Issuu on Google+

Martin Wulfhorst

The Orchestral Violinist’s Companion Bärenreiter

Volume 1

ve i s n e h e r p m a co guidebook ts ds of excerp with hundre

Bärenreiter

The Orchestral Violinist’s Companion This book is a guide to the art of playing the violin in a professional orchestra. It is a workbook, reference tool, and textbook for:

Excerpts

• • • •

conservatory and college students who are preparing for an orchestral Allegrocareer molto con brio = 84 ll from more than 340 works ≤1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 œ2 2 45 audition candidates at the beginning or at later stages Strauss, in their careers #### C Ó Don œ œ œ J ‰ Œ ˙ by 87 composers œ ‰ œ œ & œ Juan (Ex. 3.4b) œœ string teachers, conductors, and composers G are provided with bowings, ƒ classes at conservatories, universities, and summer programs. fingerings, metronome Sehr schnell und leidenschaftlich = 176 ≤1 b œ4 b œ œ b œ4≤ markings, stylistic suggestions, mm œ . 1a œ b œ b œ n œ2 n œ n œ 1 2 œ œ The Orchestral Violinist’s Companion J b œ n œ 3 and Strauss b ~~ ~~~ tips for practicing. & 4 Elektra (Ex. 3.4o) provides a comprehensive survey of the vast range of skills and knowledge vn. 1+2 ƒ ç an orchestral player needs: strategies for practicing and sight-reading, bowing excerpts represent a ≤ b œ4 These ≤ b œ4 4 nn œ ..b œ œ .. bvariety œ b œ4 .. œ of genres: 1 and left-hand technique, pizzicato and other special techniques, 1 œ1 bensemble n œ œ 2 2 œ œ .. n œ .. b œ .. n œ2 œ .. œ b œ .. b œ n œ2 ..n œ n œ .. b œ1 n symphonic bœ b ~~ ~~ playing and command of complex rhythms, knowledge of&notation and b œ ..n œ repertoire, operas,œ ..operettas, performance practice, familiarity with a core repertoire of orchestral works, ballets, and oratorios. ≤ b œ4 ≤ b œ4 ≤4 4 audition preparation, and strategies for coping with career oo issues œ1 b œ . œ b œ œ b œ b œ . œn œ2 n œn œ 1 . 2 œ œ œ1 b œ b œ .. œ .œ b œ b œ n œ2 .. œ . n œn œ 1 2 .. . œ œ bœ œ nœ bœ nœ œ including the physical and mental stresses of ~~ ~~ &b long-term orchestral work. h

3

q

One-plus-one patterns:

One-plus-three patterns:

&b

≤ b œ4 4≤ œ1 b œ b œ œ . œ .. b œb œ n œ2 n œ . œ ..n œ

≤ 4 ≤4 bœ œ1 b œ b œ œ b œ œ . b œ n œ2 n œ œ œ . 1 2 œ œ œ . œ . .. œ œ bœ nœ bœ nœ ~~ ~~ 1 2

3 Learning, Practicing, Sight-Reading • 3.9 Strategies for Physical Practice: Speed 2 # # # œ œ œ œ ‹ œ œ œ≤ œ 1 œ # œ œ œ œj ‰ &# C 3

pp

1

Training as an Orchestral Violinist – History, Challenges, Concepts

The Orchestral Mode

• Daily practice routines for orchestral violinists: bowing, shifting, scales, arpeggios, double stops, and chords • Strategies for improving ease and endurance

Allegro molto con brio h = 84 h

q

One-plus-three patterns: One-plus-three patterns:

"Siciliano" patterns:

≤ ≤ ≤ b œ4• Divide4≤ any passage into consecutive segments of two, ≤ 4 three,or ≤41 b œ4 b œ b œ4 ≤ b œ 4≤uu œ b œorœeight and then œpattern byb note 1 2note œ œ1 four,b six, œ œ bœ œ. 2 nœ . œ .. bnotes 2 n shift b œ b œ œ 1 b œ b œ œ œ œ . .. . .. œ œ œ..n œthen1 play2 œeach œ & b œbeat nœœ œas a single . œ ..byb œbeat. nifœ one ~~the œ b œ œ . b œ n œ2 n œ œb œ n. œb œ1 . œband . œb ..œsegment b œ n œas2Grasp œ n œ plays unit: “It feels singleb action all the notes of ~~

(5) Inserting rests or fermatas between segments played at full speed—another type of combining slow and fast practice—is per-4 1 haps one of the most efficient methods for learning fast passages with difficult pitch patterns: “The added fermatas provide b the & time to judge the correctness of the previous passage, to think of the next passage in all its detail, and to formulate the next outgoing command in its entirety” ( Gerle 1983, 15). Choose segments of appropriate length. 2

Learning, Practicing, and Sight-Reading

Basic Orchestral Technique – Principles, Routines, and Maintenance

One-plus-two patterns:

q

group together” ( Fischer 2004, 24). vv • Overlapping segments are very useful covering the Allegro molto con brio for h = 84 pp “seams” but aremolto a little awkward of the continuous Allegro brio h because = 84 3 con pp bow retakes. 1 1 1 2 3 6 0 1 2 Strauss,6 Don 0 1 1

œ œ œ ‹œ œ ≤ œ## # # # # C & #œ # Cœ œ ‹ œ œœ œ≤ œ œœ œœ # œ œ jœ ‰ œ ~~œj ‰ ~~ uu & 2 œ" ≤ ≤ 1 ≤ " 2332 "ƒ 3 " 23 2 #"œ G ≤ œ" œ œ nœ nœ " #œ 23 # # # # œ2 œ œ0 " ‹ œ1 œ # œ " œ # œ ƒ œ ‹ œ œ ~~G œ ‹ œ ~~ œ " œ œ j œ œ One-plus-two patterns: œ œ qq & œ œ3 œ 3 RÔ œ3 One-plus-two patterns: 2 2 qq . œ 36 3 1 1 . œ #0# #1#. 1 œœ ≤œ0 œ . ‹1œ2œ œ≤ . œ 1 œ . œœ œ .j0‰ 1 1 .œœ. ≤œ0 œ1 ‹ œ11.2œ œ≤ œ . 1 œ œ .œ3 œ j0 ‰ 1 œ1 œœ.œ0≤. œ1 œ 6 # # & œ œ ‹ œ œ . œ # œ œ . œ #jœ‰ œ œ œ œ ‹ œ œ œ . # œ œ œ . #jœ‰ œ œœ . œ ‹ œ œ œ &## œœ ≤ 1 œ2œœ " œ≤ 2 œ 1 ≤3 23 œ 23 nœ nœ #œ # # # # œ2 œ œ0 ‹ œ1 œ # œ " œ # œ n œ n œ " # œ œ œ " j œ2 œ œ0 " ‹ œ1 œ # œ œ # œ œ " j œ One-plus-five patterns (Only two of six possibilities are shown.) œ œ œ One-plus-five œœœœ 3 rr & 3 œ patterns 6 rr œ (Only œ two of six6 possibilities are shown.) œ 36 3 1 6 œ # #œ# # œ3 0 œ1 ‹ œ1 œœ ≤œ0 œ1 ‹ œ1 œ œ≤ 1 2 œ œ #6œ1 œ2 œ j œ œ‰ 0 œ1 ‹ œ1 œœ œ0œ œ ‹ œ1≤ œ œ1 2 œ≤ œ # 6 6# # œ œ œ & œ # œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ j # œ œ Overlapping segments with added fermatas: vv #œ œ œ œ ‰ &2 6 6 ≤ ≤ 1 ≤ œ 23 6 # # # # œ2 œ œ0 ‹ œ " œ1 œ # œ œ " œ # œ œ" œ n œ6 n œ # œ " œ œ œ œ" œ œ œ œ ss & 2 œ œ 1 ss 23 n œ n œ (œ1 ) 0 ‹ œ1 2œ #œœ œ # œ 2 # 1 # 23 # œ0 ‹ œœ1 œ œ# œ œ œ # œ œ n œ n œ (œ1 ) œœ # # # # ~~~~ & # œ2 œ~~~~ œ œ œ œ œ œ 4œ œ ~~œ œ ~~ ww xx Expanding segments,& moving forward: 3 slightly off 3 " ƒslightly off " 1 3 # ## ˙4 1 " " "tt ƒ (f) " (f) œœ &# ≈ nœ 1 n œn œ œn œ œ œ œ œ 1 1 œœ tt n œ œ œ œ n œ 23 n œ œ œ œ œ 23œ œ œ œ# #œ#0œ# œ2 . œœ #œœ0œ1œ‹ œ . 2 œ # œ œ0 œœ2œœ . #œ0œ1 ‹ œ œœ .œ œ# œœ 0 œ2 œ . œ#0 œ1‹ œ œ . # œ nœ œ œ 1 2 ƒ ≤ # # # # œ2 & ‹œ œ. ‹œ œ. ‹œ. œ œ œ œ . . œ œ œ œ œ . 3 3 Expanding segments, moving backward: & ≤ 3 33 33 " ≤ " 3 " patterns: "33 "Siciliano" 1 3 3 ≤ œ" # "Siciliano" patterns: œ # œ œ œ œ œ extremely soft dynamics, a typical " # nœ Bowing Sound & # Technique, nœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ Strauss, Don Juan (Ex. 3.4b) Juan (Ex. 3.4b)

Consecutive segments with added fermatas:

• A comprehensive learning system covering: goal setting, self-assessment, planning, mental and physical practice, self-monitoring, and strategies for coping with performance anxiety • Practice strategies for learning orchestral repertoire  sample page 47 • Strategies for sight-reading, learning “impossible” pieces, and learning repertoire under time pressure

4

~~

ll Allegro molto con brio = 84≤ 2 2 2 ll 3 3 3 1 1 2 2 2 45 # # œ. œ œ . 0 œ1 ‹ œ1Strauss, # C œÓœ œ0 ≤1 œ12 ‹3œ1‰0œ 1. ≤2 3œœ0 œ131 œ0œ2 œ1 œ2 œ3 œ0 œ ˙2œJ ‰ Œ ˙ 45Don 1# # ≤ œ . # # # # # œ œ0 œ1 . ‹ œ1 œ œ≤ . œ 1 œ . œ œ & . ##œ #œ Cœ . Ó j ‰ ‰ . œ œ œ œ # œ .Jœ œ‰ Œ. j ‰ 3.4b) Strauss, Don Juan (Ex. œ j ‰ œ # œ & & œœ œœ œ œ G Juan (Ex. 3.4b) œœœ G ƒ 3 ƒ 3 Sehr schnell und leidenschaftlich = 176 One-plus-five patterns (Only two of six possibilities are shown.) rr = 176 3 3 Sehr schnell und leidenschaftlich 4≤ ≤ b œ4 œ œ 0 œ1mm 6 # # # # œ œ œ œ0 œ1 ‹ œ1 œ œ≤ œ œ 1 œ2 œ ‹≤1 œ1 b œœ4 œ b œœ1 .œ≤œ œb œ#4≤1aœ1 b œ2œ œœ b œ œ b œ bjœ n1œ2 ‰n2œ n œ 1 2 œ œ mm j ‰ œ # œ J œ b œ b œœ n œ2œn œ n œœ œ . 3 1a b œ n œ ~~~ & œ œ Strauss 3 ~~6 & b 4J ~~ b œ n œ œ œ ~~~ Elektra (Ex.b 3.4o) Strauss 6 Elektra (Ex. 3.4o) & 4 vn. 1+2 ƒ ç vn. 1+2 ƒ ç ss ≤ b œ4 ≤ b œ4 4 2 œ 1 1 23 b œ ..b œ œ .. b œ b œ4 .. œ ≤ 4 1 4 14 # # # # ~~~~ œ2 œ œ0 ‹ œ1 œ # œ œ # œ œ n œnnn œ (œ≤1) bœœ4nn œ 2 n œ ..n œ 1 2 b œ 2 œ .. œ1 b œ b œ bœœ .. .. b œ b œ œ b œ n œ œ &œb œ œ œœ..b œ b~~œ ..n œ2 n œ ..n œ.. 1 .. 2 œ ..bœ .. n œ œ ~~ œ b œ .. b œ n œ2 b..œn..œ nb œ ..n œ . & b bœ nœ b ~~ 3 slightly off & One-plus-one patterns: ƒ (f) One-plus-one patterns: tt ≤ ≤ b œ4 41 1 1 23 ≤≤ b œ4 4 2 # # # # œ2 . œ œ0 ‹ œ . œ # œ œ2 œ . œ0 ‹ œ œoo. # œ≤1 b œ4 oo .œœ1 bœ0œ4 ‹ œb œ .œ .œ b#œœœ b œ b œ . œ1n œ2 n œn œ 1 . 2 œ≤1 œb œ4 b œ b œ4œ1 .. œ .b œ b œ .. œ2.œ b œ b œ n œ2 .. œ . œ b œ . œ & œ &b œ b œ 3b œ . œn œ2 n œn . 2 œb œœ œ n œ œ ~~ œ b œ b œ n œ .. œ . n œn œ 1 3 3 bœ œ nœ bœ n ~~ 3 3 3 &b qq

What is the essence of orchestral playing? And what are the musician’s priorities when playing in an orchestra? There is a particular mindset that is specific and essential to orchestral playing.

3

G

ƒ

47

6

A brief historical sketch of orchestral training, a critical analysis of the current state of orchestral training, and a proposal for an original system for comprehensive orchestral training.

2

6

Strauss, Don Juan (Ex. 3.4b)

Allegro molto con brio h = 84 3 0 1 1

Wulfhorst_OrchestralViolonistCompanion.indb 47

5

25.11.2012 20:55:34

œ

œ

Production, Coordinationn ϲ

≤ 4 yy œ3 3 œ. œ. œ. # œ2 . section œ • Blending51 within the violin ## J Œ ~~~~~~~ • Adapting&to# #the conductor’s > ≤f G≤ p interpretation Loops: 3 4 3 3 4 3 1 2 œ œ zz 1 œ œ œ • Great variety of strokes from legato œ œ # œ œ œ œ 51 # ## to ricochet, & #fast repetitions and .. .. forward backward tremolo, numerous bowing patterns, 4 articulations, dynamics (including œ œ œ n œ2 œ œ # œ2 œ œ3 œ n œ2 ## & # # .. #### .

.. ..

n œ œ ‹ œ3 œ œ ‹ œ œ1 #œ 2

. .

œ œ œ œofœ œmany orchestral parts), n œ œchallenge œ œœœ 2 colors, and special techniques such as n œ. œ. ‹ œ3. œ. 2 œ # col œ2 legno ponticello # œ and ˙ nœ ‰ Œ J bow stroke •1 Musical examples for each 1 3 1 F or pattern 4 3 3 3 œ 3 œ œ œ  œ140 œ œ sample œpage œ n œ2 # œ2 œ œ 52 .. .. “bad” bowings – a short .. • “Good” and guide for bowing orchestral parts 2 2 œ ‹ œ3 œ1 n œ # œ # œ n œ2 œ ‹ œ3 œ ‹ œ œ1 n œ

Practice also as a trilling shift:

œ ‹ œ3 œ œ œ ‹ œ #œ œ 1

. .

.. ..

3 ‹ œ œ # œ œ # œ2 n œ2 œ œ

..

. .

œ # œ œ # œ2 # œ n œ2 œ œ 4

.

6

9

Left-Hand Technique

• Orchestral intonation and fingering • Particularly tricky pitch patterns: diatonic and chromatic scale patterns, arpeggios, leaps and silent shifts, extremely high passages, remote keys, whole-tone motion, free tonality and atonality, trills and other ornaments, portamento and glissando, harmonics

10 Repertoire and Style

Decoding and Marking Orchestral Parts – A Manual of Orchestral Notation and Performance Practice

• A suggested core repertoire of orchestral works • A guide to building this core repertoire and creating a style grid • Different styles and their unique challenges

• Specific suggestions for marking your part • Detailed discussion of all aspects of notation and performance practice

11 Profession and Career 140

• Career planning • Setting goals (profiles of various orchestra types and various orchestral positions such as concertmaster and section player) • Auditioning • Orchestral life • Long-term work in an orchestra

5 Bowing Technique, Sound Production, Coordination • 5.17 Repetitions of Pitches

c – e •5.N17 OM6 Ease and endurance are challenges in many passages with extremelyEx. fast repetitions. To play all notes with the 4.10a same intensity is difficult or impossible (and often:not even q = 120 : h =112+ h =112+ a b q = 120described desirable!). Play withon/off the “curves” or “waves” in Chapter 4.14/(11). Follow the contour and metrical stresses Coordination andof speed the phrases with the dynamics and, at an extreme pace, even with the speed of your motion. Intensify the dynamics and

& c @ @ œ@ œ@ œ œ

(≤)

Allegro [h = 92+] 3 start poco ponticello

b(œ). œ œ œ . @ pá > á 2nd x: cresc. n œ2 b œ œ . œ œ n!œ !œ !œ !œ ! ! b & @ á > >>>> c

Donizetti L'Elisir II/12

76

&b c @

speed on the moving notes, toward the melodic high points, and on the accented notes. Relax on the longer notes or pedals with repetitions: play more softly and, as necessary, even use a stroke that is slower than the notated values. f , h • Practice displaced repetitions. g , i • Practice the repetitions by starting on the beat.

! ! ! ! ! ! œ! œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ (≤)

112 1 3 1 2 œ œ b œ . b œ œ !œ !œ !œ !œ œ. œ œ œ. œ œ @ @ « @ > > > > > > á á > á > œ œ œ b œ œ œ n œ2 œ b œ œ b œ œ œ ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! n!œ ! ! ! 3x..

Presto q = - 116

d

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! œ nœ œ bœ œ œ œ ! @ @ ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !œ œ ƒ 1) ( 1 3 ) ( 437 sim. 4 vn. 1 b ! ! ! ! ! ! ! œ! œ! œ! ! ! ! ! ! œ! œ! œ! ! ! @ œ! œ! œ œ œ & b b œ! ! œ! œ! œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ ! ! ! !œ œG œ œœœ L 442 ( 4) œ œ œ œ4 œ4 œ4 œ8 œ8 3x œ8 œ8 b 4 œœ œ œ @ @ @ .. æ æ .. .. æ æ .. & b b œ ! ! ! ! !œ !œ œ @ relax S S

12 Resources available at

3

b 2 &b b 4 œ

433 vn. 1+2

Beethoven Symphony 3/iv

1

œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! œ! (41) œœœ œ !œ ! ! ! œ œ !! @

http://www.orch.info

• A list of published excerpt collections • A guide to additional resources: websites, technical studies, articles, books, recordings, and software • Introductory videos

Più vivo [h = 100+] 3 3 > √ 1 œ > 1 œ1 œ >œ œ œ œ #>œ œ œ n>œ œ œ 1 œ1 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ3 œ ˙ 1 ##œœ ##œœ1 œ >œ œ œ œ # # c !œ !œ ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !œ ! ! ! n!œ ! ! !œ #!œ ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! @ 74 .. !œ ! ! ! ! ! ! ! &

e

B 66/70

Grieg, Peer/8 (= Suite I/iv)

(√) ( 3)

ƒ

2

3

(>3) 3 1 > n >œ œ œ > œ œœ> 75 # # ! #!œ ! ! !œ !œ !œ !œ œ1 #!œ #!œ !œ !œ !œ !œ !œ ! #!œ ! ! @˙ ! & 2 (√)

3

3

> #>œ # œ œ œ >˙ 80 # œ1 # œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ & #! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! @ 1

stringendo al fine C

3 2 f

Displaced repetitions

&c

Ex. 4.10a = 100 : 160

Pizzicato and Other Special Technical Issues

• Basic and advanced pizzicato techniques required for repertoire of the 19th and 20th centuries • Switching between pizzicato and arco • Techniques specific to the playing of contemporary music

8

> 8 Rhy > >œ an 1 œ m 1 ##œ # œ œ th œ œd Eœnsemble Playing • œ ##œœ œ œ œ œ œ ##œœ #œ 8.6 Irregular !!!!! !œ ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! 8.! 6! Irr Off-Beats a eg

Rhythm and Ensemble Playing

• Two-part exercises and excerpts for partner practice or for string classes  sample page 301 • Basic conducting technique • Counting • Syncopation, tuplets, cross-rhythms • Irregular meters • Rubato and accompanying • Ensemble playing

ular Off-Bea nd Syncopat ions, Off-B ts and Sync eat Accent opations, O s The following ff-Beat Acc 301 challenges are ents rel cluded in the ated to the rhy previous Chapt thmic patter ns iner. a – b • Irregu lar off-beats and irregular tice with a par syncopation tner or a click s • Practrack. File 8.N6 a racthe off-beat All.o vivace pat hm irregular terns with sustai Where appropriate practice [q. = 84 Ð1 00] off beats 110%ned notes instead a 69 -2 of rests.

3 2

œ1 œ œ œ > ! ! ! ! @˙

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

q

Wulfhorst_OrchestralViolonistCompanion.indb 140

7

Repeat mm. 66-72

3 2

II

II

! ! ! pizz. ! hm!aninoff ! ! ! Rac œ œ& œ## 89 n œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ j œ j dim. œ œ œ Daœ nceœs/iii œ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ n œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœj œj vn. I œ F ‰ ‰ œ ‰ 6 n œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ 8 œ ‰ �� œœ œœ ‰ .. 9 n œœ œœ œ≤. œ. œ. œ. œ. f œœ œœ œ œ 8 œ ‰œ ‰ ## 9 IV 3 œ œ œ œ arco & 8 œœœ œœœœœœ œ j arco . . > . . . . . œ 6 vn. II f œ marcato œ œ j . . œ. œ. >œ 8 œ œ œ. œ œ .. 89 œ j Ex. 8.06b 11 > > 0% . .> Allegretto >. >œ œ œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. = 116 9 +5 b 2. . . q= ≤ Shostakovich b 10 œœ œœ œœ q n œ. b œœ. œ. œ. Cello Conce 3 3 Ex rto 1/i & b b C Ó 2 œ Œ . œ8.0Œ 6b 11œ 0% 1 n œ. œ. œ. œ. 2 div. « Al C ∑ .. 3 Ó # œ œ œ n œ legF retto = 116 1 ≤ 2 9 +5 Œ b ‘ C ∑ .. n œ. œ. œ. b 10 œ.3 œ œb2. œœ. œ. q = q.n œ.. œ≤.≤. œ. . Shostakovich ≤ # œ b œ œ b CellobConce 3 nŒœ œ Œ b œœœ œ œœ œ. œ2. œ. ≤. 1 & b 23 rtoŒ 1/i œ&œb Œb Cn œ Óœ œœ 11œ 2+4 .3 . . . div. œ œ œœC ∑ . 3 œ. œ#. nœœ.œ œœ œœœ. œn. œœ. F C Œ ≤ Œ 23 Ó b œ « œ b . œ Ó œ œ. . .1 Œ ‘ Œ2 œ Œ œŒœ œ ‘ œC œœ œœ∑ œ. .. c – i • SPn œ. Ex. . rœ4.1 . pra0a (Prœ.3actiœ ceb œalso on the sam œ C 8 Fo Œ ≤ œ c . = . 80 . ≤ e cti pitc : cin h.) œ erœ toœ achn100 acc 11 +4 œ œ+ g œpurpo ses, œ Off exaœ b œe off b baten3tsŒin# ord &-be ieve complete n œ œggedrat œ -beatb œ. œ. œj. • Praœ≤.cti boswb 2 accent accent& ependence bet andcpulseŒ. . . C œŒind . ce œ e ost œ œ ina œ 3 œ to pat œ .f œ.cedœ. for œ. . . Ó en œ œ >œ œ >œ >œ ~~~ Œ 2 we Œ œ ‘ Œ b œ terœ nsœ in disœpla m at fulœ œ ed. on/off œ > œ. œ >œ œ œ œ >œ œ œ ~~~ Ex. 4.10a (Pr Œ~ œ œ œ C Œ œ œl spe actice also on œ ~ œ œ œ œ ~ œ œ œ the c g = 80Al œ sam œ e pitch.) :leg 100ro + = 132 > ~~ œ > œ Off-beat œ ~ œ 3 œ œ œ >œ d ≤ ≤ accents > & c1 +10 .1≤ # œj œ≤. >œ 4 e Verdi ˘ ~ # # œ n œ œ ~ ˘ œ ~ 1 œ œ Trovatore II/4 on/ &off cœ >œ œ > > >œ œ œ #œœ. œœ œœ. œœœ œ.œ ˘œœ ~.~1~ ˘œ 3 ˘œ ˘œ ˘ f > œ œ œ# œ.œ œn œ.œ œ .œ œ ~~.~ ˘œ # œj œ> .. > Flegro = 132 Al g œ> n œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœj >œ ~~~ > 3 ≤ cre sc. ≤ > j ≤.[ = >100 1 +10 ≤ > Al1≤legro 4 Verdi # œ. 2# œ œ IIœ n+]œ œ4. œ .1 œ˘ . ˘œ ˘ 1 ˘ h # ≤ rit. œ Trovatore II/4 & c œ œ . ˘ 91 # œ F œ . n œ ≤ ≤. . œ œ ˘ œ 3 . œ ˘ . . œ Brahms œ œ ˘ j 2 . œ . b F J nœ œ Symphony 3/iv & b b b C œ. œ.. œ. n œ2. œ. œ. b œ. . œ. . n œ. œ œ œ2 œ4# œ n œœ. œ. œ n œ. œ # œ œ> œj >œ 2œ œ œ ≤ cresc. œ œ œ 2 œ bœ . ˘ Alƒ legSro ≤[ = 100 1 œ n œ œ œ œ.b ˘œ . ˘œ 1 ˘ œ+] S 1 3 1 h 2 S 4 II ben ma S œ # œ.≤n œrit.# œ Œ Œ ~~~~ 1 rc. 91 F œ. ≤ ≤ . œ. S 1 S1 S 1 Al legro Brahms b b C= 140 nJœ n œ. œ. œ œ2. œ. œ. œ. 2 . b œ. . 2 œ4 Symphony242 b 4 & b on 3/iv 3 n œ. œ. œ œ. œ œ.n œ. œ œ œ œ2 œ œ œ 2 b œ ˘ Kodály 2 Galánta & 4 œ # œ œ œ ƒœ # Sœ œ 3≤ œ # œ œ1 Sœ 1œ œ 1 4 n œ œ œ œ. œœ.b ˘œ . ˘œ 1 ˘ S œ œ œ > œ œ # œ. n œ # œ Œ Œ ~~~~ vn. 1-2 > œ > œ > œ œ Sœ œ œbenœma# œrc.œ n1œS 1œ S 1 S0 1 p m.ro258 = > Alleg 140octave > : one > œ # œ> œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 higher 242 on Al legro 4viv > ac œ œ Kodály e = 152 œ œ œ œ œ œj ‰ Œ > √ 2 534 Ga lánta 1 & 4> œ # œ 4 œœ œ œ># œ œ1 1œ # œ œ œ œ (œ3) . S œ # œ œ œ . œ œ œ & . vn. 1-2 p > œ œ # >œ œ # œ >>œ œœ œ œ >œœ œ œ2 œ œ >œ j Practice:0 œ # b > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ > œ > m. 258: one > vn. 1/I F poco a poc octave higher œœ œ œ œ œ > œ œ #œœ#>œœ2œ n242 o cresc. Allegro vivac e = 152 .. œ #>œ œœ> œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j ‰ Œ √ 534 1 3 # >kœ > œ # œ # œ >œ œ. S ~~~ & .. œ œ œ =œ80œ >œ # œ1 œ1 # œ >œ œ œ (>œ ) 2 > j : 160 b Pra œ œ œ ctic œ œ œ œ œ >œ 2 242 e: Pla agains vn.yin t o a poc 1/Ig F poc #œ . off-bea ts & c o ‰cresc. ‰ ∑‰ ‰ . œ ‰ œ≤ ‰ ‰ ≤ œ œ ‰œ ‰ . œ #œ œ œ œ ‰ œ . ‰ œ ‰ œ kmetronome œ > œ # œ # œ >œ œ ~~~ œ

g Practice:

r œ

1

2

h

25.11.2012 20:59:20

1

h

2

1

2

q

q

q

q

h

h

q

q

q

Wulfhorst_Or

chestralViolon

istCompanion

.indb 301

q

q

20.11.2012

q

= 80 : 160

22:26:15

Martin Wulfhorst The Orchestral Violinist’s Companion Vol. 1: Training · Practicing and Sight-Reading · Basic Orchestral Technique · Bowing Technique and Sound Production Vol. 2: Left-Hand Technique · Pizzicato and Other Special Techniques · Rhythm and Ensemble Playing · Notation and Performance Practice · Repertoire and Style · Profession and Career · Resources (2013) xxxi, 483 pages. English text, paperback, format 23 x 30 cm Approx. 1,000 excerpts from 340 works by 87 composers; approx. 30 illustrations, diagrams, and tables. ISBN 978-3-7618-1758-2 The volumes cannot be purchased separately.

The Author Prior to joining the Hamburg Symphony as Associate Concertmaster, Martin Wulfhorst was a member of the Berlin Deutsche Oper Orchestra and served on the faculty of Colgate University (NY), teaching violin and chamber music. His CDs include world premiere recordings of chamber music from the circle of Brahms and by contemporary American composers, issued by Jambus and Spectrum/Innova. He studied with Ernö Sebestyén in Berlin and with Masao Kawasaki and Itzhak Perlman at Brooklyn College, and received a Ph. D. in musicology from the City University of New York. In addition to publishing numerous journal and encyclopedia articles, he has contributed to performing editions of Bach’s orchestral violin solos, Mozart’s concertos and sonatas, Mendelssohn’s Concerto in E minor, and cadenzas for Beethoven’s Concerto, all published by Bärenreiter. www.martin-wulfhorst.com

Irvine Arditti, Robert HP Platz The Techniques of Violin Playing In English and German (2013) 128 pages, with a DVD; paperback ISBN 978-3-7618-2267-8 Irvine Arditti who is an extraordinary violinist and a specialist for contemporary music, worked together with the composer and conductor Robert HP Platz to produce this book on contemporary violin technique. It presents detailed explanations of the technical possibilities of the violin for performers and composers.

Resources available at http://www.orch.info

This publication takes into account the virtuosity of a new generation of soloists. These are soloists who with their exceptional ability, have succeeded in paving the way for a greater understanding of classical and contemporary music. The chapters on bowing techniques, vibrato, pizzicato, glissando, harmonics, tablatures, rhythm, and electronic sound production are illustrated with numerous musical examples and diagrams. Particularly helpful is the accompanying DVD, on which Irvine Arditti demonstrates and explains the described techniques. Chapters on

Your Music Dealer

Bärenreiter-Verlag · Karl Vötterle GmbH & Co. KG · 34111 Kassel · Germany www.baerenreiter.com · info@baerenreiter.com · Printed in Germany 1/1301/10 · SPA 50_48

the basics of violin technique and on Arditti’s personal experience with notable composers make the book equally interesting for non-violinists.


Wulfhorst - The Orchestral Violinist's Companion