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SERVING ENGINE BUILDERS & REBUILDERS SINCE 1964 2014 JULY

EngineBuilderMag.com

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Contents 07.14

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Features

ON THE COVER

Chevy’s Stroker Engines

Cutting Tools and Abrasives When it comes to machining late-model engines or doing high performance work, tolerances and finishes often have to be much tighter and smoother to meet OE-specifications. Consequently, you need up-to-date equipment and tooling that can hold close tolerances and deliver high quality finishes

26 Cummins Diesel ISX Engine The Cummins ISX engine is one of the workhorses of the Cummins brand. They are a dominating factor in power generation applications, mining and industrial settings. Since

Chevy’s 348 and 409 ‘W’ motors have managed to keep their popularity going. In fact, such a high number of quality parts are being made today for these motors that they may even be more popular than ever. Engine builders can assemble a 409, 509 or even a 609-inch W motor. So, it makes sense that with all those parts, there are a surprisingly high number of stroker combos available. Read how Strokers are ‘staying on track.’

32 Columns

board diagnostics which monitor emissions output and

Carley’s Corner ............................4 By Larry Carley

maximizes engine efficiency. See what makes these engines

Preventing flat tappet cam failures

2013, Cummins ISX engines have been equipped with on-

Tales From The WD ......................14 By Dave Sutton

50

Comebacks: What do we do when we have a failure?

Fast Lane......................................20 By Jim ‘Animal’ Feurer Keeping cylinders round and un-cracked

Memory Lane ..............................68 By Randy Rundle

Buying Diesel Pistons

The beginning of a life long friendship with “Speedy” Bill Smith

Diesel engines are high compression, high heat engines that demand a lot from their pistons. Their compression ratios improve thermal efficiency and fuel economy, but create more pressure. Diesel pistons also have to contend with more heat than gasoline counterparts. Read what makes a piston

60 COVER DESIGN BY NICHOLE ANDERSON

DEPARTMENTS Industry News & Events ............................................6 Shop Solutions ..........................................................12 Rebuilder Profile - Blake’s Remanufacturing..............78 On the Road ..............................................................81 2014 Supplier Spotlight..............................................83 Cores/Classifieds/Ad Index ........................................86 NASCAR Performance................................................88 ENGINE BUILDER founded Oct. 1964 Copyright 2014 Babcox Media Inc.

ENGINE BUILDER (ISSN 1535-041X) (July 2014, Volume 50, Number 07): Published monthly by Babcox Media Inc., 3550 Embassy Parkway, Akron, OH 44333 U.S.A. Phone (330) 670-1234, FAX (330) 670-0874. Periodical postage paid at Akron, OH 44333 and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ENGINE BUILDER, 3550 Embassy Parkway, Akron, OH 44333. A limited number of complimentary subscriptions are available to individuals who meet the qualification requirements. Call (330) 670-1234, Ext. 275, to speak to a subscription services representative or FAX us at (330) 670-5335. Paid Subscriptions are available for non-qualified subscribers at the following rates: U.S.: $69 for one year. Canada: $89 for one year. Canadian rates include GST. Ohio residents add current county sales tax. Other foreign rates/via air mail: $129 for one year. Payable in advance in U.S. funds. Mail payment to ENGINE BUILDER, P.O. Box 75692, Cleveland, OH 44101-4755. VISA, MasterCard or American Express accepted. Publisher reserves the right to reject any subscription that does not conform to his standards or buying power coverage. Advertising which is below standard is refused. Opinions in signed articles and advertisements are not necessarily those of this magazine or its publisher. Diligent effort is made to ensure the integrity of every statement. Unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by return postage.

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Carley’s Corner

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Preventing Flat Tappet Cam Failures F

lat tappet cams, with either solid or hydraulic lifters, are commonly used in many street and performance engines. It's a simple design that works well, provided there's adequate lubrication between the lifters and cam lobes to prevent wear that can wipe out a cam and/or lifters.

The problem is today's motor oils contain much less ZDDP anti-wear additive than in years past. Most oils contain less than 800 parts per million (ppm) of ZDDP to comply with emission requirements, because ZDDP that finds its way into the exhaust can shorten the life of catalytic converters and O2 sensors. Reducing ZDDP in motor oil does not create a wear problem for engines with roller cams or overhead cams because there is much less friction between the cam and lifters or valve followers than in a flat tappet engine. Oil companies say today's low ZDDP motor oils also provide adequate protection in older engines with flat tappet cams – provided the engine has stock valve springs. But the lower ZDDP levels have often proven to be woefully inadequate in engines with flat tappet performance cams and stiffer valve springs. The small contact patch between the cam lobes and lifters is the highest pressure point inside the engine. If there is insufficient oil between the cam lobes and lifters and/or the oil lacks sufficient levels of anti-wear This pile of debris is what was found inside a brand new set of EDM lifters that were never disassembled or cleaned after the oil holes were burned in the bottoms of the lifters.

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additive, the cam lobes and/or lifters may suffer the consequences. One way to address this issue is to use a ZDDP crankcase additive to add extra anti-wear protection to the oil, or to use a diesel oil, street performance oil or racing oil that contains 1500 ppm or more of ZDDP. The risk of flat tappet cam and lifter failure can also be minimized by using lifters that are made of high quality materials. The metallurgy in some low cost imported lifters won't hold up over time. Equally important is the crown finish on the bottoms of the lifters. The bottom of a flat tappet lifter isn't perfectly flat. It has a slight crown that is .0015 to .0025 inches higher in the center than around the edges. The crown helps the lifter rotate as it rides on the cam lobe (which has a slight taper to one side). On high revving engines with extremely stiff valve springs, a slightly lower crown (.0007 to .0012 inches) may be recommended. The bottom of the lifter also needs to be relatively smooth (but not polished) because a small amount of texture helps the oil spread across the surface. Hand polishing the bottom of lifters can often ruin the proper contour of the crown.

EDM Lifters Another way to assure good lubrication between a flat tappet lifter and cam lobe is to create a small hole in the bottom center of the lifter. This allows oil inside the lifter to dribble through the hole to maintain a thin film of oil between the moving parts. The size of the oil typically ranges from .015 to .026 inches in diameter, and is created by using an electric discharge machine (EDM) to burn the hole through the lifter. When done right, EDM lifters can provide an extra measure of protection in demanding applications. But if done incorrectly, they can cause problems down the road. The right way to manufacture an EDM lifter is to burn the hole in the bottom of the lifter BEFORE the lifter is assembled and finished. The bottom of

TECHNICAL EDITOR Larry Carley

the lifter can then be ground before the lifter is cleaned, assembled and put in the box. The quick and dirty way to make an EDM lifter (which is the WRONG way) is to take an assembled lifter out of the box, burn the hole through the bottom of the lifter, buff it up a bit and stick it back in the box without disassembling or cleaning it. The debris from the EDM hole burning process remains inside the lifter, which means the debris can migrate out of the lifter when the lifter is installed in the engine. The debris may travel up the pushrods and damage the rocker arms, it can exit the lifter and damage the cam lobes or bearings, or it may even plug up the oil hole itself negating the function of the hole that was created to improve lubrication. One lifter supplier showed us the considerable amount of debris that came out of a set of EDM lifters that were made the wrong way. Engine builders who are buying and installing these improperly made EDM lifters have no way of knowing the lifters contain debris inside. So, if you are not buying EDM lifters from a supplier who is making them the right way, you'd better disassemble, inspect and clean every lifter before you install them. Another alternative to EDM lifters is to use lifters that have had three evenly spaced flats machined vertically along the sides of the lifter body. The flats allow a small amount of oil to flow down the sides of the lifter for extra lubrication to the cam. Finally, it goes without saying to always use a high pressure assembly lube on the cam lobes and lifters when building the engine. Assembly lube will stick to the parts much better than oil, and provide protection during the critical break-in time. ■

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Industry News

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Getting “Pumped” For Pending Sale Schumann’s Sales & Service is Selling its Wet Sump Oil Pump Program By Greg Jones, managing editor

Verne Schumann has been around racing since the mid‘50s. He knows a thing or two about the industry and so does his business, Schumann’s Sales & Service, Inc., an engine parts supplier located in Blue Grass, IA, which Verne founded in 1970. Now, nearly 45 years later, Verne and his wife are beginning to ponder life after business and are putting the company’s wet sump oil pump program up for sale. Since 1970, Schumann’s has supplied the industry through high performance, OE rebuilders, AERA rebuilders, Ag manufacturers, and the Big 3 car manufacturers. Aside from dealing in oil pumps, Schumann’s also offers valve train parts, gaskets and piston rings, but those areas of the business won’t be up for sale for another year or so. Verne and Schumann’s Sales & Service got seriously involved in oil pumps about five years ago, and within the past three years the company has gained a good chunk of market share. Technology-wise, Schumann’s holds numerous patents, has patents pending and patents applied for. When Verne and his company analyzed the oil pump industry, they looked at both wet sump and dry sump. Dry sump oil pump systems, however, only constituted about 10 percent of total racecars nationwide and there was a lot of competition in the market. Wet sump oil pumps were in 90 percent of the racecars running and the market only had one major player involved. “I decided to go wet sump,” Verne says. When Verne analyzed the wet sump industry, it was real evident that over half the sales were small block Chevys. The small block Chevy, when it was invented in 1953, had a couple things that were 6 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

inefficient within the oil pump portion of the engine. No. 1, the inlet of the oil pump into the valve plate came in below the gears where it should come into the pump at gear level. No. 2, the ability of the bypass valving system was inadequate on a percentage of volume to properly address the pump function.

Schumann’s wet sump oil pump program resolved those issues with its dual feed pump, which is a patented product. The oil enters through two passageways – one to the bottom of the gears, which is traditional, and the other 50 percent of the oil comes into the side of the gears. “That’s been one of our mainstay products and it completely eliminates cavitation and aeration so that pump demand doesn’t outrun inlet supply,” Verne says. “That’s why we dominate with that pump. And with our pump the inlet is standard industry so you don’t need to buy a special pan or pick-up to use our pump.” In addition to its dual feed oil pump, Schumann’s has a patented energy recovery system in which it takes disposable oil that has been pressurized and compressed once already, and through a modulation system, puts that oil back into the intake stream and turbochargers that intake stream. The amount of oil bypass is typically between 20 and 40 percent in a regular pump, so that percentage of compressed oil arriving back into the intake stream already predispositioned at that volume and pressure creates a savings of 20 to 40 percent on the

input effort required to get the next volume of oil back out. “People are amazed when they run our energy recovery pump on a test stand how easy it turns over,” Verne says. Schumann’s produces a national product for national exposure for national acceptance through national distributors. Through all of the company’s endeavors Verne says it has probably developed and brought to market 25 industry firsts. Over the past couple years the company has proven it can compete in the oil pump industry. “We have our fair share of the market place today and we have a larger share of technology,” Verne says. “In the last three years we’ve been a strong player.” In an ideal world Verne is looking to sell Schumann’s in a merger/acquisition scenario where the business could double or triple in size, but would consider cash offers. The wet sump oil pump program requires 3,000 to 4,000 sq. ft. of floor space and Verne would like to keep the current sales force and

Industry Events August 28-September 2 NHRA Chevy Performance US Nationals Indianapolis, IN www.nhra.com or 317-718-8750

October 28-30 Engine Expo Novi, MI www.engine-expo.com

November 3-6 AAPEX 2014 Las Vegas www.aapexshow.com

November 4-7 2014 SEMA Show Las Vegas www.semashow.com

For more industry events, visit our website at

www.enginebuildermag.com or subscribe to

www.aftermarketnews.com.

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Industry News distributors in place and add on to them. “In our industry there is a good marriage out there for us, and we’re going to try our best to make the best decision for the oil pump program,” Verne says. “It’s an opportunity for somebody to pickup a very aggressive, turn key, dominant force in that segment with modern technology and patents.” For more information call 563-381-2416.

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two-stage (R2S) and three-stage (R3S) turbocharging systems and variable turbine geometry (VTG) turbochargers.

Caterpillar, Argonne Undertake Cooperative Virtual Engine Design

BorgWarner Awarded for Turbo Technologies BorgWarner Turbo Systems received an AutomotiveINNOVATIONS 2014 Award during a ceremony held recently in Frankfurt, Germany. Organized by the Center of Automotive Management (CAM) and PricewaterhouseCoopers, BorgWarner was honored in the Powertrain Technology category for a variety of turbocharging technologies, including regulated

CAM, an independent institute for empirical research on automotive and mobility issues in BergischGladbach, Germany, conducted the extensive study along with PricewaterhouseCoopers AG WPG, a consulting and auditing firm. The Automotive Innovations Study identifies future trends and innovation profiles of global automotive companies based on technical innovations in vehicles. The awards were presented following a comprehensive analysis of several suppliers around the world. BorgWarner’s turbocharging technologies also received a 2013 Automotive News PACE Award and a 2013 Automotive News PACE Innovation Partnership Award for its collaboration with BMW on the first R3S turbocharging system for diesel engines, a 2012 PACE Award for its VTG turbocharger with low-pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technology, and a 2008 PACE Award and PACE Environmental Award for its R2S turbocharging technology.

Pulstar Pulse Plugs Named Official Plugs Of Sportscar Vintage Racing Association

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prove that a vintage car can still benefit from new technology.” Pulstar Pulse Plugs Performance Expert Al Unser Jr. won the Charity Indy Legends Pro-Am Race with his amateur partner Peter Klutt, as part of the three-day inaugural SVRA Brickyard Vintage Racing Invitational at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. For more information , call 888800-6700 or visit www.pulstar.com.

The Sportscar Vintage Racing Association (SVRA) has named Enerpulse Technologies' Pulstar Pulse Plugs the “Official Plug” of the SVRA. "SVRA is thrilled to announce our new partnership with Enerpulse Technologies and their Pulstar Pulse brand,” said Tony Parella, SVRA president and CEO. “The advanced technology of a pulsed power spark plug is an exciting development in the racing world. We are happy to

Caterpillar Inc., in Peoria, IL, turned to U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and its Virtual Engine Research Institute and Fuels Initiative (VERIFI), where experts are developing new engine combustion models that incorporate accurate descriptions of two-phase flows, chemistry, transport phenomena and device geometries to provide predictive simulations of engine and fuel performance. Caterpillar and Argonne have entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) along with Convergent Science, Inc., in Madison, WI, to further explore ways to predict how things work in diesel engine performance and emissions before any experimental work is conducted. This is the first such CRADA undertaken by VERIFI since its inception this spring. Caterpillar anticipates that simulations developed by VERIFI’s researchers will reduce the time and cost of the design cycle for new engines, allow the rapid adaptation of fuels from new sources and lead to substantial increases in fuel economy while meeting future emissions standards. Advances in high-performance computing enable VERIFI researchers to run engine simulations in parallel on thousands, or even hundreds of thousands of processors. While efficient scaling of engine simulations to such massively parallel machines remains a significant challenge, such calculations will ultimately allow not only the rapid engineering of specific engine designs, fuels and operation

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Industry News conditions, but also allow their optimization. For more information, visit science.energy.gov.

Jasper Opens Additional Gas Engine Remanufacturing Unit Jasper Engines and Transmissions has expanded its Gas Engine Remanufacturing Division within the Jasper, Indiana facility. The Jasper facility utilized four remanufacturing lines (called PODs) in which an engine went from a core, to a finished product, within one remanufacturing unit.

Each POD has specific engine families that it remanufactures. This allows each POD to become specialized with those engine families, which helps Jasper produce a quality product and produce it more efficiently. The need for a fifth POD was realized as early as November, 2013, as increased sales of Jasper remanufactured Ford modular engines (4.6L and 5.4L Triton V8 and 6.8L V10) exceeded the Gas Engine Division’s maximum production. “We were selling 28 units per day at the start of the year,” said Randy Bauer, Jasper Facility Gas Division Manager. “We’re currently averaging 33 sales per day of these units. We were spending a considerable amount of overtime to produce these units. With this engine family remanufactured in a separate POD, we’ll reduce the amount of overtime that our associates are working, and at the same time improve the ergonomic part of their work.” The new POD, named POD 305, began gas engine remanufacturing on June 1 after months of development, and the relocation of

Jasper’s Differential Division. A team of associates handles engine remanufacturing duties within five areas: disassembly, prep and repair, head machining, block machining and assembly/testing. With the formation of the Power Drive Transmission facility later this year, the Gas Division is anticipating additional floor space within the Jasper Facility to transform their existing PODs in a similar fashion. For more information, www.jasperengines.com.

Latest Powerplants to Pack a Punch The much-anticipated HEMI Hellcat engine is Dodge and SRT’s first application of V8 supercharger technology, delivering an amazing 600-plus horsepower. This supercharged 6.2-liter HEMI V8 Hellcat engine is the most powerful V8 engine ever produced by the Chrysler Group. According to Chrysler, its breakthrough supercharged engine features a forged-steel crankshaft with induction-hardened bearing surfaces. The result is a crank so well-engineered it can withstand firing pressures of 110 bar (1,595 psi) – the equivalent of five family sedans standing on each piston, every two revolutions. And its unique, specially tuned crank damper has been tested to 13,000 rpm. High-strength, forged-alloy pistons – developed using advanced telemetry measurement – are coupled to powder-forged connecting rods

with high-load-capacity bushings and diamond-like-carbon-coated piston pins.

The supercharged 6.2L HEMI (seen above) has premium-grade, heat-treated aluminum-alloy cylinder heads that are optimized for superior thermal conductivity. And, its die-cast aluminum rocker covers are painted HEMI Orange. According to its engine designers, the blower used on the Hellcat is rated at 2,380 cc per rev, and spins at 14,600 rpm. The twin screw rotors have a special coating to reduce corrosion and to be conducive to higher tolerances and temperatures. Air enters through a port near the driver’s side marker light and is redirected through an 8-liter air box before reaching the blower. Two air to water intercoolers, mounted on the supercharger housing, offer supplemental cooling. An integrated electronic bypass valve regulates air boost, and a massive 92-mm throttle body controls the power. Fuel delivery is managed by half-inch fuel lines and

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Industry News 600 cc/min fuel injectors. The Hellcat engine also uses a high-tech lubrication system employing a high-flow gerotor pump, oil-toair heat exchanger and piston cooling jets. The race for higher production horsepower using supercharged engines has gained momentum. In early June, General Motors announced its Corvette Z06’s LT4 supercharged 6.2L V8 engine is SAEcertified at 650 horsepower at 6,400 rpm and 650 lb-ft of torque at 3,600 rpm. The new LT4 engine (seen here) is based on the same Gen 5 small block foundation as the Corvette Stingray’s LT1 6.2L naturally aspirated engine, incorporating several unique features designed to support its higher output and the greater cylinder pressures created by forced induction, including: •Rotocast A356T6 aluminum cylinder heads that are stronger and handle heat better than conventional alu-

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minum heads; • Lightweight titanium intake valves; • Machined, forged powder metal steel connecting rods for reduced reciprocating mass; • A high 10.0:1 compression ratio – for a forced-induction engine; • Forged aluminum pistons with

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unique, stronger structure to ensure strength under high cylinder pressures; • Stainless steel exhaust manifolds and an aluminum balancer that are lighter than their LT1 counterparts, • Standard dry-sump oiling system with a dual-pressure-control oil pump, and • A new 1.7L supercharger that spins at up to 20,000 rpm – 5,000 rpm more than the supercharger on the Corvette ZR1’s engine. Read more on these two engines, as well as other news stories geared toward engine builders, at www.EngineBuilderMag.com

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Organize and Save Organizing your parts inventory in your shop, building or warehouse is difficult whether it's a few pieces or a few thousand parts.

in our shop on the lathe, where it was also drilled and tapped. This can save you from damaging a new cam bearing and it is much easier to handle than a gear with the camshaft hanging off of it. Randy Torvinen Torvinen's Machine Menahga, MN

Yes, I’m in 100%

Start by thinking about what it's going to take to find that part later on. Have an area set aside for just parts, arrange it in categories and decide if shelves, wall hooks or a combination will work best. Because none of us are getting any younger and the numbers on the boxes seem to be getting smaller and smaller, we try to use the bottom shelf for only large boxes or over-stock items. There's nothing more annoying than ordering a part and then finding you had one in a corner later on. So keep them close and easy to find to save money and time. Ken Marlar Sterling Engine Parts Minneapolis, MN

More on Cam Gear Clearances I recently read a Shop Solution about using a cam and cam gear to test for gear to block clearance on late, small block Chevys. For years we’ve used an aluminum hub that's .002” under cam bearing bore size so a guy can do it when the block is stripped and cleaned. We turned down the scrap aluminum

Many years ago, before I got into the engine business, I met an attorney who told a story that made sense then and still applies today. He said, “When I represent a defendant, I get paid 100 percent up front, that way I only have to worry about keeping my client out of jail as opposed to both getting paid and keeping him out of jail. If I have to worry about both, I’m going to worry more about getting paid.” This applies today to many of our machine shop customers. Many times when I call on machine shops, I see jobs that are finished and just waiting to be picked up (and paid for) which creates a cash flow issue for the machine shop owner. They paid for the parts and the labor to build the engine and are forced to wait for their customer to come up with the cash. I do have a few customers who use the old attorney system of getting paid 100 percent before starting the job. Those shops can worry 100 percent of the time about building the best engine possible and delivering it on time, rather than being paid, and their customers know it. If your customer can’t afford to pay for the entire job before you start, what miracle to do you expect to happen for him to come up with the balance a week later when the job is done? Consider a 100 percent deposit on the job, and focus on completing the job on time, as promised. Mark D. Sarine Engine Rebuilders Warehouse, Inc. Dania Beach, FL

Engine Bearings: Friction and Pre-Lubrication Issues Overcoming friction is essential to successful bearing service. In order to understand friction, we must take a close-up look at a “smooth” surface. If we were to take a cross-section of a 12 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

polished piece of metal, we would see that even a ground and polished surface has peaks and valleys (If magnified, picture two files rubbing together). Measuring these peaks and valleys with a precision electronic instrument is how surface finish is determined. When two surfaces come together, the peaks make contact. Under load, the peaks tend to weld together. This is often called “micro-welding.” Sliding the mating surfaces across each other requires that these tiny welds be broken apart. This is friction. As the peaks are torn apart heat is created and tiny particles break off causing what we commonly refer to as wear. With very few exceptions, engine bearings rely on hydrodynamic lubrication for successful performance. What that means is, in operation the shaft floats on a thin film of oil. This is what keeps friction and wear to a minimum. Thickness of the oil film depends on a number of variables within the engine such as load, speed and oil viscosity. Oil film thickness should not be confused with clearance, which is the space between the shaft and bearing. Although the entire clearance space may be filled with oil, the shaft is forced off center by engine loads. This causes the shaft to operate very close to the bearing on one side of the clearance space. Generally speaking minimum oil film thicknesses in this loaded area of the bearing are typically in the range of only .0001” to .0002”. Even though these minimum oil film thicknesses are very small, engine bearings can have an almost unlimited life if proper operating conditions are established at assembly and maintained throughout the engine’s service life. The engine's oil film is generated by shaft rotation. At rest the shaft and bearing are in contact. On start-up the shaft rubs the bearing briefly. Running, the shaft pulls oil from the clearance space into the wedge shaped area between the shaft and bearing. The oil wedge lifts the shaft away from the bearing and supports it during engine operation. The force exerted by

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the oil wedge must be sufficient to offset the load applied by the engine or the oil film will collapse resulting in contact. Because oil must be present in the bearing clearance space in order for the shaft to build an oil film, pre-lubricating an engine before initial start-up is extremely important. Even though everything inside the engine was coated with oil at assembly, oil can be thrown off rather quickly once the crankshaft starts spinning. Actually pumping oil through the engine’s oil galleries is the only effective way to pre-lubricate the engine. This can be done on some engines by actually driving the oil pump with an old distributor shaft or oil pump priming tool in an electric drill. Where this is not feasible, supplying pressurized oil from an external source is the best way. Attach a hose from the oil source to the engine’s main oil gallery where the oil pressure-sending unit mounts. Pre-lubing in this way will prime the pump and filters and fill all oil passages. — Engine Pro Technical Committee with thanks to Mahle Aftermarket Inc.

Shop Solutions – The Power of Knowledge Engine Builder and Engine Pro present Shop Solutions in each issue of Engine Builder Magazine and at enginebuildermag.com. The feature is intended to provide machine shop owners and engine technicians the opportunity to share their knowledge to benefit the entire industry and their own shops. Those who submit Shop Solutions that are published are awarded a prepaid $100 Visa gift card.

Engine Pro is a nationwide network of distributors that warehouse a full line of internal engine components for domestic and import passenger car, light truck, heavy duty, industrial, marine, agricultural and performance applications. They also produce engine parts under the Engine Pro name that offer premium features at an affordable price.

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Tales From The WD

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“Failure Happens.” CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Dave Sutton

I

n our industry and business, one thing that has not changed is the inconvenience and total disruption to progress and profits brought along by a comeback. Unfortunately, “Failure Happens.” This might just be the next must-have bumper sticker. It could address our teenagers, our government and the occasional warranty. I won't address my teenagers and you don't want to get me started on the government here, so let's address the warranty. What do we do when we have a failure? We blame the failed part of course!! Why not? It's right here in front of us and it has obviously failed. It should be in one piece, but now it's two. It used to have a smooth finish, but now it looks like molten metal. It used to seal combustion in, but now there are metal rings exposed and gasket material is missing. Or maybe the lobes used to all be the same, but now some are flat. Isn’t it funny how we can read this and immediately recognize problems, but when it happens to one of our own engines the perspective changes? Immediately we eliminate any dimensional issues. Every machined surface is perfect, every torque spec met and every lifter was rotating freely in the block. Not to mention proper break-in procedures, pre-oiling and correct lubricants are beyond reproach. No sir, I'm quite convinced it was the part. After all, these things have worked for me in the past. Hence, they cannot be a problem in this case. Before you pick up the phone to call your supplier and start pointing fingers, I'd suggest a little self examination. Check everything. Ask yourself, “If I was hired to examine this engine built by another shop and

14 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

it had this failure, what would I be looking for? What could that builder have done wrong to create this problem?” Again, it's perspective. If you are willing to except the fact that something may not have been right when it left your shop, you will be a lot less prone to overlook a potential problem and less surprised when the parts manufacturer points out something you missed that may have caused the failure. I had a recent example of a machining mishap. A good friend and shop owner was telling me about a current project. A regular customer of his thought he'd save some money and had bought a so-called “crate engine” off the web. It had come from a shop near me and my friend thought he needed to share what goes on out there in the machine world. This engine had some good parts and what the consumer had felt was a fair price. For reasons unknown, he decided to bring the engine in and just have it checked out before installation in his project. First observation was less then impressive, but this was from someone who is extremely meticulous. But it wasn't until he put the dial-bore gauge into a cylinder that the true problem was found. Somehow a cylinder bore that should have measured 4.030” was an additional .003” oversize. The cylinder bore was already worn out and the engine had not been fired. Now. I still don't know what shop near me this motor came from, nor do I want to know. To my friend, this was just an example of what might be going on in the rebuilding industry to give us all a bad name. What I see is just an example of how we might think everything is perfect when in fact it is not. After all, seven holes were perfect.

Was someone in a hurry, distracted or interrupted? I don't know, but the fact is one in eight were not right. You could apply this observation to head, rod or main bolt torque, crank journal grinding and polishing, piston ring installation and so on and so on. Any time you have multiple operations, the odds go up that one may not be correct. Whether it's one in eight, or one in 34, the odds are against you if you are not 100 percent on your game when machining or assembling an engine. Before we get to installation problems and pre-existing conditions, let’s address problem areas you may not normally have to measure or machine and may be taking for granted. After 40+ years in this business, I've heard a lot of stories and heard about a lot of problems. I will not say I've heard it all. Let's just see what tomorrow brings. Recently, right here in the pages of Engine Builder there was a “Shop Solution” based on technical information from Mahle-Clevite about camshaft bearings. In that tip, I was surprised to learn that just about every engine manufactured to use cam bearings has the original semi-finished bearings bored to size in the cylinder block. After all these years of phone calls about cam bearing installation problems, I finally get the picture. Those bores and the bore alignment did not need to be perfect from the factory. But it does need to be perfect to install new finished machined cam bearings. So if you don't check the cam bore diameter before you install the bearings, you shouldn't be surprised when you have troubles getting the

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14-18 Tales WD 7/23/14 2:48 PM Page 16

Tales From The WD new bearings in the hole, or when the cam won't go into the newly installed bearing or won't turn freely. This is a fact and you have only two choices. You can check the bore before installation, or after you've destroyed a new bearing. On the subject of cam bearing alignment, I was once asked to call on a very high performance shop that was trying to build high horsepower, dependable small block Chevy engines under the then new 2-bbl carburetor rules. The rules also called for the use of stock blocks. To meet his goals this builder knew he had to look at every aspect of the engine and needed to extract as much power from each cylinder as possible. Through some meticulous measuring, he found that the cam tunnel rarely followed the main bearing tunnel exactly. To fix this problem, he setup and align-bored cam tunnels parallel to the main bore. In some cases it took careful setup to correct the problem accurately with a .040” oversize bearing. This means the bore was off in one or more directions as much as .020”. I could not help but apply that knowledge to camshaft failure. If your cam tunnel is going down and out at a small angle away from the front of the engine, how does this affect the cam lobe taper and lifter face radius that keeps the lifter turning? Throw in some lifter bore variance and who knows what the total stacking of these angles will produce. In another example I had a chance to look a big block Chevy cylinder block that had seen maybe 100,000 miles of service as a stock engine before it became a high performance project that continually ate every performance camshaft the shop installed. It wasn't until the motor was finally pulled from the car and inspected that it was discovered how far the lifter bores were out of alignment with the cam lobe. The distributor gear hit the cam gear correctly and the timing chain was aligned and straight, but when you put a light down the lifter bore you may have been as surprised as we were to see only about half of the cam lobe. It had somehow survived with stock spring pressure, but ate itself up when subjected to a performance grind and high pressure springs. Needless to say, this all started with a claim of a “soft” camshaft. Today, it doesn't just seem engines 16 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

are lasting longer, they are lasting longer. At one time we were impressed if an engine went 100,000 miles without major repair. We could also bank on the fact that once they reached the six-digit mileage they were ready for a rebuild. Somewhere along the way, someone threw a wrench into the works. A second industrial revolution was upon us. The electronic revolution infiltrated our grocery getters. After a brief period to sort things out, modern electronics have made a huge impact on the life of the internal combustion engine and consequentially on our businesses. Like most things, when everything is in good order, great results happen. If your computer, ignition system, fuel pump, injectors and all the electronic sensors and components are working properly, long service, good fuel

mileage and good performance happen. But what happens when any part of the system goes bad? At this point there is a good chance the engine will end up in your shop. To start, you teardown the engine, find the source of the oil consumption, the cause of the noises coming from inside or the failure. We estimate, machine, acquire the needed parts and assemble an engine that is as good as or better than the day it left the factory. Yet, we can still have a comeback. “How in the world can this happen to me? What happened?” I'd say we are asking questions at the wrong time. I ask,” Why did the engine come in to the shop in the first place? What failed and why?” Given that many engines make it 250,000 to 300,000 miles, why didn't this one? Then I'd ask, “Did that cause a failure the second time?” If the engine had a bad injector and was running lean in one hole, was this addressed before these parts were

bolted on to the new engine? Several years ago, the Windsor style Fords suffered from a crossfire condition that would cause detonation and destroy pistons. More than once I heard about failures that were traced back to unrepaired or replaced ignition wires that caused the remanufactured engine to fail just like the first. The new modular Ford V8s have been known to have catastrophic failures that send debris back up into the intake manifold and plenum. It's no mystery that this debris will make its way back into the new engine if the manifold and plenum are not cleaned properly. Detonation was a problem for the early version of these motors. The engine controls that were at fault and caused the failure will become equal opportunity destroyers for engine number two, as will any debris. I was recently contacted about such a failure. To make matters worse, this engine is supercharged. There were problems with the first engine. The car was sold off cheap as a project for some unsuspecting buyer. Within 60 miles the new engine grenaded a piston. There is not enough of this hypereutectic piston left to really examine to determine what happened. All eyes and blame are on the piston. A lack of understanding that though they may be tougher than a traditional cast piston, a “hyper” piston is still a cast piston, and if you hit it with a hammer, it will shatter like glass. I do know that there are seven other pistons that look good, and since they were all made at the same time, all from the same batch, it is not fair to simply blame the piston. I fear that the original problem that caused a failure was never addressed. Add a little boost and you have catastrophe. Now there is nothing the parts manufacturer and the parts distributor has any control over here. Granted, you could say the same for the engine builder who did not do the install. I do not know if he even installed the manifold. But now the car owner is upset, ignorant to the fact that it took something more than an act of God to destroy the piston. In the mess that ensued, who could identify any additional foreign matter amongst the piston fragments to blame for contacting and destroying the new slug. More likely it is something in the

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14-18 Tales WD 7/23/14 2:48 PM Page 18

Tales From The WD controls for the fuel or ignition system that caused this. If I understand correctly, the install and initial firing of the new engine was done by the car owner and a buddy – not a professional. I can only hope a “Pro” would have thought to look into what caused the first failure, but I am not very confident this would've been the case. There is also the stark comparison between the failure rates for some P.E.R.'s verses custom builders. The custom builder gets a chance to look at the original engine and hopefully ask and detect what caused the failure. Not so the P.E.R. He may not see the core motor for a week or more after he delivers his remanufactured product. It generally goes to a teardown room and no one thinks twice about the condition of this “core.” This is a mistake in my mind. If a close inspection was performed and any cause and effect noted, this could be used to protect you from any future failure claim. So when given the chance up front, there is really no excuse for the custom builder to not

ask and note problems right from the start. If anything is found that may have caused the original motor to fail, it might be noted on your work order. It should be stipulated that the engine carries no warranty if this condition is not fixed before the new engine is fired. At this point, we've made sure all of our machining processes and our assembly was flawless. All the ignition and fuel system components check out well. We've also verified that the original engine failure was completely different and unrelated to the warranty condition. So now we have no place to turn but to look at a possible part failure. If this is the case, handle it correctly. Get the required warranty claim form from the part manufacturer. Fill it out completely. Supply all the required receipts pertaining to the original engine job and installation, and all the receipts for the current repair. Create the perfect paper trail. Show that everything was done correctly and outline exactly why it could only have

Circle 18 for more information 18 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

been a part failure. Submit everything for inspection and be patient. Usually these things take time. One last suggestion, do not put together a request for the most amount of reimbursement, with the thoughts that you'll be happy with what you get. I have been far more successful with claims that were fair or even a little less than fair. Put together a parts list; do not add tax or any other shop fees. For labor, use book time and a $35-40.00 per hour charge. Enough to cover you or your employee's time. This is not something that will be profitable. There is a cost to doing business, and in this case it might be a small loss of your time. This too must be explained to the installer. The best that can happen for all is to try to make it right for the consumer. Get the job done and get their vehicle back on the road. The reimbursement, whatever it will be, may or may not come in time. Sometimes things are out of our control. Sometimes, “Failure happens.” ■

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Fast Lane

20-24 Fast Lane 7/23/14 2:52 PM Page 20

‘Cracking’ Down on Block Fillers I

n earlier articles, I mentioned filling dedicated, drag racing iron blocks to keep cylinders round and keep them from cracking. Many drag racers still practice that modification. Today, racers have the luxury of a low-cost block filler called Hard Blok, provided by Joel Bayless. Back in my early Pro Stock days, when I was racing Cleveland small blocks, we had to use a very expensive Devcon aluminum epoxy. It was easy to use and it poured like cake batter.

It bonded to anything, had nil shrinkage or expansion when hardened and weighed slightly less than the water it displaced. But, it was very expensive. Today, the cost of that epoxy needed to do a small block would be about $500. On the other hand, a tub of Hard Blok is about $85 for a short fill and $92 for the larger tub. Hard Blok is not quite as easy to use as the aluminum liquid epoxy, but the $400 saved to safely do the same thing is well worth the slight extra effort, in my opinion.

BY JIM “ANIMAL” FEURER

I did have a couple 427 aluminum Cleveland blocks that had 4.125 ID Ramsco steel sleeves. The sleeves might bend a bit, but never break. So I did not fill those blocks. A big thing to consider before filling blocks to the deck or even 1.5" below, as I did, is that block is then dedicated to short term cooling. There is no release for block fillers that I know of. Plus, I am not sure about cooling even for some bracket racing. At RT 66 Drag Strip in Joliet, they go "round robin" by the

Here is a shot of Jim’s ‘Monolith’ 672 which actually ran its best in 1989 with a cracked cylinder.

20 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

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Fast Lane stroke crank from my 370" engine. With 4.125 bore and 3.625 crank I created 388 CI. It had great rod ratio. This was the AHRA Nitrous Small Block Pro Stock era. My next race was the AHRA Summer Nationals at Kansas City. First run with the 388 – wow!! That combo felt as strong as my aluminum 427. Suddenly, This is the Cleveland block half into the that a customer from Indirun, my anapolis had filled with a Zephyr fiberglass resin. The engine nosed over never got through the and my car quarter-mile. The cylinders filled with were wacked out of round so bad that the pistons grabbed oil smoke. No burnt the cylinder walls above the aluminum ring package. Note the smell? Just tapped hole for a drain cock, two inches below deck. oil. Oil was Unfortunately, this poor old everywhere. semis. For Pro Stock, it was OK. block just sits around and We We towed back and had at least rusts. I fear to resize the switched cylinder or replace sleeves an hour between rounds. engines to for fear that the resin may Before Hard Blok, many my back up, react again. racers and engine builders the 409" experimented filling blocks iron, Devcon with various substances. Many had filled Cleveland, and got through some very shocking and ill effects. the weekend with a semi-final finish. Way back about 1982, I had a When I got back to my shop in customer's block someone filled Lacon, IL., I pulled that hurt 388” with some sort of industrial engine apart. The sleeved bores were equipment, concrete type grout. Like wacked out of round so bad the concrete, the substance had been pistons were scored above the ring mixed with water. package from rubbing the extremely I chased little dots of rust, not distorted cylinder walls. only on the outside of the block, but Apparently that sleeved, bored to also on the nice cylinder bores I had .125 over, and resin filler method torque honed. I had to wait weeks to was a failure. Hard Blok was not on assemble that engine before that the market till 1986, so it was back to block quit bleeding those tiny rust the high dollar Devcon liquid spots. aluminum epoxy. In the early ‘80s, another negative When I switched to Mammoth block filling result I experienced was motors in ‘84, those 4.625 bore when my good 427 aluminum block cylinders in the A/R aluminum was hurt. In desperation I acquired a blocks maintained integrity pretty Cleveland block from some joker in well, until we started using nitrous Indy that had talked me into trying in those engines. it in my own racecar. By ‘87, I started running as an He had sleeved every cylinder Outlaw Pro Stock, using nitrous and filled it 3/4 of the way under with my 672" A/R Ford Boss Hemi the deck with fiberglass resin and we named the "Monolith." The hardener. The block was then bored block, like my next four mammoth and honed to 4.125. I put it together engines, was an aluminum Allen using new special order BRC 4.125 Root design with 11.2 deck. When pistons and Brooks windage rods. using nitrous, the inboard cylinders For a crank I borrowed my 3.625 2 & 3 and 6 & 7 would go out of 22 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

round .003” to even .005”. The problem was the thin aluminum between those center cylinders would crack. In some cases the cracks would eventually travel the radius to the main saddle bosses. Then a welding repair was in order, including reinforcement between the cylinder sleeves. When only “freshening up” the still useable engine with out of round cylinders, I would hone with a deck plate using a course stone with light pressure so the stones would trim the high spots. Too much pressure and too fine stone, the hone would just follow the irregularity and make matters worse. It was tricky. With patience I could get the distortion to just under .001 and still keep useable piston clearance. Once that was reached then a light as possible plateau hone. When ordering pistons for nitrous or power adder engines, I always ordered several extra pistons in progressive sizes to counter future excessive piston to wall clearance. Another too loose clearance fix was to knurl the pistons on my trusty Perfect Circle piston knurling machine. Knurling does work. Even on race engines. Those sleeves used in the A/R blocks were not prone to cracking. Like the Ramsco sleeves in my earlier aluminum Cleveland blocks, they would bend, but not break. However, somehow I managed to crack one of those sleeves. I had five A/R Boss Hemi's since 1984. So one cracked liner in all that time is not too bad. While starting on a routine freshen, intending to install new aluminum rods, I discovered #2 cylinder with a small crack. The cylinder with the crack, when leaked down, tested the same as the rest for cranking compression. All were 190/195. The engine had been running fine. Plugs looked perfect. The perpendicular crack started just below the top lip and went about .500 down. I had put my recently freshened 666" engine "Damien" in the Zephyr for two USSC contracted bookings. I wanted to take the Monolith for backup. We were running out of time. I reasoned that engine was

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Fast Lane running ok with that crack. No telling how long it had been that way. It had not been apart for 30 runs. If we need it for a few runs it should be OK. No time to fix it, the rods have only 30 runs, so I put the heads and intake back on and got it ready to load in the travel crate. Another problem arose. Zeke, my racecar, was still on the stands. I had started Damien earlier. I still needed to tweak the NOS/Animal nitrous fogger system. In doing so I warmed the engine up again, cranked the throttle enough to burst the nitrous. Whooom! After I did, smoke started pouring out the driver side header big time. Oh man! I had hurt a piston. Later, I found when I burst the nitrous # 6 had cracked the ring land above # 2 ring groove. I found several like that with nitrous engines during my many years. The land cracks behind and away from the piston. You cannot see it. To check, use a small screw driver in the upper and lower ring grooves, and

carefully apply pressure up and down. If that land is cracked behind there, it will move. We needed to get wrapped up and on the road to Englishtown, NJ, nearly 1,000 miles away. No time to fix Damien. My regular crew help that was to go East with me, and a friend, were already here at my shop. We changed engines, putting the Monolith with the cracked sleeve liner back in, started the engine and it ran fine. (I refrained from bursting the nitrous!) We got to Englishtown in the nick of time for the Wednesday “Night of Fire” and ran the best times and MPH ever with that old Zephyr and the Monolith with a cracked cylinder. We looked at plugs every run. They were storybook examples. All exactly perfect readings. On Saturday night, our USSC Circuit was booked at Atco, NJ. We had time when we got there and pulled the passenger side head off. I measured the crack with a machinist 6-inch ruler. The crack had

Circle 24 for more information 24 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

moved about .060” further down. We had made four full hard runs. I determined the crack must have moved .015” a run. We put the Monolith back together. We ran our USSC Chicago style program and got in the finals. We ran well, but not as well as Walter Henry. We went back home and checked the crack. It had moved down .060” more. We had made four more runs at Atco. Cranking compression was still even at 190+. We had a UDRA finals at Great Lakes that coming weekend and I capped the UDRA championship for the second year in a row, winning Outlaw Pro Stock with the Monolith and the cracked cylinder. When I later removed the passenger side head at my shop, I measured the crack. You guessed it. The crack had moved down another .060”. We had made four more great runs at Great Lakes. ■

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Cutting Tools

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Cut to the Chase: Looking Into Cutting Tools and Abrasives for Today’s Engine Work BY LARRY CARLEY, TECHNICAL EDITOR

High speed CNC porting tooling requires plenty of coolant to flush away chips and to carry away heat.

W

hen it comes to way back in the 1930s for cutting machining late model cast iron and steel. There are engines, tolerances are various types of carbide including generally much tighter and finishes tungsten carbide and titanium often have to be much smoother to carbide. meet original equipment Small particles of carbide are specifications. bonded together with cobalt in a If you're doing performance sintering process to manufacture work, there's even less margin for various types of tool inserts, drill error. Consequently, you need upbits, end mills, ball mills, cutting to-date equipment and tooling that tools and reamers. can hold close tolerances and deThe toughness and durability of liver high quality fina carbide tool will ishes while boosting PolyCrystaline Diamond productivity at the (PCD) tooling works best on same time. aluminum, while Cubic Boron Most of today's Nitride (CBN) tooling is best boring, honing, resur- for surfacing iron. facing and valve and guide machines have the speed, rigidity and accuracy to achieve these kind of results, but they also require tooling that can match the performance capabilities these machines are designed to deliver. Carbide has served the automotive engine building industry well for many years, and it is still an affordable option for shops that can't afford the higher initial cost of superabrasives, like PCD (PolyCrystaline Diamond) or CBN (Cubic Boron Nitride). Carbide was first introduced

26 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

depend on the type of carbide, how much cobalt, nickel, molybdenum or other metals are in the alloy, whether the tool is solid carbide or a cemented carbide over a steel substrate, and whether the tool has an outer coating. For some applications such as a fluted reamer for bronze or manganese valve guides, plain carbide often works best. But, for reaming cast iron guides, a coated carbide may be better.

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Cutting Tools

For milling and boring cast iron and aluminum heads and blocks, carbide works well on both. But, carbide has more of a challenge cutting harder metals such as ductile iron and Compacted Graphite Iron (CGI). The harder the metal, the faster the tool wears and the more often you have to replace your tooling. It's the same story with cutting speeds. The higher the cutting speed, the more heat that's generated and the shorter the tool life. Coated carbides hold up better than uncoated carbides, and some coatings have been specially developed for machining ductile iron and CGI. Even so, CBN would probably be the best choice for machining the harder grades of iron because of its increased toughness and tool life. Even though the initial cost of CBN is higher than carbide, CBN can actually save you money in the long run because the tooling lasts longer. If you're boring cylinders in cast iron engine blocks, carbide works fine, as long as you keep the speed and depth of cut within limits. The best results are typically achieved with a boring speed of 400 RPM with standard carbide tooling. At that rate, you can probably bore 40 to 50 cylinders before you have to replace or rotate the tooling. On the other hand, if you are using a high speed boring machine, you'll have to use CBN because carbide just won't hold up at higher cutting speeds. With CBN and high speed boring equipment, you can bore a cylinder in 30 to 40 seconds at 1,200 to 2,500 RPM. The only drawback to faster boring speeds is that may leave a rougher surface with fractured metal that will require additional honing to get it down to base metal for a proper surface finish. The best choice for machining aluminum blocks and heads is PCD. Aluminum chips tend to stick to CBN, but not PCD, so if you don't want to use some type of lubricant/coolant when machining aluminum, use PCD inserts to achieve the high quality finish you want. 28 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

Like CBN, PCD is extremely hard and provides long tool life, but it can react chemically when used on iron, and lose its cutting edge. If you want to use CBN to resurface aluminum, a light coating of soap, wax or WD-40 can prevent the aluminum chips from sticking to the CBN tooling and smearing the surface. To achieve a high quality finish with any Line honing a cylinder block is type necessary for proper bore of alignment and geometry.

tooling, use a higher cutting speed and lower feed rate with a very shallow cut on the final pass (less than .001 inch). With a single insert cutter spinning at 1,000 to 1,500 RPM, keep the feed rate under two inches per minute. This should produce a surface finish in the low teens (RA or Roughness Average). Just as important as using the right tooling, speeds and feeds is the rigidity of the equipment itself. To achieve today's flatness and smoothness requirements, a surfacer must be a very rigid machine. The

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Cutting Tools work table, cutting head, shaft and motor must all be strong and constructed to extremely tight tolerances. Any flexing or movement in these parts will affect the quality of the surface finish regardless of the type of inserts you are using. So, if you're not getting the kind of surface finishes you want, don't blame the inserts you are using. It might be the equipment itself.

High-Tech Tool Coatings The science of coatings has come a long way in recent years. Coatings generally improve tool durability and wear resistance significantly compared to uncoated tools. Some coatings can extend tool life up to 10X or more. Coatings can also reduce the amount of power needed to cut metal while reducing heat buildup in the tool and on the work surface. Coatings such as TitaniumCarbo-Nitride (TiCN) and

Zirconium-Nitride (ZiN) may be used to add wear resistance. Titanium-Nitride (TiN) is a gold colored coating that may also be used for wear resistance. Aluminum Oxide (alumina or Al2O3) or Zirconium-Oxide (ZrO2) may also be used to provide thermal and corrosion protection. Some inserts have multiple coatings to provide multiple benefits. Coatings may be applied by a Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process or by a Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) process. Coatings applied by a CVD process are usually thicker, provide increased wear resistance and usually more suitable for higher cutting speeds. CVD is often used to apply TiCN and Al2O3 coatings on tools. Coatings applied with a PVD process may be extremely thin (only 0.25 to 5 microns thick), but leave a sharper cutting edge best suited for slower cutting speeds. PVD coatings are often used on solid carbide tools as

well as positive rake inserts. PVD coatings also work well on inserts used for intermittent cuts (like resurfacing cylinder heads). Coatings obviously add expense to manufacturing of tooling, but when you consider the advantages that coatings often provide (longer tool life and better surface finishes), they are well worth the cost. The best advice is to follow the tool supplier's recommendations for which type of coatings will work best for a given application.

Cutting Valve Seats The majority of cylinder heads today are aluminum, which means the heads may have to be machined to accept new valve seats and/or valve guides if the original parts are loose or damaged. Valve seats are typically refinished with multi-angle valve seat cutters which include 3-angle, 4angle, multi-angle and even continuous curve bits. Guides can be reamed

Circle 29 for more information EngineBuilderMag.com 29

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Cutting Tools

to oversize to accept valves with oversized stems, or enlarged to accept valve guide liners or new guides. Carbide or diamond honing Tungsten carbide stones can both deliver a highvalve seat cutters with quality finish. Diamond stones various angle profiles cost more initially, but can and diameters have hone far more cylinder bores made valve seat and with greater consistency finishing into a onethan the carbide units. step operation, even for multi-angle valve jobs. Individual seat angles can still be cut the "old fashioned way" using several single angle cutters, but why make extra work for yourself if it can be done in a single step with a multi-angle cutter?

Honing Abrasives Honing abrasives may be used for line honing main bores and cam bores as well as cylinder bores. Honing may be multi step as when rough honing followed by finish honing, or it may be used following a boring operation to smooth the bores to final dimensions and surface finish specifications. One of the concerns with cylinder honing is tool flex and the problems it can create in the bore geometry and finish. For some operations, a honing abrasive that cuts freely may be more important than the longevity of the honing stones. Thinner stones combined with honing heads that are more closely matched to match a specific bore diameter rather than a broad range of bore sizes is a current trend in shops today. According to one supplier of honing stones, most engine builders are using metal bonded diamond or CBN honing abrasives rather than conventional vitrified abrasives such as silicon carbide or aluminum oxide for their honing operations. Silicon carbide works well with ordinary cast iron, while aluminum oxide is better for harder alloys. Conventional vitrified abrasives cut cleanly and do an excellent job of finishing cylinders – as long as you use the right honing procedure to achieve a bore finish that meets OEM specs or the ring manufacturer's requirements. But, conventional honing stones also wear quickly, so 30 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

you have to constantly monitor the honing process and compensate for stone wear to keep the bores round and straight. By comparison, diamond and CBN honing abrasives wear very little so they cut more consistently. This usually allows more uniform finishes and better overall results. A set of conventional vitrified honing stones might handle up to 30 V8 blocks (240 to 260 cylinder bores) before they're worn out and have to be replaced. A set of metal bond diamond honing stones, on the other hand, might do as many as 1,500 V8 engine blocks (12,000 cylinder bores) before they have to be replaced. That's a huge difference!

So, although the initial cost of the diamond honing stones is much higher than conventional honing stones, their longer service life more than makes up the difference over the long run. Because diamond is a harder material and wears more slowly than conventional abrasives, it cuts differently and requires more pressure. Diamond tends to plow through a metal surface rather than cut through it. This can generate heat and distortion in the cylinder bore if the wrong type of equipment, pressure settings or lubrication are used in the honing process. When done correctly, though, it can actually improve bore geometry

26-31 Cutting Tools 7/15/14 11:50 AM Page 31

Cutting Tools by producing a rounder, straighter hole. Diamond is also good for rough honing cylinders to oversize because it can remove a lot of metal fast. Finishing requires at least a two-step procedure, otherwise the surface will be too rough. If you're switching from conventional stones to diamond, you'll generally have to use a higher number grit to achieve the same RA (roughness average) when finishing a cylinder. For example, if you have been using #220 grit conventional stones to finish cylinders for chrome rings, the equivalent diamond stones might be a #325 grit. If you have been using #280 grit conventional stones to hone for moly rings, the diamond equivalent might be #550 grit stones. The actual numbers will vary somewhat depending on the brand and grade of the stones. Diamond honing stones tend to

leave a lot of folded and torn metal on the surface, so the bores usually need to be brushed to remove the debris when they are finished. Many different names are given to the same tool and process. Some call it a plateau hone, a soft hone, a whisker hone or an ultra-fine hone. But they all do the same thing: they sweep across the surface to remove jagged peaks, folded and torn material. A cylinder bore must also have a certain amount of cross hatch and valley depth to retain oil. It must also provide a relatively flat surface area to support the piston rings. Ring manufacturers typically specify a surface finish of 16 to 25 RA for moly faced rings. These numbers can be easily obtained with diamond stones and brushing. When finishing the cylinders with a brush, only light pressure is required. The RPM of the brush should be similar to that which the cylinder

was originally honed, and no more than 16 to 18 strokes should be applied (some say 8 to 10 strokes is about right). Too many strokes with a brush may produce too smooth a finish that doesn't hold oil. Reversing the direction of rotation while brushing helps to remove the unwanted material on the surface. The end result should be a cylinder that provides immediate ring seal with little if any wear on the cylinder wall or rings when the engine is first started. Brushing the bore after honing makes a huge improvement in the surface finish, whether diamonds or conventional honing stones were used to hone the bore. Brushing should lower the overall RA down to 8 to 12, with RPK (relative peak height) numbers in the 5 to 15 range, and RVK (relative valley depth) numbers in the 15 to 30 range. â– 

Circle 31 for more information EngineBuilderMag.com 31

Chevy Stroker

32-40,82 Chevy Stroker 7/15/14 11:46 AM Page 32

BY JOHN CAROLLO, CONTRIBUTING WRITER

C

hevy’s 348 and 409 ‘W’ motors are having no problem keeping their popularity going. In fact, judging by the numbers of high quality parts being made for these motors today, they may even be more popular than ever. The quick and dirty of W motors and their parts today is that you can sit at your computer, whip out your credit card and ‘build’ a 409 without having to buy one original part. While that in itself is pretty mind blowing, you also have the option to build a 509 or even a 609-inch W motor. So, it makes perfect sense that with all those parts, there are a surprisingly high number of stroker combos available.

W Origins Chevy's W-series 348 and later the 409 became legends on the street, and in particular the 409 also became a legend on the track. In the early 1960s, these engines powered

32 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

a variety of GM vehicles and the Z11 Impalas at the drag strip. While these engines enjoyed a hay day in the early 1960s and pop culture status in the hot rod community, higher horsepower Mark IV Chevy big-block engines overshadowed these W-engines by the late 1960s. But recently, the 348s and 409s have enjoyed a high-performance renaissance and many speed manufacturers are making heads, blocks and virtually every part for these engines.

Half and Half A quick history lesson shows us that Chevy used stroking to grow the 348 into the 409. One half of the move from 348 to 409 was an increase of .1875 inches in the cylinder bore. A stock 348 has a bore of 4.125 inches and a 409 has the bigger bore of 4.3125 inches. The other half was the stroke change from 348s to 409s that went from 3.25 to 3.50 inches for a net

gain of a quarter inch. Together, the new bore and stroke gained those 61 cubic inches. Of course, there was more to do such as redesign the block for both clearance and better water flow. But, the basics are still the same. Chevy did it one more time when they created a handful of motors used exclusively for drag racing in late ‘62/early ‘63. Those motors would turn out to be the Holy Grail of W engines, the rare Z11, 427 cubic inch motor. They’re also a good example of how stroker methodology works. To make the Z11 427, Chevy actually used a standard 409 block with its stock bore of 4.3125 inches. Because the W motor was pretty much ‘capped’ at that size and could not physically go much larger, any additional cubic inches would have to come from increasing the stroke. Chevy did just that and added .150 inches to the stock 409 stroke, for a 3.650 inch stroke.

32-40,82 Chevy Stroker 7/15/14 11:46 AM Page 33

Chevy Stroker Of course, a newly-designed set of iron heads and aluminum intake let those extra 18 inches breathe much better and become a legend in the Super Stock wars.

427 Version Along the lines of Z11 specs, noted 409 guru, Lamar Walden, tells us a homemade version of the famous Z11 short block can be simply made by using that same 3.650 stroke crankshaft in a stock 409 block with a stock bore size. No extra crankshaft clearance work is needed on the block and all the bearing sizes are the same so it becomes a ‘drop in.’ The final results will yield a 427 cubic inch W motor with your choice of heads and intake.

Below the Block Another aspect dealing with the increased crankshaft clearance required with building a W stroker engine goes beyond the block – or more accurately, below the block. The oil pans from 348 and 409 motors have an interchangeable bolt pattern, but are different. While that may sound confusing, think of it this way. The oil pan of a 348 can’t always be used on a stroker motor as it is slightly narrower than those made for 409s. The answer is to use the wider 409 oil pan or, as Joe Jill from Superior Automotive says, “notch the 348 pan.” With today’s generous amount of reproduction 348/409 parts available, a factory reproduction 409 oil pan can be easily found at places like Show-Cars.com. Racing oil pans for W motors can be found at Stef's Performance Products.

Giddy Up The engines of the late 50s to mid 60s are forever part of our pop culture. In fact, there probably isn’t an engine builder alive who hasn’t heard the song "409" written by Brian Wilson, Mike Love and Gary Usher for The Beach Boys. The song features Mike Love singing lead vocals and it was originally released as the B-side of the "Surfin' Safari" single. The song, inspired by Usher's obsession with hot rods, was later released on the band’s 1962 album, Surfin' Safari, and it was also on their 1963 album, Little Deuce Coupe. Today, we know four bolt mains are desired in virtually all racing engines, and all of the new, aftermarket aluminum and iron blocks use them on the center three mains. Retrofitting a 348 or 409 block to use four bolt mains on those center three mains is not difficult and the block offers room for the upgrade. There are a number of companies making retro fit caps and a choice of straight or splayed is available. One such company is Pro Gram Engineering, which makes three such

products. One is with the extra bolts being added in a straight pattern. Another uses a splayed pattern and the third offers a front cap with four straight bolts. These kits fit both the 348 and 409 blocks as both use the same diameter cranks.

Formula 409 If a builder wants a monster motor with lots of cubic inches, the best way would be to use one of the new aluminum 409 blocks by World Products or Bob Walla Racing. Walla also offers iron blocks and

Building Strength Another related aspect to stroking any W motor is making it stronger. Most builders will agree that if having some machine work is in the cards for any W stroker, it is an excellent time for an additional machine operation. All W motors came with only two bolt mains. Chevrolet made fewer than 50 of the Z11 engine for drag racing. The engineers stroked out the 409 into 427, increasing the size of the engine by lengthening the stroke of the rods and not overboring the cylinders. EngineBuilderMag.com 33

32-40,82 Chevy Stroker 7/15/14 11:46 AM Page 34

Chevy Stroker World. If that isn’t enough cubic inches for a W motor fan, Bob Walla’s iron block is capable of housing 600 or 609 cubic inches. These are essentially stroker engines as the stroke and bore offer seemingly unlimited combos. From the money angle, a W stroker can be built two ways. One uses a bigger budget for custom made parts, such as those aftermarket blocks using custom made crankshafts, rods and pistons. The other and more economical way is to use off the shelf parts designed for W strokers using stock blocks. Those parts are steadily growing in numbers and availability. Many times, stroker kits are available and include the core parts such as crank, rods and pistons. Other kits are more complete and add rings and bearings. The benefit that is really growing is that many of these kits require little or no machining.

When rebuilding W engines, care must be taken that the compression is correct. Here you can see the relief cut is actually two cuts. These cuts are still used today, even when overboring the blocks to create a bigger engine.

we’ll get back to that shortly. With these new aluminum and iron blocks, much larger motors can be built without any of the original engine’s design limitations. The early test motors built using the all aluminum World Merlin 409 easily made over 500 inches, settling in at a comfortable 509 cubic inches under the talented hands of Lamar Walden, who designed the blocks for

Popular Kits Lamar Walden Automotive has a few stroker kits for 409s. One is a 450 cubic inch model and the other is a 482 cubic incher – both from 409 blocks. They include forged pistons, steel crankshaft, H beam

At the bottom of this Bob Walla block, you see strong cylinder walls, cross webbing and plenty of clearance for stroker engines. Circle 34 for more information 34 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

35 PBM_Layout 1 7/15/14 10:29 AM Page 35

Circle 35 on Reader Service Card for more information

32-40,82 Chevy Stroker 7/15/14 11:46 AM Page 36

Chevy Stroker

A look from above the World W block shows large ribs that add to the webbing structure to strengthen the block in the lifter gallery area.

connecting rods, rings and bearings. Show Cars, a specialist for Chevys of that era, sells a 409 four inch stroker kit that comes with an Eagle crankshaft, Ross forged pistons and

This view of the World aluminum W block shows the steel main caps and distinctive water pump bosses outboard on the face of the block.

pins, GM rods, Clevite bearings and a chrome moly piston ring set. Since they offer a number of stroker kits, the sizes and

components vary. Another Show Cars kit has a 33/4 stroke and coupled with bore sixes that are 0.030, 0.040 and 0.060 over, there are varied combinations. 11:1 compression Keith Black pistons have overbore sizes of the slightly different 0.038, 0.048 and 0.068 in. 348s have not been left out as there are kits using the same 3-3/4 stroke and overbore sizes. Scat Crankshafts is another one offering stroker kits. Its two kits start with 409 blocks and are available in 434 and 472 cubic inch versions using 4.155 and 4.340 bore sizes. Both H and I beam connecting rods are available. The kits include the crankshaft, rods, pistons, rings and bearings, and can be bought with different balancing packages. For those making their own stroker, Eagle Rods and Crankshafts offers a crankshaft with a four inch stroke for 409s, as well as the rods to fit it. While not a full kit, W pistons can be had by a number of manufacturers. Don’t forget that BBC crankshafts make the basis of a good W stroker and tapping into companies such as Calles can get you a state of the art model.

Combinations and Calculations

Circle 36 for more information 36 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

There are a surprisingly large number of stroker combinations using stock 348 or 409 blocks. Steve

37 Lunati_Layout 1 7/15/14 10:28 AM Page 37

Circle 37 on Reader Service Card for more information

32-40,82 Chevy Stroker 7/15/14 11:46 AM Page 38

Chevy Stroker

BLOCK 348 348 409 409 std bore (4.3125) 409 409 409 409

OVERBORE

STROKE

.030 over .030 over .060 over

3.50 4.00 3.50 3.650 3.750 4.00 4.00 4.125

.060 over .040 over .060 over .100 over

This Magnum XL crank from Callies is offered in a 3.50” to 5.6” stroke for biginch engines. The 4340 forged steel crankshafts provide ample strength and longevity for these engines.

CUBIC INCHES 383 CI 434 CI 421 CI 427 CI (Z11 specs) 451 CI 476 CI 481 CI 500 CI

Magnante is an automotive journalist and has reported on a number of stroker builds. Here’s a few of them, broken down to just the facts for a quick reference. The Edelbrock 421 Stroker came about when Edelbrock wanted to start building aluminum W motor heads. Edelbrock built this stroker as its test mule, long before any new aftermarket blocks were available. Starting with a 1964 truck 409 block and crankshaft, the motor’s six quart oil pan, .060” overbore (final bore size of 4.375 inches) and the stock 3.50-inch stroke, the combo ended up as 421 cubic inches. A four bolt main kit was used as well as 9.6:1 J&E pistons on Eagle forged H-beam rods, and the 6.135 inch long Big Block Chevy pieces that fit the 409 crank perfectly. Also included were ARP 7/16, 12 point cap rod bolts to improve over the stock 3/8 bolts that Chevy orignally used. All this was designed to allow it to use 91 octane fuel and be a street engine. The crankshaft snout on a W motor will match up to a Small Block Chevy harmonic balancer, so an ATI Super Damper was used. The intake was an Edelbrock dual-quad aluminum with Edelbrock 500 CFM Thunder AVS carburetors. This combo created 466 horsepower and 461.9 torque. That in itself is quite a motor and with just the .060” overbore, yet, retaining stock 409 heads. When Magnante reported on this engine, he said more could be built into that 409 truck block, “Step up to a 470plus cube stroker kit, add a point of compression, swap on a set of 750cfm carburetors and do a little porting and you’ll nudge 600 horsepower for sure.” Edelbrock’s recipe yielded

Circle 38 for more information 38 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

32-40,82 Chevy Stroker 7/15/14 11:46 AM Page 39

Chevy Stroker horsepower and 542 ft./lbs. of torque. There are a few machining operations that need to be done on the 454 crank before assembly. The biggest is turning down the mains .250 inch from 2.748 to 2.498 inches. After machining the mains, the radius on the crank’s journal to the cheek will need to be stress relieved as the new shape will be 90 degrees. Precision balancing is also recommended as is turning down the crank snout. The finished size should be 1.250-inches so an externally-balanced SBC 400 damper can be used. Joe from Superior says that in the past, he had to do quite a bit of crankshaft work for his W strokers. The Superior Automotive 481 Stroker sports the following specs: Block Stroke Bore Cubic Inches HP (approx)

409 4.00 4.3725 481 532

Typically, they would need to be turned down, edges rounded and chamfered, counterweights knife edge shaped and snouts turned down. It didn’t stop there, as there was heat-treating and Chevy's W-series 348 and later the 409 became legends on the street, and in particular the 409 also became a legend on the track.

horsepower: 466.1 @ 5800 rpm. Basic specs are: Block Stroke Bore Cubic Inches HP (approx)

409 3.500 4.375 421 466

Another W stroker Magnante reported on also uses a 409 block with a big, four inch stroke and even bigger pistons. In this case, a crankshaft from a Big Block Chevy is the starting point. The bore was .060 over and the results were 481 cubic inches. Tech wise, the bore ended at 4.3725 inches. Superior Automotive did this build and they used a popular crank for W strokers, the Mark IV, 454 Big Block Chevy. There is a trick here, as it needs to be a crank from between 1970 and 1990. Later crankshafts, like 1991 and up, won’t fit into the 409 block. Using this will increase the stroke by ½ inch and, coupled with the bigger pistons and other performance work, will yield 532 Circle 39 for more information EngineBuilderMag.com 39

32-40,82 Chevy Stroker 7/15/14 11:46 AM Page 40

At this stage of the rebuild, the pistons, cam, crank and timing have all been installed and our short block is virtually complete.

Circle 14 for more information

Circle 40 for more information

40 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

hard coating to do. Joe says these days, finished stroker crankshafts are more readily available and even offer centralized counterweights so additional clearance is minimal or not even needed. On this 409/481 build, the added throw of the bigger 454 counterweights and connecting rods are enough to impact the bottom of the cylinder bores. Machining small notches creates clearance for the now-larger rotating assembly. The rest of the rotating assembly has some wiggle room, too. Superior says reconditioned stock 454 rods can be used, but they opted for new, forged steel, Eagle I-beam rods that are often less expensive. These rods have the usual 454, 6.135 inch measurement and offer wider beams, wrist pin bushings and use bigger ARP 7/16 inch rod end cap bolts. Another cool combo came from Superior Automotive, and it was a sleeper! This stroker takes advantage of the fact that a lot more 348s were made than 409s. In fact, when the 409 came out, Chevy kept making the 348s. Superior says these little brothers can make a kick ass 434 inch stroker. This combo used Edelbrock’s Performer RPM aluminum heads, an Eagle stroker crank with H-beam rods, Ross pistons, an Isky solid roller cam and a new single plane, four barrel intake manifold from Lamar Walden which developed 576.8 horsepower at 6200 RPM with 516.8 ft./lbs. at 5500 RPM. According to Superior, the they started with the stock bore and opened it up from 4.125 by 0.030 to 4.155 inches. They checked the wall thickness after the bore and found it to be 0.175 average. A second boring operation enlarged the crescent found in 348/409 blocks that acts as part of the combustion chambers and that size is now .060” over. Into the block went an Eagle, 4340 forged steel crank. Even with its four inch stroke 0.750 greater than the stock 3.25 stroke of a 348, Eagle reduced the counterweight diameter of its crankshaft, making it a drop-in. The Ross forged pistons are 11.7:1 versions and weigh less than the stock pieces and the newer rods are heavier and stronger than the originals. Sometimes with this build, that extra ¾ inch of stroke might contact some 348 blocks, so Superior used its Rottler CNC machine station to add some clearance. With the use of Edelbrock Performer RPM heads, the

Continues on Page 82

4.030

4.030

4.155

4.155

4.155

4.125

4.030

4.030

3.905

4.030

4.030

4.155

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Engine & Performance Warehouse www.epwi.net

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

EPW/PBM www.pbm-erson.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

358

358

358

377

377

377

383

383

383

383

383

383

BORE

SUPPLIER/WEB SITE

3.875

3.750

3.750

4.000

3.750

3.750

3.500

3.500

3.480

3.875

3.480

3.480

STROKE

LPC Forged

Lunati Signature Forged

Lunati Voodoo Forged

PBM Forged

Eagle Forged

Eagle Cast

Scat Forged

Scat Cast

Lunati Signature Forged

LPC Forged

LPC Forged

LPC Forged

CRANKSHAFT

Lunati Forged ICON Series Forged Flat Top

Lunati Signature Forged, I-Beam 6.000 Scat Forged I-Beam, 1.7 Rod Ratio

King “Alecular Pro Series” Uncoated

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

6.000” Scat 7/16” I-Beam

Lunati Signature Forged, I-Beam

Lunati Voodoo Forged, H-Beam

Mahle/SRP Forged

Mahle Forged

Icon Forged Forged

Mahle Forged

Mahle 8.2:1 Forged

5.700 Eagle Forged, H-Beam, Rod Ratio 1.52 PBM H-Beam

Speed-Pro 10.5:1 Hypereutectic

5.700 Eagle Forged, I-Beam, Rod Ratio 1.52

Engine Pro Uncoated 6.000 EPWI Forged I-Beam

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

SRP Forged Dome

Mahle/SRP Forged

5.700” Scat 7/16” I-Beam

King “Alecular Pro Series” Uncoated

Mahle/SRP Forged

6.000 LPC H-Beam

King Alecular Pro Series Uncoated

Mahle/SRP Forged

5.700 LPC H-Beam

PISTONS

King Alecular Pro Series Uncoated

BEARINGS

Mahle Straight

Icon Straight

Mahle

Mahle Steel, Straight

Speed-Pro Steel, Straight

SRP Straight

ICON Straight Tool Steel 132 gms

Lunati

PINS

LPC Plasma Moly

Lunati Moly

Icon Moly

PBM Moly

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Hastings Moly, Ductile Iron

Engine Pro Moly Steel

ICON Moly

Lunati Moly

LPC Plasma Moly

LPC Plasma Moly

LPC Plasma Moly

RINGS

8000

7000

BK-1383-XI

38301SRK

38302VRK

83861I

B12006030

B13405E030

1-90610

37701SRK

BK-1358-XI

BK-358-X-6

BK-358-X

MAX RPM PART NO. AS LISTED

How To Use This Resource Guide

CID

RODS

Admittedly, we couldn’t get everything in these charts as we’d like, however, this should give you a good idea of what kind of kits are available and from which suppliers. We have organized the data by manufacturer and then block type, whether it's a small block or big block or something else. GM’s LS platform, for instance, has it’s own section because, well, there are just so many variations. Our “Other” section includes mostly import kits but is hopefully a growing section to be filled with sport compact kits in the future. If you want to find a specific kit for, say, a Small Block Chevy 350, then you could look under the appropriate heading and scroll down the left hand column to find the stroker displacement you wish to build. We included as much information as we could fit on the page and sent forms out to every major engine parts supplier for their feedback. Of course, not everyone chose to participate and we didn’t want to make anything up for them. We also included sections in the form for identifying timing components, whether it was a timing chain, belt or gear included with the kit and the manufacturer. Unfortunately, this information was incomplete so it was not included. However, many stroker kits do come with timing sets and oil pans (also an incomplete section). We suggest that you select a kit and then call the supplier listed for further information on each of their kits. This information is as accurate as we could make it but there may be other features and components available. Furthermore, you may be able to swap out components for other brands if that is your preference, but, again, give your supplier a call to see what you can do with your kit selection. ■

GENERAL MOTORS Small Block Stroker Kits

41-48 Stroker Charts updated 7/15/14 11:39 AM Page 41

STROKER RESOURCE GUIDE

EngineBuilderMag.com 41

42 July 2013 | EngineBuilder 4.000

4.155

4.125

4.155

4.125

4.155

4.155

4.155

4.155

4.155

4.125

4.155

4.155

4.125

4.155

4.155

4.155

4.155

4.185

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Engine & Performance Warehouse www.epwi.net

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

EPW/PBM www.pbm-erson.com

Motor State Distributing www.motorstate.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Motor State Distributing www.motorstate.com

Lunati Power

Coast High Performance www.coasthigh.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

406

406

407

415

420

421

421

421

421

427

434

434

434

434

434

434

488

495

434 Pontiac

4.155

4.000

4.030

EPW/PBM www.pbm-erson.com

395

4.000

4.500

4.500

4.000

4.000

4.000

4.100

4.000

3.875

3.875

3.875

3.875

3.875

3.875

3.750

3.750

3.750

3.875

3.750

4.030

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

383

STROKE

BORE

SUPPLIER/WEB SITE

CID

Scat Forged

Eagle Forged

Clevite Uncoated

King Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

King Uncoated

Lunati Voodoo Forged Scat Forged

Clevite 77

Clevite Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

King “Alecular Pro Series” Uncoated

Eagle Forged

Scat Forged

Scat Forged

LPC Forged

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

Lunati Voodoo Forged Eagle Forged

Clevite Uncoated

King “Alecular Pro Series” Uncoated

Mahle/SRP Forged SRP Forged, Flat Top

6.000” Scat 7/16” I-Beam 6.000 Scat Forged, H-Beam/1.5 Rod Ratio

6.800 Scat Forged, H-Beam/1.7:1 Rod Ratio

ICON Series Forged, Flat Top

Mahle 10.6:1

Probe Forged

6.700 Scat Forged, H-Beam 6.800 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.51

Icon Forged

JE Forged, Dome

Lunati Voodoo 6.000”

6.000 Eagle Forged

Mahle Forged, Flat Top

Mahle 10:1, Forged

6.000 Eagle Forged, H-Beam, Rod Ratio 1.50

6.000 Scat Forged, H-Beam/1.5 Rod Ratio

SRP Straight, Tool Steel, 130g

Mahle Steel, Straight

JE

PBM

SRP Straight

Mahle Straight

PBM

ICON Straight, Tool Steel, 132 gms

PINS

Total Seal Ductile Moly

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Mahle Steel, Straight ICON Straight Steel, 163g

Perfect Circle Moly, Ductile Iron

Icon Moly

Perfect Circle Plasma Moly

Mahle Ductile Moly

Total Seal Ductile Moly

LPC Plasma Moly

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Lunati Voodoo Moly

Total Seal Ductile Moly

LPC Plasma Moly

LPC Plasma Moly

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Perfect Circle Plasma Moly

PBM Moly

LPC Plasma Moly

Engine Pro Moly Steel

Mahle Moly

PBM Moly

ICON Moly

RINGS

Probe 86L20, Straight, 150g

Icon Straight

JE

Mahle Straight, Tool Steel, 130g

SRP Straight, Tool Steel, 130g

Mahle Steel, Straight

Lunati Voodoo Forged Lunati Voodoo Straight

SRP Forged, Flat Top

6.000 Scat Forged H-Beam/1.55 Rod Ratio Lunati Voodoo Forged, H-Beam

Mahle/SRP Forged

Mahle/SRP Forged

6.000” Scat 7/16” I-Beam

6.000 LPC H-Beam

King Alecular Pro Series Uncoated

Mahle 11.3:1, Forged

JE Forged Dome

6.000 Eagle Forged H-Beam 6.000 Eagle Forged, H-Beam, Rod Ratio 1.55

PBM Forged

Mahle/SRP Forged

SRP Forged

Mahle Flat Top Forged

PBM Forged

ICON Series Forged, Dish Top

PISTONS

PBM H-Beam

King Uncoated

Clevite

Clevite Uncoated

5.700 LPC H-Beam

King Alecular Pro Series Uncoated

Scat Forged

LPC Forged

LPC Forged

Eagle Forged

Eagle Forged

PBM Forged

LPC Forged

5.700 EPWI Forged, I-Beam

Lunati Signature Forged, I-Beam

PBM H-Beam

5.700 Scat Forged, I-Beam/1.52 Rod Ratio

RODS

Engine Pro Uncoated

King Uncoated

Lunati Signature Forged Scat Forged

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

BEARINGS

PBM Forged

Scat Cast

CRANKSHAFT

GENERAL MOTORS Small Block Stroker Kits

6500

7500

7500

8000

MAX RPM

1-41650

B51501065

14856-SCA-376-P488

1-41565

1-40902

BK-1434-XI

B12055030

1-40901 Chevy 350 1-41564 Chevy 400

BK-1421-XI

BK-421-X

B12032030

41560D

BK-407-X

40602SRK

39560F

1-90355

PART NO. AS LISTED

41-48 Stroker Charts updated 7/15/14 11:39 AM Page 42

3.905

3.903

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

K1 Technologies www.k1technologies.com

383

383

4.030

3.030

4.030

4.070

4.070

4.070

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Atech Motorsports www.atechmotorsports.com

Coast High Performance www.coasthigh.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

408

408

408.18

416

416

416

4.125

4.070

4.130

4.155

K1 Technologies www.k1technologies.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Livernois Motorsports www.livernoismotorsports.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

429

429

434

4.125

427

427

4.070

4.030

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

408

Livernois Motorsports www.livernoismotorsports.com Livernois Motorsports www.livernoismotorsports.com

4.005

Livernois Motorsports www.livernoismotorsports.com

404

419

4.000

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

4.070

402

388

3.905

3.905

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

383

Atech Motorsports www.atechmotorsports.com Livernois Motorsports www.livernoismotorsports.com

3.905

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

383

383.25

3.905

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

383

BORE

SUPPLIER/WEB SITE

CID

4.000

4.000

4.125

4.000

4.000

4.000

4.000

4.000

4.000

4.000

4.125

4.000

4.000

4.000

4.000

3.720

4.000

4.000

4.000

4.000

4.000

4.000

STROKE

Lunati Signature Forged

Manley Forged

King Uncoated

Clevite Coated

King Uncoated

Clevite Optional

K1, Forged 3464000 RB6F

Eagle Forged

Clevite Coated

Clevite Coated

King Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

Clevite

Clevite Uncoated

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

Clevite Coated

King Uncoated

Clevite Coated

Clevite

Clevite Optional

Clevite Uncoated

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

BEARINGS

Manley Forged

Manley Forged

Lunati Voodoo Forged

Scat Forged

Probe Forged

Esp Forged

Scat Forged

Lunati Voodoo Forged

Eagle Forged

Manley Forged

Lunati Voodoo Forged

GM cast

Eagle Forged

K1, Forged 3464000 RB6F

Scat Forged

Lunati Voodoo Forged

Eagle Forged

Eagle Forged

CRANKSHAFT

GENERAL MOTORS LS Stroker Kits

Ross Forged

6.125 Lunati Signature Forged, I-Beam

6.125 Manley Forged, H-Beam

6.125 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.48

6.125 K1 CH 6125 ALLBLS8A Forged H-Beam

6.125 Manley Forged, H-Beam 6.125 Manley Forged, H-Beam

Lunati Voodoo Forged 6.125” I-Beam

Lunati Forged

Ross Forged

Mahle 11.0:1 Forged

Wiseco, Forged, K395x125

Ross Forged

Ross Forged

Diamond Forged

SRP Forged Flat or Dished Top

Probe Forged

6.125 Probe Forged, H-Beam 6.125 Scat Forged H-Beam/1.53 Rod Ratio

Mahle Forged

Race Tec Forged Dish Top

Diamond Dish Ford

Eagle Forged, H-Beam

6.125 Scat Forged H-Beam/1.48 Rod Ratio

Lunati Voodoo Forged

6.125 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Mahle 10.8:1 Forged Rod Ratio 1.53

6.125 Manley Forged, H-Beam

Icon Dish Forged

Ross Forged

6.125 Lunati Voodoo Forged, H-Beam

Mahle Flat Top Forged

6.125 Manley Forged, H-Beam

Wiseco, Forged, K464x3903

Auto Tec Forged Flat Top

Icon Dish Forged

Mahle 10.8:1 Forged

Mahle 11.0:1 Forged

PISTONS

Eagle Forged, H-Beam

6.125 K1, Forged, H-Beam, CH 6125 ALLBLS8A

6.200 Scat Forged H-Beam/1.55 Rod Ratio

6.125 Lunati Voodoo Forged, H-Beam

6.125 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.53

6.125 Eagle, Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.53

RODS

Lunati Straight

Ross H-13, Straight, 118g

Mahle Steel, Straight

Wiseco Straight 5115, 105g

Ross H-13, Straight, 118g Ross H-13, Straight, 118g

Diamond Straight

SRP Straight Tool Steel 106g

Probe 86L20, Straight, 118g

Race Tec Tool Steel 110g

Diamond Straight

Mahle Steel, Straight

Ross H-13, Straight, 118g

Icon Straight

Ross H-13, Straight, 118g

Wiseco Straight 5115, 105g

Auto Tec Straight Tool Steel 130g

Icon Straight

Mahle Steel, Straight

Mahle Steel, Straight

PINS

Lunati Moly

Total Seal Steel

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Wiseco GFX Steel Nitride Napier

Total Seal Steel

Total Seal Steel

Total Seal Moly

Total Seal Ductile Moly

Total Seal Moly, Ductile Iron

Plasma Moly File fit

Total Seal Ductile Moly

Total Seal Moly

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Total Seal Steel

Icon Moly

Total Seal Steel

Plasma Moly File fit

Wiseco GFX Steel Nitride Napier

Total Seal Ductile Moly

7500

8000

8000

7500

7500

7500

7000

7500

7500

8000

7000

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Icon Moly

7000

New

LMELSX429

B129524070

R-KD20147 (LSx)

LMEBB

KIT 26

1-41912-070 Flat Top 1-41912-070 Dished Top

15000-PS-C416

ESP- 129104030

1-41921 (LS2)

B129104030

KIT 24

New

LMESSLS3

ESP- 129123905

R-KD20123 (LS1)

1-41902

New

B128043905

B129123905

MAX RPM PART NO. AS LISTED

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

RINGS

41-48 Stroker Charts updated 7/15/14 11:39 AM Page 43

EngineBuilderMag.com 43

44 July 2013 | EngineBuilder

4.125

4.125

4.155

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

454

454

499 4.600

4.250

4.250

4.125

STROKE

Lunati Signature Forged

Scat Forged

Lunati Signature Forged

Eagle Forged

CRANKSHAFT

King Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

BEARINGS

BORE

4.250

4.155

4.185

4.155

4.155

4.280

4.280

4.185

4.310

4.310

4.185

4.310

4.310

4.280

4.310

4.250

4.500

4.500

4.500

SUPPLIER/WEB SITE

Engine & Performance Warehouse www.epwi.net

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Atech Motorsports www.atechmotorsports.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Dick Miller Racing www.dickmillerracing.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

K1 Technologies www.k1technologies.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Dick Miller Racing www.dickmillerracing.com

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

CID

460

461

468

488

488

489

489

495

496

496

496

496

496

504

511

511

540

540

540

4.250

4.250

4.250

4.500

4.375

4.375

4.250

4.250

4.500

4.250

4.250

4.500

4.250

4.250

4.500

4.500

4.250

4.250

4.000

STROKE

Lunati Signature Forged

Scat Forged

LPC Forged

Olds Forged

Eagle Forged

King Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

King “Alecular Pro Series” Uncoated

Clevite Coated

King Uncoated

Clevite

Clevite Optional

K1 454-4250 DC6F Forged Scat Forged

Clevite Uncoated

Clevite Coated

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

Scat Forged

Olds Forged

Eagle Forged

Eagle Cast

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

Lunati Voodoo Forged Eagle Cast

King Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

King Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

Engine Pro Uncoated

BEARINGS

Scat Cast

Scat Forged

Eagle Forged

Eagle Cast

Scat Forged

Scat Forged

CRANKSHAFT

GENERAL MOTORS Big Block Stroker Kits

4.125

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

441

BORE

SUPPLIER/WEB SITE

CID

GENERAL MOTORS LS Stroker Kits Continued

Mahle Forged Dome

6.385 Scat Forged, H-Beam

Lunati Signature 6.385”

Mahle Forged

SRP Forged, Dome Top

Mahle/SRP Forged

6.385 LPC H-Beam 6.385 Scat Forged, H-Beam/1.50 Rod Ratio

Diamond Forged

7.000 Oliver Forged

Mahle 10.6:1, Forged

Pro Tru PT119H3 Forged

6.385 K1 CH 6385 APRBLS8A Forged, H-Beam

6.385 Eagle Forged, H-Beam, Rod Ratio 1.46

SRP Forged Dome

Diamond Forged

Mahle 10.2:1, Forged

Mahle 10.2:1, Forged

Mahle 10.0:1, Forged

Icon Forged

UEM ICON Series Forged Dome

ICON Series Forged Dished Top

Mahle Forged

Mahle 10.2:1, Forged

ICON Series Forged, Flat or Dished Top

SRP Forged

PISTONS

Lunati Forged

Mahle Forged Flat Top

Lunati Forged

Mahle 11.3:1 Forged

PISTONS

6.385 Scat Forged H-Beam

7.000 Oliver Forged

6.385 Eagle Forged, H-Beam, Rod Ratio 1.50

6.385 Eagle Forged, I-beam, Rod Ratio 1.50

7.100 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.58

Lunati Voodoo Forged 6.385” H-Beam

6.385 Scat Forged, I-Beam/1.5:1 Rod Ratio

6.700 Scat Forged, H-Beam/1.48:1 Rod Ratio

6.800 Eagle Forged

6.800 Eagle Forged, I-Beam Rod Ratio 1.60

6.800 Scat Forged, H-Beam/1.6:1 Rod Ratio

6.135 /6.385 Engine Pro Forged, H-Beam

RODS

6.300 Lunati Signature Forged, I-Beam

6.250 Scat Forged HBeam/1.47 Rod Ratio

6.300 Lunati Signature Forged, I-Beam

6.125 Eagle Forged, HBeam/Rod Ratio 1.48

RODS

Mahle Straight

JE Pistons Straight, Tool Steel, 150g

Mahle Moly

Total Seal Ductile Moly

LPC Plasma Moly

Total Seal Moly

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Mahle Steel, Straight Diamond Straight

Mahle Ductile Moly

Mahle Straight, Tool Steel 145g

Hastings Ductile Moly

Total Seal Ductile Moly

JE Pistons Straight, Tool Steel, 150g Wiseco Straight, 5115 156g

Total Seal Moly

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Mahle Steel, Straight Diamond Straight

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Total Seal Ductile Moly

UEM Straight, Tool Steel, 141g

Mahle Steel, Straight

Total Seal Ductile Moly

ICON Straight, Tool Steel 163g

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Sealed Power Moly

Mahle Steel, Straight

Mahle Steel, Straight

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Mahle Steel, Straight

Icon Moly

Total Seal Ductile Moly

ICON Straight, Tool Steel 163g

Icon Straight

Engine Pro Moly Steel

RINGS

Lunati Moly

Mahle Ductile Moly

Lunati Moly

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

RINGS

SRP Straight

PINS

Lunati Straight

Mahle Straight Steel 118g

Lunati Straight

Mahle Steel, Straight

PINS

New

1-41935 (LSx Tall Deck)

45408SRK

B129194125

7000

8000

7000

7000

7000

6500

6000

6500

42504SRK06

1-42380

BK-1540-X

DMR-4002-5467

B11014060

1-42365

R-PT10199

1-42360-060

DMR-4002-5467

B1113060

B18022060

B42105060

42504VRK06

1-91605

1-41671

ESP-51503030

B52403030

1-41660 Flat Top 1-41661 Dished Top

MAX RPM PART NO. AS LISTED

7000

MAX RPM PART NO. AS LISTED

41-48 Stroker Charts updated 7/15/14 11:40 AM Page 44

4.560

4.560

4.500

4.600

4.600

4.600

4.500

4.600

4.600

4.600

4.500

4.600

4.600

4.600

4.600

4.600

4.600

4.155/ 4.181

4.155/ 4.181

EPW/PBM www.pbm-erson.com

EPW/PBM www.pbm-erson.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

EPW/PBM www.pbm-erson.com

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

EPW/PBM www.pbm-erson.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

EPW/PBM www.pbm-erson.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Butler Performance www.butlerperformance.com

Butler Performance www.butlerperformance.com

Butler Performance www.butlerperformance.com

Butler Performance www.butlerperformance.com

555

555

557

565

565

565

572

598

598

598

604

632

632

632

632

632

632

461-467 Pont.

461-467 Pont.

494-501 Pont.

535-541 Pont.

4.350/ 4.375

4.181/ 4.211

BORE

SUPPLIER/WEB SITE

CID

4.500

4.250

4.250

4.750

4.750

4.750

4.750

4.750

4.750

4.750

4.500

4.500

4.500

4.500

4.250

4.250

4.250

4.375

4.250

4.250

STROKE

Mahle Forged Dome Top

6.700 Scat Forged, H-Beam

Forged

Forged

Forged

Cast

Scat Forged

Speed Pro

Speed Pro

Speed Pro

Speed Pro

Clevite Uncoated

Mahle/SRP Forged

6.700 LPC H-Beam

King “Alecular Pro Series” Uncoated

LPC Forged

6.700 Lunati Signature Forged, I-Beam

King Uncoated

Lunati Signature Forged

Ross Forged BP/Ross Forged

6.800” H-Beam Forged or Oliver Billet

Ross, Butler Exclusive Forging

Ross, Butler Exclusive Forging

6.800 Eagle or Scat Forged

6.800 Eagle or Scat Forged

6.800 Eagle or Scat Forged, H-Beam

Lunati Forged

Lunati Voodoo Forged

Lunati Voodoo Forged, H-Beam

Lunati Voodoo

Lunati Voodoo Forged

JE Forged

6.700 PBM H-Beam

PBM Moly

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Lunati Moly

LPC Plasma Moly

Total Seal Moly

Total Seal Moly

Ross 5150 ChromeMoly, Straight, 128g Ross 5150 Straight

Total Seal Moly or Gapless Optional

Total Seal Moly or Gapless Optional

Mahle Ductile Moly

LPC Plasma Moly

Lunati Moly

Ross 5150 ChromeMoly, Straight, 128g

Ross 5150 ChromeMoly, Straight, 128g

Mahle Straight Tool Steel 145 gms

Lunati Straight

Lunati Voodoo 8620 Lunati Voodoo Moly Steel, Straight

JE

Mahle Steel, Straight

Mahle 10.3:1 Forged

6.660 Mahle Forged, H-Beam, Rod Ratio 1.40

Clevite

King Uncoated

Callies Forged

Eagle Forged

Lunati Straight

King Uncoated

Lunati Signature Forged

Mahle/SRP Forged

PBM Moly

Lunati Moly

Total Seal Moly

LPC Plasma Moly

PBM Moly

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

PBM Moly

PBM Moly

RINGS

Lunati Voodoo 8620 Lunati Voodoo Moly Steel, Straight

SRP

Lunati Straight

Lunati Forged

6.535 LPC H-Beam

King “Alecular Pro Series” Uncoated

LPC Forged

Lunati Voodoo Forged

SRP Forged

Lunati Forged

Diamond Straight

SRP

Mahle Steel, Straight

SRP

SRP

PINS

6.700 Lunati Signature Forged, I-Beam

6.535 Lunati Voodoo Forged, H-Beam

Lunati Voodoo

6.535 PBM H-Beam

6.700 Lunati Signature Forged, I-Beam

Lunati Voodoo Forged

King Uncoated

Lunati Signature Forged

Diamond Flat Top Forged

Lunati Signature Forged 6.385” I-Beam

Clevite

King Uncoated

Lunati Signature Forged

Mahle/SRP Forged

SRP Forged

Mahle 10.5:1 Forged

SRP Forged

SRP Forged

PISTONS

6.385 LPC H-Beam

PBM H-Beam

6.385 Eagle Forged, H-Beam, Rod Ratio 1.46

PBM H-Beam

PBM H-Beam

RODS

PBM Forged

Mahle Clevite H-Series, Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

King Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

BEARINGS

LPC Forged

PBM Forged

Eagle Forged

PBM Forged

PBM Forged

CRANKSHAFT

GENERAL MOTORS Big Block Stroker Kits

7500

7000

7000

6500

6500

8000

BPI-4500-300F

BPI-461-300F

BPI-461-300C

1-42398

BK-1632-X

63204SRK

63204VRK

63267F

New

BK-1598-X

59804VRK

59865D

New

42054SRK09

BK-1565-X

56563D

B116174500

55563F

55563D

MAX RPM PART NO. AS LISTED

41-48 Stroker Charts updated 7/15/14 11:40 AM Page 45

EngineBuilderMag.com 45

BORE

3.553

3.572

3.572

3.572

3.700

3.700

4.030

4.000

4.030

4.030

4.030

4.030

4.030

4.000

4.030

4.030

4.030

3.700

4.125

4.125

4.030

4.000

4.030

SUPPLIER/WEB SITE

LIvernois Motorsports www.livernoismotorsports.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Livernois Motorsports www.livernoismotorsports.com

Livernois Motorsports www.livernoismotorsports.com

K1 Technologies www.k1technologies.com

Engine & Performance Warehouse www.epwi.net

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Engine & Performance Warehouse www.epwi.net

Motor State Distributing www.motorstate.com

Motor State Distributing www.motorstate.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

LIvernois Motorsports www.livernoismotorsports.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

Engine & Performance Warehouse www.epwi.net

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

CID

298

301

301

301

323

323

46 July 2013 | EngineBuilder

327

331

347

347

347

347

347

347

347

347

347

358

374

388

393

393

393

3.850

3.850

3.850

3.625

3.500

4.165

3.400

3.400

3.400

3.400

3.400

3.400

3.400

3.400

3.400

3.250

3.250

3.750

3.750

3.750

3.750

3.750

3.750

STROKE

King Uncoated

Lunati Signature Forged

Clevite Uncoated

King Uncoated

Scat Cast Lunati Signature Forged

Mahle Clevite P-Series Uncoated

King Uncoated

Lunati Signature Forged

Eagle Cast

Clevite Coated

King Uncoated

Lunati Voodoo Forged Ford Forged

Clevite Uncoated

Clevite 77

Clevite Uncoated

SRP Forged

Diamond Forged

Lunati Signature Forged 6.200” I-Beam

KB Hypereutectic

Lunati Forged

Lunati Forged

Ross Forged

5.955 Scat Forged I-Beam

5.956 Eagle I-Beam

6.200 Lunati Signature Forged, I-Beam

6.200 Lunati Signature Forged, I-Beam

6.657 Manley Forged, H-Beam

Diamond Straight

SRP Straight

Lunati Straight

Lunati Straight

Diamond Moly

E-Direct EPWI Moly Steel

Hastings Moly Rings

Lunati Moly

Lunati Moly

Total Seal Steel

Ross H-13, Straight, 111g

Icon Flat Top Forged

Lunati Voodoo Forged 5.400” H-Beam

Perfect Circle Plasma Moly Icon Moly

SRP Straight

SRP Forged, Flat Top

5.400 Eagle Forged, H-Beam

Perfect Circle Plasma Moly

Icon Straight

SRP Straight

SRP Forged, Flat Top

5.400 Eagle Forged, I-Beam

E-Direct EPWI Moly Steel

SRP or Keith Black Straight

SRP or Keith Black Hypereutectic

Total Seal Ductile Moly

SRP Straight, Tool Steel, 130g

LPC Plasma Moly

LPC Plasma Moly

Lunati Voodoo Moly

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Mahle Steel, Straight Lunati Voodoo straight, 8620 steel

E-Direct EPWI Moly Steel

Hastings Ductile Moly

SRP Straight

Wiseco Straight, 5115, 117g

Total Seal Steel

Total Seal Steel

Ross H-13, Straight, 111g Ross H-13, Straight, 111g

Arias Moly, Ductile Iron

Arias Moly, Ductile Iron

Arias Moly, Ductile Iron

Total Seal Steel

RINGS

Arias Steel, Straight

Arias Steel, Straight

Arias Steel, Straight

Ross H-13, Straight, 111g

PINS

5.400 Eagle Forged, I-Beam

SRP Forged

5.400 Eagle Forged, H-Beam

Clevite Uncoated

Mahle/SRP Forged

5.400 LPC H-Beam

Mahle Clevite H-Series Uncoated

Eagle Forged

Eagle Cast

EPWI Cast

Scat Forged

LPC Forged

Lunati Voodoo Forged

5.400 Lunati Voodoo Forged, H-Beam Mahle/SRP Forged

Mahle 10.0:1, Forged

5.400 Eagle Forged, H-Beam, Rod Ratio 1.59

H-Beam

SRP

5.400 Scat Forged, I-Beam

5.400 LPC

Pro Tru PT070H3

5.400 K1 FH 5400A1168-A Forged, H-Beam

Ross Forged

5.850 Manley Forged, H-Beam

Arias 11.2:1 Forged

5.950 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.59 Ross Forged

Arias 10.8:1 Forged

5.950 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.59

5.850 Manley Forged, H-Beam

Arias 10.9:1 Forged

5.950 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.59

PISTONS Ross/Diamond Forged

RODS 5.850 Manley Forged, H-Beam

Mahle Clevite H-Series Uncoated

Lunati Voodoo

Lunati Voodoo Forged LPC Forged

King Uncoated

Eagle Forged

Clevite Uncoated

Clevite Optional

K1, Forged 302-3250GB6F Scat Cast

Clevite Coated

Clevite Coated

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

Clevite Coated

BEARINGS

Kellogg Forged

Kellogg Forged

Eagle Forged

Eagle Forged

Eagle Forged

Kellogg Forged

CRANKSHAFT

FORD Small Block Stroker Kits

8000

7000

8500

8500

8500

8500

8500

8500

38506SRK07

RK-393-W

New

New

KIT6-4VB

1-45310

RK-347-IXD

RK-347-IX

34705VRK

B14003030

R-PT10242

KIT31-BOSS

KIT13-3VBB

B14413020

B14423020

B14403020

KIT13-3VB

MAX RPM PART NO. AS LISTED

41-48 Stroker Charts updated 7/15/14 11:40 AM Page 46

4.125

4.030

4.030

4.030

4.030

4.000

4.030

4.030

4.030

4.125

4.030

4.125

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Atech Motorsports www.atechmotorsports.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Engine & Performance Warehouse www.epwi.net

Liberty Engine Parts www.libertyengineparts.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

EPW/PBM www.pbm-erson.com

Lunati Power www.lunatipower.com

EPW/PBM www.pbm-erson.com

401

408

408

408

408

408

408

418

418

427

428

438

4.100

4.00

4.000

4.100

4.100

4.000

4.000

4.000

4.000

4.000

4.000

3.750

STROKE

4.080

4.080

4.160

4.390

4.390

4.440

LIvernois Motorsports www.livernoismotorsports.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Atech Motorsports www.atechmotorsports.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

400

445

462

520

520

557

4.500

4.300

4.300

4.250

4.250

3.825

STROKE

Cast

Eagle Cast

Scat Forged

Scat Cast

Scat Cast

Eagle Cast

Ford

CRANKSHAFT

3.940

4.060

3.930

Hughes Engines Inc. www.hughesengines.com

Coast High Performance www.coasthigh.com

Livernois Motorsports www.livernoismotorsports.com

392

392

Magnum

390

3.920

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

366

BORE

SUPPLIER/WEB SITE

CID

4.050

3.795

4.000

3.795

STROKE

Manley Forged

Scat Forged

Scat Cast

Scat Forged

CRANKSHAFT

Clevite Coated

Clevite Uncoated

Clevite 77 Uncoated

Clevite H-Series

BEARINGS

King Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

Uncoated

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

Clevite Coated

BEARINGS

Clevite Uncoated

King Uncoated

Lunati Voodoo Forged

Clevite Uncoated

6.125 Manley Forged, H-Beam

6.125 Scat Forged, H-Beam

Scat Cast 6.123” I-Beam

6.125 Scat Forged H-Beam

RODS

6.700 Eagle Forged, I-beam Rod Ratio 1.49

6.800 Scat Forged H-Beam

Scat Forged, I-beam

6.700 Scat Forged H-Beam

6.635 Eagle Forged, HBeam Rod Ratio 1.56

6.200 Carillo Forged, HBeam

RODS

6.200 PBM H-Beam

Lunati Voodoo Forged 6.250” H-Beam

PBM H-Beam

6.200 Scat Forged H-Beam

Ross Forged

Probe Forged

Icon Forged

Probe Forged

PISTONS

Mahle 10.5:1 Forged

Mahle Forged

Probe Forged

Mahle Forged

Mahle 10.5:1 Forged

Ross Forged

PISTONS

SRP Forged

Icon Dish Forged

SRP Forged

SRP Forged

Mahle 9.9:1 Forged

6.200 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.51

King Uncoated

Mahle/SRP Forged

6.200 Eagle I-Beam

SRP Forged

SRP Forged

Mahle Clevite P-Series Uncoated

6.200 Scat Forged H-Beam

Icon Dish Forged

Keith Black Hypereutectic

Eagle Forged, I-Beam 6.250 Lunati Voodoo Forged, H-Beam

Mahle 10.2:1 Forged

6.000 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.50

Lunati Forged

PISTONS

6.250 Scat Forged H-Beam

Clevite

PBM Forged

RODS 6.200 Lunati Signature Forged, I-Beam

Clevite Uncoated

PBM Forged

Scat Forged

Eagle Forged

Eagle

Scat Cast

Clevite Uncoated

King Uncoated

Lunati Voodoo Forged Scat Forged

Clevite Uncoated

Eagle Cast

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

Lunati Signature Forged Eagle Forged

BEARINGS

CRANKSHAFT

CHRYSLER Small Block Stroker Kits

BORE

SUPPLIER/WEB SITE

CID

FORD Big Block Stroker Kits

BORE

SUPPLIER/WEB SITE

CID

FORD Small Block Stroker Kits

Total Seal Moly Perfect Circle Moly, Ductile Iron Total Seal Steel

Probe 86L20, Straight, 118g Ross H-13, Straight, 118g

Total Seal Ductile Moly

RINGS

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Mahle Ductile Moly

Total Seal Moly, Classic Race

Mahle Ductile Moly

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Total Seal Steel

RINGS

PBM Moly

Icon Moly

Icon Straight Steel 118 g

Probe Straight Steel 149 gms

PINS

Mahle Steel, Straight

Mahle Straight Steel 145 gms

Probe

Mahle Straight Tool Steel 145 gms

Mahle Steel, Straight

Ross H-13, Straight, 118g

PINS

SRP

Icon straight

PBM Moly

Total Seal Ductile Moly

SRP Straight Tool Steel 130g SRP

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Mahle Steel, Straight

LPC Plasma Moly

E-Direct EPWI Moly Steel

Total Seal Ductile Moly

SRP Straight Tool Steel 130g SRP Straight

Icon Moly

Keith Black Moly, Ductile Iron

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Lunati Moly

RINGS

Icon Straight

Keith Black Steel, Straight

Mahle Steel, Straight

Lunati Straight

PINS

43862FBK

40006VRK01

42762FBK

1-47460

B14126030

RK-408-W

1-47355

40806VRK

ESP-16524030

B14702-030

B15108080

1-47604

SCA-1-94955BE

1-94652

B157164080

LME-RAPTOR6.6

7000

7500

8000

LME392

14372-SCA-729-M6.1

1-48101 5.7L Hemi

MAX RPM PART NO. AS LISTED

6500

7000

7000

MAX RPM PART NO. AS LISTED

7000

8000

New

MAX RPM PART NO. AS LISTED

41-48 Stroker Charts updated 7/15/14 11:41 AM Page 47

EngineBuilderMag.com 47

48 July 2013 | EngineBuilder

4.030

4.030

4.030

4.070

4.080

4.030

4.070

4.080

4.160

4.390

4.390

4.440

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Hughes Engines Inc. www.hughesengines.com

Hughes Engines Inc. www.hughesengines.com

Livernois Motorsports www.livernoismotorsports.com

K1 Technologies www.k1technologies.com

K1 Technologies www.k1technologies.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Atech Motorsports www.atechmotorsports.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

408

408

426

426

392 Hemi

426 Hemi

408

416

445

462

520

520

557 4.500

4.300

4.300

4.250

4.250

4.000

4.000

4.080

4.080

4.050

4.180

4.000

4.000

4.000

3.795

STROKE

Eagle Cast

Scat Forged

Scat Cast

Scat Cast

Eagle Cast

Eagle Forged

Eagle Cast

K1 345-4080SA6F Forged

K1 345-4080SA6F Forged

Manley Forged

Molner Tech Forged

Scat Cast

Scat Forged

Molnar Tech Forged

Scat Forged

CRANKSHAFT

BORE

4.350

4.350

4.350

4.350

4.350

4.375

4.500

4.280

4.360

4.375

SUPPLIER/WEB SITE

EPW/PBM www.pbm-erson.com

EPW/PBM www.pbm-erson.com

Hughes Engines Inc. www.hughesengines.com

K1 Technologies www.k1technologies.com

Hughes Engines Inc. www.hughesengines.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

Eagle Specialty Products www.eaglerod.com

CID

440

440

493

493

505

541

572

426 B

493

499 4.150

4.150

3.750

4.500

4.500

4.250

4.150

4.150

4.100

3.750

STROKE

Eagle Forged

Eagle Forged

Scat Forged

Scat Forged

Eagle Forged

Eagle Forged

K1, Forged, 440-4150JC6F

Eagle Forged

PBM Forged

PBM Forged

CRANKSHAFT

CHRYSLER Big Block Stroker Kits

Magnum

3.917

4.030

Hughes Engines Inc. www.hughesengines.com

393

408

4.060

Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com

BORE

SUPPLIER/WEB SITE

CID

CHRYSLER Small Block Stroker Kits

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

Clevite Coated

Clevite Coated

King Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

Clevite Optional

Clevite 77 Uncoated, Full Groove

Clevite Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

BEARINGS

King Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

Uncoated

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

King Uncoated

Clevite Optional

Clevite Optional

Clevite Coated

Clevite 77 Uncoated

Clevite Uncoated

Clevite H-Series

Clevite 77 Uncoated

Clevite H-Series

BEARINGS

RODS

6.760 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.63

6.760 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.63

6.760 Scat Forged H-Beam

7.100 Scat Forged H-Beam

7.100 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.58

Eagle Forged 7.100” H-Beam

6.670 K1 DH6760APRB8-A Forged H-Beam

6.760” Eagle H-Beam

6.760 PBM H-Beam

6.760 PBM H-Beam

RODS

6.700 Eagle Forged, I-Beam Rod Ratio 1.49

6.800 Scat Forged H-Beam

Scat Forged, I-Beam

6.700 Scat Forged H-Beam

6.635 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.56

6.123 Eagle Forged, H-Beam Rod Ratio 1.53

6.123 Eagle Forged, I-Beam Rod Ratio 1.53

6.125 K1, Forged H-Beam DH6125AHGB8-A

6.125 K1, Forged H-Beam DH6125AHGB8-A

6.125 Manley Forged, H-Beam

6.123 Molner Tech Forged, Billet, Rod Ratio 1.46

Scat Cast 6.123” H-Beam

6.123 Scat Forged H-Beam

Molnar Tech Forged H-Beam

6.125 Scat Forged H-Beam

Mahle 10.5:1 Forged

Mahle 10.7:1 Forged

SRP Forged

ICON Forged

Mahle 11.2:1 Forged

Icon Forged

Pro Tru PT091H3 Forged

ICON Forged

SRP Forged

SRP Forged

PISTONS

Mahle 10.5:1 Forged

Mahle Forged

Probe Forged

Mahle Forged

Mahle 10.2:1 Forged

Mahle 10.8:1 Forged

Mahle 9.9:1 Forged

Wiseco Forged K470x05

Wiseco Forged

Ross Forged

DSS Forged

Keith Black Hypereutectic

ICON Forged

Icon Forged

Probe Forged

PISTONS

PINS

RINGS

Mahle Steel, Straight

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Total Seal Ductile Moly

SRP Straight Tool Steel 150g Mahle Steel, Straight

Total Seal Ductile Moly

Mahle Steel, Straight ICON Straight Steel 141g

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Icon Steel 141 g

Hastings Ductile Moly

Total Seal Moly, Nodular Iron

PBM Moly

PBM Moly

RINGS

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Mahle Ductile Moly

Total Seal Moly, classic race

Mahle Ductile Moly

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Mahle Moly, Ductile Iron

Wiseco GFX Steel Nitride Napier

Wiseco GFX Steel Nitride Napier

Total Seal Steel

Total Seal Moly, Nodular Iron

Sealed Power Ductile Moly

Total Seal Ductile Moly

Total Seal Moly

Total Seal Ductile Moly

Total Seal Moly, Nodular Iron

Wiseco Straight 5115, 156g

Icon Steel 141 g

SRP

SRP

PINS

Mahle Steel, Straight

Mahle Straight Steel 145g

Probe

Mahle Straight Tool Steel 145 gms

Mahle Steel, Straight

Mahle Steel, Straight

Mahle Steel, Straight

Wiseco Straight 5115, 108g

Wiseco, K465X5, Straight 5115, 117g

Ross H-13, Straight, 118g

DSS Steel, Straight 110 g

Keith Black Straight Steel 118 g

ICON Straight Steel 190g

Icon Steel 118 g

Probe Straight Steel 149g

B15108080

1-47604

SCA-1-94955BE

1-94652

B157164080

B20106030

B20502030

R-KD20249

R-KD20245

LME426

1-48035

1-48107 6.1L Hemi

8000

7000

8000

8000

7500

B21103030

B21201030

1-48081

1-48065

B21205055

R-PT10240

44067F

44068F

MAX RPM PART NO. AS LISTED

6500

7000

7000

7000

7000

8000

8000

MAX RPM PART NO. AS LISTED

41-48 Stroker Charts updated 7/15/14 11:42 AM Page 48

49 Auto Care Association_Layout 1 7/15/14 10:28 AM Page 49

Circle 49 on Reader Service Card for more information

Cummins Diesel ISX

50-58 Cummins Diesel 7/15/14 11:38 AM Page 50

By John Clifford, Marketing Director, Blake’s Remanufacturing

Generating Strength Building on the Cummins ISX Engine

T

he Cummins ISX engine is one of the workhorses of the Cummins brand and will continue to be a dominating factor in power generation applications, mining and industrial settings. Cummins ISX engines are also very popular as a heavy-duty truck application engine. Blake’s Remanufacturing’s remanufactured Cummins ISX engines are rebuilt to OEM specifications in our ISO 9001 level machine shop. This means that even older model Cummins ISX engine applications are often rebuilt using better, more updated parts and techniques than the original engine. Cummins ISX engines in many These ISX 15 engines, which were being shipped to a customer in Ecuador, have a power range about 450 hp.

50 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

51 Area Diesel Service_Layout 1 7/15/14 10:27 AM Page 51

Circle 51 on Reader Service Card for more information

50-58 Cummins Diesel 7/15/14 11:38 AM Page 52

Cummins ISX aspects replaced the Cummins N14 engines in 2001, due to the EPA tier regulations. The first Cummins ISX engine rolled off the production line in 1998. Until 2010, this engine was a dual overhead cam design with one cam actuating the injectors and the other the valve train. Beginning in 2013, Cummins ISX engines were equipped with onboard diagnostics which monitor emissions output and maximizes engine efficiency. This Cummins ISX model was also completed one year ahead of production schedule to meet the EPA Department of Transportation Regulations. The “ISX” in Cummins ISX stands for “Interact System” which is the on-highway fuel system Cummins developed to vastly improve performance. Cummins ISX engines are very popular for on-highway and commercial trucking applications since they have the ability to pull between 430hp – 620hp at 2050 ft./lbs. Consequently, the brother of the Cummins ISX is the Cummins QSX which is part of the “Quantum” series. The Cummins QSX engine is the primary workhorse for offhighway, industrial, marine, heavy equipment and oil & gas applications. The Cummins QSX delivers between 365hp – 665hp at 1875 ft./lbs. of torque. Blake’s Remanufacturing has the ability to do both Cummins ISX and Cummins QSX engine rebuilds.

Cummins Cooling The Cummins 15L ISX is the latest engine in the ISX family which debuted in 2013. With the ISX 15 the fuel efficiency is increased 10 percent + over previous models. The foundation of the ISX 15L is the reduction of the size of the radiator and multiple cooling panels. This reduction in size of the cooling system without the loss of cooling power mean overall better aerodynamics within the engine. The new Cummins ISX engine cooling system allows for losses from the 52 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

REBUILDING TIPS ON THE ISX 1. Pay special attention to the spring loaded cam gear. 2. Need to use a puller for front and back seal. a. Special puller tool to pull off the crankshaft. b. Kent-Moore Tool. 3. Back off the spring loaded tension before unloading it. 4. Totally non interchangeable between ISX and QSX. Use all specified parts. 5. Difference between ISX engine blocks. a. Some have EGRs and others do not. b. You can use both types of engine blocks if need be: The water fittings just need to be fitted with frost plugs. 6. Everything on ISX and QSX is heavy-duty. These engines use heavy-duty cams. 7. Make sure to set the idol gear properly. ISX has floating gears as they are on a floating hub. a. The gears float because of the backlash. b. There must be backlash on the gears. c. There also must be torque between all of the gears. d. The timing must be set properly between the gears. e. In a running engine the gears must be unloaded. Only the Detroit 60 Series has similar floating gears. 8. Pay special attention to the dual overhead cams: one for the valves and injectors and the other for the Jake Brakes. 9. Overall, strictly follow the service manual. Stick to OEM specifications and tolerances as this engine is a very precise piece of equipment and has little room for error. From the staff at Blake’s Remanufacturing Services, LLC, Denver, CO

53 Quality Power_Layout 1 7/15/14 10:26 AM Page 53

Circle 53 on Reader Service Card for more information

50-58 Cummins Diesel 7/15/14 11:38 AM Page 54

Cummins ISX

Engine builders at Blake’s performing line boring on an engine block.

camshaft actuation. The dual cam design uses an integrated fuel system model (IFSM) which contains pressure regulators, gear pump, lift pump, metering and timing actuators and shutoff valve to accurately deliver diesel fuel directly to the injectors. The IFSM typically has a one section valve cover that is either plastic or chrome plated on older models of the Cummins ISX. The latest versions of the Cummins ISX 15 engine keep getting more fuel-efficient as the technology keeps advancing. Cummins has stated that the newest ISX 15 can deliver up to 2 percent better fuel economy than previously reported. The newest Cummins ISX 15 operational efficiency actually delivers more horsepower than in older ISX engine models. The ratings on the ISX 15 range from 400-600 hp (298-447 kW) with 2050 lb.-ft. of peak torque. The SmartTorque system Cummins developed adds roughly 200 lb.-ft. of extra torque to the top two gears of the engine. This means that Class 8 trucks can drive up steeper grades with much fewer downshifts making the ride that much smoother and less strenuous on the engine. For other models of the Cummins ISX engine, the additional torque from the SmartTorque system is applied to the lower gears where it is needed the most. Blake’s Remanufacturing reports that it can provide a remanufactured Cummins ISX 15 for half the cost of a new model, with no loss of efficiency or horsepower.

Cummins ISX Fuel Efficiency Physics

Engine builder Brad Millers prepping the engine block for assembly.

engine’s alternator and various other water pumps to be mitigated. The new technology also allows for more open room which creates cooled air for the engine. The new cooling technology will likely save around 2,000 gallons of fuel per year for a class 8 truck which also means less particulate emissions. In addition to improved efficiency of the cooling system Cummins has also refined the combustion chamber to provide fewer active re-generations of the after treatment system.

Focus on Fuel Efficiency The Cummins 15L ISX engine is also the newest engine with the improved fuel system. Up until 2010 the traditional Cummins ISX engine featured the antiquated dual overhead camshaft design. One of the camshafts activated the injectors and the other camshaft activated the valve train. This type of injection system is called high pressure injection and operates to create injection pressure by the 54 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

The fuel efficiency technology of the Cummins ISX engine uses the power of steam. Harnessing the power of steam for propulsion purposes has been around for almost 2,000 years. The steam engine was first patented in 1606 by Spanish inventor Jerónimo de Ayanz y Beaumont. It was in 1698 that Thomas Savery patented a steam pump which condensed steam to create a vacuum to draw water into the chamber, then applied the pressurized steam to further a piston. The same basic steam technology is used today in the Cummins ISX. This scientific process is called the Organic Rankine Cycle. Applying the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) to the diesel engine is quite a different process. Heat in a standard reciprocating engine if often looked as something to be avoided at all costs, but with new technology it is utilized to aid in better fuel efficiency. The technology is called Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) which turns excess heat from a major problem into the key to improved efficiency. In the Cummins ISX engine the heat comes out of the engine and travels directly to a superheater system. The superheater increases the temperature of the wet steam from the boiler into an extremely dry superheated steam. This concept of “dry steam” is steam that is heated beyond boiling. The dry steam contains a lot of energy which then turns a turbine in power plant systems. The

55 Henkel_Layout 1 7/15/14 10:25 AM Page 55

Circle 55 on Reader Service Card for more information

50-58 Cummins Diesel 7/15/14 11:38 AM Page 56

Cummins ISX turbine then turns a generator which converts waste heat into electricity. In the Cummins ISX engine the electricity is used to power a small electric motor built into the crankshaft. After the superheated dry steam’s energy is transferred into the turbine it later is sent to a recuperator then to a condenser where it is condensed and routed back into the boiler

producing a closed loop system. This is quite a revolutionary concept for the Cummins ISX having both the internal and external combustion in one engine. The extra energy that is recovered comes from four different sources: 6 percent increase in energy will come from the EGR, 2 percent will come from exhaust energy, and 2 percent will

Circle 56 for more information 56 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

come from other accessories that used to drain additional power. All of this additional energy adds up to about 10 percent increase in overall fuel efficiency for the Cummins ISX 15. The basic premise of the Cummins ISX engine’s fuel efficiency is recovering waste energy. Waste energy can be described as energy that is not used for any practical purposes. Energy can be neither created nor destroyed. It is stored in the form of kinetic energy (in motion) or potential energy (stored energy). When studying energy within the Cummins ISX engine we can ascertain that most of the energy is stored in the diesel fuel as potential energy. When that diesel fuel is burned in the combustion engine it changes form to kinetic energy, which then drives the pistons. However, most of the diesel fuel’s energy is lost as heat. One gallon of diesel fuel contains about 139,000 Btu (British Thermal Unit) of potential energy. One Btu is defined as the amount of heat required to increase one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit. The goal with any engine is to achieve peak thermal efficiency where as peak thermal efficiency is described as the work you get divided by the energy you put in. For example, a gas powered car engine is roughly 25 percent efficient and a heavy-duty diesel powered Cummins ISX engine is roughly 40 percent efficient. What that means is that if a vehicle used 10 gallons of gas only 4 gallons would go to towards propelling the tires forward; the other 6 gallons are wasted. The Organic Rankine Cycle technology in the Cummins ISX 15 aims to recovery as much energy as possible through heat recovery. Across the board, only roughly 33 percent of energy is used towards moving the motor. An example of waste energy in relation to trucks is when heat escapes from the engine to the outdoors. The heat sources on a Cummins

50-58 Cummins Diesel 7/15/14 11:38 AM Page 57

vehicle that help warm you up on a cold day include the Cummins ISX engine itself, the radiator, transfer case, transmission, differentials, U-Joints, brakes, cooling units, and your heater. Noise is also a heat source and is mostly a waste energy by product. The second kind of energy is work energy. Work energy is harnessed energy being directed where you want it to go. However, there are always going to be other hindrances to 100 percent thermal efficiency. Gravity, inertia, laws of aerodynamics and drag will always be barriers to overcome to capturing 100 percent of an energy source. The second law of thermodynamics states that achieving 100 percent thermal efficiency can’t be accomplished.

ISX Emissions History Cummins has always been on the forefront of emissions reduction and the development of technology that improves

Blake’s also offers new and remanufactured crankshafts, camshafts, lifters, connecting rods, cylinder heads, cylinder blocks and rocker assemblies for all the major diesel manufacturers, including Caterpillar, Detroit Diesel, Waukesha, John Deere, Mack, Perkins, International/Navistar, Alco, EMD and Komatsu.

emissions output. The first technology Cummins introduced to help reduce particulate emissions was cooled exhaust gas recirculation or EGR system. This system was introduced in the Cummins ISX CM870 model in 2002 and works by taking exhaust gas and re-circulates it back into the engine intake. This process radically lowers the combustion chamber temperatures in the Cummins ISX engine thus reducing the creation of Nitrogen Oxide. NOx and NOy (NOx plus other compounds that are created during the oxidation process of NOx) are the common causes of air pollution, smog and acid rain. Another big change in emissions reduction rolled out in 2008 when Cummins introduced Diesel Particulate Filter technology for the Circle 57 for more information EngineBuilderMag.com 57

50-58 Cummins Diesel 7/15/14 11:39 AM Page 58

Cummins ISX

Street Smarts In 2009, Cummins Inc. unveiled its on-highway engine lineup ready to meet the new Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations for the North American market recently. Among the products introduced was the new Cummins ISX11.9 engine, a compact and lightweight medium-bore engine the company said was suitable for vocational trucks, day cabs, emergency vehicles and motor coach applications. Sharing common cooled EGR, VGT Turbocharger, XPI fuel system, electronic controls and aftertreatment system with the ISX15, the ISX11.9 was offered with ratings from 310425 HP (231-317 kW) and torque from 1,150 to 1,650 lb.ft. (1,559 – 2,237 N•m). The ISX11.9 was offered with an optional engine compression brake. All of Cummins 2010 on-highway MidRange and HeavyDuty engines are compatible with long-life coolants and biodiesel blends up to B20.

Cummins ISX CM871 model. Diesel Particulate Filter technology or DPF is a filtration system designed to trap particulate NOx matter created by the Cummins ISX engine. The second step of the system is the Diesel Oxidation Catalyst which further breaks down the particulate matter via oxidation of the ash. The ash of the diesel particulate is oftentimes called soot. Then again in 2010 the Cummins ISX engine made another upgrade to its emissions technology with the ISX 15 CM2250 model. The Cummins ISX 15 CM2250 features the improved Exhaust Gas Recirculation in addition to Selective Catalytic Reduction for diesel particulate All Blake’s remanufactured matter. exchange engines are dyno These new tested prior to shipping. guidelines further confined to EPA regulations also known as Urea Injection Reduction. The selective catalytic reduction system contains a diesel exhaust fluid composed of urea and water, controller, holding tank, pump, injector and the catalyst brick. The system works by heating up the diesel exhaust fluid which is then pumped and injected into a decomposition area which then chemically reacts with the diesel exhaust in the Selective Catalytic Reduction chamber to reduce the level of NOx. The Cummins ISX 15 uses one camshaft compared to previous versions which used two. This single camshaft design in the Cummins ISX engine is due to the introduction of the common rail fueling system in which diesel fuel is pressurized from already high pressure. The fuel is stored in multiple piston pumps and transferred through tubes to a rail where the diesel fuel is stored under extremely high pressures up to but not including 35,000 psi. For more information on the Cummins ISX engine or the Cummins QSX engine, contact Blake's Remanufacturing at www.blakesreman.com. For more on the 40 years of Blake’s Remanufacturing, check out the Rebuilder Profile article beginning on page 78. ■

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Diesel Pistons

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Internal Affairs: The Demands on Diesel Pistons and Sleeves BY LARRY CARLEY, TECHNICAL EDITOR

T

he pistons are some of the hardest working components inside a diesel engine.

Diesel engines are high compression, high heat engines that demand a lot from their pistons. Compression ratios are typically in the 16:1 to 20:1 range, which improves thermal efficiency and fuel economy, but also creates more pressure. Cylinder pressures in many production diesel engines may range from 2200 up to 2700 PSI or higher depending on the engine's power rating, compared to 1450 PSI for a naturally aspirated gasoline engine or 2100 PSI for a turbocharged gas engine. Diesel pistons also have to contend with more heat than their gasoline counterparts. Flame temperatures can range from 2600 degrees F to over 3600 degrees F in the piston's combustion bowl, producing surface temperatures of up to 750 degrees F or higher in the

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rim area around the bowl. At such temperatures, aluminum pistons can be dangerously close to their melting point, so oil cooling is essential to dissipate heat, cool the rings and control thermal expansion.

Keeping ‘em Cool... Diesel pistons are cooled by spraying oil at the underside of the piston and directing some of the oil into hollow cavities or galleries in the top portion of the piston behind the upper ring land. On some pistons, an oil cooling duct is created in the back of the top ring insert by welding on a steel plate. Oil cooling lowers the temperature of the top ring up to 100 degrees F or more for better sealing, less blowby and longer piston and ring life.

...And Give ’em Room High operating temperatures also mean diesel pistons usually need

Diesel engines demand a lot from their pistons. Factors such as engine compression ratios, cylinder pressures and flame temperatures are all important factors in the design and construction of diesel pistons.

more clearance to accommodate thermal expansion – especially when an engine is being modified to produce more power. On a stock Duramax, the factory recommends about .002 inch of piston-to-wall clearance. For a street performance/drag application, you might want to allow .006 to .008 inch of piston clearance depending on the type of pistons used (cast or forged) and the amount of boost pressure. For a high boost diesel engine being used in a pulling application, you might need as much as .012 to .013 inch of clearance.

Diesel Piston Material Most production diesel pistons are still cast aluminum, though new materials are coming into use (more on this in a minute). One would think diesel pistons

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Diesel Pistons would be forged aluminum to handle the higher loads and heat, and some aftermarket performance pistons for diesel engines are 2618 forged aluminum or even CNCmachined billet aluminum. However, cast aluminum pistons have long been used for most production diesel engines because cast pistons can be easily molded with a steel upper ring land to extend the durability of the rings. Castings are also less expensive than forgings or other materials. The pistons that are used in light truck diesel engines such as GM Duramax, Ford Powerstroke and Dodge Cummins tend to be longer and heavier than the pistons used in gasoline engines. Bore sizes in these engines can range from 3.74 inches up to 4.21 inches depending on the application, but piston weights can be as much as 1000 to 1200 grams with a 300 to 400 gram wrist pin. The extra weight doesn't matter much because a stock diesel engine typically operates at relatively low RPM (under 4,500 RPM). But if you're modifying one of these engines for pulling or drag racing, you'll likely want a lighter forged piston that can handle higher engine speeds. You'll also need different pistons if you're building a stroker motor. One piston supplier we interviewed for this article said the original equipment stock pistons in Cummins engines are "over built" for durability. The wrist pins are large and heavy so they will last a long time, which is great for a hardworking daily driver. But for a diesel performance engine, you may not need so much beef. The pins can be lightened up by using pistons that have smaller and shorter wrist pins. Durability should not be an issue with smaller, lighter wrist pins because a diesel engine used for pulling or drag racing only experiences maximum load for a relatively short period of time. It isn't expected to go 200,000 miles or more like a production engine. Lighter performance pistons can also make engine balancing easier and less expensive in certain

applications. With Duramax engines, the crankshaft should be internally balanced for performance use rather than externally balanced. But this can require a lot of heavy metal in the counterweights. Using lighter pistons can minimize the amount of heavy metal that's needed to achieve an internal balance. One piston manufacturer said the

trend towards lighter diesel performance pistons is only going to accelerate. The manufacturer expressed that the pistons they will be making a few years from now will be much different and lighter than the ones they are producing for performance diesel engines today.

Diesel Piston Coatings Many aftermarket suppliers of

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Diesel Pistons forged pistons for diesel engines use various types of coatings and surface treatments on their pistons. Anodizing and similar treatments are typically used in the ring grooves and crown area for durability. Many consider anodizing a must if you're building a high boost engine for the pistons and rings to survive. Anti-friction coatings are also popular on the piston skirt to provide scuff protection. These "dry film lubricants" may contain such ingredients as molybdenum disulfide, tungsten disulfide and/or PTFE (Teflon) in a thermosetting polymer binder (water or solvent based). Dry film coatings are typically formulated to provide surface lubricity and protect against friction, galling and wear. A dry film coating provides an extra margin of safety if oil pressure is lost (at least for awhile), and helps prevent metal-to-metal contact under extreme pressure or following a dry start. Dry film lubricant coatings on piston skirts typically add about .001" to the piston diameter, so the question often comes up as to how this affects piston installation clearances. One piston manufacturer said it is not necessary to compensate for the coating when figuring piston-to-bore clearances. "Just pretend the coating isn't there," is their advice. Use the piston size on the box to calculate clearances, not the actual diameter of the coated piston. Another type of coating that may be used on diesel pistons to enhance performance and heat management is a ceramicmetallic coating on the top of the piston and in the bowl. In theory, heat reflecting coatings improve thermal efficiency and help pistons run cooler.

But if the surface isn't prepared properly before the coating is applied, it may flake loose under heat and load.

Piston Bowl Configurations Some aftermarket performance pistons are reworked stock cast pistons. "De-lipping" the bowl area to open up the combustion chamber is a common modification. A more open bowl allows longer injector duration for more power. The size, shape and angle of the center cone (if used) in the bottom of the bowl may also be modified to match the spray pattern of a particular set of injectors. One thing you do have to keep in mind when replacing pistons in an unmodified diesel engine is to make sure the replacement pistons have the same bowl configuration as the original. This is important to maintain the same compression ratio and combustion characteristics that were designed into the engine so you don't adversely affect fuel economy, performance or emissions. For example, on Cummins diesels there are more than 25 different pistons for Cummins B-series engines which include variants for on-road, off-road, marine, turbocharged and non-turbocharged, different ring packs, etc. To get the right replacement piston, you need to know the "CPL" (Critical Parts List) for the engine application. The CPL lists all of the major parts that are used in the engine, including the pistons, cam, injectors and turbo. You may also need the original equipment serial number on the piston, which may be etched or laser printed on the top of the piston. There may also be a raw casting number inside the piston, but this is not application specific because the same casting may be machined different ways EngineBuilderMag.com 63

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Diesel Pistons

for different engine applications.

Steel Pistons Big over-the-road heavy-duty truck engines are expected to last a lot of miles, upwards of a million or more with proper maintenance and care. Cast aluminum pistons hold up well enough in light to moderate use applications, but for high output engines, two-piece "articulated" pistons with steel crowns and aluminum skirts may be used for improved durability. The wrist pin holds the two pieces together, and allows the piston to handle higher loads than would be possible with a one-piece cast piston. One-piece steel pistons have also been around for a number of years and offer numerous advantages over cast aluminum, forged aluminum and twopiece aluminum/steel pistons in hard working diesel engines. Steel pistons are more expensive to manufacture than cast or forged aluminum pistons, but steel is much stronger than aluminum and can handle higher loads and temperatures without failing. Weight would seem to be a disadvantage, since steel is a heavier and denser metal than aluminum. Yet steel pistons can be as light or even lighter than

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aluminum pistons, if mass is removed in areas where extra strength isn't needed. Ring land wear is also not a problem with steel pistons because the entire piston is steel. Another advantage with steel is that its coefficient of

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Diesel Pistons consistent metallurgy, so the sleeves don't have hard spots or inclusions that may cause problems later on. Sleeves are usually semi-finished, and are not final finished until after the block has been bored and the sleeve has been pressed into position in the block. Wet liners, by comparison, are often finished to specifications and are ready to install. Dry sleeves require a certain amount of Piston manufacturers interviewed in this press fit to hold the sleeve in article believe that the trend toward lighter diesel performance pistons is only going to place. accelerate, and that pistons being developed The recommended amount a few years from now will be much different of interference will vary and lighter than the ones being manufactured depending on the type of today. metal the sleeve is made from, the type of engine block and thermal expansion is similar to that the application. of a cast iron engine block. Aluminum expands at a much higher rate than steel as it heats up, which increases the risk of piston scuffing and wiping out a cylinder if the engine gets too hot.

With similar metals (iron sleeve in an iron block), the standard press fit recommendation is usually .001 to .002 inch of interference. With dissimilar metals (iron sleeve in an aluminum block), as much as .003 inch of interference may be recommended. One tip that makes dry sleeve installation easier and also improves cylinder cooling is to lightly brush the cylinder bore after it has been bored to accept the sleeve. This will smooth the surface of the bore allowing the sleeve to slide into place more easily. A smoother surface will also allow better metalto-metal contact between the sleeve and block for good heat transfer. Steel sleeves are used in some puller motors and other diesel racing applications for their hardness and strength. But steel is harder on rings than ductile iron, so don't expect the rings to last forever if you end up installing steel sleeves in a motor you are building. Plain cast iron rings often work best with

Cylinder Sleeves And Liners Light duty diesel engines are like most gasoline engines, in that they have cast iron blocks with either aluminum or cast iron heads. If one or more cylinders are worn or damaged, they can often be salvaged and restored to their original bore diameter by boring the block and pressing in a dry sleeve. According to the people who make sleeves, centrifugal spun-cast ductile iron sleeves should be your first choice for any type of performance application. Ductile iron has more tensile strength than ordinary gray iron, as well as more "give" (elongation) which allows it to resist cracking under higher loads. There are also different grades of ductile iron, some of which are significantly better than others. Sleeves and liners that are spun cast also provide a more uniform and Circle 65 for more information EngineBuilderMag.com 65

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Diesel Pistons steel sleeves. The wet liners that are used in heavy-duty diesel engines are essentially drop-in cylinders that are sealed at the top and bottom with a flange and o-rings. The amount of slip fit will vary depending on the application, so follow the OEM recommendations. Wet liners are thicker than repair sleeves or cast-in-place sleeves because they have no metal around them to provide added support. As with dry sleeves, ductile iron liners provide the extra strength needed for high output applications. Wet liners can fail from fatigue cracking, or as a result of cavitation erosion. Every time the cylinder fires, it expands and contracts slightly causing small bubbles to form in the coolant that is circulating around the outside of the liners. When the bubbles implode, they do so with great force and chip away at the outside of the liners.

Over time, cavitation can pit and erode away so much metal that the liner eventually perforates and allows coolant to leak into the cylinder. This can cause the engine to overheat, or it can even hydrolock the cylinder.

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Cavitation erosion is often the result of coolant neglect, or using a coolant that does not contain “Supplemental Coolant Additives.� These additives include nitrite and/or molybdate that form a protective oxide film on the outside

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Diesel Pistons of the liners that helps them resist cavitation erosion. Fully formulated heavy-duty engine coolants that meet ASTM D6210 or similar standards contain the proper additives to resist cavitation erosion.

Piston and Sleeve Finishing and Break-In Tips When finishing diesel cylinder bores or sleeves, a two or three step process that results in a plateau finish is usually best to reduce ring break-in and seating time. The type of honing stones, feed and pressure used to finish the cylinders will vary depending on what kind of finish you want to achieve.

After the cylinders have been finished to specs, they must be scrubbed clean with hot soapy water and a brush to remove all traces of honing residue. Once the cylinders are clean, they can be lightly oiled with break-in oil. Use a conventional oil or a breakin oil for the initial start-up and break-in process, not a synthetic oil. Prime or pressurize the oil system prior to starting the engine. Once it

starts, rev it up to 2000 to 2500 RPM for 30 minutes while varying engine speed as the rings seat. Once the break-in process has been completed, drain the oil, change the filter and refill the crankcase with whatever oil will be used from that point on (conventional 15W-40 or synthetic 15W-40 or 5W-40 typically). â– 

As a rule, you should avoid trying to remove too much metal too quickly, using too much feed pressure and excessive dwell time to minimize heat build up that can distort the bores. Using torque plates is always recommended to improve bore geometry.

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Memory Lane

BY RANDY RUNDLE

The Beginning of a Life Long Friendship This is what Speedway Motors looked like in the 1960’s. That is Speedy himself waiting on customers.

I

met “Speedy” Bill Smith while on a magazine assignment for a former hot rodder magazine back in April of 1999. The magazine editor called early one Monday morning… “I know you only write technical articles for the magazine but we need somebody to go interview “Speedy” Bill Smith in Lincoln, Nebraska. You are the closest…see if you can pull this interview story off. He is your assignment and you have to call and make your own arrangements…good luck!” I was terrified. Speedy Bill is a legacy and I figured the odds of getting into his office for an interview was going to be tough, especially for a no name automotive journalist…just another word hack…I could hear him now! I called up Speedy’s office talked to his receptionist who

This is Speedway Motors today. Getting here wasn’t easy, as there were about a dozen moves in between as the business grew and became more successful each year. 68 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

asked me a dozen questions about who I was, who my editor was, and what exactly I wanted from Bill. I must have finally passed muster because the next thing I here is “Hello” in kind of a gruff voice. There was no doubt in my mind who was on the other end. It took less than 10 minutes to get on his schedule and after that he made it clear we were done and he hung up! Wow…what was I in for? On interview day, I was there at his office 30 minutes early. It was a two and a half hour drive from my house to his office and I knew I

could not afford to be late. At the appointed hour, he came walking down the hall buzzed me through the security doors and into his office. I had made up a list of questions I wanted to ask him, so I started down my list. After about 15 minutes he looked me in the eye and asked…what do you really do for a living? That stopped me dead in my tracks! I paused…gathered my thoughts, and told him. I was a freelance automotive journalist and that I owned a company called Fifth Avenue Antique Auto Parts in Kansas. I explained about my 6-volt alternators, cooling fans, electric fuel pumps, and the rest of the parts I make for antique vehicles including those entered in the Great Race. I explained that I wrote the technical articles for automotive magazines to explain how my

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Memory Lane “stuff” worked. After a pause he said… “I have heard of you and your company…” He seemed generally interested and so the next 30 minutes, he interviewed me, about my background and how long I had been in business and who my customers were and my involvement in the Great Race. I explained once again that I normally wrote technical articles for the automotive magazines and that I got assigned this job because I was closest to him! Then he looks at me square in the eye again and proceeds to tell me, “I knew you were not one of those ‘slickster’ California automotive journalist types. I knew right away you did not do this for a living.” I got one of the best interviews with Speedy Bill that anyone has ever gotten. It went on for most of the day. He got out pictures of the early days, gave me a complete tour of the entire building and Museum of Speed and

showed me prototypes of upcoming products and the plans for expansion of his Museum. When I turned in my story to editor, he immediately called and demanded to know how I got an interview like that from Speedy Bill. “You have personal information and pictures in that story that he has never shared with anyone! I am more than impressed!” he said. When the story came out, it was in two parts with all of the early pictures and information nobody had ever captured before. I was more than proud of that story. When I received my copies, I drove up to Lincoln and hand delivered a copy to Speedy in person. Typical Speedy, he began to read the article as soon as I handed it to him and said to “have a seat.” If things were not as he expected, it was clear to me I would be the first to know. He finished reading the article, looked up and said…”Good Article!” I was more than relieved!

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From then on we became friends. I had proven myself to him and earned his respect. I had delivered just the story that I said I would and included the points he wanted. Something I later learned was very difficult to do. He later told me he seldom gave personal interviews because the magazine types “always screw it up and never get the facts right.” He said, “I thought I could trust you and I am a pretty good judge of character…” “He later became a good customer of Fifth Avenue after six months of intense negotiations. As I look back now, I think he was trying to teach me some negotiating skills. I survived class, signed him up and I can now say I learned from one of the best. I have learned more about life and business from him than I could have ever imagined. He has also proven to be a good customer, but you’d better have your ducks in a row and not miss a delivery deadline. Luckily I never have but it hasn’t

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Memory Lane Many of you know Speedy Bill and Speedway Motors for the Street Rod and Racing catalogs that have graced your mailbox for the past 60 years. Here is part of my original interview about his early days; I hope you find it interesting.

This is in his own words…

This will give you an idea of the quality of the Smith Museum of Speed (www.museumofamericanspeed.com). Those are actual Indy garages, disassembled at the track and reassembled in Speedy’s museum. The brick in front of the garages are actual Indy bricks.

always been easy. Now some dozen years later, we spoke on a weekly basis up until his death. I would call him or he would call me and I would go by the house

to see him when I was delivering orders to the company. Of all the friends he has made in the past 60 years, I am honored to be on his short list.

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Bill Smith was born in Lincoln, NE. His parents lived in a quaint house located at 4427 “O” Street in Lincoln. “O” Street is still considered the longest straight street in the country. “O” street stretches 50 miles east to the Missouri River and westward 40 miles, till it meets up with a corncrib. Needless, to say, if it was happening in Lincoln, it happened on “O” Street. Bill got his first real job at age 13 working for “Milo” Kaslaskie who ran the second hand repair store, two blocks down from his house. “Milo would pay me 15 cents an hour in cash, or 25 cents an hour if I would take it out in trade. Trading

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“Speedy” Bill Smith

usually proved to be a better deal.” Bill’s father worked for the Lincoln Telephone and Telegraph Company as an engineer. He was a hard working, dedicated and dependable employee, always arriving a half an hour before work started, and always arriving home at the same time each day, a trait Bill is also known for. “My mother was a homemaker. She and my father made every effort to ensure that I grew up an honest, hard working young man. There were rules in those early days. My dad got home from work at 5:15 p.m. every day and my mother had supper on the table at 5:30 p.m. I was expected to be there and never late… no excuses and no exceptions.” Bill bought his first car from Milo when he was 14-years-old, a “slightly used” 1917 Ford Model T Roadster pickup. “I had it all figured out, I was going to get rich with that pickup. In those days people burned their trash in the alley behind their homes. Eventually they would end up with a huge pile of ashes. I figured I could make some good money hauling those ashes to the city dump. My plans were to charge a dollar a load. Needless, to say, I did not get rich.” Bill applied for, and received his social security card, when he was just 8 years old. Bill says, “I went down with an older friend of mine to sign up. He had to lift me up so I could see over the counter. When our cards arrived, we were one number apart.” Graduating from cars to motorcycles, Bill bought an old 45cubic inch Indian motorcycle when he was 17 years old. The passion for speed was in his blood. “That old Indian ran good, but was not near fast enough, so I traded it for an 80cubic inch Indian motorcycle. “That 80 cubic inch motorcycle Circle 73 for more information EngineBuilderMag.com 73

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Memory Lane was fast, it would easily run 100 mph in fourth gear. I would pull up next to a car on the highway in third gear… egg them on a little, shift into fourth, and leave them in the dust. Most cars in those days would seldom run over 85 mph. “I raced motorcycle flat track for a few years, and was pretty good at it, in part because I only weighed 125 pounds dripping wet. I also did not take any unnecessary risks because I knew if I came home with a broken arm or broken leg, that I would also end up with a broken head via my mother. That fear also helped me to decide cars were safer than motorcycles. Later, on I figured out I was a better mechanic and car builder than I was a driver. “I did race on the streets a little in those days, and while I could easily outrun the cops, my mother, was a different story. I was taught early on, never to lie, steal, or do anything dishonest. If my mother asked what I had been doing I had no choice but to

tell her. My expression usually told the story.” Bill also raced cars for money during those early years. “One of my early racecars was a Ford Model A Roadster A-V8, (Model A car with a Flathead V8 engine installed) which I towed to the races with a rope, often to races over 100 miles away. I always convinced a local 14 year-old neighborhood kid to “steer” the car. “In Nebraska, you had to be 16 years of age to drive, I often wondered how old you had to be to just “steer” a car down the highway? We never got pulled over, so I never found out.” His passion for building cars, building engines and racing was intense. Many times there was only enough money in his pocket to get to a race, and pay the entry fee. If he did not win any money, he would stay late and pick up Coke bottles from the infield and turn them in at two cents each, to make enough gas money for the trip home. To put this

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in perspective at two cents a bottle it took about 50 bottles to buy five gallons of gas, enough to get home.

The Beginning of Speedway Motors… Bill started Speedway Motors in 1952 at the age of 23 after graduating from college, and getting married to his sweetheart Joyce. Speedway Motors “officially” began (with a $300 loan from Joyce) in a 20' x 20’ cement block building (that once served as a soda pop stand) located at 2232 “O” Street in downtown Lincoln. (Today, that address is an empty lot). “Times were difficult. Sometimes it would be two or three weeks between customers. I did a lot of porting and polishing of cylinder heads in those days… that was about all I had room for in that small shop. “I also installed a lot of headers and dual exhaust systems in my dad's garage at home. Fords were quite popular then and one set of headers and a pair of “Smithy”

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Memory Lane mufflers would fit most any of the Ford cars built from 1932 up through 1953. “Aaron Fenton (who's real name is Aaron Finkelestein by the way) also grew up here in Lincoln. Aaron left to attend college in California after graduating high school. Aaron's brother Benny owned an auto store called “Ben's Auto Parts,” just two blocks down from my speed shop. Aaron, as you know, got into making “Fenton Equipment” and he was selling to me. I was doing quite well because I could show the customer how to install the parts or would install them for a little extra. “Benny watched what I was doing, and decided he wanted in on the action. He ordered a train carload of product from his brother in California and proceeded to sell it at 40 percent less than my cost. I nearly starved. People would buy the stuff from Benny, and then come ask me how to install it. Talk about tough competition that was it, I had no other income!

“I held out, and Benny's sales eventually dropped off. Aaron called one day and said… Benny was sending his remaining inventory back and did I want to buy it? I said I would give 10 cents on the dollar. Aaron says, “You're trying to kill me…” I said, “You have been trying to kill me for the last year and a half. “I bought the inventory out and did ok after that,” Smith said. “It was Aaron Fenton and Vic Edelbrock that were the first to make a million dollars in the performance aftermarket business.” By 1955, Speedway Motors had expanded to a 50 x 125 sq. foot shop and had nine employees. “We were doing engine swaps, averaging threefour a week. We could make anything we needed. We designed our own motor mounts, transmission mounts, shifter brackets, etc. We could put any engine in any car. I was also the first shop in the state of Nebraska to own a Stewart Warner engine balancing machine. By then I had also expanded the business into

building complete racing motors. I built all types of racing engines, but especially Flatheads.”

The Origins of Mail Order “In the 1960's I started running ads in “Hot Rod” Magazine. The ads had no zip code or telephone number. I had to ship everything via Greyhound Bus, because there was no UPS service in Nebraska until the 1970s. “I remember I once shipped a complete Pontiac Engine to Des Moines Iowa via the bus. When I arrived at the local bus depot they said “we” are not loading “that” on a bus! I said, OK, fine, I will do it myself, and I did. “I loaded all of my freight onto the bus myself in those days… and did most of the bus company's paperwork as well. The local bus company employees had little interest in my freight business. It is much different at Speedway Motors today. We process over 2,000 orders each day, and will completely fill three UPS semi-trucks daily. We still

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Memory Lane maintain a 99.6 percent fill rate, something I am quite proud of.”

Those Famous Trademark Hats Like many people, I wondered what the story was behind Bill's famous trademark hats. Bill explained… “When I built and campaigned USAC Championship cars in the early ‘70s, I felt there needed to be some rule changes so I campaigned to get a seat on the board of directors. As I campaigned, people could not remember my name or keep me straight from anyone else. Somebody told me I needed to get a trademark so I could be easily recognized. “So I went to see “Manny the Hatter” in Austin, Texas. My first hat cost $75 in the early 1970s. Today, the same hat costs $450. I have been through 20 hats in 30 years. The hats have become my trademark. Not many people recognize me without my hat on.”

The Innovations Speedway Motors started building fiberglass bodies for racecars way back in 1955, long before anybody else even thought of the idea. In the 1960s, Speedway Motors introduced their now-famous fiberglass T-Bucket kit. Speedway Motors shipped at least one T-Bucket kit every week for over 20 years. Speedway Motors was also the first to offer the 1934 Chevy Roadster Body in Fiberglass. In recent years with the introduction of their 1934 Ford Club Cab Pickup, the innovations have continued. “I have always believed in the importance of offering a kit car program at a reasonable cost. This allows the entry-level customer a chance to build a car and be involved in the hobby without spending a fortune…” I remember getting Speedway Catalogs in the mail during my high school years…seems everybody was on the mailing list. Those catalogs were like a Christmas wish book. After I toured behind the scenes

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and saw what it takes to fill 2,000 orders a day (with just 125 employees) it is truly an eye opening experience. Speedway Motors has been in business since 1952 and has out lasted most all of its competition. When you see the big picture it becomes crystal clear why Speedway has not only survived, but also has remained at the top of its game. As Speedy reminded me at the end of every conversation… “You have to keep the pedal mashed down and ‘“pushing against the back of the radiator if you want to stay ahead of the game…” My reply to him was … “If I can see your taillight go over the hill now and then, I know I am following the right path.” That always seems to make him laugh a little and he would say…”keep up the good work!” Then I knew we were done till next time. I will miss him greatly, but I know in my heart that he still has the pedal “mashed down and touching the back of that radiator” even in the after life. Godspeed, Speedy. ■

77 What's On The Dyno 7/15/14 11:29 AM Page 77

WHAT’S ON THE DYNO? 500-Inch Chrysler Engine Tune Over at Pro Car Associates, Inc., Akron, OH, this Chrysler 500-inch, fuel-injected engine was shipped to them to run and tune on the dyno. According to Pro Car Associates, the tune is a bit unique in that the staff had to wire the FAST EZ-EFI 2.0 throttle body to the Holley HP ECM. But, the shop’s engine specialists agreed that this job “was a fun project and something different.” Photos courtesy of Pro Car Associates, Inc. www.procarassociates.com If your shop want’s to be featured in an upcoming installment of “What’s on the Dyno?” — just send an email to esunkin@babcox.com with a hires photo of an engine on your dyno, along with details on what enhancements your shop made to the engine, the type of vehicle it will be used in, any dyno numbers you would like to share and your shop's name and location.

Entries selected from a random drawing will be featured in an upcoming "What's on the Dyno?" section of the magazine, and the sender will be awarded a $50 gift card.

presented by:

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Rebuilder Profile

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Building on Opportunities Dan Bendever, president, Blake’s Remanufacturing, talks about the company’s 40 year history and its future. BY GREG JONES, MANAGING EDITOR

I

n today’s volatile business environment, many companies don’t last long enough to see many milestone anniversaries, let alone make it long enough to see the third generation of leadership. However, despite the odds of the business world being against them, Blake’s Remanufacturing in Denver reached its 40th anniversary milestone in 2013. The company remanufactures crankshafts, camshafts, lifters, connecting rods, cylinder heads, cylinder blocks, and rocker assemblies for major manufacturers, and was founded by Robert Blake in 1973. Blake was an entrepreneur most of his adult life, starting businesses and becoming successful along the way, which is impressive when you consider that he only had a sixth grade education. He began tinkering with cars and motorcycles as a young man and was an accomplished racer. His

78 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

obsession with motors quickly turned into a career. Blake retired from his own business, Power Engineering Company, at the age of 59. However, he was one of those guys who didn’t do well with retirement. So, in 1973, Blake decided to start another camshaft and crankshaft grinding company as a hobby to keep himself busy. His hobby turned into Blake's Grinding and he continued to work there in his old age. When Blake passed away in the mid 1990s, he gave his company to his daughter, Barbara Blake. Dan Bendever is a third-generation owner of Blake’s Remanufacturing. When he became president in 1999, the company only had three employees and was only involved in camshafts and lifters. Dan has significantly changed the business to where it is today.

Barbara ran the business for several years, but in 1999, she decided it was her time to retire, and turned the reins over to her son, Dan Bendever. “When my grandfather first

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Rebuilder Profile the future. In 2009, Blake’s became a fullblown machine shop that does everything from cylinder heads and blocks to rebuilding engines. “I saw the writing on the wall,” he says. “I saw the market dwindling and dying. At the time I was 31 years old and I wanted to be in business for the next 20, 30, 40 years. We needed to do one of two things – expand the operation and become Robert Blake, founder of Blake’s Remanufacturing, pioneered the parts exchange program which helps keep more than 20,000 diesel engine parts in stock at all times.

started he was doing pony crankshafts,” says Bendever, who is president of the company today. “It evolved and he started doing camshafts, crankshafts and lifters. He did that from ’73 until the late ‘80s and early ‘90s. He then sold the crankshaft part of the business.” In 1999, when Bendever’s mom was ready to sell the company, Dan bought it and has been running it ever since. When Dan took over the company there were only three employees and the company was doing about $280,000 a year. “We have transformed the company from just doing camshafts and lifters into doing connecting rods and getting back into crankshafts,” Bendever says. Dan saw that Blake’s Remanufacturing needed some innovation and restructuring to get the gears going in the business. Through Dan’s vision and efforts the company grew to $2.7 million in 2007.

Business Overhaul In October 2008, the economy collapsed, but that didn’t deter Dan from his philosophy of continuing to expand the company, and by following his vision Blake’s Remanufacturing survived the great recession. Dan quickly realized that many customers were now doing their own machine shop work, aftermarket OEM parts from overseas were becoming better quality and that full engine overhauls were the wave of Circle 79 for more information

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what they were because it seemed like that model was working, or find something else to do because I didn’t think the camshaft and lifter market was going to be there for the next 3040 years.” Dan’s foray into the machine shop part of the business has been his biggest challenge since buying the company. “In 2009 when I got into a bad partnership related to the machine shop side of the business, I had to learn under fire how to rebuild engines, cylinder heads and blocks, which wasn’t my expertise,” he says. “That was one of the most challenging things because I had to throw myself and my team into the fire, because we had expanded and taken on so much overhead that we couldn’t go backward, we had to go forward.“ Dan made adjustments accordingly and today, Blake's Remanufacturing has 35 employees and currently resides in a 48,000 sq. ft. ISO 9001 level machine shop. Now that the recession is behind the company and the industry, Dan and his employees continue to look for opportunities to grow the company, all while providing quality remanufactured parts and engines. “We’ve grown so much in the last four or five years that we really need to hone in and get good at what we’re doing, which is what we’ve been focused on the last few years,” he says. “We can always be better and put quality control measures in and some ISO certification and things like that, which is the direction we’ve been moving in.” No matter the course Dan and his staff at Blake’s Remanufacturing had to take to continue to see success, they have done so for 40 years now. “It’s a sense of pride to reach this milestone,” Bendever says. “Seeing something my grandfather started with only a sixth grade education and for my mom and I to continue to move it forward has given us all a sense of pride.” ■ For more information on Blake’s Remanufacturing services, visit:

www.blakesreman.com Circle 81 for more information

gFollow us on

Plant tour at Cometic Gasket (www.cometic.com), which supplies high-performance and custom gaskets for a variety of markets including automotive, antique vehicles, automotive racing, ATV, motorcycle, off-road and other powersports.

Engine Builder On the Road

81 on the Road 7/15/14 11:25 AM Page 81

Engine Builder and Speedville.com staff enjoyed Family Night at the Wayne County Speedway (www.waynecountyspeedway.com) in Orrville, OH, for mid-season championship racing.

We traveled to the Hot Rod Power Tour at Summit Motorsports Park in Norwalk, OH. We saw our fair share of hot rods and cool rides, as well as the staff from Edelbrock and Fram Filtration. EngineBuilderMag.com 81

32-40,82 Chevy Stroker 7/15/14 11:46 AM Page 82

Continued from Page 40 valves are bigger than stock and will impact the block if the lift is too great. But that’s more about the aluminum heads than the block. The Superior Automotive 434 Stroker measures out like this: Block Stroke Bore Cubic Inches HP (approx)

348 4.0 4.155 434 577

The heads are limited by Edelbrock to 0.550 maximum valve lift on 348 blocks. This insures no valve-to-block contact so checking with a spring and dial indicator is suggested. An easy aspect of this build is that a stock 348/409 crank snout will fit a SBC harmonic balancer. It will need relocating of the timing mark to be accurate. The new Eagle stroker

crankshaft corrects this with the correct keyway position. These are but a few of the options for building a W Motor Stroker out of a stock block. The aftermarket blocks offer even more combos to build bigger and badder W motors. ■ Editor’s Notes: The suppliers mentioned in this article are options and recommendations presented by the author for particular stroker builds. Engine builders should use this information as a reference and that performance results from their own stroker builds will vary, depending on their selection of parts and products. For a downloadable Stroker Engine Reference Guide of General Motors, Ford and Chrysler kits, visit: www.EngineBuilderMag.com.

‘By the Book’ How to Rebuild & Modify Chevy 348/409 Engines Veteran magazine writer and author John Carollo provides insightful instruction for rebuilding a stock engine and also how to build a sound performance W-engine as well. The reader is shown how to select a strong clean block, free of core shift and fatal cracks, select the best heads for a particular build, and increase the compression ratio. Selecting a camshaft and a strong connecting rod and piston combination is also an important aspect of the engine build, and all options are examined. Book Notes: Pages: 144 Publisher: CarTech ISBN: 9781934709573 Purchase Info: www.cartechbooks.com Circle 82 for more information 82 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

83-85 Spotlights 7/15/14 11:23 AM Page 83

Engine Pro H-Beam Connecting Rods are forged from 4340 steel and produced on CNC machinery. They are finished in the U.S. to ensure precise big-end and pin-end bore sizes. Rods are magnafluxed, heat treated, stress relieved, shot peened and sonic tested to ensure they provide the strength required for high horsepower applications. Engine Pro connecting rods equipped with standard 8740 bolts are rated for up to 700 horsepower in small blocks, and 850 horsepower in big block applications. Visit, www.goenginepro.com.

Engine Pro Phone: 800-ENGINE-1

www.goenginepro.com

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Web-Based Valvetrain Parts Catalog SBI has released a Web-based version of its acclaimed catalog in order to provide users with real-time updates on additions to the company’s line of replacement valvetrain parts for close to 3,000 applications divided among late-model domestic and import passenger car, light truck, performance, marine, agricultural, heavy-duty and forklift/industrial. The catalog also features listings of K-Line Bronze Bullet-brand valve guide liners and miscellaneous K-Line tooling stocked by SBI, Exclusive Master Distributor for K-Line. Based on SBI’s CD-ROM catalog, the SBI Web-based catalog allows the user to search the database by part type/part number, vehicle type, engine manufacturer, or specific engine and make codes.

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S.B. International Phone:1-800-THE-SEAT

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Product Spotlights

Engine Pro High Performance Connecting Rods

Product Spotlights

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Ergonomic Blast Cabinets ZERO blast cabinets are now available in an ergonomic body style, which allows the operator to sit while working. The cabinet configuration provides comfortable knee-room for the operator without interfering with the free flow of media for reclamation and re-use. Standard cabinet features include: large, quick-change window, reverse-pulse cartridge-style dust collector, suction-blast or pressure-blast models. HEPA filtration as an option. Cabinets can work with glass bead, aluminum oxide and other recyclable media. Applications: cleaning, de-burring, peening, and finishing.

Ford 5.0L & 5.8L Hydraulic Roller Camshafts Elgin Industries has introduced three new Elgin PRO-STOCKÂŽ hydraulic roller performance camshafts for Ford 5.0L and 5.8L engines. Each cam is manufactured from premium billet steel. Now available through Elgin PRO-STOCK distributors are: p/n: E-1835-P Adv. Dur.: 285/292 Dur. @ .050: 220/226 Valve Lift: 499/.510 Lobe Sep.: 112 p/n: E-1836-P Adv. Dur.: 286/289 Dur. @ .050: 224/232 Valve Lift: 542/.563 Lobe Sep.: 112 p/n: E-1837-P Adv. Dur.: 299/327 Dur. @ .050: 236/248 Valve Lift: 574/.595 Lobe Sep.: 110

Clemco Industries Corp.

Elgin Industries

Phone: 800-788-0599

Phone: 800-323-6764

www.clemcoindustries.com

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www.elginind.com

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Valve Spring Tester Performance Trends has released a major High Force upgrade to is automatic spring tester, letting you test to 2500 lbs or more. Drag racers like Johnny Gray and Shane Gray of Gray Motorsports say “we saw an improved consistency in our engine performance and greater reliability of our valve springs. We even had a situation when we caught a valve spring that would have failed before it got put into service. This tool has proven to Gray Motorsports it is the best way for us to test valve springs for our race teams."

Performance Trends 248-473-9230

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Classified/Cores

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Visit EngineBuilderMag.com The Engine Builder website - www.enginebuildermag.com - provides weekly updated news, products and technical information along with the same in-depth editorial content as the magazine. Technical, product and equipment, market research, business management and financial information is all searchable by keywords making it easy for engine builders to find the information they need from current and past issues. Currently the site receives more than 100,000+ page views/ impressions per month and growing!

Engine Builder Phone: 330?670?1234 www.enginebuildermag.com

enginebuildermag.com Publisher Doug Kaufman, ext. 262 dkaufman@babcox.com

Tech Editor Larry Carley lcarley@babcox.com

enginebuildermag.com

Editor Ed Sunkin, ext. 258 esunkin@babcox.com

Advertising Services Tina Purnell, ext. 243 tpurnell@babcox.com

3550 Embassy Parkway Akron, OH 44333-8318 FAX 330-670-0874

Senior Executive Editor Brendan Baker, ext. 228 bbaker@babcox.com

330-670-1234

Managing Editor Greg Jones ext. 272 gjones@babcox.com Graphic Designer Nichole Anderson, ext. 232 nanderson@babcox.com

86 July 2014 | EngineBuilder

Director of Distribution Rich Zisk, ext. 287 rzisk@babcox.co Circulation Manager Pat Robinson, ext. 276 probinson@babcox.com Sr. Circulation Specialist Ellen Mays, ext. 275 emays@babcox.com

Sales Representatives Bobbie Adams badams@babcox.com 330-670-1234, ext. 238 Roberto Almenar ralmenar@babcox.com 330-670-1234, ext. 233 David Benson dbenson@babcox.com 330-670-1234 ext. 210 Don Hemming dhemming@babcox.com 330-670-1234, ext. 286 Jamie Lewis jlewis@babcox.com 330-670-1234, ext. 266

Dean Martin dmartin@babcox.com 330-670-1234, ext. 225 Jim Merle jmerle@babcox.com 330-670-1234, ext. 280 Tom Staab tstaab@babcox.com 330-670-1234, ext 224 Glenn Warner gwarner@babcox.com 330-670-1234, ext. 212 John Zick jzick@babcox.com 949-756-8835

Babcox Media Inc. Bill Babcox, President Greg Cira, Vice President, CFO Jeff Stankard, Vice President Beth Scheetz, Controller In Memorium: Edward S. Babcox (1885-1970) Founder of Babcox Publications Inc. Tom B. Babcox (1919-1995) Chairman

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Classified/Cores

USED AND REBUILT EQUIPMENT MACHINE REBUILDING

FLOW BENCHES

CBN TOOLING: WE RESHARPEN CBN’S!

JAMISON EQUIPMENT 1908 11th St., Emmetsburg IA 50536 800-841-5405 Check out our used equip. list at www.jamisonequipment.com

Simply the Best Lists: Automotive Aftermarket Truck Fleet & Powersports Markets

What Type of Direct Marketing Initiatives Do You Have in Store for 2014? Direct Mail E-Mail Marketing Telemarketing New Business • Prospecting Drive Web Site

Traffic Database Enhancement Catalog Mailing Promote Upcoming Tradeshows

Don Hemming, List Sales Manager Babcox Media, Inc. Phone: 330-670-1234 x286  Fax: 330-670-0874 dhemming@babcox.com  www.babcox.com

Call now to order or to receive a free 2014 catalog 1-800-434-5141 www.autobodysupplies.com

To Advertise in CLASSIFIEDS! Call Roberto Almenar at 330-670-1234, ext. 233 ralmenar@babcox.com Advertiser Index

COMPANY NAME AAPEX Access Industries American Gasket Amsterdam RAI | International Exhibitions Area Diesel Service, Inc. ARP/Automotive Racing Products Inc Atech Motorsports Auto Care Association AutoZone BlueDevil Products Brad Penn Lubricants Butler Performance Clemco Industries Cloyes Gear & Products Inc. Dakota Parts Warehouse Darton International Diamond Racing Products/Trend Performance DNJ Engine Components DTech Products Eagle Specialty Products Edelbrock Corp Elgin Industries Engine & Performance Warehouse Engine Parts Group Engine Parts Warehouse ESCO Industries Federal-Mogul Motorparts Federal-Mogul Motorparts Federal Mogul Motorparts/Speed Pro Federal Mogul Motorparts/Speed Pro

PAGE # 59 Cover 2 72 80 51 38 39 49 15 56 58 40 75 74 9 61 79 1 10 19 73 11 23 13 35 65 17 Gatefold 63 Cover

Federal Mogul Motorparts/Speed Pro Go Power Dynamometer Systems Goodson Mfg Co GRP Connecting Rods Henkel Corp Howards Cams Injector Experts IPD Liberty Engine Parts Los Angeles Sleeve Lubriplate Lubricants Co Lunati LLC Mahle Motorsports Manton Pushrods & Rockers Motovicity Distribution Motovicity Distribution NPR of America, Inc. Packard Industries PowerBore Cylinder Sleeves Quality Cutter Grinding Quality Power Products Ross Racing Pistons Rottler Manufacturing SB International Scat Enterprises Scorpion Racing Products Topline Topline Topline Trac-Pro

62 77 29 70 55 40 8 57 5 67 25 37 24 34 21 36 27 18 64 31 53 66 Cover 4 3 7 82 67 76 64 80

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Track Talk What’s #INMYRIDE Could Win You A Trip to Las Vegas NASCAR driver Tony Stewart sits behind the wheel of the 850-horsepower No. 14 Mobil 1 / Bass Pro Shops Chevrolet SS on the weekends, but on his personal time he sports a sleek Chevy Tahoe. The burning question fans want to know: What junk does he tote in his trunk? Now thanks to sponsor Mobil 1, NASCAR fans can get a glimpse of what’s inside Stewart’s everyday ride, plus share photos of what’s inside their own vehicles, too. Mobil 1 has teamed up with NASCAR Digital Media to launch the Mobil 1 #INMYRIDE Sweepstakes, a ten-week campaign designed to give NASCAR fans an opportu-

nity to show off the weird, the funny, the helpful, maybe the essential items they keep in their trunks, glove compartments, backseats or even underthe-hood for a chance to win an unforgettable NASCAR experience – a trip to Las Vegas, NV for the 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Champion’s Week™, Dec. 4–6, 2014. “We’re asking fans to show us their personalities and what is important to them by visiting NASCAR.com/inmyride and sharing their unique images,” said Artis M. Brown, Mobil 1 motorsports manager, ExxonMobil Fuels & Lubricants. Now through Aug. 31, 2014, fans are encouraged to enter the

NASCAR driver Tony Stewart gives fans a humorous take on what’s inside his Chevy Tahoe, inviting everyday motorists to do the same at NASCAR.com/inmyride. Credit: Getty Images

sweepstakes and share their #INMYRIDE photos by visiting www.NASCAR.com/inmyride - a special hub within the “NASCAR Automotive Technology Center engineered by Mobil 1” page on NASCAR.com. One lucky fan will be randomly selected as the sweepstakes winner. That winner and a guest will receive a NASCAR Champion’s Week-themed

What you tote around in your vehicle says a lot about yourself. Mobil 1 is celebrating car lovers everywhere inviting them to upload their #INMYRIDE photos and enter to win a trip to NASCAR Champion’s Week™.

Follow NASCAR Performance on Twitter and Facebook www.twitter.com/NASCARauto www.facebook.com/NASCARPerformance

prize package that will include airfare, hotel accommodations and tickets to NASCAR events jam-packed into the seasonending celebration in Vegas. While other sports have sticks and balls, NASCAR has the automobile and a fan base steeped in rich car culture. NASCAR fans are more likely than non-fans to be heavy users of their vehicles, which makes the Mobil 1 #INMYRIDE Sweepstakes a perfect avenue for Mobil 1 to engage fans. “You can tell a lot about drivers just by looking inside their cars, whether it’s under the hood or in the cabin,” said Brown. “We’ve found that many passionate Mobil 1 users take pride in the fact they’re putting the world’s leading synthetic motor oil brand in their engines.” Mobil 1, which marks its 40th Anniversary this year, has been the Official Motor Oil of NASCAR® since 2003. More than half of all NASCAR teams in NASCAR’s top three series rely on Mobil 1 lubricant technology, as do many of the world’s leading automotive manufacturers.

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Engine Builder, July 2014