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Appleton Public Library Friends of Appleton Public Library 225 N Oneida Street Appleton, WI 54911 (920) 832-6177 www.apl.org

Fine Print APPLETON PUBLIC LIBRARY | FRIENDS OF APPLETON PUBLIC LIBRARY

STAY UP-TO-DATE!

How can you stay up-to-date on the APL building process? Visit our building process website at www.apl150.org.

L A I C E SP N O I T I ED

6

Century Libraries

APL 150: The Plan for the Future

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Imagine Your Library

15

Economic and Community Development

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With a Little Help From Our Friends

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Frequently Asked Questions

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Contents...

3 Serving the community for over 110 years, Appleton Public Library currently operates from an 85,000 square foot facility at 225 N. Oneida Street. Established under state law by the City of Appleton, APL is governed by a nine-member citizen Board of Trustees.

Is the City forcing the property owners to give up their properties? Absolutely not. Mayor Hanna has stated that if the property owners decide not to sell their properties to the City of Appleton, then the process for the proposed site will end. Owners of both properties have openly stated that they are willing to begin conversations about the library in the proposed location.

APL houses and serves as resource library for the Outagamie Waupaca Library System (OWLS), a federated system of 16 member libraries.

Appleton Public Library Phone Numbers Administration.........................(920) 832-6170 Children’s Desk........................ (920) 832-6187 Circulation Desk......................(920) 832-6179 Information Desk.....................(920) 832-6177 Reference Desk......................(920) 832-6173

Appleton Public Library School Year Hours Monday.............................. 9:00 am - 9:00 pm Tuesday.............................. 9:00 am - 9:00 pm Wednesday....................... 9:00 am - 9:00 pm Thursday............................. 9:00 am - 9:00 pm Friday.................................. 9:00 am - 6:00 pm Saturday............................. 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Sunday...............................12:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Appleton Public Library Upcoming Closures Labor Day...................................September 1 Thanksgiving..............................November 27

www.apl.org info@apl.org | refquest@apl.org

4

What is the anticipated cost and who’s going to pay for it? The total cost for the proposed site and new library facility is estimated at just under $37 million. By comparison, a remodel and expansion of the current facility is estimated at just over $32 million. The City of Appleton has put placeholder figures into the budget to help fund the library project through 2017. A percentage of the estimated building cost would have to be funded by private donations solicited by the Friends of Appleton Public Library.

5

Is parking and access at the proposed site going to be an issue? The City of Appleton is in the middle of a downtown traffic and parking study. With the library in the proposed future location, we can help solve long-standing issues because traffic and parking solutions would serve to benefit the community. Fine Print • Special Edition | 19

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elow are some of the questions we are often asked. A full list of frequently asked questions is available on our building process website at www.apl150.org, as well as near the entrance of the library. If you have a question that is not on the list, feel free to ask us! We’re available in-person, via email at info@apl.org or by phone at (920) 832-6170.

1

The The Appleton Appleton Public Public Library Library continues continues to to grow... grow... 1981 2013

Mail correspondence to: Appleton Public Library - Fine Print 225 N Oneida Street Appleton, WI 54911

What’s wrong with the current library? In In 2013: 2013:

• 1,448,958 book and media materials

• 1,448,958 book strategic and media materials The 2013 community-based plan, APL were circulated. circulated. 150, found thatwere the current facility does not • 1,600 people on average walked • 1,600 people on average meet the needs of the community. through the doors daily. walked

APPLETON PUBLIC LIBRARY | VALUE INDEX EVALUATION Site

Score

Total Project Cost

Value Index

1

Existing Library Expansion

186

$34,747,139

5.36

2

Post Crescent Renovation

282

$39,024,583

7.23

3a

Bluff Site: Banquet and Clinic

418

$39,468,354

10.58

Bluff Site: Church and Clinic

241

$39,728,565

6.06

Bluff Site: Church and Banquet

499

$39,781,669

12.54

(11c)

3b (11d)

3c (11a)

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1981 1981 Email correspondence to: 2013 2013 info@apl.org

Circulation Circulation 0 0

through the doors daily. • 4,183 meeting room reservations were 4,183 meeting room reservations were As the library•strives to fulfill its mission and vision, Average booked by community members. Average booked by community members. the facility is falling behind standards for Daily Visitors • 82,298 in-library computer sessions logged. Daily Visitors • 82,298 sessions logged. contemporary urbanin-library libraries.computer The graph to the • 42,311 people attended our 1,478 right shows the amount of use the library was • 42,311 people attended our 1,478 programs programs built for compared to the amount of use we Compare those numbers to when the are seeing today. Compare those numbers to when the Meeting Room building first opened in 1981: Meeting Room building first opened in 1981: Reservations Reservations • 593,123 items were circulated • 593,123 items were circulated • 600 people on average walked • 600 people average through the on doors daily walked through the doors daily • 110 meeting room reservations were In-Library • 110 meeting room reservations were booked In-Library Computer booked Computer • 0 in-library computer sessions logged. Sessions • 0 in-library computer sessions logged. Sessions There weren’t any computers in the There libraryweren’t in 1981! any computers in the library in 1981!

Fine Print is published quarterly by Appleton Public Library. Printing for Fine Print is provided by the Outagamie Waupaca Library System (OWLS).

0 0

0 0

300,000 300,000

600,000 600,000

500 500

1,000 1,000

900,000 900,000

1,000 1,000

2,000 2,000

1,200,000 1,200,000

1,500,000 1,500,000

1,500 1,500

3,000 3,000

2,000 2,000

4,000 4,000

5,000 5,000

APL Mission Learn, know, gather, grow - your center of community life. APL Vision Where potential is transformed into reality. Contact Us For information about services, programs or materials please call us at (920) 832-6177. Connect With Us!

0 0

20,000 20,000

40,000 40,000

60,000 60,000

80,000 80,000

100,000 100,000

How was the proposed site selected? The site was selected after months of stakeholder interviews, research and test layouts. A decision matrix was created for the site evaluations. This matrix includes 15 categories of criteria and was structured to prevent one criterion alone from impacting the final result. See the extensive decision matrix at www.apl150.org.

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Building Communities R.

David Lankes, professor and Dean’s Scholar for the New Librarianship at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies once tweeted, “Bad libraries build collections. Good libraries build services (of which a collection is one). Great libraries build communities.” Here at Appleton Public Library, we take those 127 characters to heart and strive to build communities every day. With the help of our community, we have created a new vision and strategies that are based on this notion, because every single person in our community deserves a great library. Our facility plays an important role in how successfully we can implement our vision and strategies. With your help, we have decided that to be successful, we need a new facility, and the best location for that new facility is in the area of Appleton that will bridge the waterfront to the downtown area. We have been diligent in making sure that we have not only kept you up-to-date with the planning process, but have given you opportunities to provide input, and we will continue to do this. For now, we invite you to take a look through this special edition of Fine Print, where you’ll find articles on 21st century library service, an overview of our community-based plan, the economic impact a new facility would have on the Appleton area and more.

“Bad libraries build collections. Good libraries build services (of which a collection is one). Great libraries build communities.” R. David Lankes via Twitter

Fine Print • Special Edition | 3

21

st Century Libraries

With a little help from our

W

e get a lot of questions about the future of libraries. One of the more common questions is, “Why do we need libraries when the trend is away from the printed page?” Libraries aren’t just about books; instead they’re about what you do with the knowledge you acquire through resources like books. Libraries have always changed, and we will continue to evolve as the changing nature of acquiring and sharing information provides many exciting opportunities for libraries and communities. In the past, library spaces revolved around books and objects. The image below is a postcard of the Appleton Public Library circa 1908. It’s beautiful and reflects the sentiment of the time where the library was a gatekeeper. Furniture was substantial and the focus was on storage of physical resources. Today’s libraries are flexible spaces designed

around people, discovery and social interaction. The photo on the right side of the page shows how flexible library spaces are becoming - the book shelves have wheels! The table below says a lot. On one side, we have the traditional output measures of libraries. On the other side, we have the results. Focusing on the results reflects a change in values toward measuring success through meaningful impact, rather than simply the numbers libraries have relied on in the past.

FROM Searchable Information Space for Resources Information Visitor, Patron, Guest Consumer Institutional

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A Public-Private Partnership

People, Discovery, Interaction

FRIENDS A

s Appleton Public Library focuses on building plans and city officials discuss the City of Appleton’s Capital Improvement Budget, Friends of Appleton Public Library are measuring the potential for private financial support through a feasibility study.

This summer Library Strategies Inc, a consulting firm associated with the Friends of Saint Paul Public Library, interviewed local individuals and organizations. These interviewers shared information about the process, the community’s needs, preliminary building concepts and the proposed site. Then they asked for feedback. It was important to work with an independent consultant to ensure accurate results. Library Strategies consultants work only with libraries and have a 24-year proven track record for accuracy with public libraries across the nation. Although the final feasibility report is not expected until September, preliminary results from Library Strategies communicate broad support for APL’s community-driven planning process, the need for a new building and for the preliminary concepts. There is also wide enthusiasm for the proposed bluff site, which would benefit all of downtown Appleton and serve as a gateway to the city. While these interviews only tested the proposed concept, they report that philanthropic support would not be as strong for a renovation of the existing library or other possible sites. Stay tuned for more information about how a great 21st century library may be built, with a little help from our Friends.

Fine Print • Special Edition | 17

Historically a large ravine stretched through much of downtown. Today much of that area has been filled and developed, but you can still see evidence in Arbutus Park and Jones Park. The ravine presents challenges to construction throughout much of downtown, especially in the area between those parks, but those challenges are not insurmountable. Appleton has a successful and thriving downtown, defined by College Avenue, resulting in a narrow, linear focal point with areas on the periphery not as prominently highlighted. The proposed location of a new Appleton Public Library between Lawrence, Oneida and Morrison does something no other location can do. Building the library on this site will expand downtown beyond the narrow strip while increasing connectivity and raising awareness of surrounding businesses and community amenities. This infusion of vibrancy, vitality and activity will be noticeable from College Avenue. The visibility of this location from our renovated Houdini and City Center Plazas encourages multi-modal transportation between multiple community destinations. No other site will add this visible depth, simply because of the existing structures. An inspiring and prominent civic structure such as the public library, filling the skyline in that location, would be an inviting and welcoming gateway feature. The bluff that the proposed location sits on top of serves as the foundation of innovation and industry of Appleton's early years. While an elevation differential such as this can present development challenges, it also creates a lot of opportunities. By building the library here we can bridge the 46 foot elevation differential and finally connect the riverfront to downtown. Providing connectivity to these areas is a priority for the City of Appleton and Appleton Downtown Inc. The library project will give the City of Appleton the ability to work in earnest to pursue linkages between downtown and the riverfront. If we design a connection from downtown to the flats and Jones Park, we will achieve connectivity to both ends of the central business district and provide opportunities to put a lasting imprint on how we would like our downtown to be positioned for the future in terms of walkability, connectivity and urbanism. All of these are vital elements in attracting economic development and achieving community development. The proposed site also has valuable synergies with neighboring institutions such as the YMCA, Lawrence University, Fox Valley Family Medicine Residency Program and other businesses.

16 | Fine Print • Special Edition

The library's presence in this area will provide a willing collaborative partner and a destination anchor in a manner that strengthens visitor traffic without serving as a competitor to the businesses and services in the area. It will also allow longstanding parking needs for this area to be addressed in partnership, as well as provide solutions for improved access along Lawrence Street, resulting in safer passage for pedestrians and vehicular traffic. Of the 17 locations evaluated for the potential future site for the library, this particular site is the only one that provides the vibrancy, effectiveness and efficiency to answer all these issues. The length of this article precludes me from sharing each criteria evaluated while assessing the proposed site, but I encourage you to review the Criteria Matrix (located at www.apl150.org) created to evaluate all the potential sites. The library’s thorough participatory engagement process provides us with context to come to a solution for the library’s needs that also works to strengthen downtown, connect to the riverfront and work in partnership to solve other community problems, while providing us with a library that addresses current and future needs.

Wisconsin Library Service

4.06 $ 4.25

$ x

for each dollar of taxpayer investment million annual budget for APL

$17. 25 million annual local impact Return on Investment http://pld.dpi.wi.gov/pld_econimpact

So what does this modern library look like? It’s people focused. In the past, resources in a public library were defined as physical materials, such as books. Today resources are defined more broadly to include knowledge and expertise of individuals and organizations in the community. The public library creates a forum for community experts to share their knowledge. Another significant shift is that Information once moved in one direction; the citizen was the consumer of information. Today’s library facilitates the participation of its citizens learning, creating, sharing and innovating, producing a cycle of knowledge that enriches the community. Gone is the library as a gatekeeper of information, allowing access to community members. Now the library provide tools and training to access and evaluate information. Public libraries were once a quiet place for consumption of information and contemplation. The library of the future provides multiple types of space to engage citizens and create experiences.

It’s people friendly. The physical space of a library has long been thought of as institutional, however new library spaces are being created to be inspirational. Service desks are less grand and more approachable. In some cases, libraries are instituting roaming librarians who aren’t anchored to a desk. It’s increasingly planned by people. Many changes in libraries of the 21st century are the result of people-driven input in planning, service creation and service evaluation. A good example of this is our new strategic plan that you will read about in the next few pages. The role of libraries is changing rapidly. Don’t be mistaken, these changes don’t mean the traditional services you know and love aren’t important or will disappear. The new paradigm works hand in hand with the services you are familiar with, but also positions us to meet the new demands. We invite you to continuing reading through this issue of Fine Print as we address how we plan to embrace our role as a library of the 21st century.

Colleen Rortvedt Library Director

TO Experiences Space as a Resource Meaning/Reliability People as a Resource Creator Inspirational Adapted from Rolf Hapel, Director of Citizen Services & Libraries, Aarhus, Denmark

DOK, Delft Neth

erlands Fine Print • Special Edition | 5

APL 150 The plan for the future

F

or the last year or so, you may have heard us using the term APL 150. What is APL 150? In the simplest form, it is our community-based plan that looks toward our 150th anniversary in 2047. We have broken APL 150 up in to three steps; our first step was to define who we are, our second step was to define how we would accomplish the goals we set from the first step and our final step is to put the all of the planning into action. We are lucky to be a part of such a wonderful community that takes ownership of their public library. Thousands of you have worked with us for the last three years to make sure your library is a vibrant asset that is poised to serve our community far into the future. We’re not done yet, so we hope you continue to show ownership of your public library by providing input and staying informed throughout these important next steps.

Step One: Who Are We?

In 2008 and 2009, we completed a Building and Services Study and a detailed Program Design Study. Concerns were expressed that we were putting the building first. We listened to those concerns and took the next two years to formulate the framework for what would be known as APL 150. In April 2012, we kicked off a series of what we call our Community Conversations. Our goal

APL 150 Timeline

2008 & 2009 Proposal for Professional Services

April 2012 -13

Spring 2013

was to understand the hopes and dreams our community has for Appleton. We facilitated ten public meetings in aldermanic districts and every participant’s voice was heard and recorded. Then we sought out ten more special focus groups to ensure we heard all perspectives. In March and April of 2013, we brought in two guest speakers. The guest speakers, urban planner Tony Nelessen and futurist Garry Golden spoke about the future of libraries and how we can learn to anticipate changes in society and technology. In May 2013, a group of 20 people including city and library staff, trustees, alderpersons and community leaders visited two libraries in Illinois to see first-hand how they are providing 21st century library service to their communities. That month we also asked you to give us your thoughts on our strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats through an online survey.

APL 150 Timeline

In June 2013, staff experts from different sections of the library gave a presentation about what the future of their services will look like.

2008 & 2009 April 2012 -13 2013 Finally, during the summer of 2013Spring we assembled a Community Advisory Committee consisting of representatives from throughout the community who spent hours helping us develop our vision and strategies, which are the building blocks of the services for years to come. Services & we will offer Community Library Future Proposal for Professional Services

Appleton Public Library Final Report

July 3, 2008

Final Report

July 3, 2008

Appleton Public Library PROGRAM DESIGN STUDY

June 2009

Building Studies

May 2013

Conversations

May 2013

Presentations

June 2013

Summer 2013

S.W.O.T. Analysis

for:

Appleton Public Library

for:

Appleton Public Library

&

By Karen Harkness City of Appleton Director of Community and Economic Development

T

here are as many different definitions and meanings of community and economic development as there are people who practice these professions.

The Economic Development Handbook definition states, “From a public perspective, local economic development involves the allocation of limited resources-land, labor, capitol and entrepreneurship in a way that has a positive effect on the level of business activity, employment, income distribution patterns and fiscal solvency.” There is a difference between community development and economic development. The United Nations defines community development broadly as "A process where community members come together to take collective action and generate solutions to common problems." Community well-being (economic, social, environmental and cultural) often evolves from this type of collective action being taken at a grassroots level, and it is the process for making a community a better place to live and work. The Appleton Public Library building project is many things, including an economic and community development project. APL’s building project is an essential strategy to improve the vitality of our city from the standpoint of financial growth as well as quality of life. One of the most important tasks to the success of this project is a critical approach to the site selection process. Usage of library services is but one measurement to success and like other economic development projects, success will also be determined by where the facility is located.

PROGRAM DESIGN STUDY

June 2009

Downtown Appleton is a fascinating place to look at from a development and construction standpoint.

21st Century Library Services

Services & Building Studies

Community Conversations

6 | Fine Print • Special Edition

May 2013

ECONOMIC COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

May 2013 S.W.O.T. Analysis

Library Future Presentations

June 2013

21st Century Library Visits

Summer 2013

Community Survey

Staff Experts Presentations

Community Advisory Committee

Fine Print • Special Edition |15

Step Two: What type of facility is needed?

Site Scoring Matrix Site Amenities

Quality/      Character

Adaptability/  Flexibility

Merchandising  Collection

Public  Wayfinding

Site Access  Average

Access by  Bike/Foot

Access by Car

Access by  Transit

Materials Flow

Collection  Organization

Expandability

Staff Efficiency  (Service Pts)

April 15, 2014

Total

Criteria

Size sf 94,786 94,786

Acreage a 2.18 2.18

SCORE

Weight

10

9

8

7

8

>

>

>

7

7

4

9

6

5

4

186

ES PS

3.5 35

3 27

1 8

5 35

1 8

7

5

7

6.3 44

1 7

3 12

0 0

1 6

0 0

1 4

2

153,586 156,081

3.53 3.58

282

ES PS

4.5 45

1 9

5 40

3 21

1 8

7

5

7

6.3 44

3 21

3 12

5 45

3 18

3 15

1 4

3a

159,741 159,741

3.67 3.67

418

ES PS

5.5 55

5 45

5 40

7 49

3 24

1

1

3

1.7 12

5 35

7 28

7 63

5 30

5 25

3 12

141,723 141,723

3.25 3.25

241

ES PS

6 60

3 27

1 8

3 21

1 8

1

1

3

1.7 12

1 7

1 4

3 27

5 30

5 25

3 12

175,771 175,771

4.04 4.04

499

ES PS

6 60

5 45

5 40

7 49

7 56

1

1

3

1.7 12

7 49

7 28

7 63

7 42

7 35

5 20

Site

At the beginning of this year we hired architectural firm Engberg Anderson to update the Program Design Study they completed for us in 2009. The Program Design Study works as a road map for the architects to plan out how much, and what type of space is needed. Everything the library needs to provide responsible service is in the Program Design Study. EA and staff members spent several weeks working on the new Program Design Study.

Previous Site  Selection  Criteria*

APPLETON PUBLIC LIBRARY | BUILDING CONCEPT EVALUATION

Image/Civic  Presence/     Identity

The next step in the APL 150 process was to define the type of facility we would need to be able to accomplish our vision and strategies. 1

(11c)

3b (11d)

3c (11a)

Stakeholder Recommended Sites

In light of the insights from the community-based strategic plan, as well as changes in service-delivery models, collection usage and trends, and advances in library technology, the 2014 Program Design Study was updated to recommend an increase in building size from 86,000 square feet to 120,000 square feet with an option to include space for the City of Appleton Parks and Recreation Department. The next step in defining what type of facility is needed was to identify a best-fit location. Through a series of interviews with stakeholders in the community, several potential sites for the library were identified, including the current site. All of the sites can be found on the image to the right, as well as at www.apl150.org.

Specialized Services and Programs

Diversion and Leisure

Collaborative Environment

Hub of Learning and Literacy

Engaged and Sustainable Organization

The Future: Children and Teens

Creation and Innovation

The sites identified were then scored on a matrix and weighed with factors including: • The Size of the Lot • Visibility • Image • Control • Access • Cultural Synergy • Business Synergy • Residential Synergy • Adjacencies • Potential Development • Amenities • Perception of Safety • Site Geometry • Building Operational Efficiency • Ease of Construction • Perception After the sites were scored, the top three sites were pulled from the ranking. Those three sites included the current site, the Post-Crescent and Horsch Appliance site and three variations of the Trinity Lutheran Church, Fox Banquets and Rivertyme Catering, and UW-Clinic site.

APL Strategic Wheel Fine Print • Special Edition | 7

The three sites were then evaluated more extensively with a Building Concept Evaluation. In order to evaluate the three sites, the architects created building configurations for each of the three sites. The configurations were based off of the size recommendations from the Program Design Study. The criteria for the Building Concept Evaluation was weighed with factors including: • Previous Site Selection Criteria • Staff Efficiency • Expandability • Collection Organization • Materials Flow • Site Access Average • Public Wayfinding • Merchandising Collection • Adaptability and Flexibility • Quality and Character • Civic Presence and Identity • Site Amenities The architects then worked to create a very broad Cost Matrix for each of the sites. The criteria for the Cost Matrix included:

• Site Acquisition Cost • Demolition/Remediation Cost • Library Remodeling Cost • Total Construction Cost • Escalation • Professional Services Fees • Furniture, Fixture and Equipment Cost • Moving and Relocation Fees • Cost of Temporary Library Space • Collection Enhancement

Site Scoring Matrix Access by  Transit

Access by Car

Access by  Bike/Foot

Site Access  Average

Public  Wayfinding

9

8

7

8

>

>

>

7

7

4

9

6

5

4

3.5 35

3 27

1 8

5 35

1 8

7

5

7

6.3 44

1 7

3 12

0 0

1 6

0 0

1 4

2

153,586 156,081

3.53 3.58

282

ES PS

4.5 45

1 9

5 40

3 21

1 8

7

5

7

6.3 44

3 21

3 12

5 45

3 18

3 15

1 4

3a

159,741 159,741

3.67 3.67

418

ES PS

5.5 55

5 45

5 40

7 49

3 24

1

1

3

1.7 12

5 35

7 28

7 63

5 30

5 25

3 12

141,723 141,723

3.25 3.25

241

ES PS

6 60

3 27

1 8

3 21

1 8

1

1

3

1.7 12

1 7

1 4

3 27

5 30

5 25

3 12

175,771 175,771

4.04 4.04

499

ES PS

6 60

5 45

5 40

7 49

7 56

1

1

3

1.7 12

7 49

7 28

7 63

7 42

7 35

5 20

(11c)

3b (11d)

3c (11a)

Site Amenities

Materials Flow

10

ES PS

Image/Civic  Presence/     Identity

Collection  Organization

Weight

186

Quality/      Character

Expandability

SCORE

Adaptability/  Flexibility

Criteria

Acreage a 2.18 2.18

1

Previous Site  Selection  Criteria*

Total

Staff Efficiency  (Service Pts)

Merchandising  Collection

April 15, 2014

Size sf 94,786 94,786

Site

The final recommendation presented to the Appleton Public Library Board of Trustees was to proceed with a more in-depth evaluation of the Trinity Lutheran Church and Fox Banquets and Rivertyme catering site, based on the Building Concept Evaluation, Cost Matrix and Site Value Index.

TEEN ACTIVITY ZONE

Tuesday, April 15 during the Appleton Public Library Board of Trustees Board Meeting, Trustees voted unanimously in favor of the recommendation.

The new teen area is flexible for programs and welcoming for teens. It inspires a love of learning and literature and also invites teens to dream and create. The space quickly converts to a programming area where teens will be both instructed and entertained. New technologies can be quickly implemented in the space, allowing the library to be more responsive to changing needs.

After years of community planning, we are finally ready to put all of the work we have completed, with your help, into action. There are many steps that we must complete in the coming weeks. Those steps include: 1. Property Negotiation. We are currently working with the property owners, and we are confident this can be a mutually beneficial relationship. By statute, there are many steps we need to complete during the property negotiation process. Those steps include a request to begin property negotiations, property appraisals and providing a relocation plan for property owners. 2. Concept and Budget Development. The final report will be presented for decision to the full Board of Trustees during our September board meeting.

3. Budget Adoption. The Mayor’s 2015 budget will be published October 1 and will include a captial budget for the library. We hope you will continue to follow this exciting process, and we welcome any questions or comments you have.

8 | Fine Print • Special Edition

Natural light fills patron seating and staff work areas. The Silver LEED certified facility reflects our focus on sustainability and responsible use of tax payer dollars. We maximize public investment with the use of many dedicated volunteers, our work with many partners and organizations throughout the community and private support and investment through the Friends of APL.

Step Three: Putting the plan into action.

Finally, the architects created a Site Value Index for each of the three sites. The Site Value Index was calculated using the total score of the Building Concept Evaluation divided by the total estimated project cost.

APPLETON PUBLIC LIBRARY | BUILDING CONCEPT EVALUATION

CENTRAL STAIR

CHILDREN’S PLAY ZONE The new Children’s Area is designed with children of specific ages in mind and age-specific zones that help them learn. Parents will find zones that give their smallest children a place to explore while they have a chance to meet other parents and visit. Older children have their own space with age-appropriate materials and technology that invite them to read, learn and grow in a dynamic space tailored to their needs. Fine Print • Special Edition | 13

2013

From the north, the new facility welcomes visitors to a hub of learning and literacy. As well as supporting our traditional role, the new facility will also reflect the sentiments of today’s active, collaborative ways of learning. One of the busiest places in Appleton, we currently draw in 1,600 visitors a day, and this new facility will see a projected 40% increase in usage. The new library offers after-hours access to meeting spaces, satisfying the already tremendous demand for gathering and collaborative spaces. Last year, we housed over 4,000 meetings and events in our existing facility and were forced to turn away additional bookings due to a lack of space. The new facility provides a variety of flexible meeting rooms that offer opportunities for use, including one-on-one tutoring, digital learning labs, conference rooms, a lecture hall, a green roof, a creation demonstration center and children’s programming spaces.

42, 311 HIGHEST OVERALL

ATTENDANCE OF ANY SINGLE-SITE

LIBRARY IN WI

6,7 5 3 A D UL

HIGHEST CHILDREN’S

ATTENDANCE

OF ANY SINGLE-SITE

LIBRARY IN WI

DOOR COUNT

99 TEE N S

95 , 039

9

ILDREN CH

5,4

REGISTERED BORROWERS

for any single-site library in Wisconsin

30, 05

HIGHEST NUMBER OF

PROGRAM ATTENDANCE

Appleton Public Library

TS

HIGHEST TEEN ATTENDANCE

OF ALL LIBRARIES

IN WISCONSIN

556, 874

MAIN ENTRY

82,298

COMPUTER SESSIONS The new library provides the important traditional services that our community knows, loves and relies upon, but is also designed with today’s technology and the future in mind. The new facility doesn’t add service points, avoiding increased operational costs. It focuses on flexibility in order to offer innovating, evolving and modern services. 12 | Fine Print • Special Edition

HIGHEST NUMBER OF CHECKOUTS FOR ANY

SINGLE SITE LIBRARY IN WI

QUESTIONS ANSWERED

1,376,833

?

?

107,678 ?

?

? ?

Imagine... T

hrough its very structure, this concept tells the story of what makes Appleton unique, a story told to us by the 20 focus groups that we held throughout 2012 and 2013. Sitting on a bluff overlooking the historic mills and the Fox River, this civic space will serve as a representation of Appleton’s historical legacy of innovation, as well as a symbol for the dreams and achievements of the future. The building brings together elements of industrial and modern architecture, incorporating gestures of steel and cream city bricks that reflect the mills below. This facility will serve as a statement of the value of transparency and openness in a community that values participation from the citizenry. It’s a building as unique and special as Appleton.

Imagine... T

hrough its very structure, this concept tells the story of what makes Appleton unique, a story told to us by the 20 focus groups that we held throughout 2012 and 2013. Sitting on a bluff overlooking the historic mills and the Fox River, this civic space will serve as a representation of Appleton’s historical legacy of innovation, as well as a symbol for the dreams and achievements of the future. The building brings together elements of industrial and modern architecture, incorporating gestures of steel and cream city bricks that reflect the mills below. This facility will serve as a statement of the value of transparency and openness in a community that values participation from the citizenry. It’s a building as unique and special as Appleton.

2013

From the north, the new facility welcomes visitors to a hub of learning and literacy. As well as supporting our traditional role, the new facility will also reflect the sentiments of today’s active, collaborative ways of learning. One of the busiest places in Appleton, we currently draw in 1,600 visitors a day, and this new facility will see a projected 40% increase in usage. The new library offers after-hours access to meeting spaces, satisfying the already tremendous demand for gathering and collaborative spaces. Last year, we housed over 4,000 meetings and events in our existing facility and were forced to turn away additional bookings due to a lack of space. The new facility provides a variety of flexible meeting rooms that offer opportunities for use, including one-on-one tutoring, digital learning labs, conference rooms, a lecture hall, a green roof, a creation demonstration center and children’s programming spaces.

42, 311 HIGHEST OVERALL

ATTENDANCE OF ANY SINGLE-SITE

LIBRARY IN WI

6,7 5 3 A D UL

HIGHEST CHILDREN’S

ATTENDANCE

OF ANY SINGLE-SITE

LIBRARY IN WI

DOOR COUNT

99 TEE N S

95 , 039

9

ILDREN CH

5,4

REGISTERED BORROWERS

for any single-site library in Wisconsin

30, 05

HIGHEST NUMBER OF

PROGRAM ATTENDANCE

Appleton Public Library

TS

HIGHEST TEEN ATTENDANCE

OF ALL LIBRARIES

IN WISCONSIN

556, 874

MAIN ENTRY

82,298

COMPUTER SESSIONS The new library provides the important traditional services that our community knows, loves and relies upon, but is also designed with today’s technology and the future in mind. The new facility doesn’t add service points, avoiding increased operational costs. It focuses on flexibility in order to offer innovating, evolving and modern services. 12 | Fine Print • Special Edition

HIGHEST NUMBER OF CHECKOUTS FOR ANY

SINGLE SITE LIBRARY IN WI

QUESTIONS ANSWERED

1,376,833

?

?

107,678 ?

?

? ?

The three sites were then evaluated more extensively with a Building Concept Evaluation. In order to evaluate the three sites, the architects created building configurations for each of the three sites. The configurations were based off of the size recommendations from the Program Design Study. The criteria for the Building Concept Evaluation was weighed with factors including: • Previous Site Selection Criteria • Staff Efficiency • Expandability • Collection Organization • Materials Flow • Site Access Average • Public Wayfinding • Merchandising Collection • Adaptability and Flexibility • Quality and Character • Civic Presence and Identity • Site Amenities The architects then worked to create a very broad Cost Matrix for each of the sites. The criteria for the Cost Matrix included:

• Site Acquisition Cost • Demolition/Remediation Cost • Library Remodeling Cost • Total Construction Cost • Escalation • Professional Services Fees • Furniture, Fixture and Equipment Cost • Moving and Relocation Fees • Cost of Temporary Library Space • Collection Enhancement

Site Scoring Matrix Access by  Transit

Access by Car

Access by  Bike/Foot

Site Access  Average

Public  Wayfinding

9

8

7

8

>

>

>

7

7

4

9

6

5

4

3.5 35

3 27

1 8

5 35

1 8

7

5

7

6.3 44

1 7

3 12

0 0

1 6

0 0

1 4

2

153,586 156,081

3.53 3.58

282

ES PS

4.5 45

1 9

5 40

3 21

1 8

7

5

7

6.3 44

3 21

3 12

5 45

3 18

3 15

1 4

3a

159,741 159,741

3.67 3.67

418

ES PS

5.5 55

5 45

5 40

7 49

3 24

1

1

3

1.7 12

5 35

7 28

7 63

5 30

5 25

3 12

141,723 141,723

3.25 3.25

241

ES PS

6 60

3 27

1 8

3 21

1 8

1

1

3

1.7 12

1 7

1 4

3 27

5 30

5 25

3 12

175,771 175,771

4.04 4.04

499

ES PS

6 60

5 45

5 40

7 49

7 56

1

1

3

1.7 12

7 49

7 28

7 63

7 42

7 35

5 20

(11c)

3b (11d)

3c (11a)

Site Amenities

Materials Flow

10

ES PS

Image/Civic  Presence/     Identity

Collection  Organization

Weight

186

Quality/      Character

Expandability

SCORE

Adaptability/  Flexibility

Criteria

Acreage a 2.18 2.18

1

Previous Site  Selection  Criteria*

Total

Staff Efficiency  (Service Pts)

Merchandising  Collection

April 15, 2014

Size sf 94,786 94,786

Site

The final recommendation presented to the Appleton Public Library Board of Trustees was to proceed with a more in-depth evaluation of the Trinity Lutheran Church and Fox Banquets and Rivertyme catering site, based on the Building Concept Evaluation, Cost Matrix and Site Value Index.

TEEN ACTIVITY ZONE

Tuesday, April 15 during the Appleton Public Library Board of Trustees Board Meeting, Trustees voted unanimously in favor of the recommendation.

The new teen area is flexible for programs and welcoming for teens. It inspires a love of learning and literature and also invites teens to dream and create. The space quickly converts to a programming area where teens will be both instructed and entertained. New technologies can be quickly implemented in the space, allowing the library to be more responsive to changing needs.

After years of community planning, we are finally ready to put all of the work we have completed, with your help, into action. There are many steps that we must complete in the coming weeks. Those steps include: 1. Property Negotiation. We are currently working with the property owners, and we are confident this can be a mutually beneficial relationship. By statute, there are many steps we need to complete during the property negotiation process. Those steps include a request to begin property negotiations, property appraisals and providing a relocation plan for property owners. 2. Concept and Budget Development. The final report will be presented for decision to the full Board of Trustees during our September board meeting.

3. Budget Adoption. The Mayor’s 2015 budget will be published October 1 and will include a captial budget for the library. We hope you will continue to follow this exciting process, and we welcome any questions or comments you have.

8 | Fine Print • Special Edition

Natural light fills patron seating and staff work areas. The Silver LEED certified facility reflects our focus on sustainability and responsible use of tax payer dollars. We maximize public investment with the use of many dedicated volunteers, our work with many partners and organizations throughout the community and private support and investment through the Friends of APL.

Step Three: Putting the plan into action.

Finally, the architects created a Site Value Index for each of the three sites. The Site Value Index was calculated using the total score of the Building Concept Evaluation divided by the total estimated project cost.

APPLETON PUBLIC LIBRARY | BUILDING CONCEPT EVALUATION

CENTRAL STAIR

CHILDREN’S PLAY ZONE The new Children’s Area is designed with children of specific ages in mind and age-specific zones that help them learn. Parents will find zones that give their smallest children a place to explore while they have a chance to meet other parents and visit. Older children have their own space with age-appropriate materials and technology that invite them to read, learn and grow in a dynamic space tailored to their needs. Fine Print • Special Edition | 13

Step Two: What type of facility is needed?

Site Scoring Matrix Site Amenities

Quality/      Character

Adaptability/  Flexibility

Merchandising  Collection

Public  Wayfinding

Site Access  Average

Access by  Bike/Foot

Access by Car

Access by  Transit

Materials Flow

Collection  Organization

Expandability

Staff Efficiency  (Service Pts)

April 15, 2014

Total

Criteria

Size sf 94,786 94,786

Acreage a 2.18 2.18

SCORE

Weight

10

9

8

7

8

>

>

>

7

7

4

9

6

5

4

186

ES PS

3.5 35

3 27

1 8

5 35

1 8

7

5

7

6.3 44

1 7

3 12

0 0

1 6

0 0

1 4

2

153,586 156,081

3.53 3.58

282

ES PS

4.5 45

1 9

5 40

3 21

1 8

7

5

7

6.3 44

3 21

3 12

5 45

3 18

3 15

1 4

3a

159,741 159,741

3.67 3.67

418

ES PS

5.5 55

5 45

5 40

7 49

3 24

1

1

3

1.7 12

5 35

7 28

7 63

5 30

5 25

3 12

141,723 141,723

3.25 3.25

241

ES PS

6 60

3 27

1 8

3 21

1 8

1

1

3

1.7 12

1 7

1 4

3 27

5 30

5 25

3 12

175,771 175,771

4.04 4.04

499

ES PS

6 60

5 45

5 40

7 49

7 56

1

1

3

1.7 12

7 49

7 28

7 63

7 42

7 35

5 20

Site

At the beginning of this year we hired architectural firm Engberg Anderson to update the Program Design Study they completed for us in 2009. The Program Design Study works as a road map for the architects to plan out how much, and what type of space is needed. Everything the library needs to provide responsible service is in the Program Design Study. EA and staff members spent several weeks working on the new Program Design Study.

Previous Site  Selection  Criteria*

APPLETON PUBLIC LIBRARY | BUILDING CONCEPT EVALUATION

Image/Civic  Presence/     Identity

The next step in the APL 150 process was to define the type of facility we would need to be able to accomplish our vision and strategies. 1

(11c)

3b (11d)

3c (11a)

Stakeholder Recommended Sites

In light of the insights from the community-based strategic plan, as well as changes in service-delivery models, collection usage and trends, and advances in library technology, the 2014 Program Design Study was updated to recommend an increase in building size from 86,000 square feet to 120,000 square feet with an option to include space for the City of Appleton Parks and Recreation Department. The next step in defining what type of facility is needed was to identify a best-fit location. Through a series of interviews with stakeholders in the community, several potential sites for the library were identified, including the current site. All of the sites can be found on the image to the right, as well as at www.apl150.org.

Specialized Services and Programs

Diversion and Leisure

Collaborative Environment

Hub of Learning and Literacy

Engaged and Sustainable Organization

The Future: Children and Teens

Creation and Innovation

The sites identified were then scored on a matrix and weighed with factors including: • The Size of the Lot • Visibility • Image • Control • Access • Cultural Synergy • Business Synergy • Residential Synergy • Adjacencies • Potential Development • Amenities • Perception of Safety • Site Geometry • Building Operational Efficiency • Ease of Construction • Perception After the sites were scored, the top three sites were pulled from the ranking. Those three sites included the current site, the Post-Crescent and Horsch Appliance site and three variations of the Trinity Lutheran Church, Fox Banquets and Rivertyme Catering, and UW-Clinic site.

APL Strategic Wheel Fine Print • Special Edition | 7

APL 150 The plan for the future

F

or the last year or so, you may have heard us using the term APL 150. What is APL 150? In the simplest form, it is our community-based plan that looks toward our 150th anniversary in 2047. We have broken APL 150 up in to three steps; our first step was to define who we are, our second step was to define how we would accomplish the goals we set from the first step and our final step is to put the all of the planning into action. We are lucky to be a part of such a wonderful community that takes ownership of their public library. Thousands of you have worked with us for the last three years to make sure your library is a vibrant asset that is poised to serve our community far into the future. We’re not done yet, so we hope you continue to show ownership of your public library by providing input and staying informed throughout these important next steps.

Step One: Who Are We?

In 2008 and 2009, we completed a Building and Services Study and a detailed Program Design Study. Concerns were expressed that we were putting the building first. We listened to those concerns and took the next two years to formulate the framework for what would be known as APL 150. In April 2012, we kicked off a series of what we call our Community Conversations. Our goal

APL 150 Timeline

2008 & 2009 Proposal for Professional Services

April 2012 -13

Spring 2013

was to understand the hopes and dreams our community has for Appleton. We facilitated ten public meetings in aldermanic districts and every participant’s voice was heard and recorded. Then we sought out ten more special focus groups to ensure we heard all perspectives. In March and April of 2013, we brought in two guest speakers. The guest speakers, urban planner Tony Nelessen and futurist Garry Golden spoke about the future of libraries and how we can learn to anticipate changes in society and technology. In May 2013, a group of 20 people including city and library staff, trustees, alderpersons and community leaders visited two libraries in Illinois to see first-hand how they are providing 21st century library service to their communities. That month we also asked you to give us your thoughts on our strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats through an online survey.

APL 150 Timeline

In June 2013, staff experts from different sections of the library gave a presentation about what the future of their services will look like.

2008 & 2009 April 2012 -13 2013 Finally, during the summer of 2013Spring we assembled a Community Advisory Committee consisting of representatives from throughout the community who spent hours helping us develop our vision and strategies, which are the building blocks of the services for years to come. Services & we will offer Community Library Future Proposal for Professional Services

Appleton Public Library Final Report

July 3, 2008

Final Report

July 3, 2008

Appleton Public Library PROGRAM DESIGN STUDY

June 2009

Building Studies

May 2013

Conversations

May 2013

Presentations

June 2013

Summer 2013

S.W.O.T. Analysis

for:

Appleton Public Library

for:

Appleton Public Library

&

By Karen Harkness City of Appleton Director of Community and Economic Development

T

here are as many different definitions and meanings of community and economic development as there are people who practice these professions.

The Economic Development Handbook definition states, “From a public perspective, local economic development involves the allocation of limited resources-land, labor, capitol and entrepreneurship in a way that has a positive effect on the level of business activity, employment, income distribution patterns and fiscal solvency.” There is a difference between community development and economic development. The United Nations defines community development broadly as "A process where community members come together to take collective action and generate solutions to common problems." Community well-being (economic, social, environmental and cultural) often evolves from this type of collective action being taken at a grassroots level, and it is the process for making a community a better place to live and work. The Appleton Public Library building project is many things, including an economic and community development project. APL’s building project is an essential strategy to improve the vitality of our city from the standpoint of financial growth as well as quality of life. One of the most important tasks to the success of this project is a critical approach to the site selection process. Usage of library services is but one measurement to success and like other economic development projects, success will also be determined by where the facility is located.

PROGRAM DESIGN STUDY

June 2009

Downtown Appleton is a fascinating place to look at from a development and construction standpoint.

21st Century Library Services

Services & Building Studies

Community Conversations

6 | Fine Print • Special Edition

May 2013

ECONOMIC COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

May 2013 S.W.O.T. Analysis

Library Future Presentations

June 2013

21st Century Library Visits

Summer 2013

Community Survey

Staff Experts Presentations

Community Advisory Committee

Fine Print • Special Edition |15

Historically a large ravine stretched through much of downtown. Today much of that area has been filled and developed, but you can still see evidence in Arbutus Park and Jones Park. The ravine presents challenges to construction throughout much of downtown, especially in the area between those parks, but those challenges are not insurmountable. Appleton has a successful and thriving downtown, defined by College Avenue, resulting in a narrow, linear focal point with areas on the periphery not as prominently highlighted. The proposed location of a new Appleton Public Library between Lawrence, Oneida and Morrison does something no other location can do. Building the library on this site will expand downtown beyond the narrow strip while increasing connectivity and raising awareness of surrounding businesses and community amenities. This infusion of vibrancy, vitality and activity will be noticeable from College Avenue. The visibility of this location from our renovated Houdini and City Center Plazas encourages multi-modal transportation between multiple community destinations. No other site will add this visible depth, simply because of the existing structures. An inspiring and prominent civic structure such as the public library, filling the skyline in that location, would be an inviting and welcoming gateway feature. The bluff that the proposed location sits on top of serves as the foundation of innovation and industry of Appleton's early years. While an elevation differential such as this can present development challenges, it also creates a lot of opportunities. By building the library here we can bridge the 46 foot elevation differential and finally connect the riverfront to downtown. Providing connectivity to these areas is a priority for the City of Appleton and Appleton Downtown Inc. The library project will give the City of Appleton the ability to work in earnest to pursue linkages between downtown and the riverfront. If we design a connection from downtown to the flats and Jones Park, we will achieve connectivity to both ends of the central business district and provide opportunities to put a lasting imprint on how we would like our downtown to be positioned for the future in terms of walkability, connectivity and urbanism. All of these are vital elements in attracting economic development and achieving community development. The proposed site also has valuable synergies with neighboring institutions such as the YMCA, Lawrence University, Fox Valley Family Medicine Residency Program and other businesses.

16 | Fine Print • Special Edition

The library's presence in this area will provide a willing collaborative partner and a destination anchor in a manner that strengthens visitor traffic without serving as a competitor to the businesses and services in the area. It will also allow longstanding parking needs for this area to be addressed in partnership, as well as provide solutions for improved access along Lawrence Street, resulting in safer passage for pedestrians and vehicular traffic. Of the 17 locations evaluated for the potential future site for the library, this particular site is the only one that provides the vibrancy, effectiveness and efficiency to answer all these issues. The length of this article precludes me from sharing each criteria evaluated while assessing the proposed site, but I encourage you to review the Criteria Matrix (located at www.apl150.org) created to evaluate all the potential sites. The library’s thorough participatory engagement process provides us with context to come to a solution for the library’s needs that also works to strengthen downtown, connect to the riverfront and work in partnership to solve other community problems, while providing us with a library that addresses current and future needs.

Wisconsin Library Service

4.06 $ 4.25

$ x

for each dollar of taxpayer investment million annual budget for APL

$17. 25 million annual local impact Return on Investment http://pld.dpi.wi.gov/pld_econimpact

So what does this modern library look like? It’s people focused. In the past, resources in a public library were defined as physical materials, such as books. Today resources are defined more broadly to include knowledge and expertise of individuals and organizations in the community. The public library creates a forum for community experts to share their knowledge. Another significant shift is that Information once moved in one direction; the citizen was the consumer of information. Today’s library facilitates the participation of its citizens learning, creating, sharing and innovating, producing a cycle of knowledge that enriches the community. Gone is the library as a gatekeeper of information, allowing access to community members. Now the library provide tools and training to access and evaluate information. Public libraries were once a quiet place for consumption of information and contemplation. The library of the future provides multiple types of space to engage citizens and create experiences.

It’s people friendly. The physical space of a library has long been thought of as institutional, however new library spaces are being created to be inspirational. Service desks are less grand and more approachable. In some cases, libraries are instituting roaming librarians who aren’t anchored to a desk. It’s increasingly planned by people. Many changes in libraries of the 21st century are the result of people-driven input in planning, service creation and service evaluation. A good example of this is our new strategic plan that you will read about in the next few pages. The role of libraries is changing rapidly. Don’t be mistaken, these changes don’t mean the traditional services you know and love aren’t important or will disappear. The new paradigm works hand in hand with the services you are familiar with, but also positions us to meet the new demands. We invite you to continuing reading through this issue of Fine Print as we address how we plan to embrace our role as a library of the 21st century.

Colleen Rortvedt Library Director

TO Experiences Space as a Resource Meaning/Reliability People as a Resource Creator Inspirational Adapted from Rolf Hapel, Director of Citizen Services & Libraries, Aarhus, Denmark

DOK, Delft Neth

erlands Fine Print • Special Edition | 5

21

st Century Libraries

With a little help from our

W

e get a lot of questions about the future of libraries. One of the more common questions is, “Why do we need libraries when the trend is away from the printed page?” Libraries aren’t just about books; instead they’re about what you do with the knowledge you acquire through resources like books. Libraries have always changed, and we will continue to evolve as the changing nature of acquiring and sharing information provides many exciting opportunities for libraries and communities. In the past, library spaces revolved around books and objects. The image below is a postcard of the Appleton Public Library circa 1908. It’s beautiful and reflects the sentiment of the time where the library was a gatekeeper. Furniture was substantial and the focus was on storage of physical resources. Today’s libraries are flexible spaces designed

around people, discovery and social interaction. The photo on the right side of the page shows how flexible library spaces are becoming - the book shelves have wheels! The table below says a lot. On one side, we have the traditional output measures of libraries. On the other side, we have the results. Focusing on the results reflects a change in values toward measuring success through meaningful impact, rather than simply the numbers libraries have relied on in the past.

FROM Searchable Information Space for Resources Information Visitor, Patron, Guest Consumer Institutional

4 | Fine Print • Special Edition

A Public-Private Partnership

People, Discovery, Interaction

FRIENDS A

s Appleton Public Library focuses on building plans and city officials discuss the City of Appleton’s Capital Improvement Budget, Friends of Appleton Public Library are measuring the potential for private financial support through a feasibility study.

This summer Library Strategies Inc, a consulting firm associated with the Friends of Saint Paul Public Library, interviewed local individuals and organizations. These interviewers shared information about the process, the community’s needs, preliminary building concepts and the proposed site. Then they asked for feedback. It was important to work with an independent consultant to ensure accurate results. Library Strategies consultants work only with libraries and have a 24-year proven track record for accuracy with public libraries across the nation. Although the final feasibility report is not expected until September, preliminary results from Library Strategies communicate broad support for APL’s community-driven planning process, the need for a new building and for the preliminary concepts. There is also wide enthusiasm for the proposed bluff site, which would benefit all of downtown Appleton and serve as a gateway to the city. While these interviews only tested the proposed concept, they report that philanthropic support would not be as strong for a renovation of the existing library or other possible sites. Stay tuned for more information about how a great 21st century library may be built, with a little help from our Friends.

Fine Print • Special Edition | 17

B

elow are some of the questions we are often asked. A full list of frequently asked questions is available on our building process website at www.apl150.org, as well as near the entrance of the library. If you have a question that is not on the list, feel free to ask us! We’re available in-person, via email at info@apl.org or by phone at (920) 832-6170.

1

The The Appleton Appleton Public Public Library Library continues continues to to grow... grow... 1981 2013

Mail correspondence to: Appleton Public Library - Fine Print 225 N Oneida Street Appleton, WI 54911

What’s wrong with the current library? In In 2013: 2013:

• 1,448,958 book and media materials

• 1,448,958 book strategic and media materials The 2013 community-based plan, APL were circulated. circulated. 150, found thatwere the current facility does not • 1,600 people on average walked • 1,600 people on average meet the needs of the community. through the doors daily. walked

APPLETON PUBLIC LIBRARY | VALUE INDEX EVALUATION Site

Score

Total Project Cost

Value Index

1

Existing Library Expansion

186

$34,747,139

5.36

2

Post Crescent Renovation

282

$39,024,583

7.23

3a

Bluff Site: Banquet and Clinic

418

$39,468,354

10.58

Bluff Site: Church and Clinic

241

$39,728,565

6.06

Bluff Site: Church and Banquet

499

$39,781,669

12.54

(11c)

3b (11d)

3c (11a)

18 | Fine Print • Special Edition

2

1981 1981 Email correspondence to: 2013 2013 info@apl.org

Circulation Circulation 0 0

through the doors daily. • 4,183 meeting room reservations were 4,183 meeting room reservations were As the library•strives to fulfill its mission and vision, Average booked by community members. Average booked by community members. the facility is falling behind standards for Daily Visitors • 82,298 in-library computer sessions logged. Daily Visitors • 82,298 sessions logged. contemporary urbanin-library libraries.computer The graph to the • 42,311 people attended our 1,478 right shows the amount of use the library was • 42,311 people attended our 1,478 programs programs built for compared to the amount of use we Compare those numbers to when the are seeing today. Compare those numbers to when the Meeting Room building first opened in 1981: Meeting Room building first opened in 1981: Reservations Reservations • 593,123 items were circulated • 593,123 items were circulated • 600 people on average walked • 600 people average through the on doors daily walked through the doors daily • 110 meeting room reservations were In-Library • 110 meeting room reservations were booked In-Library Computer booked Computer • 0 in-library computer sessions logged. Sessions • 0 in-library computer sessions logged. Sessions There weren’t any computers in the There libraryweren’t in 1981! any computers in the library in 1981!

Fine Print is published quarterly by Appleton Public Library. Printing for Fine Print is provided by the Outagamie Waupaca Library System (OWLS).

0 0

0 0

300,000 300,000

600,000 600,000

500 500

1,000 1,000

900,000 900,000

1,000 1,000

2,000 2,000

1,200,000 1,200,000

1,500,000 1,500,000

1,500 1,500

3,000 3,000

2,000 2,000

4,000 4,000

5,000 5,000

APL Mission Learn, know, gather, grow - your center of community life. APL Vision Where potential is transformed into reality. Contact Us For information about services, programs or materials please call us at (920) 832-6177. Connect With Us!

0 0

20,000 20,000

40,000 40,000

60,000 60,000

80,000 80,000

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How was the proposed site selected? The site was selected after months of stakeholder interviews, research and test layouts. A decision matrix was created for the site evaluations. This matrix includes 15 categories of criteria and was structured to prevent one criterion alone from impacting the final result. See the extensive decision matrix at www.apl150.org.

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Building Communities R.

David Lankes, professor and Dean’s Scholar for the New Librarianship at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies once tweeted, “Bad libraries build collections. Good libraries build services (of which a collection is one). Great libraries build communities.” Here at Appleton Public Library, we take those 127 characters to heart and strive to build communities every day. With the help of our community, we have created a new vision and strategies that are based on this notion, because every single person in our community deserves a great library. Our facility plays an important role in how successfully we can implement our vision and strategies. With your help, we have decided that to be successful, we need a new facility, and the best location for that new facility is in the area of Appleton that will bridge the waterfront to the downtown area. We have been diligent in making sure that we have not only kept you up-to-date with the planning process, but have given you opportunities to provide input, and we will continue to do this. For now, we invite you to take a look through this special edition of Fine Print, where you’ll find articles on 21st century library service, an overview of our community-based plan, the economic impact a new facility would have on the Appleton area and more.

“Bad libraries build collections. Good libraries build services (of which a collection is one). Great libraries build communities.” R. David Lankes via Twitter

Fine Print • Special Edition | 3

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Century Libraries

APL 150: The Plan for the Future

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Imagine Your Library

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Economic and Community Development

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With a Little Help From Our Friends

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Frequently Asked Questions

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Contents...

3 Serving the community for over 110 years, Appleton Public Library currently operates from an 85,000 square foot facility at 225 N. Oneida Street. Established under state law by the City of Appleton, APL is governed by a nine-member citizen Board of Trustees.

Is the City forcing the property owners to give up their properties? Absolutely not. Mayor Hanna has stated that if the property owners decide not to sell their properties to the City of Appleton, then the process for the proposed site will end. Owners of both properties have openly stated that they are willing to begin conversations about the library in the proposed location.

APL houses and serves as resource library for the Outagamie Waupaca Library System (OWLS), a federated system of 16 member libraries.

Appleton Public Library Phone Numbers Administration.........................(920) 832-6170 Children’s Desk........................ (920) 832-6187 Circulation Desk......................(920) 832-6179 Information Desk.....................(920) 832-6177 Reference Desk......................(920) 832-6173

Appleton Public Library School Year Hours Monday.............................. 9:00 am - 9:00 pm Tuesday.............................. 9:00 am - 9:00 pm Wednesday....................... 9:00 am - 9:00 pm Thursday............................. 9:00 am - 9:00 pm Friday.................................. 9:00 am - 6:00 pm Saturday............................. 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Sunday...............................12:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Appleton Public Library Upcoming Closures Labor Day...................................September 1 Thanksgiving..............................November 27

www.apl.org info@apl.org | refquest@apl.org

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What is the anticipated cost and who’s going to pay for it? The total cost for the proposed site and new library facility is estimated at just under $37 million. By comparison, a remodel and expansion of the current facility is estimated at just over $32 million. The City of Appleton has put placeholder figures into the budget to help fund the library project through 2017. A percentage of the estimated building cost would have to be funded by private donations solicited by the Friends of Appleton Public Library.

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Is parking and access at the proposed site going to be an issue? The City of Appleton is in the middle of a downtown traffic and parking study. With the library in the proposed future location, we can help solve long-standing issues because traffic and parking solutions would serve to benefit the community. Fine Print • Special Edition | 19

Appleton Public Library Friends of Appleton Public Library 225 N Oneida Street Appleton, WI 54911 (920) 832-6177 www.apl.org

Fine Print APPLETON PUBLIC LIBRARY | FRIENDS OF APPLETON PUBLIC LIBRARY

STAY UP-TO-DATE!

How can you stay up-to-date on the APL building process? Visit our building process website at www.apl150.org.

L A I C E SP N O I T I ED


Special Edition Newsletter