Issuu on Google+

1

carroll school of management

mBA

Master of Business Administration

2 Faculty 6 Community 8 Full-Time MBA 12 Evening MBA 16 Applied Learning 22 Career s and the Alumni Network 26 Boston 28 Admission

1

The Boston College Carroll School of Management prepares students to think critically, manage change, and create solutions to pressing problems. Our MBA program is built on a rigorous academic foundation that combines breadth of knowledge in the disciplines of management, depth of knowledge in a management specialization, and a wealth of practical management experiences. Students here gain hands-on experience through case studies, internships, field study, and real-world consulting and business plan projects. They make lasting connections with faculty and other members of the Carroll School community. And they graduate with a deep understanding of the ethical responsibilities of leadership.

Âť

A graduate program is as strong as the values that drive it. At the Carroll School of Management, our core values—honesty and integrity, mutual respect, pursuit of excellence, and personal accountability—are an integral part of who we are.

2

3

Core Values of the Carroll School Honesty and Integrity. We are committed

Pursuit of Excellence. We are committed

to promoting the highest standards of honesty

to creating an environment where all members

and integrity to ensure that all members of

of the community pursue the highest possible

the community recognize the inherent benefits

level of academic performance and personal

of living these ideals and to guarantee that

development for themselves and other members

academic performance is evaluated reliably and

of the community.

rewarded fairly. Per sonal Accountability. We are comMutual Respect. We are committed to foster-

mitted to fostering an environment where

ing an environment in which every member

every member of the community understands

of the community nurtures the spirit of trust,

and accepts responsibility for upholding and

teamwork, openness, and respect that is

reinforcing our values.

necessary to embrace and fully capitalize on our professional community.

These guiding principles are a way of life for every member of the Carroll School community, and serve as the foundation for building strong, trust-based relationships among students, faculty, administration, alumni, and employers.

2

Ronnie Sadka Professor of Finance Hillenbrand Family Faculty Fellow “My research focuses primarily on understanding liquidity in the financial markets. I have access to all the trades that have occurred on the New York Stock Exchange—nearly a trillion observations. I constructed a liquidity risk factor, an aggregate measure for the average cost of a stock transaction, and noticed that it changes dramatically from month to month. I later found that this liquidity risk factor can explain the performance of several popular equity trading strategies as well as the outperformance of some mutual funds and hedge funds. In looking at the data for another research project, my partners and I found something that no one had noticed before: some stocks do well in particular half hours of the day. For example, a stock that performs well between 2:00 and 2:30 on one day is likely to continue to perform well at that same time every day for almost a month. People were completely shocked by this finding. Our theory is that large-asset managers do not change their trading model every day. Rather, they trade different accounts on different days, but they’re working with the same stocks and they’re trading at the same time of day. When we first started this work in 2007, people were skeptical. They didn’t see the importance of studying half-hour returns. Today, high-frequency trading is one of the central topics of debate among financial regulators. We are now looking at milliseconds, and people recognize that a half hour is a lifetime for highfrequency trades.” Ronnie Sadka’s research has been published widely in financial journals. Prior to joining the faculty at Boston College, Professor Sadka taught at the University of Chicago, New York University, Northwestern University, and the University of Washington. His industry experience includes Goldman Sachs Asset Management and Lehman Brothers (quantitative strategies).

faculty

The Carroll School’s faculty is distinguished by an extraordinary combination of research talent and teaching ability. Professors here are researchers, consultants, and thought leaders in every aspect of business. They consistently make important contributions to leading management journals and publications. They comment on current business topics in national media, contribute to discussions at the highest levels of government, and consult for some of the largest companies and nonprofit organizations in the world today. At the same time, Carroll School faculty members are exceptional teachers who share a deep commitment to educating the next generation of business leaders. Our collaborative environment and strong sense of community attract faculty members who place a high value on connecting with students and serving as advisors and mentors. In and out of the classroom, Carroll School professors work closely with students to help them achieve their goals.

Âť

www.bc.edu/mbafaculty

3

4

faculty

G. Peter Wilson Joseph L. Sweeney Chair of Accounting “When my first-year MBA students come back from doing their internships and I ask them what they learned in my class, the answer always involves technical skills. When I ask the same question five years out of school, they’ve forgotten the technical details. Instead, they say I taught them concepts—how to think critically about issues. If you ask them 15 years out, they say they learned how to think—how to be a healthy skeptic. By then, they’ve forgotten 100 percent of the technical detail. After 25 or 30 years, they focus on the values that Boston College taught them without even realizing it: respect, teamwork, doing the right thing at the right

time. Those are the inherent values that come with the University’s 150 years of Jesuit tradition. On the first day of class I tell my students, ‘I’m a very good teacher. I’ve been doing this for 40 years, and I’m quite, quite good—but I’m not great. By myself, I can’t make the course great. But when we all work together, then we make the journey to understanding and value.’ My job in the classroom is to be the orchestrator—to help students begin to make the journey from ‘me’ to ‘we.’ A great deal of what goes on in my class deals with accounting, but there are also much bigger lessons going on. These are the journeys we’re helping students begin to make.” G. Peter Wilson is an award-winning educator who often serves as a speaker, an instructor, a media spokesperson, and a consultant to major companies. His research investigates the impact of accounting and tax rules on managers’ investment, operating, financing, and reporting decisions. Professor Wilson has served on the faculties of Lake-Sumter Community College, Carnegie-Mellon University, Stanford University, Harvard University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

5

Kathleen Seiders Professor of Marketing “Teaching at Boston College is a dream. The University has an extremely collegial environment with a strong sense of respect among faculty, students, and the administration. It’s a place where people genuinely support each other and pull for each other’s success. Also, the University is moving forward on a steep trajectory—expanding, hiring talented new faculty, and aggressively dedicating more resources to teaching and research. At the same time, students continue to be very front and center. The administration pays special attention to the student experience, developing new programs and adjusting the curriculum in response to what’s going on in the world. MBA students here are very motivated, and they come to the classroom with terrific experience. In my classroom, I use an interactive teaching style that allows students to bring that experience into the discussion. Instead of using a textbook, I assign case studies that tell stories about companies facing issues with advertising, branding, and other aspects of business. Then we discuss each case, sharing ideas and talking about what’s feasible, what’s effective, and what might not work. There’s no right answer, and we get a lot of different perspectives. That’s important, because although our students have rich experience in one or two industries, they need to understand other industries and perspectives too.” Kathleen Seiders conducts research in the areas of customer convenience, retailing and service strategy, and public policy and food marketing. Past president of the Academic Council of the American Marketing Association, Professor Seiders has appeared on 60 Minutes, CBS Morning News, and NPR’s Marketplace. Before launching her academic career, she worked in the food retailing industry.

6

Maria T. Lopez, mba ’11 Associate Marketing Manager, General Mills “The highlight of my experience at Boston College was the people. I always thought of business schools as competitive places where it’s every man for himself, but at the Carroll School there’s a unique balance between competition and support. Students here are competitive, but they also want to see you succeed—and they are very willing to help you do so. When one of my classmates and I applied for the same internship, we prepared for interviews together. We asked each other practice questions, provided feedback, drove together to the final interview, and went out for sushi afterwards. When I started looking for a full-time job, my classmates sent me job listings even when they were applying for the same post. The professors, too, are exceptionally caring and considerate. They know how to balance different learning styles, and they’re more than willing to take the time to explain concepts outside of class. I worked as a research assistant for a marketing professor who recently presented some major research to the FDA on the convenience of over-the-counter drugs. We collaborated very well together, and she ended up being my mentor. That collaborative atmosphere permeates through the classroom as well. One person will start work on a study guide, then someone else will work on the next chapter, and in the end 15 people are involved. Each individual’s success is everyone’s success, and Boston College succeeds as a result.”

Community

At the heart of the Carroll School experience is a collaborative spirit and a vibrant sense of community. In part, that’s because classes are small—enrollment in the Full-Time MBA class is limited to approximately 100 students per year. This gives students remarkable access to some of the finest teachers and researchers in the world, and plenty of opportunities to make their voices heard. What’s more, MBA students spend a significant amount of time working together in teams. Across the curriculum, students form teams to tackle specific class projects and assignments. In the Full-Time Program, teamwork forms the basis of three semester-long projects: the Design Thinking Project, the Consulting Project, and the Business Plan Project. In addition, Carroll School students often team up informally to form study groups. Boston College’s Jesuit heritage also plays a role in fostering a sense of community. All MBA students fulfill the University’s tradition of service—a program requirement—by serving as mentors, role models, or tutors in underserved communities, or by providing pro bono professional services to local nonprofit organizations. The Graduate Management Association provides additional opportunities to gain leadership experience and develop personal and professional interests through its numerous school-sponsored clubs, Graduate Women in Business, the Tech Club, and the Graduate Finance Association.

»

www.bc.edu/mbacommunity

7

8

Meaghan Carey, mba ’11 Lead Financial Analyst, Finance Leadership Development Program, Target Corporation “I came to Boston College from a position in public accounting at PricewaterhouseCoopers. My background was heavily weighted toward accounting and finance, and I knew I needed to broaden my scope in order to stay in retailing and consumer products. I credit the coursework at the Carroll School with giving me new ways to look at business problems. The core curriculum introduced me to formal MBA structures and frameworks that you need to attack those problems and find solutions. Also, I took a brand management class that gave me a new perspective on the importance of branding, and I had an internship with a major footwear company. Between the internship and the coursework, I was well prepared to add value to a major retailer. Before even graduating from the MBA program, I had a job lined up with Target’s corporate headquarters in a three-year management development program. I hadn’t realized that BC was on their radar, but the company’s recruiters had seen my background on the Carroll School’s career strategies website and contacted me for an interview. Target is just one of several top Fortune 500 companies that actively recruit Boston College MBAs—and that says a lot about the school.”

The Full-time MBA

Each year, 100 students embark on the two-year Full-Time MBA Program. We carefully select individuals who bring a varied set of backgrounds and experiences to dynamic class discussions, team projects, and applied learning opportunities. While each class is diverse, our students share a desire for learning, personal growth, and professional advancement. In the first year, students progress through the program as a cohort, developing close ties with their classmates along the way. The second year focuses on electives and opportunities for academic-year internships.

Curriculum The Full-Time MBA curriculum combines carefully sequenced courses with experiential learning components. The foundation of the curriculum is the three-semester Management Practice course sequence, which introduces students to cross-functional learning through design thinking projects, professional consulting engagements, new business designs, and strategic analysis.

Year One Coursework begins with an introduction to the ways effective managers add value in their organizations. During the first semester, students build a broad foundation of business knowledge and capabilities. The second semester includes an examination of the complex demands of managing in a changing global environment. The first year also includes three electives, an introduction to design thinking, and the Consulting Project, in which student teams deliver practical solutions to real-world clients.

9

10

The Full-time MBA

Year Two

Dual-Degree Progr ams

The second year of coursework is designed to strengthen students’ essential skills while developing depth in a functional or interdisciplinary specialization of choice. Students take seven electives spread over the two semesters of the second year. The second year also includes the Business Plan Project. Working in teams, students take an idea for a product or service from concept to the completion of an investment-grade business plan. In addition, many students choose to pursue an academic-year internship.

The Carroll School of Management offers more than 18 highly regarded dual-degree programs in collaboration with other schools and programs at Boston College. Typically, more than 10 percent of students combine their MBA degrees with other graduate degrees, such as Juris Doctor (JD), Accounting (MSA), and Social Work (MSW). In addition, students may combine an MBA at the Carroll School with a Master’s in Urban and Environmental Planning and Policy at Tufts University. Students are generally able to complete the requirements of a dual-degree program in significantly less time than it would take to pursue each program separately. Most dual-degree programs take three years to complete, but program lengths vary. To enroll in a dual-degree program, students must apply and be admitted to both schools involved. Dual-degree programs have varying requirements.

Customizing the MBA The Carroll School offers an array of specializations designed to develop depth and expertise in a functional or interdisciplinary business area. All Full-Time MBA students are required to complete a specialization with at least six elective courses. Students begin taking these electives as early as the second semester.

Areas of Specialization Asset Management Business Analytics Competitive Service Delivery Corporate Finance Entrepreneurial Management Financial Reporting and Control Global Management Leadership and Management Marketing and Information Analytics Product and Brand Management Tailored Specialization * * If your preferred course of study is not available, you may be able to work with a faculty member to develop a personalized specialization.

»

www.bc.edu/mbafulltime

The Full-time MBA

full-time mba program curriculum year 1—semester 1* 7 weeks

(16 credits)

7 weeks

year 1—semester 2 7 weeks

(16 credits)

7 weeks

Management Practice I: Manager’s Laboratory (2)

Management Practice II: Acting in Organizations (3)

Accounting (2)

Economics (2)

Operations Management (2)

Global Capitalism, Culture, and Ethics (2)

Managing People and Organizations (2)

Financial Management (2)

Elective (2)

Elective (2)

Statistics (2)

Information Technology for Management (2)

Strategic Management (2)

Elective (2)

Marketing (2)

Modeling and Decision Analysis (1)

year 2—semester 1

(12 credits)

year 2—semester 2

14 weeks

14 weeks

Management Practice III: Business Planning and Entrepreneurship (3)

Elective (3)

Elective (3)

Elective (3)

Elective (3)

Elective (3)

Elective (3)

Elective (3)

* The first semester begins with a one-week orientation.

(12 credits)

11

12

Joseph Hannasch, mba ’11 Contracts Manager, General Electric “I was on active duty in the Air Force for nearly six years before I started looking at MBA programs. My job in the Service involved contracts and acquisitions, so I was encountering some business concepts that I didn’t know much about. I decided it would be a good idea to get a greater understanding of the business world. I went to an information session at the Carroll School, where I heard students talk about the school’s values and the importance of accountability, integrity, and mutual respect. That resonated strongly with me, because those values lined up very closely with what I had been steeped in as a member of the military. Even though I was a part-time student, I found opportunities to get involved outside of class. As the Evening Program representative to the Graduate Management Association (GMA), for example, I was involved with planning events and budgeting. Most of the members of the GMA were full-time students, but it was an inclusive group that accommodated the concerns of part-time students. I left the military in December 2008, in large part so I could stay in Boston and continue with my MBA. I started working at General Electric while I was still in school. I’m still with GE, but now that I’ve completed my MBA, I have increased responsibilities and I’m involved in strategic planning.”

The evening MBA

The Evening MBA Program offers a flexible option for professionals who wish to continue their careers while pursuing a graduate management degree. Evening MBA students work in collaboration with the same world-class scholars and teachers who deliver the Full-Time MBA Program. Classes are small, and students enjoy a strong sense of community. The program attracts a diverse mix of highly motivated individuals from the vibrant and diverse regional business community. For the 12th consecutive year, the Boston College Evening MBA Program has been ranked in the nation’s top 35 by U.S. News & World Report.

Curriculum The required core curriculum provides a strong foundation in managerial, analytical, and practical management skills. In the Business Development Workshop, students undertake an innovative new-venture planning exercise that hones presentation skills and takes analytical and teamwork skills to a higher level. Evening MBA Program study is capped by two integrative courses which examine competitive strategy and social issues from a management perspective. Finally, students choose electives that allow them to pursue their interests and enhance their functional expertise. Evening students take elective courses together with FullTime MBA students, expanding their community as well as their professional networks.

13

14

The evening MBA

evening mba program curriculum core cour ses

(24 credits)

credits

suggested semester

Economics

3

1

Managing People and Organizations

3

1

Accounting

3

2

Information Technology for Management

3

2

Marketing

3

3

Financial Management

3

3

Statistics

3

4

Operations Management

3

5

integr ative cour ses

(32 credits)

credits

suggested semester

Business Development Workshop

2

3 or 4

Strategic Management

3

6

Managing Business in Society

3

7

24 (3 each)

4–8

Elective Courses (8)

The evening MBA

Concentrations

Scheduling Options

Evening students may complete a concentration in an area of particular interest by taking at least three elective courses in that area. The following concentrations are available:

The Carroll School offers two pathways through the Evening MBA Program. Under our cohort model, students take all core courses with the same group of students—fostering friendships and contacts across a wide range of businesses and industries. Alternatively, students may choose the self-paced option, which allows for greater flexibility in the course schedule. Students generally take two courses in the fall and spring semesters, but may take additional courses during the summer. Most Evening MBA Program classes meet weekdays from 7:00 to 9:30 p.m. during the academic year, with a limited number meeting from 4:30 to 7:00 p.m. and on Saturdays. Summer courses meet weekdays from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Evening MBA Program students typically complete their degrees in three or four years.

Asset Management Business Analytics Competitive Service Delivery Corporate Finance Entrepreneurial Management Financial Reporting and Controls Global Management Leadership and Management Marketing and Information Analytics Product and Brand Management

Cour se Waiver s Evening MBA students who have demonstrated mastery in a core subject area may receive advanced standing, thereby reducing the total number of courses required for their degree. In general, advanced standing is awarded to students who have completed one of the following: • An undergraduate major in a core course area • At least two intermediate or advanced undergraduate courses in a core area • Graduate management courses at another AACSB-accredited institution • A recognized professional certification (CPA or CFA)

»

www.bc.edu/mbaevening

15

16

Juan Concepcion, mba/jd ’03 Employment and Litigation Attorney, Burns & Levinson LLP Member, Boston College Board of Trustees “While I was at BC Law, I came to appreciate that the practice of law naturally requires an understanding of business and the ability to manage and to lead. So I decided to pursue an MBA, and the Carroll School was the obvious choice. The dual-degree program provided a good balance. In law school, I learned to think critically as an individual. At the Carroll School, where the primary focus is on team-building, I was able to use that skill in the context of a team. For the Diane Weiss Consulting Competition, for example, my team worked with an impressive biotechnical company to identify an issue or process that the company needed to address. As a team, we analyzed the issue, developed strategies and steps to address it, and provided the client company with our recommendations. Presenting them in front of the company’s high-ranking officials was a priceless experience. As a senior associate at Nixon Peabody, one of the nation’s largest law firms, I draw on my Carroll School education every day. Every decision I make there is firmly rooted in the business acumen I gained at Boston College. I especially value BC’s emphasis on doing well in business by doing good for others. Carroll School students are taught not only to create profit or great returns, but also to consider how our actions will impact society in general.”

applied learning

The Carroll School was a pioneer in giving all MBA students the experience of solving real business problems at real companies in real time. Today, experiential learning is an integral part of the curriculum for students in both the Full-Time and Evening MBA programs. Core Cour sework Teamwork and Consulting Âť During the first semester of the Full-Time Program, students are introduced to the design thinking method. They learn new approaches to working in teams, generating ideas, solving problems, and making decisions. Students utilize their new skills creating the design for an original product or service. The following semester, Full-Time MBA students team up again to provide consulting services to real-world clients ranging from startup businesses to major multinational corporations and governmental agencies. The project culminates in the prestigious Diane Weiss Consulting Competition, in which teams are chosen to make formal presentations before a panel of CEOs and senior managers from leading companies. Business Planning Âť As part of the curriculum, both Full-Time and Evening MBA students plan and develop a business of their own. Working in teams, students take an idea for a product or service from concept to the completion of an investment-grade business plan. The project culminates in formal presentations in a competitive format to faculty, peers, and executives in the

17

18

applied learning

business community. Some teams even go on to launch successful businesses based on their work in this class. Curriculum in Investment Research and Management (CIRM) » The CIRM Program, which is available to both Full-Time and Evening MBA students, examines the disparate functions of successful financial services firms and provides an exceptional opportunity for students to gain investment management experience. Presented as a three-course sequence of electives, CIRM offers a reality-based curriculum that merges theoretical learning with hands-on workshops in a productively competitive environment. For qualifying students, the program culminates in “live money” portfolio management.

International and Off-Campus Opportunities International Management Experience » Students examine economic activity, market trends, and culture in Asia and Great Britain in this elective course, which culminates in a trip abroad. In Asia, they interact with business leaders, tour manufacturing operations, and meet with government officials responsible for trade and investment activity. Recent destinations include China, Hong Kong, India, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam. In London, students investigate the world’s largest financial market, visiting brokerage houses, banks, asset and wealth management firms, hedge funds, and financial boutiques. They also meet with noted British finance professors. Graduate TechTrek » A field-study course, TechTrek features week-long visits to Silicon Valley, Seattle, and New York City, allowing students to tour some of the nation’s hottest tech firms and participate in master classes with venture capitalists (founding partners), CEOs, and entrepreneurs. Coursework and site visits focus on management rather than “techie” issues. Among the companies visited in recent years are Amazon,

applied learning

Apple, Cisco, eBay, Google, Intel, Microsoft, Nintendo, Starbucks, Sun, Wells Fargo, and Yahoo!. International Consulting Project (ICP) » In this elective course, students work in teams on consulting projects for international clients. Students complete their research and analysis in Boston, then travel to their clients’ home countries to present their recommendations. Recent projects have taken students to China and Peru. Warren Buffett & Berkshire Hathaway Field Experience » Through this highly selective program, MBA students travel to Omaha to meet with billionaire investor Warren Buffett at the headquarters of his Berkshire Hathaway hold-

ing company. In addition to a tour of Berkshire Hathaway, students participate in a closed-door Q&A and luncheon with Mr. Buffett. Students have come away from this trip “with a sense of

Jose Colin, mba ’13 Senior Program Manager, Amazon.com “I came to Boston College from Mexico City, where I worked in operations for a Mexican transnational company for eight years. When it was time to move to a position with more growth potential, I knew that a graduate degree in business was the best way to complement my work experience. As an international student without permanent work authorization in the United States, I expected the job search to be challenging. But I ended up with two job offers before graduation. The first offer was from New Balance in Boston, where I had done not only a summer internship but also a part-time internship during the second year of my MBA program. Then I got a call from Amazon, inviting me to apply to their selective MBA recruiting program for a job in purchasing. Several intensive interviews later, I received a competitive offer, complete with a relocation package and visa sponsorship. My education at the Carroll School gave me the tools to compete for a job at this level, and the School’s good reputation in the marketplace helped my résumé get noticed. I’m grateful that my experiences at BC allowed me to move into a position in an exciting company with a lot of growth potential.”

19

20

Liz Rampolla, mba ’12 Account Manager, Maritz “I started thinking about pursuing an MBA in 2007, when I was working for Pfizer in Manhattan. I planned to attend school full time, but the timing never seemed right. Then in 2010 I moved to Boston and started looking at part-time programs. I was drawn to Boston College because it had a strong academic reputation and a great sense of community—and I sensed that I would be able to have a full-time experience in a part-time setting. And that’s just what I’ve found. Part-time students at the Carroll School can get involved in everything from executive lectures to student organizations to professional activities that enhance the academic experience. I’ve seen six high-level executives speak, from the CEO of Motorola to the CFO of Raytheon. And as a member of the Technology Club, I’ve visited local companies and met industry leaders. I had the opportunity to meet Warren Buffett, one of my idols. A group of us traveled to his company’s headquarters in Omaha, where we met with him for a Q&A and a luncheon. I also visited 20 tech companies on the West Coast through the Carroll School’s TechTrek program. Over the course of five days, we visited everything from small start-ups to Google to blue-chip companies, meeting with executives and seeing how different companies operate. It was a fantastic experience, and we learned more than we ever could have learned in a classroom. By the time we left, I was so inspired that I wanted to start my own company.”

applied learning

the man behind the financial empire and his emphasis on the responsibility of each individual to contribute back to society.”

Lectures and Events Each year, CEOs and senior executives of leading organizations across the globe come to Boston College to share insights and leading-edge thinking on the practice of business. These visits typically include informal settings that accommodate a lively exchange of questions and views. Lectures are open to all Carroll School students but do not lead to course credit. Business leaders are also frequent guests in the classroom, where they add depth and immediacy to discussions. The Manager’s Studio » Hosted by faculty member Bob Radin, the Manager’s Studio brings top executives to campus to share their personal and professional experiences with students. Sessions begin with an interview, offering a rare glimpse into executives’ personal lives, and are followed by a student-led question and answer period. Participants in recent programs include Colin Angle, chairman of the board, CEO, and co-founder of iRobot; Laura Sen ’78, CEO of BJ’s

Wholesale Club (pictured top left); and William Glavin, CEO of Oppenheimer Funds. Chief Executives’ Club of Boston » The Carroll School also houses the Chief Executives’ Club of Boston, which is ranked the “#2 speaking venue for CEOs in the world,” edged only by the Clinton Global Initiative among business forums that feature top-level CEO speakers sharing their strategic vision with other corporate leaders. * Recent speakers include PepsiCo CEO and Chairman Indra K. Nooyi; McDonald’s Corporation Vice Chairman and CEO James Skinner; Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer; and Cisco Systems, Inc., Chairman and CEO John T. Chambers (pictured below). * As ranked by Weber Shandwick from a published “Five Star Conference” study.

»

www.bc.edu/MBAappliedlearning

Speaker s at recent Carroll School lectures and events Daniel F. Akerson Chairman & CEO General Motors

Robert Kraft Chairman & CEO New England Patriots

Sharon Allen Chairman of the Board Deloitte LLP

Carol Meyrowitz President & CEO The TJX Companies, Inc.

James Gibbons President & CEO Goodwill Industries International, Inc.

Peggy Noonan Author & Columnist The Wall Street Journal

John Hammergren Chairman, President & CEO McKesson Corporation

Joseph M. Tucci Chairman, President & CEO EMC Corporation

21

22

Fay Donahue, mba ’80 President and CEO Delta Dental of Massachusetts “I chose Boston College for my MBA because it seemed like the best place to learn about the issues facing general managers in the broadest possible way. While I planned to concentrate in finance, I’d also get to dig into areas like marketing and strategy, accounting, and negotiation—all of which have turned out to be crucial to my work as a president and CEO. My experience at BC was everything I’d hoped for. Not only did the faculty teach the course content, but they also taught us to think through problems and communicate our insights, and they stressed the importance of working on teams. I still remember working with some classmates on a business plan for something called ‘Gourmet Kitchen White Sauce.’ We had to figure out how to create the product, how to market the product, how to price the product. It was a model of a senior team, very much like the teams I work with now. The University’s commitment to the idea of doing well by doing good also had a big impact on me. Our company is a huge business—we have 1,200 employees, and we sell dental benefit plans to 15 million people. But we also run an institute that promotes oral health, and our foundation supports oral-health efforts with $15,000–20,000 in charitable contributions every year. Our mission is to improve the oral health of every man, woman, and child in this country, and that commitment is so consistent with the values of BC. I still get back to BC occasionally, and I love meeting the students. They not only have the same drive and curiosity as the people I attended business school with, but also the commitment to using their gifts to make the world a better place. And that makes me feel good about the future.”

Career s and the Alumni Network

When it comes to career advancement, Carroll School graduates have several distinct advantages. Not only does the MBA curriculum provide excellent preparation for a changing business environment, we also offer exceptional career services and an influential network of loyal alumni. Career Services The Career Strategies office offers a wide range of programs and events to help students clarify their interests, gain insights into a variety of industries, and interact with alumni and other business leaders. In addition, Career Strategies staff members work with each student individually to prepare them for a successful job search, providing support in developing rĂŠsumĂŠs and cover letters, preparing for interviews, and negotiating job offers.

Internships Full-Time MBA students at the Carroll School complete a summer internship after the first year of study—an excellent opportunity to apply classroom learning to the real world while making valuable industry connections. Many students continue to work with their summer internship employer or a new employer during the second year of study.

23

24

Career s and the Alumni Network

The Boston College Network Founded in 1863, Boston College is one of the world’s most highly respected educational institutions. Throughout its history, Boston College has developed leaders for every field of human endeavor. Today, the Boston College alumni community encompasses more than 162,000 individuals all over the world, including nearly 35,000 graduates of the Carroll School. Graduates of the Carroll School join a loyal and influential network of leading scholars and practitioners, outstanding students, and accomplished alumni.

»

www.bc.edu/mbacareer s

Matt Taylor, mba/msf ’04 Director of Corporate Financial Systems and Compliance, Staples “I’ve been part of the Boston College community for a long time. Not only do I come from a family of BC graduates, but I did my undergraduate work there as well. I never considered going anywhere else for my MBA. I knew that at the Carroll School I would be challenged and that my already extensive Boston College network would get even stronger. I was right on both counts. The professors at the Carroll School were very fair, but they pushed us hard and challenged us to be our best. And the focus on team-based projects meant that I got to know people from very different business backgrounds. In my professional life, I was primarily working with people in my own discipline, and it was beneficial to work with people with different perspectives. Before going back to school for my MBA, I was focused on my own individual contributions in the workplace, not on the company as a whole. I graduated with a much broader perspective. I might not have been setting company strategy on my first day of work at Staples after graduation, but I was thinking like a senior leader. I started at Staples as a financial analyst. I researched numbers, examined the company’s performance, and made recommendations. Today, I manage five very different teams in the finance department, and my focus has shifted to operations. It’s a very different role, but I was prepared to make that kind of career change because of the managerial leadership qualities that I developed at the Carroll School.”

25

“Through   cooperation and integrity we prosper.”

—Carroll School Graduate Programs motto

26

boston

Boston is recognized worldwide as a major center of economic activity and growth. Leading financial services and investment firms are located here, as are global organizations in consulting, advertising, and telecommunications. Innovative technology companies and groundbreaking biotech firms thrive alongside Fortune 500 manufacturing companies and household names in consumer products. The Carroll School has strong ties to the city’s business community, so our students enjoy exceptional opportunities to make valuable connections, learn from local business leaders, and advance their careers. But there’s more to Boston than professional opportunities. The largest metropolis in New England, this fine city boasts a lively mix of history, art, culture, entertainment, and awardwinning restaurants. Recreational opportunities include sailing in Boston Harbor, ice-skating on Boston Common, and rowing on the Charles River. From our world-class cultural institutions and professional sports teams to the natural beauty of the ocean and the nearby mountains, Boston is a great place to live, study, and work.

Âť

www.bc.edu/mbaBoston

27

28

admission

The Boston College MBA Program seeks students with outstanding potential for leadership and academic excellence. How to Apply

Executive Fellowship Progr am

Each candidate must complete an application for admission, which includes transcripts of all academic work, two essays, and two letters of recommendation. Prior work experience and evidence of management potential are significant criteria in the admissions process. All applicants are required to take the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Dual-degree candidates may be eligible to waive the GMAT. Applicants whose native language is not English must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the Pearson Test of English (PTE), or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). All candidates must be graduates of accredited colleges or universities. For specific information regarding application requirements and deadlines for both the Full-Time and Evening MBA programs, please contact us.

Students admitted to this highly selective program receive merit-based scholarships and are paired with mentors who have achieved significant professional success in the business community. Recipients and their mentors meet at intervals to discuss topics of mutual professional interest as well as the Fellow’s career goals. Fellows often receive additional guidance and mentoring through facilitated meetings with other leading executives and decision makers.

Financial Assistance and Merit-Based Awards The Boston College MBA Program provides a wide range of merit-based graduate assistantships and scholarships to both domestic and international Full-Time students. The University also offers loan and work-study programs to help students finance their education. See the University’s website for information about these programs as well as a sample MBA student budget, including tuition, expenses, and fees.

Campus Interviews and Visits Evaluative interviews for the Full-Time MBA Program are available by invitation only. Interviews are not used as part of the Evening MBA application process. However, the MBA Admissions Committee welcomes the opportunity to meet with prospective students to discuss their questions and assist them in learning more about the MBA Program. Candidates may arrange for a campus tour or attend classes during their visit. To obtain a schedule of our MBA Information Receptions and Information Panels held in Fulton Hall or at the Boston College Club, located in Boston’s financial district, please contact us or visit our website.

»

www.bc.edu/carrollmba

The Carroll School of Management of Boston College is accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). The School is also a member of the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) and the New England Association of Graduate Admission Professionals. The Boston College Carroll School of Management MBA Program publications contain current information regarding the University calendar, admissions, degree requirements, fees, regulations, and course offerings. They are not intended to be and should not be relied upon as a statement of the University’s contractual undertakings. Boston College reserves the right in its sole judgment to make changes of any nature in its programs, calendar, or academic schedule, whenever it is deemed necessary or desirable, including changes in the course content, the rescheduling of classes and other academic activities, and requiring or affording alternatives for scheduled classes and other academic activities, in any such cases giving notice thereof as is reasonably practicable under the circumstances.

Nondiscrimination Statement Founded by the Society of Jesus in 1863, Boston College is dedicated to intellectual excellence and to its Jesuit, Catholic heritage. Boston College recognizes the essential contribution a diverse community of students, faculty, and staff makes to the advancement of its goals and ideals in an atmosphere of respect for one another and for the University’s mission and heritage. Accordingly, Boston College commits itself to maintaining a welcoming environment for all people and extends its welcome in particular to those who may be vulnerable to discrimination, on the basis of their race, ethnic or national origin, religion, color, age, gender, marital or parental status, veteran status, disabilities, or sexual orientation. Boston College rejects and condemns all forms of harassment, wrongful discrimination, and disrespect. It has developed procedures to respond to incidents of harassment whatever the basis or circumstance. Moreover, it is the policy of Boston College, while reserving its lawful rights where appropriate, to take actions designed to promote the Jesuit, Catholic principles that sustain its mission and heritage, to comply with all state and federal laws prohibiting discrimination in employment and in its educational programs on the basis of a person’s race, religion, color, ethnic or national origin, age, sex, marital or parental status, veteran status, or disability, and to comply with state law prohibiting discrimination on the basis of a person’s sexual orientation. To this end, Boston College has designated its Executive Director for Institutional Diversity to coordinate its efforts to comply with and carry out its responsibilities to prevent discrimination in accordance with state and federal laws. Any applicant for admission or employment, and all students, faculty members, and employees, are welcome to raise any questions regarding this policy with the Office for Institutional Diversity. In addition, any person who believes that an act of unlawful discrimination has occurred at Boston College may raise this issue with the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights of the United States Department of Education.

Campus Safety and Security Program/Equity in Athletics In compliance with the Higher Education Amendments of 1998, Boston College publishes and makes available to any prospective student upon request: a copy of Boston College’s annual security report, Campus Safety and Security Program. This report contains statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus and on public property immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus. The report also incorporates institutional policies concerning campus security, including Reporting of Crimes and Other Emergencies, the Safety Notification Procedure, Campus Law Enforcement, and the Campus Sexual Assault Program; information regarding the available educational programs that address campus security procedures and practices, and crime prevention; information regarding drug and alcohol policies, and other matters. A report of athletic program participation rates and financial support data is available. This report details participation rates, financial support, and other information on men’s and women’s intercollegiate athletic programs. To request a copy of either of the above reports, please call the Office of the Financial Vice President and Treasurer at 617–552–4856, or send your request in writing to: Boston College, Office of the Financial Vice President and Treasurer, More Hall 200, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467–3808.

produced by the office of marketing communications 8/13

CV4

carroll school of management office of graduate management admissions 140 Commonwealth Avenue Chestnut Hill, MAssachusetts 02467–3808 T: 617–552–3920 | f: 617–552–8078 | e: bcmba@bc.edu www.bc.edu/carroll


MBA Program, Carroll School of Management