduate, I…plan to attend law school. Dumb thing I’ve done: I allowed myself to get extremely nervous before my driving test and ended up running a red light! But no one was injured.

Hardest Bethel class: Introduction to Statistical Methods and Experimental Design When I graduate, I…plan to work with urban youth using drama/theatre to connect and reach kids.

Hardest Bethel class: Multi-variable Calculus

Hardest Bethel class: Humanities When I graduate, I…plan to teach elementary school. Dumb thing I’ve done: I once wore 4 ½ inch heels to teach for an entire day. I’m not exactly sure what I was thinking that morning!

In my free time, I…play trumpet and piano in band and orchestra, take piano lessons, and play piano in chamber ensembles. I enjoy traveling on mission trips and have been to Mexico and Texas with campus ministries groups. Hardest Bethel class: Readings from Latin America and Spain

When I graduate, I…want to become a high school band teacher.

When I graduate, I…plan to go into actuarial science, preferably at an insurance company.

Dumb thing I’ve done: While driving, I made a wrong turn and ended up in the parking entrance at the airport. I had no money to get through the gate, so I had to go back the wrong way.

Dumb thing I’ve done: On a vacation to Florida many years ago, I accidentally smacked my forehead against a stucco stairwell while chasing my brother. We spent several hours at the hospital.

Bethel University

31

Academic Recognition • According to the American Enterprise Institute study Diplomas and Dropouts, Bethel University has the highest graduation rate in the Midwest and stands among the five highest in the nation in the “Competitive” category— schools with moderately difficult admissions standards. • Bethel is ranked 19th in the nation for number of students studying abroad in the “Master’s Institutions” category, according to the 2008 Open Doors Report on International Educational Exchange. • Four faculty members and one student have received Fulbright grants in the last five years. • Department of Physics was chosen by The National Task Force for Undergraduate Physics as one of the 21 “Thriving” Physics Departments in the United States (out of 780). • Consistent success by teams of Bethel students in the Mathematical Contest in Modeling (MCM) and

(COMAP) with students usually placing in the first or second tier.

Award for its extensive involvement in promoting scholarship and biological research, service, convention participation, and social activities.

• Bethel forensics team is highly recognized, with participants earning national championships at the Christian College Nationals and All-American Awards from the National Parliamentary Debate Association.

• Bethel University is consistently

ranked among

• Athletes consistently named to academic all-star teams. Bethel had 76 All-MIAC All-Academic athletes, four alldistrict athletes, and two academic All-Americans in 2008-09.

• Bethel University is listed in “Top Colleges Students” in Peterson’s Competitive Colleges.

top Midwestern Universities in the “America’s Best Colleges” issue of U.S. News & World Report—this year 14th in the Master’s category.

for Top

• The Clarion student newspaper in 2008 received second place “Best of Show” honors from the Associated College Press in the four-year, non-weekly competition category. • The Gamma Omega chapter of the Tri-Beta National Honor Society (for the biological sciences) at Bethel received the

2007 Lloyd M. Bertholf “Outstanding Chapter”

while still in college. They study abroad in large numbers through partnerships Bethel has developed with other institutions around the world. They are trained to be leaders and servants, making positive and lasting contributions to their communities and churches during their college years and after graduation. National Merit scholars thrive at Bethel, where there are just 11 students to each faculty member, allowing an unusual degree of personal attention. “I have found professors that push me and want me to grow and succeed,” says senior Jessica Nordman, an elementary education major. Likewise, senior Benjamin Boycott, a teaching assistant in the finance department, has become close to a number of his Bethel instructors and says he found academic success through their guidance. “I have been impressed with the manner in which the business and economics faculty have integrated Christ, morality, and truth into a line of work that is starved for these things,” he explains. “Their passion has helped shape my future plans, and has given me a drive to use my skills for the glory of God.” BU

Christa Rheingans

Benjamin Boycott

Hannah Parks

Jessica Benham

Matthew Nelson

Stephen Seaberg

Jessica Nordman

Jonathan Seaberg

Sophomore undecided major from Madison, Minn.

Senior economics/business major from Kenai, Alaska

Junior biochemistry/molecular biology major from Plymouth, Minn.

Senior elementary education major from Owatonna, Minn.

In my free time, I…work part time as a marketing consultant and am a teaching assistant in the finance department. I played Bethel hockey for one year, and now play in a Christian men’s league, where we travel to northern Canada each winter for a mission/hockey trip. Being from Alaska, I’m also really into hunting and fishing, and last spring I finally got that big grizzly bear! I also enjoy spending time with my wife and cat.

In my free time, I…play varsity volleyball, work with Shift (a freshman Bible study/mentorship program), tutor for biology and chemistry, serve as a teaching assistant in chemistry and an intern with Medtronic. I like to relax outside, play any sort of sport, and spend time with friends.

Sophomore theatre major from Minnetonka, Minn., currently studying in Australia

Sophomore music education major from Eagan, Minn.

In my free time, I…participate on the Global Prayer Team and in Twin Cities Outreach, work in the Math Lab, volunteer as a youth mentor, and have adventures!

Freshman international relations/ communications studies major from Pittsburgh In my free time, I…plan to participate on the forensics team. I love swimming, especially the 100-yard butterfly. And taking time to visit and listen to the elderly is one of my passions.

In my free time, I…act in Bethel productions and in a performance piece at Wesley Institute in Sydney, Australia, where I’m studying this semester. I play pick-up sports like broomball and ultimate Frisbee, and I work with a local youth group every week. I love studying abroad and traveling on mission trips.

In my free time, I…play trumpet in a variety of bands, including the Minnesota Youth Symphony. I was a drum major in my high school marching band, and was on the cross country, baseball, table tennis, and math teams. I plan to be in the band, orchestra, and jazz band at Bethel and play some intramural sports.

In my free time, I…read classic novels and listen to music.

Senior mathematics/Spanish major from Eagan, Minn., currently studying in Mexico

Hardest Bethel class: Humanities I and II Dumb thing I’ve done: I’ve done too many to pick just one. But it most likely happened at four in the morning when I should have been in bed!

Hardest Bethel class: Believe it or not, ILA (Introduction to Liberal Arts)! Dumb thing I’ve done: Giving this interview. There’s a good chance I’ll never live it down!

30

International Mathematical Contest in Modeling

Fall 2009

Hardest Bethel class: Calculus II When I graduate, I…might go to medical school or enter a physician assistant program. Dumb thing I’ve done: I do lots! But I’m probably too quick to speak and say stupid things without thinking.

When I graduate, I…plan to attend law school. Dumb thing I’ve done: I allowed myself to get extremely nervous before my driving test and ended up running a red light! But no one was injured.

Hardest Bethel class: Introduction to Statistical Methods and Experimental Design When I graduate, I…plan to work with urban youth using drama/theatre to connect and reach kids.

Hardest Bethel class: Multi-variable Calculus

Hardest Bethel class: Humanities When I graduate, I…plan to teach elementary school. Dumb thing I’ve done: I once wore 4 ½ inch heels to teach for an entire day. I’m not exactly sure what I was thinking that morning!

In my free time, I…play trumpet and piano in band and orchestra, take piano lessons, and play piano in chamber ensembles. I enjoy traveling on mission trips and have been to Mexico and Texas with campus ministries groups. Hardest Bethel class: Readings from Latin America and Spain

When I graduate, I…want to become a high school band teacher.

When I graduate, I…plan to go into actuarial science, preferably at an insurance company.

Dumb thing I’ve done: While driving, I made a wrong turn and ended up in the parking entrance at the airport. I had no money to get through the gate, so I had to go back the wrong way.

Dumb thing I’ve done: On a vacation to Florida many years ago, I accidentally smacked my forehead against a stucco stairwell while chasing my brother. We spent several hours at the hospital.

Bethel University

31

Bethel Seminary San Diego, director of admissions

Favorite part of her job: “The ethos here at Bethel Seminary—it’s nurturing and encouraging.”

by Heather Johnson photo by Greg Schneider 32

Fall 2009

She had her sights set on a pink Cadillac. As a Mary Kay cosmetics rep, sales equaled success. But while Theola Campbell was driving her green Omega Oldsmobile one day, she heard the words “full-time ministry.” She knew it was God, but she ignored it. She heard the message again though. “I thought, ‘what is that? Full-time ministry? I don’t even know what that is!’” she says. Theola went to her pastor and asked him what the messages meant. “He told me he didn’t know,” she says. “I said, ‘You’re supposed to have the hook-up with God! You’re the pastor!’ But he sent me back to the Lord.” And the Lord sent her to Bethel Seminary San Diego, where she received her master’s in theological studies in June 2001. She also obtained her ministerial license and was ordained in her former church in the Baptist tradition. Within a month of graduation, and still unsure what “full-time ministry” would look like for her, she was asked to become Bethel Seminary San Diego’s director of admissions, helping to recruit new students into the kind of transforming education she had received. Eight years later, the West Coast seminary boasts the highest enrollment ever, with 236 current students and increasing diversity. More than 30 percent of the students are of Asian, African American, or Hispanic descent, reflecting the rich cultural landscape of San Diego. Theola recently received Bethel’s Distinguished Service Award for her dedicated work in the admissions office. Her dedication, however, reaches beyond Bethel’s walls. She also began a church plant called Release Worship Center in San Diego. “It’s more of a training center to help prepare those who have been hurt in a church body,” she explains. “We provide a place for people to rest for a season, find their gifts, be trained, and then released to live out God’s call.” Theola has undertaken another ministry where recovery is the main goal: San Diego’s juvenile hall. She and a team hold worship services for two of the units for young women each week. Also, once a month, this ministry provides opportunities for women to use their gift of preaching and/or teaching in a chapel setting at the Women and Children’s Center at the San Diego Rescue Mission. “I like to allow women who don’t get the opportunity to preach or teach elsewhere to come down and be guest speakers,” she says. Some come from her church; others are students or staff from Bethel Seminary. Having benefitted from seminary herself, she’s able to provide solid guidance and spiritual support to prospective and current students. “My office sees a lot of prayer,” she says. “I love getting to know students in that capacity. And I have my diploma up on the wall, so whenever they think they may not be able to do it, I point to that frame and say, ‘Yes, it’s possible. It’s do-able with God.’” Theola and her husband Mitchell—an assistant to the dean of Bethel Seminary San Diego—are both originally from Chicago. Married for 27 years, they have four adult children and one grandchild. And for the record, she’s now content to drive a Nissan Altima.

Home

1970s

Sweet Home

Through the years, living on campus at Bethel has blended faith and fun.

photo courtesy of BGC History Center

Theola Campbell

By Heather Johnson

This fall, more than 1,900 students fill the College of Arts & Sciences residence halls, and 70 will call the seminary residences home. They brought ipods, iphones, personal laptops (in various colors), Nintendo Wiis, and 64-inch, flat-screen TVs! It’s a far cry from what students in the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s brought from home (think clock radios, popcorn makers, and high-intensity lights). But through the years, a few elements of dorm life have remained constant: living in Christian community; building lifelong friendships; and, well... just good, old-fashioned fun. Hear from Bethel alumni spanning some 50 years about the fun they had while living on campus, and the jokes played on them—or by them? All in good fun, of course.

I

n 1946, there was a housing shortage. Bethel had three buildings: college, girl’s dorm, and seminary building. For a while, some of us men bunked in the basement of the sem building. Then we moved to the 4-H building on the fairgrounds. There we made our own entertainment. One highlight was Rosie’s Sauerkraut Band: Karl Rosenquist, Cal Lundberg, and me, on slide whistle, gahoon (alto sax mouthpiece on a spring that was bent to change the tone—sounded like a wounded cow), and some percussion thing. I played the gahoon because no one else would touch it.

S

eminary men lived upstairs in the seminary building at the end of World War II. One of those seminarians got up on the roof just over the door. When his fellow classmates came out the door, he poured a bucket of water down over them. Someone saw what was happening and went upstairs to that seminarian’s room. He got this man’s best suit, put it on, and then boldly walked out the door. The water came down drenching the student. But, the joke was on the jokester. It was his best suit that got doused!

Jim Spickelmier ’63, S’68

Gordon C. Krantz ’49 Bethel University

33

Bethel Seminary San Diego, director of admissions

Favorite part of her job: “The ethos here at Bethel Seminary—it’s nurturing and encouraging.”

by Heather Johnson photo by Greg Schneider 32

Fall 2009

She had her sights set on a pink Cadillac. As a Mary Kay cosmetics rep, sales equaled success. But while Theola Campbell was driving her green Omega Oldsmobile one day, she heard the words “full-time ministry.” She knew it was God, but she ignored it. She heard the message again though. “I thought, ‘what is that? Full-time ministry? I don’t even know what that is!’” she says. Theola went to her pastor and asked him what the messages meant. “He told me he didn’t know,” she says. “I said, ‘You’re supposed to have the hook-up with God! You’re the pastor!’ But he sent me back to the Lord.” And the Lord sent her to Bethel Seminary San Diego, where she received her master’s in theological studies in June 2001. She also obtained her ministerial license and was ordained in her former church in the Baptist tradition. Within a month of graduation, and still unsure what “full-time ministry” would look like for her, she was asked to become Bethel Seminary San Diego’s director of admissions, helping to recruit new students into the kind of transforming education she had received. Eight years later, the West Coast seminary boasts the highest enrollment ever, with 236 current students and increasing diversity. More than 30 percent of the students are of Asian, African American, or Hispanic descent, reflecting the rich cultural landscape of San Diego. Theola recently received Bethel’s Distinguished Service Award for her dedicated work in the admissions office. Her dedication, however, reaches beyond Bethel’s walls. She also began a church plant called Release Worship Center in San Diego. “It’s more of a training center to help prepare those who have been hurt in a church body,” she explains. “We provide a place for people to rest for a season, find their gifts, be trained, and then released to live out God’s call.” Theola has undertaken another ministry where recovery is the main goal: San Diego’s juvenile hall. She and a team hold worship services for two of the units for young women each week. Also, once a month, this ministry provides opportunities for women to use their gift of preaching and/or teaching in a chapel setting at the Women and Children’s Center at the San Diego Rescue Mission. “I like to allow women who don’t get the opportunity to preach or teach elsewhere to come down and be guest speakers,” she says. Some come from her church; others are students or staff from Bethel Seminary. Having benefitted from seminary herself, she’s able to provide solid guidance and spiritual support to prospective and current students. “My office sees a lot of prayer,” she says. “I love getting to know students in that capacity. And I have my diploma up on the wall, so whenever they think they may not be able to do it, I point to that frame and say, ‘Yes, it’s possible. It’s do-able with God.’” Theola and her husband Mitchell—an assistant to the dean of Bethel Seminary San Diego—are both originally from Chicago. Married for 27 years, they have four adult children and one grandchild. And for the record, she’s now content to drive a Nissan Altima.

Home

1970s

Sweet Home

Through the years, living on campus at Bethel has blended faith and fun.

photo courtesy of BGC History Center

Theola Campbell

By Heather Johnson

This fall, more than 1,900 students fill the College of Arts & Sciences residence halls, and 70 will call the seminary residences home. They brought ipods, iphones, personal laptops (in various colors), Nintendo Wiis, and 64-inch, flat-screen TVs! It’s a far cry from what students in the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s brought from home (think clock radios, popcorn makers, and high-intensity lights). But through the years, a few elements of dorm life have remained constant: living in Christian community; building lifelong friendships; and, well... just good, old-fashioned fun. Hear from Bethel alumni spanning some 50 years about the fun they had while living on campus, and the jokes played on them—or by them? All in good fun, of course.

I

n 1946, there was a housing shortage. Bethel had three buildings: college, girl’s dorm, and seminary building. For a while, some of us men bunked in the basement of the sem building. Then we moved to the 4-H building on the fairgrounds. There we made our own entertainment. One highlight was Rosie’s Sauerkraut Band: Karl Rosenquist, Cal Lundberg, and me, on slide whistle, gahoon (alto sax mouthpiece on a spring that was bent to change the tone—sounded like a wounded cow), and some percussion thing. I played the gahoon because no one else would touch it.

S

eminary men lived upstairs in the seminary building at the end of World War II. One of those seminarians got up on the roof just over the door. When his fellow classmates came out the door, he poured a bucket of water down over them. Someone saw what was happening and went upstairs to that seminarian’s room. He got this man’s best suit, put it on, and then boldly walked out the door. The water came down drenching the student. But, the joke was on the jokester. It was his best suit that got doused!

Jim Spickelmier ’63, S’68

Gordon C. Krantz ’49 Bethel University

33

Jim Spickelmier ’63, S’68

W

O

ur room in Bodien was on the boys’ side inside the courtyard that faced Edgren. My room was above the RD’s apartment. We got the record of the seven dwarfs singing “Heigh Ho.” At about 2 or 3 a.m., we held the speaker out the window playing it as loud as possible toward the boys in Edgren. The tune bounced back and forth on the walls making it hard to figure out where it was coming from. Finally, our phone rang, and we were told to stop immediately. It was quite funny to watch all the lights go on and boys running around trying to figure it out.

hen I was a freshman in the townhouses, we papered up the outside of the door on one of the guys’ townhouses and filled the captive space with old peanut shells off the floor of a nearby restaurant. What a big surprise for the first guy out to open the door and have all that great early morning fiber sucked about eight feet into the middle of their living room floor. Very nutritious!

Linda Swift Kinsey ’81

Robyn Sandquist ’80

1960s

1960s

S

eminary involved lots of late-night studying and students ordering Domino’s in the wee hours. Sometimes we got a little punchy: I have a photo of two of my friends sitting shirtless at their dining room table surrounded by books. One of them has a pencil in his nose. Both these guys are still in ministry. Occasionally the guys taking preaching class could be seen—and heard— walking the path behind the apartments practicing their sermons. My wife tells me I also preached in my sleep. Another memory is the snapping turtles that emerged from Lake Valentine to scare small children and lay eggs. One turtle laid her eggs on the side of the road by the old dining center. Facilities made a wood box for it to keep it safe through the winter.

S

Rick Yonker S’93

1990s

photos on this page courtesy of BGC History Center

1970s

34

Fall 2009

2005 ophomore year, when I was moving into Nelson Hall, I met my floormate and soon-to-be friend Alison Heep (now Givand). Our parents were helping us move in, and our fathers were swapping dorm-life stories. One particular prank Mr. Heep was fond of was stealing his roommates’ clothes and towel while they were showering. He also gave me a bit of advice: if it ever happened to me, go to the paper towel dispenser and unroll a huge portion in one piece to use as a toga/towel. Lo and behold, not two months later, Alison pulled this prank on me, removing my towel, robe, and clothes from the bathroom while I showered. The whole floor was treated to me walking to my room wrapped in paper towels, and was treated later in the year to Alison returning to her room after a shower wearing only the shower curtain, as my retaliation was carefully crafted to remove the paper towels from the dispenser. We even got a picture of it for the Spring Banquet, but out of kindness to Ali and a desire to be ‘Bethical,’ we did not submit it for the slideshow.

Bynthia Anose ’98, S’04

photo courtesy of BGC History Center

n the 1970s, security got complaints that some boys were throwing snowballs at cars on Snelling Avenue from the roof of the closed college buildings. Maintenance checked several times but could find no sign of entry. Finally, they found an open basement window, but no students. Coming back a second time, they found a false wall built into the back of the old Clarion office in the basement. Behind the wall were two beds and student clothes. Two Bethel college guys had been using the makeshift apartment, without rent, for most of the semester. That ended abruptly.

photo by Scott Streble

I

F

reshman year in Edgren, 1995. We (3rd-floor girls) would select unsuspecting targets (boys), phone their rooms from the lobby and say, ‘Domino’s Pizza. Your pizza is here.’ And they would say, ‘I didn’t order pizza.’ And we would say, ‘Oh, really? Well, I’m in the lobby with a hot pizza, and I need to deliver it to somebody. Do you want a free pizza?’ And they would say, ‘Yeah! I’ll be right there!’ And we would hang up, and wait for them to come running into the lobby. We would laugh, and then we would do it again.

Jada (Mrozinski) Sanders ’99

W

I

came for an overnight visit my senior year of high school (1995-1996) and stayed with a friend who was a freshman in Edgren. The next morning I had to get up early to drive back home in time for my high school classes. As most high school students are in the morning, I was a bit groggy. I went into the bathroom to take a shower. One of the showers was running; the shower curtain was open, and I could see green inside. I took another step to realize it was a Christmas tree from the tree sale in the SRC. Someone had gotten onto the floor and left the tree in the shower with the water running.

e had a roommate who was big into hunting and would leave at 4 a.m. to go north and shoot ducks. One morning we found gutted ducks in our little dorm fridge. So another roommate filled the fridge with coffee to get rid of the smell. Later, another roommate put in microwave popcorn for 30 minutes instead of three. He stepped out, and the popcorn cooked for at least 20 minutes before another roommate walked in. So, now our room smelled like dead ducks, coffee, and badly burned popcorn. In the end, this worked for the best because President Brushaber used our room as a selling point for building a new dorm; he raised a lot of support after that.

Josh Holm ’00

Mindy Molin ’00

Bethel University

35

Jim Spickelmier ’63, S’68

W

O

ur room in Bodien was on the boys’ side inside the courtyard that faced Edgren. My room was above the RD’s apartment. We got the record of the seven dwarfs singing “Heigh Ho.” At about 2 or 3 a.m., we held the speaker out the window playing it as loud as possible toward the boys in Edgren. The tune bounced back and forth on the walls making it hard to figure out where it was coming from. Finally, our phone rang, and we were told to stop immediately. It was quite funny to watch all the lights go on and boys running around trying to figure it out.

hen I was a freshman in the townhouses, we papered up the outside of the door on one of the guys’ townhouses and filled the captive space with old peanut shells off the floor of a nearby restaurant. What a big surprise for the first guy out to open the door and have all that great early morning fiber sucked about eight feet into the middle of their living room floor. Very nutritious!

Linda Swift Kinsey ’81

Robyn Sandquist ’80

1960s

1960s

S

eminary involved lots of late-night studying and students ordering Domino’s in the wee hours. Sometimes we got a little punchy: I have a photo of two of my friends sitting shirtless at their dining room table surrounded by books. One of them has a pencil in his nose. Both these guys are still in ministry. Occasionally the guys taking preaching class could be seen—and heard— walking the path behind the apartments practicing their sermons. My wife tells me I also preached in my sleep. Another memory is the snapping turtles that emerged from Lake Valentine to scare small children and lay eggs. One turtle laid her eggs on the side of the road by the old dining center. Facilities made a wood box for it to keep it safe through the winter.

S

Rick Yonker S’93

1990s

photos on this page courtesy of BGC History Center

1970s

34

Fall 2009

2005 ophomore year, when I was moving into Nelson Hall, I met my floormate and soon-to-be friend Alison Heep (now Givand). Our parents were helping us move in, and our fathers were swapping dorm-life stories. One particular prank Mr. Heep was fond of was stealing his roommates’ clothes and towel while they were showering. He also gave me a bit of advice: if it ever happened to me, go to the paper towel dispenser and unroll a huge portion in one piece to use as a toga/towel. Lo and behold, not two months later, Alison pulled this prank on me, removing my towel, robe, and clothes from the bathroom while I showered. The whole floor was treated to me walking to my room wrapped in paper towels, and was treated later in the year to Alison returning to her room after a shower wearing only the shower curtain, as my retaliation was carefully crafted to remove the paper towels from the dispenser. We even got a picture of it for the Spring Banquet, but out of kindness to Ali and a desire to be ‘Bethical,’ we did not submit it for the slideshow.

Bynthia Anose ’98, S’04

photo courtesy of BGC History Center

n the 1970s, security got complaints that some boys were throwing snowballs at cars on Snelling Avenue from the roof of the closed college buildings. Maintenance checked several times but could find no sign of entry. Finally, they found an open basement window, but no students. Coming back a second time, they found a false wall built into the back of the old Clarion office in the basement. Behind the wall were two beds and student clothes. Two Bethel college guys had been using the makeshift apartment, without rent, for most of the semester. That ended abruptly.

photo by Scott Streble

I

F

reshman year in Edgren, 1995. We (3rd-floor girls) would select unsuspecting targets (boys), phone their rooms from the lobby and say, ‘Domino’s Pizza. Your pizza is here.’ And they would say, ‘I didn’t order pizza.’ And we would say, ‘Oh, really? Well, I’m in the lobby with a hot pizza, and I need to deliver it to somebody. Do you want a free pizza?’ And they would say, ‘Yeah! I’ll be right there!’ And we would hang up, and wait for them to come running into the lobby. We would laugh, and then we would do it again.

Jada (Mrozinski) Sanders ’99

W

I

came for an overnight visit my senior year of high school (1995-1996) and stayed with a friend who was a freshman in Edgren. The next morning I had to get up early to drive back home in time for my high school classes. As most high school students are in the morning, I was a bit groggy. I went into the bathroom to take a shower. One of the showers was running; the shower curtain was open, and I could see green inside. I took another step to realize it was a Christmas tree from the tree sale in the SRC. Someone had gotten onto the floor and left the tree in the shower with the water running.

e had a roommate who was big into hunting and would leave at 4 a.m. to go north and shoot ducks. One morning we found gutted ducks in our little dorm fridge. So another roommate filled the fridge with coffee to get rid of the smell. Later, another roommate put in microwave popcorn for 30 minutes instead of three. He stepped out, and the popcorn cooked for at least 20 minutes before another roommate walked in. So, now our room smelled like dead ducks, coffee, and badly burned popcorn. In the end, this worked for the best because President Brushaber used our room as a selling point for building a new dorm; he raised a lot of support after that.

Josh Holm ’00

Mindy Molin ’00

Bethel University

35

1980s photo courtesy of BGC History Center

F

Simultaneously Spiritual Living on campus definitely includes fun and games—and it should, says Jim Benjamin, associate dean for residence life. But at Bethel, it’s much more than that. The strengthening of personal relationships with God and each other is the permanent backdrop to late-night pizza orders, movie-watching, and pingpong competitions. “We want students to take advantage of the learning environment outside the classroom,” explains Benjamin. “We want them to experience growth in their interpersonal skills, social networking, and spiritual life.” Living in residence halls often gives students a safe environment in which to practice living out the very things they’re learning in classes and chapel services. Benjamin’s staff, including 10 resident directors, works hard around the clock to ensure that each Bethel student feels welcome and comfortable. “We want to actively engage with our residents in authentic ways,” says Jenn Hillier, resident director for Bodien, a first-year student residence hall. “We want to create a place where students can be real, a place where each resident can give and receive love as we encounter the joys and challenges of life together.” To do that in Bodien, she says they work hard and play hard. Down from freshman hill, upper-class students in Heritage Hall this year are thinking about limits. “The prophet Habakkuk writes of his doubts and frustrations. He doesn’t believe God will show up in his circumstances,” explains Steph Williams, Heritage’s Resident Director. “So, what do we limit? Ourselves, others, the present, the future, our God?” The hall’s theme verse for this academic year is God’s response to Habakkuk (1:5): “Look at the nations and watch—and be utterly amazed. For I am going to do something in your days that you would not believe, even if you were told.” “We’re asking how much different life could be if we rejected the limit of expectations and chose expectancy,” says Williams. “We believe that an infinite God can do more than we can ask or imagine!” Learn more about Bethel’s other residence halls at cas.bethel. edu/student-development/reslife.

36

Fall 2009

T

he guys taped a dead fish under our dorm sink in Edgren. Unfortunately, the quietest (and most easily scared) girl found it! At 5 a.m., the tape wouldn’t stick anymore, and the fish landed at her feet. She then proceeded to scream until we were all up!

Colleen Nelson ’01, S’06

or my senior year, I lived in a Heritage apartment with six girls, but we considered the six girls who lived across the hall from us our honorary roommates— spending as much time in their room as we did in ours. One evening we ended up in my room for a while, watching “The Office.” Now, because Bethel is a safe place (and we were right across the hall), we’d left the front door unlocked. During a commercial break, my friend Amy wandered across the hall. Thirty seconds later, she reappeared in our doorway and calmly stated, “The door to the toilet room is missing.” Silence. “What?” Eliza asked. “The door to the toilet room is missing,” Amy repeated. We looked at each other, disbelieving, before the eight of us jumped up screaming. We sprinted across the hall and someone had indeed taken the door off by its hinges, leaving an open stall. We immediately knew our culprit. Mike Frederickson, aka, “Freddy.” He’d pulled such a prank when we were freshmen. Plus, we knew he had the right tools.

Nicole Westlund ’09

Alum News Bethel Magazine incorporates Alum News from all schools of Bethel University. (SEM) indicates news from Bethel Seminary alumni and (CAPS/GS) indicates news from College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School alumni. No indication is news from College of Arts & Sciences alumni.

1931 Myrel Harriet Anderson, 98, of Braham, Minn., passed away in August. She was preceded in death by her husband Frank Lowell Anderson, and is survived by her sons Gerald, Dennis (Mary), and Richard (Pam); her daughter Pat (Ed) Anthony; 14 grandchildren; 28 great-grandchildren; and five great-great-grandchildren.

1942 Merriam Leslie Olson died in July in Texas at the age of 89.

1944 Chaplain (Ret. Col.) Willis Warren Wessman (SEM), Topeka, passed away at the age of 88 in July. He served in the U.S. Navy (1944-1946) and later as an Army chaplain from 1951 until his retirement in 1979. He served during the World War II, Korean, and Vietnam War eras. His wife, Dolores (Poole), preceded him in death in 2003. He is survived by his son, Kim; daughter, Kathleen (Norman) Bacon; a granddaughter, and two grandsons.

1948 Valeda Samuelson has a new mission: Central Clearinghouse in Israel. She

Ron Asmus

2009

also continues her other ministries in the Philippines and Israel.

1946 LeRoy Gardner founded North Central Baptist Church in St. Paul and served as pastor for 39 years. In 1997 he moved to Carmichael, Calif., and founded a new church. A speaker and author, he and his wife Kay now live in Southern California.

1949 Walton Johnson (SEM) lives in Superior, Wis. He served seven churches in 35 years, and for two years in Chicago at the denominational headquarters. Since his 1983 retirement, he has served as an interim pastor in 12 churches and is still active in ministry. His first wife, Eunice, passed away in 2003. They had four children, Vern ’76, Dale ’78, Paul ’80, and Lois. He married Marit Johnson in 2005.

1953 In August 2009, Marian (Peterson) Johnson passed away in Sioux Falls, S.D., at the age of 78. She lived in Slayton, Minn., and is survived by her four sons, Gary (Sue), Dean, Gene (Karla), and David (Lisa); 14

Former director of CAPS/GS student services Ron Asmus passed away in August after a 15-month battle with leukemia. He was 66 years old. Asmus worked for Bethel from 19912009, first as an admissions counselor for what is now the College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School. He eventually became director of admissions for that area and was instrumental in the significant growth spurt in adult programs during the 1990s. A short time later he was asked to become the first director of student services for CAPS/GS. Asmus is survived by his wife of 46 years, Sharon Johnson Asmus; daughters Jennifer and Rebecca, and son-in-law Ben Hasselblad; grandchildren Christina and Austin Asmus, and Natalie, Kari, and Annika Hasselblad; and other family and friends.

“Measure our performance by what God accomplishes through our graduates after they have been prepared at Bethel to go out into the world to serve.” —John Alexis Edgren, Founder grandchildren; and 13 great-grandchildren.

1954 George William Chalmers (SEM) died at age 85 in Manila, Philippines, in August. He was a career missionary to the Philippines with the BGC (now Converge Worldwide), and a U.S. Navy veteran. He was preceded in death by his wife Nancy and a son, Stuart. He’s survived by his children, Daniel (Carla), James (Laurie), Faith (Mansor Chitsazann), Philip (Jennifer), and daughter-in-law Candace; 16 grandchildren; and eight greatgrandchildren.

1958 Nancy and Joel Stolte continue their ministry with Wycliffe Bible Translators in Bogotá, Colombia. They are making a recording of the New Testament in the Waimaha language, and are close to a final edit of a Waimahan New Testament, complete with maps, drawings, and pictures.

1959 Ed Whitford lives in Tecate, Calif. He helped start Tecate Mission, which ministers on both sides of the border. He and missionary Bill Jones aided in construction of and taught in the Seminario Biblico de Baja California, affiliated with La Iglesia Bautista La Hermosa, a church in Tecate, Baja California, Mexico. The seminary has sent more than 450 pastors and mission workers to serve throughout Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and the United States.

1964 Dale Pearson retired from the St. Paul Public schools at the end of the 2000 school year after teaching mathematics for 34 years. In the fall of 2001, he began teaching at Minnehaha Academy and retired from there at the end of the 2007 school year. He lives in Little Canada, Minn., with his wife Corrine.

1965 David Mbithi Mbiti, recipient of the 1997 Bethel Alumni Achievement Award, pas sed away at Karen Hospit al, Nairobi, Kenya, in May. He was a former director of education for Kenya, former deputy vice chancellor (finance and administration) of Daystar University, former assistant director, education program, for the Commonwealth Secretariat in London, and an elder and trustee for Christ is the Answer Ministries. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy, and his children, Josephine Muthoki, Irene Mumo, John Maithya, Juliet Mueni, and Isaac Mulangu, and his grandchild, Nia Mutanu.

1966 Hugh and Martha (Gemmel) Tracy are at a new assignment for Wycliffe in Dallas. Hugh will plan the training for Wycliffe field workers, and Martie will offer secretarial support to the international literacy and education coordinator.

Bethel University

37

1980s photo courtesy of BGC History Center

F

Simultaneously Spiritual Living on campus definitely includes fun and games—and it should, says Jim Benjamin, associate dean for residence life. But at Bethel, it’s much more than that. The strengthening of personal relationships with God and each other is the permanent backdrop to late-night pizza orders, movie-watching, and pingpong competitions. “We want students to take advantage of the learning environment outside the classroom,” explains Benjamin. “We want them to experience growth in their interpersonal skills, social networking, and spiritual life.” Living in residence halls often gives students a safe environment in which to practice living out the very things they’re learning in classes and chapel services. Benjamin’s staff, including 10 resident directors, works hard around the clock to ensure that each Bethel student feels welcome and comfortable. “We want to actively engage with our residents in authentic ways,” says Jenn Hillier, resident director for Bodien, a first-year student residence hall. “We want to create a place where students can be real, a place where each resident can give and receive love as we encounter the joys and challenges of life together.” To do that in Bodien, she says they work hard and play hard. Down from freshman hill, upper-class students in Heritage Hall this year are thinking about limits. “The prophet Habakkuk writes of his doubts and frustrations. He doesn’t believe God will show up in his circumstances,” explains Steph Williams, Heritage’s Resident Director. “So, what do we limit? Ourselves, others, the present, the future, our God?” The hall’s theme verse for this academic year is God’s response to Habakkuk (1:5): “Look at the nations and watch—and be utterly amazed. For I am going to do something in your days that you would not believe, even if you were told.” “We’re asking how much different life could be if we rejected the limit of expectations and chose expectancy,” says Williams. “We believe that an infinite God can do more than we can ask or imagine!” Learn more about Bethel’s other residence halls at cas.bethel. edu/student-development/reslife.

36

Fall 2009

T

he guys taped a dead fish under our dorm sink in Edgren. Unfortunately, the quietest (and most easily scared) girl found it! At 5 a.m., the tape wouldn’t stick anymore, and the fish landed at her feet. She then proceeded to scream until we were all up!

Colleen Nelson ’01, S’06

or my senior year, I lived in a Heritage apartment with six girls, but we considered the six girls who lived across the hall from us our honorary roommates— spending as much time in their room as we did in ours. One evening we ended up in my room for a while, watching “The Office.” Now, because Bethel is a safe place (and we were right across the hall), we’d left the front door unlocked. During a commercial break, my friend Amy wandered across the hall. Thirty seconds later, she reappeared in our doorway and calmly stated, “The door to the toilet room is missing.” Silence. “What?” Eliza asked. “The door to the toilet room is missing,” Amy repeated. We looked at each other, disbelieving, before the eight of us jumped up screaming. We sprinted across the hall and someone had indeed taken the door off by its hinges, leaving an open stall. We immediately knew our culprit. Mike Frederickson, aka, “Freddy.” He’d pulled such a prank when we were freshmen. Plus, we knew he had the right tools.

Nicole Westlund ’09

Alum News Bethel Magazine incorporates Alum News from all schools of Bethel University. (SEM) indicates news from Bethel Seminary alumni and (CAPS/GS) indicates news from College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School alumni. No indication is news from College of Arts & Sciences alumni.

1931 Myrel Harriet Anderson, 98, of Braham, Minn., passed away in August. She was preceded in death by her husband Frank Lowell Anderson, and is survived by her sons Gerald, Dennis (Mary), and Richard (Pam); her daughter Pat (Ed) Anthony; 14 grandchildren; 28 great-grandchildren; and five great-great-grandchildren.

1942 Merriam Leslie Olson died in July in Texas at the age of 89.

1944 Chaplain (Ret. Col.) Willis Warren Wessman (SEM), Topeka, passed away at the age of 88 in July. He served in the U.S. Navy (1944-1946) and later as an Army chaplain from 1951 until his retirement in 1979. He served during the World War II, Korean, and Vietnam War eras. His wife, Dolores (Poole), preceded him in death in 2003. He is survived by his son, Kim; daughter, Kathleen (Norman) Bacon; a granddaughter, and two grandsons.

1948 Valeda Samuelson has a new mission: Central Clearinghouse in Israel. She

Ron Asmus

2009

also continues her other ministries in the Philippines and Israel.

1946 LeRoy Gardner founded North Central Baptist Church in St. Paul and served as pastor for 39 years. In 1997 he moved to Carmichael, Calif., and founded a new church. A speaker and author, he and his wife Kay now live in Southern California.

1949 Walton Johnson (SEM) lives in Superior, Wis. He served seven churches in 35 years, and for two years in Chicago at the denominational headquarters. Since his 1983 retirement, he has served as an interim pastor in 12 churches and is still active in ministry. His first wife, Eunice, passed away in 2003. They had four children, Vern ’76, Dale ’78, Paul ’80, and Lois. He married Marit Johnson in 2005.

1953 In August 2009, Marian (Peterson) Johnson passed away in Sioux Falls, S.D., at the age of 78. She lived in Slayton, Minn., and is survived by her four sons, Gary (Sue), Dean, Gene (Karla), and David (Lisa); 14

Former director of CAPS/GS student services Ron Asmus passed away in August after a 15-month battle with leukemia. He was 66 years old. Asmus worked for Bethel from 19912009, first as an admissions counselor for what is now the College of Adult & Professional Studies and Graduate School. He eventually became director of admissions for that area and was instrumental in the significant growth spurt in adult programs during the 1990s. A short time later he was asked to become the first director of student services for CAPS/GS. Asmus is survived by his wife of 46 years, Sharon Johnson Asmus; daughters Jennifer and Rebecca, and son-in-law Ben Hasselblad; grandchildren Christina and Austin Asmus, and Natalie, Kari, and Annika Hasselblad; and other family and friends.

“Measure our performance by what God accomplishes through our graduates after they have been prepared at Bethel to go out into the world to serve.” —John Alexis Edgren, Founder grandchildren; and 13 great-grandchildren.

1954 George William Chalmers (SEM) died at age 85 in Manila, Philippines, in August. He was a career missionary to the Philippines with the BGC (now Converge Worldwide), and a U.S. Navy veteran. He was preceded in death by his wife Nancy and a son, Stuart. He’s survived by his children, Daniel (Carla), James (Laurie), Faith (Mansor Chitsazann), Philip (Jennifer), and daughter-in-law Candace; 16 grandchildren; and eight greatgrandchildren.

1958 Nancy and Joel Stolte continue their ministry with Wycliffe Bible Translators in Bogotá, Colombia. They are making a recording of the New Testament in the Waimaha language, and are close to a final edit of a Waimahan New Testament, complete with maps, drawings, and pictures.

1959 Ed Whitford lives in Tecate, Calif. He helped start Tecate Mission, which ministers on both sides of the border. He and missionary Bill Jones aided in construction of and taught in the Seminario Biblico de Baja California, affiliated with La Iglesia Bautista La Hermosa, a church in Tecate, Baja California, Mexico. The seminary has sent more than 450 pastors and mission workers to serve throughout Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and the United States.

1964 Dale Pearson retired from the St. Paul Public schools at the end of the 2000 school year after teaching mathematics for 34 years. In the fall of 2001, he began teaching at Minnehaha Academy and retired from there at the end of the 2007 school year. He lives in Little Canada, Minn., with his wife Corrine.

1965 David Mbithi Mbiti, recipient of the 1997 Bethel Alumni Achievement Award, pas sed away at Karen Hospit al, Nairobi, Kenya, in May. He was a former director of education for Kenya, former deputy vice chancellor (finance and administration) of Daystar University, former assistant director, education program, for the Commonwealth Secretariat in London, and an elder and trustee for Christ is the Answer Ministries. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy, and his children, Josephine Muthoki, Irene Mumo, John Maithya, Juliet Mueni, and Isaac Mulangu, and his grandchild, Nia Mutanu.

1966 Hugh and Martha (Gemmel) Tracy are at a new assignment for Wycliffe in Dallas. Hugh will plan the training for Wycliffe field workers, and Martie will offer secretarial support to the international literacy and education coordinator.

Bethel University

37

Alum News 1967 Lester Fair (SEM) died at age 83 in Hastings, Minn. He was the founder of Haven Homes Health Care Center and the pastor of Calvary Baptist Church, both of Hastings. He is survived by wife Marie; children Darlene (Harley) Stauffer, Jerry (Kris), Daneeta Erickson, and Dan (Andrea); eight grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren.

1969 In June, the Isanti-Chisago County Star featured Dan Johnson. He became a single father in 1988 to three daughters, then five, seven, and nine, when his wife died from cancer. Now grown, his girls praised him in the article for his fatherly devotion. They are: Jenny Ober ’03, Angie Kuch ’02, and Krista Hoekstra ’01.

1972 Fred Sweet (SEM M.Div. ’72, Th.M. ’73) served as pastor in four states (1973-1999). He is now director of the library at Cornerstone University in Grand Rapids, Mich., where he lives with his wife Marsha.

1974 Nancy (Meyer) Healy retired after a 35-year career in education, most recently as an administrator at Community of Peace Academy, a charter school in St. Paul, Minn. Her husband, Dave Healy ’75, is editor of the Park Bugle, a newspaper serving two St. Paul neighborhoods, as well as Falcon Heights and Lauderdale, Minn.

1975 Marian and Paul Keidel (SEM) are serving in France with the Christian & Missionary Alliance (C&MA). Paul lived a second winter in Russia doing training events for Russian pastors. He’s now involved in setting C&MA strategy for France for the next five years. Terry Olson and his family have embarked on a 22,000-mile trip around the United States in June. Follow their journey: olsonamerica.com.

1976 Cindy (Olseen) Johnson passed away

38

Fall 2009

in June after an eight-month battle with lung cancer. She is survived by her husband Bob; children Jenny, Ted, and Willy; parents Axel and Shirley Olseen; and her siblings Rick (Bambi) Olseen and Barbara Olseen. Larry Salsburey (SEM) earned a D.Min. from Asbury Seminary in Wilmore, Ky., in May. He co-pastors Grace Community Missionary Church and lives in Bad Axe, Mich., with his wife Annette.

1978 Kirsten Malcolm Berry presented her artwork at the Basilica of St. Mary, along with seven other women ar tists. Four are Jewish and f o ur Chr is tian; all work in sacred themes. The show, titled Interpretations of Faith: Women Artists in the Jewish and Christian Traditions, was May 2-June 28. See her work: kirstenmalcolmberry.com. Cheryl Ann Flaherty died of breast cancer at the age of 53 in July. She is survived by her husband Tim; children, Shannon (Jon) Walsh, Sean, Tim (Leah), Brendan, Kelsey, and Kevin; and other family and friends.

1980 Karen (Erickson) DeSchaaf, 51, died of cardiac arrest in March. She is survived by her husband Andrew and their two children, Robert (Stephanie) and Bridget. She is also survived by her mother, Joyce, and five siblings, all of whom attended Bethel. Her father, Willard (deceased in 1991), served on the Bethel board of regents. Kathleen Sears Rochelle is the librarian at a private Christian school and teaches classes to students from pre-K through fifth grade. She and her husband are deacons in their local Baptist church. They live in Hamilton, Va.

1982 Reading the last issue of Focus prompted Michael Quesnell to think about his roommates at Bethel, all of whom ended up in professions that

focus on kingdom work. Dave Finley ’82 spent years in relief work around the world, mainly with World Vision and the Peace Corps. Paul Lindberg ’81 has been working for decades in Europe through various ministries, most recently Agape Europe. Frank Sanza ’82 has been leading a music ministry for years in California and Texas. Quesnell oversees social investments for Nokia.

1986 Steven Norming ton died suddenly in April in Arizona. He’s survived by six brothers, three sisters, and many nieces and nephews.

1987 Mike Bell was elected vice chairman of the Wyoming Democratic Party. He lives in Cheyenne with his wife Amy and their son Jonathan, 2. After 14 years as head hockey coach at Osseo Senior High School, Garret Strot has been named head coach of the North Iowa Outlaws, a North American Hockey League team in Mason City, Iowa. After 22 years, the Division III hockey record he set at Bethel for the most consecutive games played (109) was broken in

Red Cross Heroes award in April by the Twin Cities Area Chapter of the American Red Cross at the annual Red Cross Heroes Breakfast. Steve and Sandy are active members of Eagle Brook Church.

February by a senior at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wis.

1989 Ana Paulina was born in November to Nydia DeAlba-Johnson and Paul R. Johnson, who live in Mexico City and are directing Latin America Mission’s short-term program, Spearhead. Ana joins Andres, 5.

1990 Doug Beetner married Keri Osborne in her hometown of Sioux City in June 2008. Their son Nathaniel Allen was born in April. They celebrated their first anniversary and first Father’s day on the same day.

1991 Talia Shay and Ty James were born in June to Robert and Relina (Strot) Malone. They were welcomed by their siblings Teagan, 11, Kensie, 7, and James, 4. The Malones live in Minneapolis.

1992 Macy Lee was born in February to Peter and Christy (Brooks) Buxman. She joins Dane, 4. They live in St. Paul.

Upcoming Alumni events The Dead Sea Scrolls exhibition hits Minneapolis/St. Paul March 12, 2010, at the Science Museum of Minnesota! Bethel University offers the following corresponding events:

April 2010

8 Lecture and Q&A by Ron Youngblood, professor emeritus of Old Testament at Bethel Seminary San Diego, and Dan Gurtner, assistant professor of New Testament at Bethel Seminary St. Paul 7-9 p.m. Benson Great Hall, St. Paul campus 10 Lecture by Ron Youngblood and Dan Gurtner 9-10:30 a.m. Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minn. 11 Lecture and Q&A by Ron Youngblood and Dan Gurtner 3-5:30 p.m. Wooddale Church, Eden Prairie, Minn. For more information about these events or to RSVP, call the alumni office at 651.638.6462, or 800.255.8706, ext. 6462, or email alumni@bethel.edu.

1994 Nathan Scott and Matthew Scott were born in April to Scott Gerdes and his wife Becky. They live in Rochester and both work for the Rochester School District, where Scott is the district treasurer and Becky is the principal at Bamber Valley Elementary School. Dan and Gretchen (Merwin) Twogood ’93 and their family traveled to Taiwan to adopt Jack Elliot, born in April. Jack joins siblings Jordan, Grant, Audrey, and Ruth in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Connie Blackwell (CAPS/GS) was featured in an article in The St. Paul Pioneer Press for her involvement in North Metro Pediatrics, a nonprofit pediatric clinic in Coon Rapids, Minn. It is one of the few nurse practitioneroperated pediatric clinics in the Twin Cities area and the only one in Anoka County that has a sliding-scale fee based on federal poverty level and family-income guidelines.

Picture of Recovery

After 35 years, some of the women of Townhouse F5 (1973-1974) got together for a reunion. In the photo: Terri Magnuson Rinke ’77, of Ellsworth, Wis., a veterinarian and mother of three; Marci Wilson Parsons ’77 of Northridge, Calif., a retired homeschooler, Latin teacher, and mother of three; Debra Calain Bestland ’77 of Buffalo, Minn., a retired homeschooler, dance instructor, and mother of four; Judy Helman ’75, of Vail, Colo., a financial executive and executive assistant to a Christian recording artist; Diane Doebler Engelstadt ’77, of Pine City, Minn., a junior high school English teacher; and Sherry Schut Yoder ’78, who teaches English at a Beijing University. Cummings ’94, Patrick (Brian) Cummings ’94, Holly (Smith) Speratos ’95, Jason Speratos ’94, Martha Hultgren, Steve Hultgren ’94. Front row: Jason Coulter ’94, Ann (Nelson) Pearcy ’93, Scott Pearcy ’94, Kris (Reynhout) Kieper ’94, (William) Chad Kieper ’94, Courtney Barker, Nathan Barker ’94.

1993 In May 2008, when a tornado struck Hugo, Minn., Steve and Sandy Anderson CAPS’08 watched as many of their neighbors lost everything. They were lucky enough to be spared, and immediately opened up their home to help their friends in need. Their front yard, driveway, and garage became a refuge and supply center, giving those who were hit by the tornado access to basic necessities and a shoulder to lean on. As a result, they were awarded the

Roommate Reunion

Chad Kieper married Kris Reynhout in September 2008 in Stillwater, Minn. Pastor Trent Anderson ’95 of Eagle Brook Church performed the ceremony. Kris is the daughter of Bethel Biology Professor Emeritus Jim Reynhout and his wife Pat ’95. Chad is the son of Bill and Mae Kieper S’94. Back row: Heather (Heinsch) Flies ’94, Chad Flies, Stacey (Schirm)

After Lynn Hansen C’70, S’02 and his wife were victims of an attempted carjacking in Kenya in 1998, he painted, And Then the Phone Rang. “I visualized a woman who has been up worrying about someone she loves and then she hears the phone ring,” explains Hansen. “I hope it helps with viewers’ fears as much as it has helped with mine.” In May, the painting was selected for the Art of Recovery exhibit, sponsored by the Minnesota Department of Public Safety Office of Justice Programs and the Minnesota State Arts Board. Another of Hansen’s paintings, Shining Pots, hangs in the main hallway at Bethel Seminary St. Paul. In addition to painting, he does photography, street theater, freelance graphic art, and mission work. “Virtually everything I

Rudi Harlan was born in July to Douglas ’95 and Lauralyn (Gorham) Ninow. Rudi joins Anna, 2. They live in St. Louis Park, Minn.

1995 Trevin Peter and Logan Thomas were b orn in March to Jason and Sarah (Stack) Opp. They join Hudson, 5, and Ade-

lyn, 3. Sarah is at home with their children as well as being a Close to My Heart consultant. Jason is a commercial real estate agent and accounting manager. Riley was born in March in Yaoundé, Cameron, to EfiWalters and Mindy (Lamberty) Tembon. She joins Wesley, 1. The Tembons serve in Cameroon with Wycliffe Bible Translators.

1996 Jennifer and John Dahlager (SEM) are serving as missionaries in Costa Rica. In August they took a team to Cuba to lead a Pastors’ Kids retreat. For the next 10 years, they will participate in

have done in my life since college has been connected in one way or another to people I know and things I have learned from, or associated with, Bethel,” he explains. In 1993, at the suggestion of a Bethel friend, he and his wife moved to Nairobi, Kenya, where he taught art at Rosslyn Academy, an international Christian school. His wife JoAnn served as the school’s business manager. They returned in 1998 so Lynn could attend Bethel Seminary St. Paul. He now pastors First Baptist Church of Battle Lake, Minn., and is also the director of the North American Committee for the Development of Good News Theological College & Seminary in Accra, Ghana, West Africa. No matter what he does, Hansen says he will always be committed to faith and art. “Faith is simply knowing something is true like you know anything else you know for sure,” he explains. “So, my work reflects my life of faith, making visible the deep heart of knowing and yearning to know God more intimately.” See his work at lynnkhansen.com. Bethel University

39

Alum News 1967 Lester Fair (SEM) died at age 83 in Hastings, Minn. He was the founder of Haven Homes Health Care Center and the pastor of Calvary Baptist Church, both of Hastings. He is survived by wife Marie; children Darlene (Harley) Stauffer, Jerry (Kris), Daneeta Erickson, and Dan (Andrea); eight grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren.

1969 In June, the Isanti-Chisago County Star featured Dan Johnson. He became a single father in 1988 to three daughters, then five, seven, and nine, when his wife died from cancer. Now grown, his girls praised him in the article for his fatherly devotion. They are: Jenny Ober ’03, Angie Kuch ’02, and Krista Hoekstra ’01.

1972 Fred Sweet (SEM M.Div. ’72, Th.M. ’73) served as pastor in four states (1973-1999). He is now director of the library at Cornerstone University in Grand Rapids, Mich., where he lives with his wife Marsha.

1974 Nancy (Meyer) Healy retired after a 35-year career in education, most recently as an administrator at Community of Peace Academy, a charter school in St. Paul, Minn. Her husband, Dave Healy ’75, is editor of the Park Bugle, a newspaper serving two St. Paul neighborhoods, as well as Falcon Heights and Lauderdale, Minn.

1975 Marian and Paul Keidel (SEM) are serving in France with the Christian & Missionary Alliance (C&MA). Paul lived a second winter in Russia doing training events for Russian pastors. He’s now involved in setting C&MA strategy for France for the next five years. Terry Olson and his family have embarked on a 22,000-mile trip around the United States in June. Follow their journey: olsonamerica.com.

1976 Cindy (Olseen) Johnson passed away

38

Fall 2009

in June after an eight-month battle with lung cancer. She is survived by her husband Bob; children Jenny, Ted, and Willy; parents Axel and Shirley Olseen; and her siblings Rick (Bambi) Olseen and Barbara Olseen. Larry Salsburey (SEM) earned a D.Min. from Asbury Seminary in Wilmore, Ky., in May. He co-pastors Grace Community Missionary Church and lives in Bad Axe, Mich., with his wife Annette.

1978 Kirsten Malcolm Berry presented her artwork at the Basilica of St. Mary, along with seven other women ar tists. Four are Jewish and f o ur Chr is tian; all work in sacred themes. The show, titled Interpretations of Faith: Women Artists in the Jewish and Christian Traditions, was May 2-June 28. See her work: kirstenmalcolmberry.com. Cheryl Ann Flaherty died of breast cancer at the age of 53 in July. She is survived by her husband Tim; children, Shannon (Jon) Walsh, Sean, Tim (Leah), Brendan, Kelsey, and Kevin; and other family and friends.

1980 Karen (Erickson) DeSchaaf, 51, died of cardiac arrest in March. She is survived by her husband Andrew and their two children, Robert (Stephanie) and Bridget. She is also survived by her mother, Joyce, and five siblings, all of whom attended Bethel. Her father, Willard (deceased in 1991), served on the Bethel board of regents. Kathleen Sears Rochelle is the librarian at a private Christian school and teaches classes to students from pre-K through fifth grade. She and her husband are deacons in their local Baptist church. They live in Hamilton, Va.

1982 Reading the last issue of Focus prompted Michael Quesnell to think about his roommates at Bethel, all of whom ended up in professions that

focus on kingdom work. Dave Finley ’82 spent years in relief work around the world, mainly with World Vision and the Peace Corps. Paul Lindberg ’81 has been working for decades in Europe through various ministries, most recently Agape Europe. Frank Sanza ’82 has been leading a music ministry for years in California and Texas. Quesnell oversees social investments for Nokia.

1986 Steven Norming ton died suddenly in April in Arizona. He’s survived by six brothers, three sisters, and many nieces and nephews.

1987 Mike Bell was elected vice chairman of the Wyoming Democratic Party. He lives in Cheyenne with his wife Amy and their son Jonathan, 2. After 14 years as head hockey coach at Osseo Senior High School, Garret Strot has been named head coach of the North Iowa Outlaws, a North American Hockey League team in Mason City, Iowa. After 22 years, the Division III hockey record he set at Bethel for the most consecutive games played (109) was broken in

Red Cross Heroes award in April by the Twin Cities Area Chapter of the American Red Cross at the annual Red Cross Heroes Breakfast. Steve and Sandy are active members of Eagle Brook Church.

February by a senior at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wis.

1989 Ana Paulina was born in November to Nydia DeAlba-Johnson and Paul R. Johnson, who live in Mexico City and are directing Latin America Mission’s short-term program, Spearhead. Ana joins Andres, 5.

1990 Doug Beetner married Keri Osborne in her hometown of Sioux City in June 2008. Their son Nathaniel Allen was born in April. They celebrated their first anniversary and first Father’s day on the same day.

1991 Talia Shay and Ty James were born in June to Robert and Relina (Strot) Malone. They were welcomed by their siblings Teagan, 11, Kensie, 7, and James, 4. The Malones live in Minneapolis.

1992 Macy Lee was born in February to Peter and Christy (Brooks) Buxman. She joins Dane, 4. They live in St. Paul.

Upcoming Alumni events The Dead Sea Scrolls exhibition hits Minneapolis/St. Paul March 12, 2010, at the Science Museum of Minnesota! Bethel University offers the following corresponding events:

April 2010

8 Lecture and Q&A by Ron Youngblood, professor emeritus of Old Testament at Bethel Seminary San Diego, and Dan Gurtner, assistant professor of New Testament at Bethel Seminary St. Paul 7-9 p.m. Benson Great Hall, St. Paul campus 10 Lecture by Ron Youngblood and Dan Gurtner 9-10:30 a.m. Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minn. 11 Lecture and Q&A by Ron Youngblood and Dan Gurtner 3-5:30 p.m. Wooddale Church, Eden Prairie, Minn. For more information about these events or to RSVP, call the alumni office at 651.638.6462, or 800.255.8706, ext. 6462, or email alumni@bethel.edu.

1994 Nathan Scott and Matthew Scott were born in April to Scott Gerdes and his wife Becky. They live in Rochester and both work for the Rochester School District, where Scott is the district treasurer and Becky is the principal at Bamber Valley Elementary School. Dan and Gretchen (Merwin) Twogood ’93 and their family traveled to Taiwan to adopt Jack Elliot, born in April. Jack joins siblings Jordan, Grant, Audrey, and Ruth in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Connie Blackwell (CAPS/GS) was featured in an article in The St. Paul Pioneer Press for her involvement in North Metro Pediatrics, a nonprofit pediatric clinic in Coon Rapids, Minn. It is one of the few nurse practitioneroperated pediatric clinics in the Twin Cities area and the only one in Anoka County that has a sliding-scale fee based on federal poverty level and family-income guidelines.

Picture of Recovery

After 35 years, some of the women of Townhouse F5 (1973-1974) got together for a reunion. In the photo: Terri Magnuson Rinke ’77, of Ellsworth, Wis., a veterinarian and mother of three; Marci Wilson Parsons ’77 of Northridge, Calif., a retired homeschooler, Latin teacher, and mother of three; Debra Calain Bestland ’77 of Buffalo, Minn., a retired homeschooler, dance instructor, and mother of four; Judy Helman ’75, of Vail, Colo., a financial executive and executive assistant to a Christian recording artist; Diane Doebler Engelstadt ’77, of Pine City, Minn., a junior high school English teacher; and Sherry Schut Yoder ’78, who teaches English at a Beijing University. Cummings ’94, Patrick (Brian) Cummings ’94, Holly (Smith) Speratos ’95, Jason Speratos ’94, Martha Hultgren, Steve Hultgren ’94. Front row: Jason Coulter ’94, Ann (Nelson) Pearcy ’93, Scott Pearcy ’94, Kris (Reynhout) Kieper ’94, (William) Chad Kieper ’94, Courtney Barker, Nathan Barker ’94.

1993 In May 2008, when a tornado struck Hugo, Minn., Steve and Sandy Anderson CAPS’08 watched as many of their neighbors lost everything. They were lucky enough to be spared, and immediately opened up their home to help their friends in need. Their front yard, driveway, and garage became a refuge and supply center, giving those who were hit by the tornado access to basic necessities and a shoulder to lean on. As a result, they were awarded the

Roommate Reunion

Chad Kieper married Kris Reynhout in September 2008 in Stillwater, Minn. Pastor Trent Anderson ’95 of Eagle Brook Church performed the ceremony. Kris is the daughter of Bethel Biology Professor Emeritus Jim Reynhout and his wife Pat ’95. Chad is the son of Bill and Mae Kieper S’94. Back row: Heather (Heinsch) Flies ’94, Chad Flies, Stacey (Schirm)

After Lynn Hansen C’70, S’02 and his wife were victims of an attempted carjacking in Kenya in 1998, he painted, And Then the Phone Rang. “I visualized a woman who has been up worrying about someone she loves and then she hears the phone ring,” explains Hansen. “I hope it helps with viewers’ fears as much as it has helped with mine.” In May, the painting was selected for the Art of Recovery exhibit, sponsored by the Minnesota Department of Public Safety Office of Justice Programs and the Minnesota State Arts Board. Another of Hansen’s paintings, Shining Pots, hangs in the main hallway at Bethel Seminary St. Paul. In addition to painting, he does photography, street theater, freelance graphic art, and mission work. “Virtually everything I

Rudi Harlan was born in July to Douglas ’95 and Lauralyn (Gorham) Ninow. Rudi joins Anna, 2. They live in St. Louis Park, Minn.

1995 Trevin Peter and Logan Thomas were b orn in March to Jason and Sarah (Stack) Opp. They join Hudson, 5, and Ade-

lyn, 3. Sarah is at home with their children as well as being a Close to My Heart consultant. Jason is a commercial real estate agent and accounting manager. Riley was born in March in Yaoundé, Cameron, to EfiWalters and Mindy (Lamberty) Tembon. She joins Wesley, 1. The Tembons serve in Cameroon with Wycliffe Bible Translators.

1996 Jennifer and John Dahlager (SEM) are serving as missionaries in Costa Rica. In August they took a team to Cuba to lead a Pastors’ Kids retreat. For the next 10 years, they will participate in

have done in my life since college has been connected in one way or another to people I know and things I have learned from, or associated with, Bethel,” he explains. In 1993, at the suggestion of a Bethel friend, he and his wife moved to Nairobi, Kenya, where he taught art at Rosslyn Academy, an international Christian school. His wife JoAnn served as the school’s business manager. They returned in 1998 so Lynn could attend Bethel Seminary St. Paul. He now pastors First Baptist Church of Battle Lake, Minn., and is also the director of the North American Committee for the Development of Good News Theological College & Seminary in Accra, Ghana, West Africa. No matter what he does, Hansen says he will always be committed to faith and art. “Faith is simply knowing something is true like you know anything else you know for sure,” he explains. “So, my work reflects my life of faith, making visible the deep heart of knowing and yearning to know God more intimately.” See his work at lynnkhansen.com. Bethel University

39

Alum News a major children’s ministry initiative called Un Million de Niños (One Million Children). Greyson Alexander Vogelaar was born in June to Jody Vogelaar and Janeen Evenson-Vogelaar ’97. They live in Toluca Lake, Calif.

1997 Naomi Sue was born in April to Jason ’06 and Kris (Kraakevik) Hedstrand. She joins Henry, 4, Josh, 2, and Erik, 1.

1998 Christine Ferguson (SEM) is a nursing home chaplain in Marlborough, Conn.

1999 Bob Christian (SEM) is a volunteer sheriff’s chaplain for Spokane County in Washington in addition to his pastoral responsibilities at Heritage Church in Spokane, Wash. He joins eight other volunteer chaplains. Alexander Steven was born in March to Chad and Stephanie (Malone) Gerads. He joins Allison, 6, Skylar, 4, Andrew, 3, and Savannah, 1. Stephanie home schools the children and teaches parenting education and infant massage part time. John Groh was named the president and CEO of the Rockford Area Convention & Visitors Bureau after a sixmonth search and 65 candidates. He also serves on the Bethel University National Alumni Board. Beth Eiserloh Johnson is the media and publications manager of the North Carolina Symphony. She and her husband Wyeth live in Raleigh, N.C.

John A. Kantke joined the law firm of Larry K. Houk ’66 in Roseville, Minn. The firm specializes in estate planning and elder law. Holly Larsen married Benjamin Hilty in July 2008. They live in St. Paul. Noelle Evelyn was born in March to Jeremy and Melissa (Hunst) Noble. She joins Joey, 2. Melissa teaches English at Jackson Middle School in the Anoka-Hennepin district. Jeremy is a senior project engineer at Buhler, Inc. They live in Medina, Minn.

2000 Bethel sports information director Dale E n g mar r i e d Courtney Hoehl ’07 in July at Roseville Covenant Church. Parents are Jack ’72 and Debbie (Hutchings) Hoehl ’72 and Cliff and Bonnie Eng. Bethel alumni involved in the wedding included: Jenny Oesterman ’07, Heather Hoehl ’00, Nikki (Murphy) Smith ’07, Mary Helen Schmidt ’08, Derick Lyngholm ’99, Ryan Carlson ’99, Eric Runyan ’99, Luke Smith ’99, Joshua Agrimson ’01, Joe Eckerle ’00, Andy Manthei ’01, and Blaine Soderholm ’99. Officiating pastor was Bethel Provost David Clark. Chloe Faith was born in June to Steve and Angela (Molitor) Landry. She joins Caleb, 5, and Grace, 3. Angie teaches fifth grade at Rum River Elementary in Andover, Minn. Molly Kaylin was born in March to Lance and Anna (Klett) Unger. They live in St. Paul. Matthew Sorensen completed his orthopedic fellowship in foot and ankle surgery at Ohio State University and joined Summit Orthopedics in Woodbury, Minn. He’s published numerous articles in academic journals and has been a contributing author for Web MD and E-medicine.

While Bethel strives for accuracy in all it does, we cannot be responsible for the content of news items submitted by alumni. The inclusion of news items here should not be construed as an endorsement of their content by Bethel Magazine or Bethel University.

40

Fall 2009

2001 Linda and David Frisbie (SEM) were honored with a distinguished service award for ministry to marriages and families at the Global General Assembly of the Nazarene denomination in July. They’ve traveled to all 50 states; nine provinces and two territories of Canada; and 42 nations. They are the authors of 10 books and many articles. In March they were hired by the Nazarene denomination as coordinators of marriage and family life ministries. Adelyn Taylor was born to Tom and Rebeca Houle in January. Tracy L. King, formerly Tracy Sybesma (CAPS/GS), earned second place and an honorable mention in the 2009 BrainStorm poetry contest sponsored by Open Minds Quarterly. Charlianna Marie and S o p h i a Grace were born in March to St eve an d Stacy (Harrison) Simpson. Steve pastors an Evangelical Free church, and Stacy is a special education teacher. They live in Iowa.

2002 Thaddeus Bryan Scott Bray was born to Jasmine Lund in January. Owen Daniel was born in September to Aaron and Karolyn (Wood) Perkins. Aaron is a general contractor and owner of Wonderful Roofing and Siding, and Karolyn is a stay-at-home mom. They live in Blaine, Minn. Ezra Keith was born in March to Lee and Michelle (Dahlsten) Peterson. He was also welcomed by Caleb Axel, 2. They reside in Chaska, Minn. John Charles was born in May to Liz and Bjorn Peterson. They live in Maplewood, Minn., and Bjorn will begin emergency medicine residency training at Regions Hospital. Emelia Wolfgram married Brad Rogers ’01 in 2003. Their daughter Aliyah was born in March. Emelia is

a LICSW hospital social worker at Gillette Children’s Hospital in St. Paul.

2003 Samuel Lacy followed his time at Bethel with four years at Princeton Theological Seminary. He and his wife Jamie are now in Mainz, Germany, where he has a fellowship in the Fulbright Program. Chloe Rose was born to Scot and Jana (Hamann) Wick in April.

2004 Ellie Autumn was born in October 2008 to Jenni (Mielke) and Ben Brandt. They live in Cokato, Minn., where Ben is a music director at Elim Mission Church.

Lydia Grace was born in April to Adam and Christina (Dunlap) Severson. She joins Ayana Eileen, 3. They live in Northfield, Minn. Kristin Stoneberg is an assistant athletic trainer at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul. Ian David Meak was born in February to Tony and Lauren Hirsbrunner Sok. They live in Frisco, Texas. L auren is a stay-at-home mom while Tony works as a hazmat technician at Texas Instruments. Andrew Vitek is a teacher at Abraham Lincoln High School in Denver. He lives in Lakewood, Col.

2005 Adam Arnold is adolescent therapist and artistic director of the blank slate theatre in St. Paul (blankslatetheatre. com).

Kyle Richard and Jacob Steve were born in June to Jason and Brittany (Graves) Dalum. Coleman James was born in October to Ryan and Andrea Davis. They live in Des Moines, where Ryan is attending medical school at Des Moines University. Arleigh (Heeren) Hagberg is a videographer/producer and lives in St. Anthony, Minn., with her husband, Jeff. Melissa Johnson received her master’s degree in social work from St. Catherine University/University of St. Thomas in May. She works for St. David’s Center, Child and Family Development, in the Family Place program and lives in St. Louis Park, Minn. Greg Schutte married Shannon Tri in July. Greg is an electrical engineer with Great River Energy. They live in Blaine, Minn.

Rebekah Ruth was born in July to Emili and Nathan Hibbs. They live in Long Prairie, Minn. Anna Michalko married Evan Miller ’06 in April. Michael Teeter graduated magna cum laude from the University of St. Thomas School of Law in Minneapolis.

2006 Hannah and J o nat han Kuriscak were featured in Minn e s ot a B rid e (Fall/Winter issue). They were married in September 2008. Melinda Hallstrom and Eric Berg ’05 were married at Calvary Church in Roseville, Minn., in November 2008. Bethel participants included: Jaclyn Hallstrom ’08, Alissa Hallstrom ’05, Travis Wermedal ’06, EvieLyn Larson ’06, Amy Wanggaard ’06, Dave Sauer ’06, David Franke ’06, and Doug Kvamme ’05. The Bergs reside in Davenport, Iowa, where Melinda is a third-year medical student and Eric is a middle/high school teacher.

The Art of Science

Pair a theatre minor from Bethel with a doctorate in physics and what do you get? T. James Belich ’97. The versatile actor and playwright combined his two passions—acting and physics—at the Minnesota Fringe Festival in July and August where he presented 10 performances of his original play, Schrödinger’s Cat Must Die!, to rave reviews. Part physics lecture and part storytelling, the one-man play tells the story of Dr. Volt, a crazed scientist obsessed with a plan to control the world. But his intentions are thwarted by his ill-fated assistant, who hinders his work at every turn. Worst of all, this assistant hounds his cat and soon plots to destroy it. The title of Belich’s play is a tongue-in-cheek reference to the Schrödinger’s Cat thought experiment, devised by Erwin Schrödinger of Austria in 1935. The physicist was attempting to explain quantum theory by the use of this experiment, which stated that a cat placed inside a box containing radiation could be both dead and alive at the same time…until the box is opened, and the world learned the cat’s final fate. Think philosophy meets science. As a physics major and theatre minor at Bethel, Belich participated in several theater productions and as an alumnus he returned to act in Measure for Measure, where he met his wife, Kelly (Brookman) ’02. He continues to act and work backstage in numerous productions around the Twin Cities. When not acting, Belich also works as a playwright, having penned nearly 20 works in various genres that have been performed around the world. Writers such as C.S. Lewis, Madeleine L’Engle, and Anton Chekhov have influenced him. As for his latest work, Belich says, “I shared my dual passions of art and science in a way that people really clicked with, which was extremely gratifying.” Both James and Kelly work for the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and live in St. Paul.

2007 Owen Bolt married Karis Krussow ’09 in July. They live in Eagan, Minn. Jessica Fletcher is a comedian based in New York City. Check out her stuff on YouTube. Jonathon Svendsen wrote “Narnia and Middle-Earth: The Stories That Meant Something,” a reflective essay on the fantasy worlds of C.S. Lewis and J.R.R Tolkien featured in Silver Leaves, the journal for the White Tree Foundation (an international Tolkien society). He is a staff writer and editor for the website NarniaFans.com where he writes “Tumnus’s Book Shelf: The

A Classic Time

NarniaFans Book Reviews.” He’s also had a number of poems featured in the Minas-Tirith Evening Star, the journal for the American Tolkien Society.

contemplating grad school in 2010 to pursue a master’s degree in social work. She and her husband Brad live in Brooklyn Park, Minn.

2008

Michelle Lydia (Richer) Osborne is a social worker at Children’s Inn in Sioux Falls, S.D.

Meghan Donner taught third grade and worked in the library at the American Christian Academy in Nigeria for the school year. In July The Clara City Herald included a photo of her with Nigerian soccer players whom she hosted when they came to the United States to play soccer at the Blaine Sports Center. Naomi (Otterness) Pitlick is a supervisor at PetSmart Hotel and is

Nearly 120 golfers, many Bethel alumni, played in Bethel’s annual Golf Classic on June 23, this year held at StoneRidge Golf Club in Stillwater, Minn. The winning foursome Dan Conrad ’90, Paul Schurbring ’92, Jeff Smith ’92, and Mark Perunovich ’90, came in 16 under par. Longtime Bethel friends and roommates, the four had not connected in more than 19 years—since college graduation. Save the Date: 2010’s Golf Classic is Tuesday, June 22.

Lindsay Sterchi (SEM) is the 18 to 20-something ministry director for New Hope Church in Effingham, Ill.

2009 Lisa Alf married Trevor Stoneberg in July. They live in Coon Rapids, Minn. Joshua Owen was born to Tammy S. Schexnaider (CAPS/GS) and her husband Michael Dreher in August. Mike is professor and chair of the communication studies department and director of forensics at Bethel University.

Read stories of alumni Joel Carlson ’93 and Sarah (Carlson) Wauterlek ’00

Bethel University

41

Alum News a major children’s ministry initiative called Un Million de Niños (One Million Children). Greyson Alexander Vogelaar was born in June to Jody Vogelaar and Janeen Evenson-Vogelaar ’97. They live in Toluca Lake, Calif.

1997 Naomi Sue was born in April to Jason ’06 and Kris (Kraakevik) Hedstrand. She joins Henry, 4, Josh, 2, and Erik, 1.

1998 Christine Ferguson (SEM) is a nursing home chaplain in Marlborough, Conn.

1999 Bob Christian (SEM) is a volunteer sheriff’s chaplain for Spokane County in Washington in addition to his pastoral responsibilities at Heritage Church in Spokane, Wash. He joins eight other volunteer chaplains. Alexander Steven was born in March to Chad and Stephanie (Malone) Gerads. He joins Allison, 6, Skylar, 4, Andrew, 3, and Savannah, 1. Stephanie home schools the children and teaches parenting education and infant massage part time. John Groh was named the president and CEO of the Rockford Area Convention & Visitors Bureau after a sixmonth search and 65 candidates. He also serves on the Bethel University National Alumni Board. Beth Eiserloh Johnson is the media and publications manager of the North Carolina Symphony. She and her husband Wyeth live in Raleigh, N.C.

John A. Kantke joined the law firm of Larry K. Houk ’66 in Roseville, Minn. The firm specializes in estate planning and elder law. Holly Larsen married Benjamin Hilty in July 2008. They live in St. Paul. Noelle Evelyn was born in March to Jeremy and Melissa (Hunst) Noble. She joins Joey, 2. Melissa teaches English at Jackson Middle School in the Anoka-Hennepin district. Jeremy is a senior project engineer at Buhler, Inc. They live in Medina, Minn.

2000 Bethel sports information director Dale E n g mar r i e d Courtney Hoehl ’07 in July at Roseville Covenant Church. Parents are Jack ’72 and Debbie (Hutchings) Hoehl ’72 and Cliff and Bonnie Eng. Bethel alumni involved in the wedding included: Jenny Oesterman ’07, Heather Hoehl ’00, Nikki (Murphy) Smith ’07, Mary Helen Schmidt ’08, Derick Lyngholm ’99, Ryan Carlson ’99, Eric Runyan ’99, Luke Smith ’99, Joshua Agrimson ’01, Joe Eckerle ’00, Andy Manthei ’01, and Blaine Soderholm ’99. Officiating pastor was Bethel Provost David Clark. Chloe Faith was born in June to Steve and Angela (Molitor) Landry. She joins Caleb, 5, and Grace, 3. Angie teaches fifth grade at Rum River Elementary in Andover, Minn. Molly Kaylin was born in March to Lance and Anna (Klett) Unger. They live in St. Paul. Matthew Sorensen completed his orthopedic fellowship in foot and ankle surgery at Ohio State University and joined Summit Orthopedics in Woodbury, Minn. He’s published numerous articles in academic journals and has been a contributing author for Web MD and E-medicine.

While Bethel strives for accuracy in all it does, we cannot be responsible for the content of news items submitted by alumni. The inclusion of news items here should not be construed as an endorsement of their content by Bethel Magazine or Bethel University.

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Fall 2009

2001 Linda and David Frisbie (SEM) were honored with a distinguished service award for ministry to marriages and families at the Global General Assembly of the Nazarene denomination in July. They’ve traveled to all 50 states; nine provinces and two territories of Canada; and 42 nations. They are the authors of 10 books and many articles. In March they were hired by the Nazarene denomination as coordinators of marriage and family life ministries. Adelyn Taylor was born to Tom and Rebeca Houle in January. Tracy L. King, formerly Tracy Sybesma (CAPS/GS), earned second place and an honorable mention in the 2009 BrainStorm poetry contest sponsored by Open Minds Quarterly. Charlianna Marie and S o p h i a Grace were born in March to St eve an d Stacy (Harrison) Simpson. Steve pastors an Evangelical Free church, and Stacy is a special education teacher. They live in Iowa.

2002 Thaddeus Bryan Scott Bray was born to Jasmine Lund in January. Owen Daniel was born in September to Aaron and Karolyn (Wood) Perkins. Aaron is a general contractor and owner of Wonderful Roofing and Siding, and Karolyn is a stay-at-home mom. They live in Blaine, Minn. Ezra Keith was born in March to Lee and Michelle (Dahlsten) Peterson. He was also welcomed by Caleb Axel, 2. They reside in Chaska, Minn. John Charles was born in May to Liz and Bjorn Peterson. They live in Maplewood, Minn., and Bjorn will begin emergency medicine residency training at Regions Hospital. Emelia Wolfgram married Brad Rogers ’01 in 2003. Their daughter Aliyah was born in March. Emelia is

a LICSW hospital social worker at Gillette Children’s Hospital in St. Paul.

2003 Samuel Lacy followed his time at Bethel with four years at Princeton Theological Seminary. He and his wife Jamie are now in Mainz, Germany, where he has a fellowship in the Fulbright Program. Chloe Rose was born to Scot and Jana (Hamann) Wick in April.

2004 Ellie Autumn was born in October 2008 to Jenni (Mielke) and Ben Brandt. They live in Cokato, Minn., where Ben is a music director at Elim Mission Church.

Lydia Grace was born in April to Adam and Christina (Dunlap) Severson. She joins Ayana Eileen, 3. They live in Northfield, Minn. Kristin Stoneberg is an assistant athletic trainer at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul. Ian David Meak was born in February to Tony and Lauren Hirsbrunner Sok. They live in Frisco, Texas. L auren is a stay-at-home mom while Tony works as a hazmat technician at Texas Instruments. Andrew Vitek is a teacher at Abraham Lincoln High School in Denver. He lives in Lakewood, Col.

2005 Adam Arnold is adolescent therapist and artistic director of the blank slate theatre in St. Paul (blankslatetheatre. com).

Kyle Richard and Jacob Steve were born in June to Jason and Brittany (Graves) Dalum. Coleman James was born in October to Ryan and Andrea Davis. They live in Des Moines, where Ryan is attending medical school at Des Moines University. Arleigh (Heeren) Hagberg is a videographer/producer and lives in St. Anthony, Minn., with her husband, Jeff. Melissa Johnson received her master’s degree in social work from St. Catherine University/University of St. Thomas in May. She works for St. David’s Center, Child and Family Development, in the Family Place program and lives in St. Louis Park, Minn. Greg Schutte married Shannon Tri in July. Greg is an electrical engineer with Great River Energy. They live in Blaine, Minn.

Rebekah Ruth was born in July to Emili and Nathan Hibbs. They live in Long Prairie, Minn. Anna Michalko married Evan Miller ’06 in April. Michael Teeter graduated magna cum laude from the University of St. Thomas School of Law in Minneapolis.

2006 Hannah and J o nat han Kuriscak were featured in Minn e s ot a B rid e (Fall/Winter issue). They were married in September 2008. Melinda Hallstrom and Eric Berg ’05 were married at Calvary Church in Roseville, Minn., in November 2008. Bethel participants included: Jaclyn Hallstrom ’08, Alissa Hallstrom ’05, Travis Wermedal ’06, EvieLyn Larson ’06, Amy Wanggaard ’06, Dave Sauer ’06, David Franke ’06, and Doug Kvamme ’05. The Bergs reside in Davenport, Iowa, where Melinda is a third-year medical student and Eric is a middle/high school teacher.

The Art of Science

Pair a theatre minor from Bethel with a doctorate in physics and what do you get? T. James Belich ’97. The versatile actor and playwright combined his two passions—acting and physics—at the Minnesota Fringe Festival in July and August where he presented 10 performances of his original play, Schrödinger’s Cat Must Die!, to rave reviews. Part physics lecture and part storytelling, the one-man play tells the story of Dr. Volt, a crazed scientist obsessed with a plan to control the world. But his intentions are thwarted by his ill-fated assistant, who hinders his work at every turn. Worst of all, this assistant hounds his cat and soon plots to destroy it. The title of Belich’s play is a tongue-in-cheek reference to the Schrödinger’s Cat thought experiment, devised by Erwin Schrödinger of Austria in 1935. The physicist was attempting to explain quantum theory by the use of this experiment, which stated that a cat placed inside a box containing radiation could be both dead and alive at the same time…until the box is opened, and the world learned the cat’s final fate. Think philosophy meets science. As a physics major and theatre minor at Bethel, Belich participated in several theater productions and as an alumnus he returned to act in Measure for Measure, where he met his wife, Kelly (Brookman) ’02. He continues to act and work backstage in numerous productions around the Twin Cities. When not acting, Belich also works as a playwright, having penned nearly 20 works in various genres that have been performed around the world. Writers such as C.S. Lewis, Madeleine L’Engle, and Anton Chekhov have influenced him. As for his latest work, Belich says, “I shared my dual passions of art and science in a way that people really clicked with, which was extremely gratifying.” Both James and Kelly work for the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and live in St. Paul.

2007 Owen Bolt married Karis Krussow ’09 in July. They live in Eagan, Minn. Jessica Fletcher is a comedian based in New York City. Check out her stuff on YouTube. Jonathon Svendsen wrote “Narnia and Middle-Earth: The Stories That Meant Something,” a reflective essay on the fantasy worlds of C.S. Lewis and J.R.R Tolkien featured in Silver Leaves, the journal for the White Tree Foundation (an international Tolkien society). He is a staff writer and editor for the website NarniaFans.com where he writes “Tumnus’s Book Shelf: The

A Classic Time

NarniaFans Book Reviews.” He’s also had a number of poems featured in the Minas-Tirith Evening Star, the journal for the American Tolkien Society.

contemplating grad school in 2010 to pursue a master’s degree in social work. She and her husband Brad live in Brooklyn Park, Minn.

2008

Michelle Lydia (Richer) Osborne is a social worker at Children’s Inn in Sioux Falls, S.D.

Meghan Donner taught third grade and worked in the library at the American Christian Academy in Nigeria for the school year. In July The Clara City Herald included a photo of her with Nigerian soccer players whom she hosted when they came to the United States to play soccer at the Blaine Sports Center. Naomi (Otterness) Pitlick is a supervisor at PetSmart Hotel and is

Nearly 120 golfers, many Bethel alumni, played in Bethel’s annual Golf Classic on June 23, this year held at StoneRidge Golf Club in Stillwater, Minn. The winning foursome Dan Conrad ’90, Paul Schurbring ’92, Jeff Smith ’92, and Mark Perunovich ’90, came in 16 under par. Longtime Bethel friends and roommates, the four had not connected in more than 19 years—since college graduation. Save the Date: 2010’s Golf Classic is Tuesday, June 22.

Lindsay Sterchi (SEM) is the 18 to 20-something ministry director for New Hope Church in Effingham, Ill.

2009 Lisa Alf married Trevor Stoneberg in July. They live in Coon Rapids, Minn. Joshua Owen was born to Tammy S. Schexnaider (CAPS/GS) and her husband Michael Dreher in August. Mike is professor and chair of the communication studies department and director of forensics at Bethel University.

Read stories of alumni Joel Carlson ’93 and Sarah (Carlson) Wauterlek ’00

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“To me, touching the names on the Birmingham Civil Rights Memorial symbolized a silent sign of respect, as well as a thank you to those who have paved the way for me and many others.” Fiona Rodrigues ’11, an organizational communications major, went on the spring break Sankofa trip in March 2009. On the annual Bethel trip, travelers ride a bus, visiting Civil Rights landmarks of the South, including the Civil Rights Museum, the Rosa Parks Museum and Library, and the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, with the goal of hopeful and God-intended reconciliation. The word “sankofa” comes from the Adinkra language of the Akan people of Ghana, West Africa, and literally translates “it is not taboo to go back and fetch what you forgot.”


Bethel Magazine Fall 2009