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Volume 14, Issue 3

Chasing Colors And Ghosts In Colorado PAGE 8

Lynn Camp

A PUBLICATION EXCLUSIVELY FOR ATVA MEMBERS

Ridin’ The Rockies

INSIDE The All-Terrain Vehicle Association (ATVA) protects ATVers’ right to ride. It also serves as a source of authoritative information about where and how to ride, products and events. The ATVA is part of the American Motorcyclist Association, the world’s most powerful voice for motorcyclists. ATVA membership is $49 a year. For more information call toll free (866) 288-2564 or check us out online at www.atvaonline.com.

THE ATVA NEWS TEAM

FEATURE 08 Chasing Colors And Ghosts In Colorado

DEPARTMENTS

04 Tips For Buying and Selling A Used ATV 07 Where To Ride: Bull Gap Off-Road Vehicle Hill Climb And Trail in Mio, Mich. 10 Three Decades Of ATV Racing 12 Profiling Today’s Top Racers 15 Marketplace and Calendar

Bill Kresnak Editor Halley Miller Designer ATVA News is published bimonthly by the All-Terrain Vehicle Association, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. Copyright by the American Motorcyclist Association. Printed in the U.S.A. No responsibility is assumed for loss or damage to unsolicited materials. Send story ideas and high-resolution photos to editor@atvaonline.com. You may see them in ATVA News. Be sure to include your name and phone number.

SNAPSHOT

STRENGTH IN NUMBERS If someone you know is interested in being a part of the ATVA, log on to www.atvaonline.com. Send your stories or ideas to editor@ atvaonline.com. www.facebook.com/ AllTerrainVehicleAssociation

Marcos Patronelli, the 2013 quad division winner of the Dakar Rally, is shown here racing in the first stage of the 2014 Dakar from Rosario to San Luis, Argentina, on Jan. 5. The Argentinian later dropped out of the race after a spectacular accident in which he jumped off his quad just before it tumbled 600 feet off a cliff. Photo courtesy of Marcelo Maragni/Red Bull Content Pool. Want to share a photo? Send it with your name to editor@atvaonline.com.

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American Motorcyclist magazine: Locate ATV action in your By Cherie Schlatter area on the monthly AMA organizer services manager Calendar of Events. Representation in Washington, D.C., and elsewhere: Freedom fighters in Washington, D.C.; Pickerington, Ohio; and on the West Coast are hard at work every day fighting for your right to ride and race. Our only defense against the many threats we face as riders is the strength we derive by banding together. Politicians understand—and respond to—strength in numbers. If you still need more reasons to urge your club members to join, consider these five critical issues: 1) We are fighting health insurance discrimination against riders. Some insurance policies won’t pay for medical care if you’re injured on an ATV or motorcycle. Imagine being denied coverage at the time when you most need it. 2) We want proof that ethanol won’t damage ATV or motorcycle engines. There’s a big push by the ethanol industry to increase the amount of ethanol in gasoline. The association is working to ensure that increased ethanol-gasoline blends aren’t approved for ATVs and motorcycles until they are proven to be safe for ATV and motorcycle engines. 3) We played a major role in overturning the federal “lead law” that imposed a de facto ban on the sale of kids’ ATVs and dirtbikes. But there will be other challenges in the future. By

ON TRACK

A PUBLICATION EXCLUSIVELY FOR ATVA MEMBERS

If you belong to a club, do you know if your fellow club members are ATVA members of the AMA? Because if they aren’t, they could be wasting some hard-earned cash! Why? Because of the many money-saving benefits offered by belonging to the ATVA. Plus, members who sign up to have their memberships automatically renewed each year get AMA Roadside Assistance at no additional charge. AMA Roadside Assistance covers cars, RVs and non-commercial trailers for a member and his or her immediate family members. The most important reason members of your club should join is that opponents of ATVing are hard at work trying to take away our riding and racing freedoms. They want to stop us from riding on public land—even in our own back yards! By joining as an ATVA member of the AMA, riders help fight these important battles. That helps everyone who loves to ride and race. Here are just some of the reasons it makes sense to be a member: VIP treatment and discounts: Members enjoy incredible savings on parts, accessories, event tickets, hotel rooms, car rentals and much, much more. The $49 annual membership fee easily pays for itself. AMA Roadside Assistance: Members who sign up to auto-renew their membership enjoy this benefit at no additional charge. AMA Roadside Assistance is available 24-hours a day for your motorcycles and other vehicles, including cars, trucks, RVs and trailers. Coverage is included for your spouse and dependent children living at home or away in college. ATVA News: ATVA members of the AMA stay abreast of what is happening in the world of ATVs with the bi-monthly ATVA News, which is bound inside American Motorcyclist magazine.

Lynn Camp

Help Us Help You

joining, members of your club can be a part of future battles protecting our kids’ right to ride and race. 4) We fight for access to public land. Does your club ride on public land? Where would you ride if access to that land were suddenly denied? At the national and local levels, we are working to block efforts to close trails and shut riders out of public land. Do your club members want to ride on their own land? Is there a private riding area near them? Some jurisdictions are trying to pass laws that would even ban riding in your own back yard, or on private motocross tracks. Every day, we are working to fight the passage of those laws. 5) We work to create more trails. When you buy gas for your off-highway vehicle, the gas tax money goes to the federal Recreational Trails Program, which the AMA helped establish. The RTP provides funds to the states to develop and maintain recreational trails. Federal lawmakers recently wanted to gut the program, but with our members’ help, we have fought back. There are many more reasons it makes sense for your club members become members. Urge them to join now at www.atvaonline.com or have them call toll free (866) 288-2564.

NEWS Tips For Buying and Selling A Used ATV

Not everyone can afford to buy a new quad. Or maybe you’d like to sell your used machine so you can buy another one. Here are some helpful tips to consider when shopping for a used ATV. You may want to take this list along with you to avoid any surprises after you buy. If the seller has a good quad for sale, he or she should not object to you going through this checklist. Remember that you are buying a used machine, so don’t expect it to be like new.

CHECKLIST You will need help for this from either a friend or the ATV’s owner. Raise the ATV up and stand it on the rear grab bar. This will allow you to inspect the undercarriage for any serious dents or damage.

Inspect the frame closely, especially around the shock mounts, A-arm mounts and intersections of frame components for any signs of rust. This is normally a sign of a stress crack and would require welding and repainting.

If possible, remove the front and rear differential inspection plugs on 4x4 ATVs. If the gear lube looks something like chocolate milk, it’s an indication that the oil is contaminated with water and there could be damage to the bearings.

On 4x4 ATVs, inspect the CV joint boots. They should be in excellent condition. Any crack or tears will allow water and dirt to enter and cause costly repairs.

Check the engine oil to see if it looks contaminated.

Raise the ATV and support the front of it with jack stands. Then try to move each front wheel in and out from top to bottom and side to side to check for worn wheel bearings and ball joints. Do the same for the rear.

Check all headlights, tail lights, the engine shut off switch and key switch for proper operation.

Check the hand, foot and parking brakes. Do they operate smoothly or stick? Check for damaged or cracked cables.

Shine a flashlight into the gas tank to look for rust. Rust can cause carburetor problems.

Remove the seat and take the air box lid off. An air box can collect water and damage an engine. A clean air box and filter is a good sign.

Check the exhaust. Has the spark arrester been removed? State and national forest regulations usually require a spark arrester.

After you buy a used machine, it’s a good idea to change all the fluids so that you know that you have fresh oil, etc.

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With the ATV on the ground, move the handlebars back and forth. This will identify worn tie-rod ends.

Check for worn out tires or tires full of plugs. Worn tires or plugs should be a price-negotiating point. Any worn or damaged tires should be replaced with new ones immediately after purchase.

Look at the front and rear sprockets. Each point should be uniform. If they are worn more on one side or have a hooked appearance, a new chain and sprocket set is needed.

COMMON PITFALLS People buy a lot of stuff online these days. While there are legitimate buyers and sellers on the internet, there are also scammers. One scam involves ATVs advertised at too-good-to-be-true prices. In this scam, the seller often claims to be living in Europe, while the quad is in the United States. The seller then asks for payment to be sent to an online escrow company while the ATV is shipped. In theory, the escrow company would hold the funds until the buyer has received the machine. But the problem is that the online escrow company is actually part of the scam. Once money is deposited into escrow, the seller and the escrow company vanish, leaving the buyer with nothing. Another scam involves a buyer offering to pay you your full asking price for the ATV you have listed for sale, with a generous amount above that to cover the cost of shipping it overseas. The buyer pays in full up front with a cashier’s check. The problem is that the cashier’s check is a forgery. Your local bank may tell you that it will put a hold of at least five days on funds from a foreign check. But that doesn’t mean the check is good. It can take weeks for a foreign check to clear, and when it bounces you have no money. You also need to be aware of your state’s laws regarding titling and registering an ATV for riding on public lands. Some states require titles to register an ATV while others do not. If you purchase an ATV from a state that doesn’t require a title but you live in a state that does, you could encounter a lot of red tape getting your ATV registered—if it’s even possible to do so.

MX vs. ATV Videogame Being Resurrected Virtual Triples

Jurisdictions Allowing ATVs On Roads Controversy Sometimes Follows Counties and towns from Washington State to Indiana are opening roads to ATVs, or considering it, but in at least one jurisdiction the action has sparked a lawsuit. Two groups in Washington State are asking the courts to reverse some Okanogan County laws that allow ATVs to use roads. County commissioners approved the laws in the summer. The lawsuit was filed in January. The Methow Valley Citizens’ Council and Conservation Northwest filed the suit claiming, among other things, that

commissioners failed to determine whether the roads were safe for ATVs. Access to hundreds of miles of roads is at stake. Meanwhile, in Oakland City, Ind., the city council passed a law allowing ATVs to use city roads. The vehicles were already allowed on county roads. In Washington County, Iowa, the Board of Supervisors was considering a proposal to allow ATVs on certain county roads, including gravel roads. A rider would be required to have a valid driver’s license. A similar move is underway in Tippecanoe County, Ind., where ABATE of Indiana has asked commissioners to allow ATVs on county roads in unincorporated areas.

A PUBLICATION EXCLUSIVELY FOR ATVA MEMBERS

Videogame maker Nordic Games says it will release MX vs. ATV: Supercross this year for PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, PC, Mac and Linux using members of the original team that produced the earlier versions of the popular game. Ken George, executive producer of MX vs. ATV, says in a printed statement: “We’re absolutely thrilled to be working with Nordic Games because they appreciate the team’s passion and dedication to bring the feel of real motocross racing to MX vs. ATV fans. Not just the adrenaline rush, but the whole experience from top to bottom. “A lot of the original team members have been aching to continue their passion: building the most authentic off-road racing games possible,” George says. “The hiatus is over, and the team is back to work on MX vs. ATV with great new things to come.” The earlier versions—MX vs. ATV: Alive and MX vs. ATV: Reflex—were produced by a different company. Nordic Games bought the rights to produce the latest version.

Ask The ATV Safety Institute

YOU ASK: I will be riding in a national forest for the first time this year. Is there anything I need to know before I go? THE ASI RESPONDS: If you haven’t had a chance to take the ATV RiderCourse, we highly recommend that you do so before you embark on your trip. The class will help increase your safety awareness and skills, introduce strategies to identify and manage risks, emphasize environmental responsibility and help you enjoy your ride to the fullest. Plan ahead—especially for a multiday ride. Contact the forest where you will be riding and get a copy of the Motor Vehicle Use Map. This map will show you where the trails are and which are open to ATVs. Many forests will have these maps available for download from their website. Good planning, following the recommended maintenance schedule of your ATV, traveling in the company of

others and practicing safe riding habits should eliminate most challenges. Before you ride, you should ensure that the ATV is in proper riding condition, gather all of the gear you’ll need for the riding – including your helmet and other protective gear, a survival kit suitable for the location you are riding in, first-aid kit and the ATV’s tool kit – and leave an itinerary to let people know your route and date of return. Suggested items to bring along include a cellphone, tow rope, flashlight, GPS unit, space blanket, food, water, signal flares and extra gasoline in an approved container. During the ride, have a map of the area that you will be riding, know the rules and regulations and remember to TREAD Lightly! (www.treadlightly.org) to ensure future use of the trails. After the ride, clean your vehicle. By

Bill Kresnak

Riding In The Forest

cleaning your ATV, you will get a chance to inspect it for problems that may arise in the future (e.g., a missing bolt or loose hose clamp). Finally, enjoy the ride! You have gone through steps that will help mitigate problems that you may encounter. To enroll in an ATV RiderCourse near you, visit www.atvsafety.org or call (800) 887-2887. May/June 2014 5

NEWS Discriminating Against Riders Lake in the Hills, Ill., now bans the use of off-highway vehicles, including ATVs, in the village limits, if the sound can be heard within 100 feet of a property line and a neighbor is disturbed. The new law is the result of noise complaints. Violators face fines of at least $100. Meanwhile, Upper Saucon Township supervisors in Pennsylvania, are considering restricting ATV use there because of noise and other complaints. Under the proposal, the use of ATVs and certain other off-highway vehicles would be barred from one half hour after sunset to 9 a.m. The proposal also would bar riding within 150 feet of occupied buildings unless the riders have written permission from the nearby property owners. Plus, riding would be barred within 30 feet of a public road. Violators would face fines of $100 to $1,000.

for sale at auctions or online to buyers in Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi. Authorities said there were two groups involved that would also barter stolen goods with each other. Authorities believe they will be able to close at least 60 theft cases with the arrests.

Jennifer Timmons / Columbia Police Department

Restrictions On ATVs In Illinois and Pennsylvania

ATVs Vital During Winter Storms Quads To The Rescue

When bitter storms hit the South this past winter, ATVs proved to be lifesavers. In Columbia, S.C., the police department has eight ATVs that were invaluable during the winter’s severe snowstorms. The quads were used to make visits to the elderly to ensure they were safe. In Atlanta, an ATV rider helped a stranded motorist and her 9-month-old daughter get home by giving them a

ride. Five others also were given lifts home aboard ATVs after abandoning their cars. One man used his ATV to give his neighbor, a surgical nurse, a 20-mile ride to the hospital because she was scheduled to assist during a heart surgery.

Kentucky Law Would Ease Helmet Requirements

Road-Crossing Rules Relaxed

Major ATV Theft Ring Busted In Tennessee Group Allegedly Sold Goods Online

An anonymous tip helped law enforcement officials in Pulaski, Tenn., recover at least $100,000 worth of stolen ATVs, motorcycles and farm equipment and arrest at least 10 people in January for alleged involvement in an ATV theft ring. Police allege the 10 Giles County men would steal the items and then offer them

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Shannon Price

Kentucky state lawmakers are considering a bill that would ease helmet requirements for ATV riders. Under current law, ATV riders must wear helmets when riding on public roads. But under a bill approved by the Senate Transportation Committee in January, riders 16 and older could cross public roads without wearing helmets. The bill’s sponsor, state Sen. Sarah Gregory (R-Monticello), says this would allow riders to cross public roads from private property to private property without wearing helmets.

Illinois May Change Registration Fees For Small ATVs Lower Fees For Smaller Quads

Registration fees for ATVs with engine sizes smaller than 75cc would be reduced from $15 a year to $10 under Senate Bill 2633, introduced by Sens. Dave Koehler (D-Peoria) and John Sullivan (D-Quincy).

Registration fees would remain at $15 for machines 75cc and larger. Under the proposal, ATVs used by landowners on their own land would also be exempt from registration fees, as well as those used in sanctioned ATV competition, by people with disabilities, by government agencies, at licensed riding parks and for farming. Registration fees would go to the state Department of Natural Resources Conservation Police Assistance Fund and the Park Conservation Fund.

NEW TRAILS PLANNED

Plans Call For New Tennessee ATV Riding Area

ATV And Motorcycle Trail Planned In Minnesota A group called the Trail Prospectors Alliance is asking the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to approve plans for a 130-mile ATV and motorcycle trail that would connect four communities in the northeast part of the state: Ely, Babbitt, Tower and Embarrass. The trail would also connect to Vermillion State Park and Bear Head State Park. Proponents say the trail, which is dubbed the Prospectors Loop, would help boost local economies. The trail would connect with the Lake County regional ATV trail system. The project is expected to cost $1 million. Supporters are exploring various funding options.

Officials Consider New Trail in Utah The federal Bureau of Land Management is expected to release an environmental assessment this year as part of a proposal to designate a 14mile motorized trail in San Juan County, Utah. County officials believe the route would help bring some economic activity to the nearby town of Blanding. Opponents argue a motorized trail could increase the creation of illegal trails and might increase the risk of vandalism of American Indian sites in nearby remote areas.

WHERE TO RIDE

Bull Gap Off-Road Vehicle Hill Climb and Trail Mio, Mich. Michigan is an off-highway rider’s paradise, with 3,700 miles of routes— half of which are ATV trails. According to the state Department of Natural Resources, riders in Michigan will find trails that are lightly groomed and they will encounter narrow sand trails, rough moguls, steep hills, stumps, rocks, brush, loose surfaces and other hazards. A very special place for riders in Michigan is the Bull Gap Hill Climb near Mio, Mich. The two-tenths-ofa-mile-long sand hill has a 35- to 40-degree grade, and is open to both highway legal and non-legal vehicles, including ATVs, dune buggies, Jeeps, trucks and motorcycles. There is a designated traffic pattern for the climb, one loop for vehicles 50 inches in width or larger and one loop for vehicles 50 inches in width or less. At the top there is a sand play area. While the hill is a big attraction, the Bull Gap Trail itself offers some 100 miles of fun. You’ll ride through woods, up hills and on forest roads. Be sure to stay off “motorcycle only” trails. Campsites are available from May 19 to Dec. 1 at the Mack Lake

Campground that is operated by the U.S. Forest Service. Fees for a single site are $15 a night. The campgrounds offer parking, fire rings, toilets and water. For more information, contact the Mio Ranger District, 107 McKinley Rd., Mio, MI 48647. Telephone: (989) 826-3252. Motorized vehicles may only be operated on designated roads, trails or areas open to that use. To find what roads and trails are open to a particular use, visitors should obtain a Motor Vehicle Use Map. Any road or trail that doesn’t appear on the Motor Vehicle Use Map isn’t open to motorized vehicles. Off-road vehicles must display a valid ORV sticker as required by state law. ORV stickers may be obtained from the state Department of Natural Resources. Directions from Grayling: Travel east on M-72 for 30 miles. Go straight and continue east on S. River Rd. for 5 miles. Turn right and travel south on FR 4332 for 2 miles. Turn right and travel west on FR 4276 for 1 mile. The site is on the right. For more information, go to http:// www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/hmnf/ recarea/?recid=18948.

May/June 2014 7

A PUBLICATION EXCLUSIVELY FOR ATVA MEMBERS

A developer has earned a conditional use permit from Clinton, Tenn., for a 180-acre ATV riding area. The facility will be called the Crossroads ATV and Recreation Park. Although it will initially cater to ATV riders, developer Morgan Johnson hopes to eventually add horseback riding, mountain bike riding and paintball. The facility will be located in Clinton’s industrial park on the city’s west side. No date has been set for construction to begin.

Chasing Colors And Ghosts In Colorado BY STEVE SALISBURY,

H

aving just relocated to Washington, D.C., from Maine, where out-of-staters are called flatlanders, I knew I was in for a treat when I found out I was heading for a ride in the Rockies, a place where I fully expected to feel like a flatlander myself. I hadn’t been in Colorado for more than an airport connection in over 30 years. It wasn’t long after my arrival in Denver that I started to get a sense of the riding that lay ahead. The mountains impressed me from a distance and even more up-close as I drove a local’s suggested back route to the outdoor vacation destination of Buena Vista. I owed my excuse for this trip to the Buena Vista (Colo.) Chamber of Commerce and the High Rocky Riders OHV club. Each year during the third week of September, the chamber and the High Rocky Riders join forces to produce the “ATV Historical Color Tour,” which is actually an ATV rally and mountain festival. The event was set for Sept. 23-27. Imagine riding your ATV in the Colorado mountains in the fall when the Aspen trees are changing colors from white to spectacular golds and blazing reds. It’s billed as an amazing event, and I was looking forward to participating. I arrived at the Branding Iron restaurant just as the event registration was winding down and the opening dinner and live entertainment were warming up. I was immediately struck by the range of ATVs in the parking lot towed by vehicles sporting a wide variety of state license plates. Moreover, the obviously well-oiled organization and enthusiasm of the High Rocky Riders OHV Club made me confident I really was in for some great rides. This was the club’s 11th Color Tour, so they had things well sorted out. The registration packet I received included everything I needed to choose the rides that suited my interests, find my way to

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LEFT: Hillsides everywhere reminded riders of the event name. BELOW: Some trails were wider than others, but the fall colors are everywhere.

the trail heads and attend the breakfasts and dinners that were included. In a nod to proving our sport has a positive effect on the communities in which we ride, there were also coupons to local business sponsors and the option of obtaining twodollar bills that I could spend in town so that local businesses would know where Color Tour participants were spending their money. I was even luckier to have Wendell Alumbaugh, the former club president, and his wife Sharon as my hosts. When I arrived at their house after dinner, I learned that we were already at 9,000 feet. It was a stunning location. As I saw in the next morning’s sunlight, the mountains rose like fortress walls, almost from right in their backyard. The ride is organized so that participants choose from five different routes on each of the four days of the tour. With expert guidance, I rode a diverse mix of trail types, from wide open dirt roads to sand washes, deep woods and climbs that ended with a break to enjoy the view and reflect on why the mountains are called the Rockies. Most of the time we were fine in two-wheel drive, but there were memorable sections that tested our riding skills. There were also slick-rock sections, some of which required us to squeeze between boulders, and several climbs with lunch-box sized rocks strewn loosely across the width of the trail.

All the trails provided full days of riding and sore muscles at night. The most memorable routes to me were the Otto Mears Toll Road and Texas Creek, the toll road for its history tied to the abandoned mines we toured for most of the afternoon and Texas Creek for its tight trails and challenging climbs. I was also mightily impressed by the view from 12,000 feet on top of a mountain overlooking the Bonanza mining district,

Lynn Camp

AMA/ATVA government affairs manager

Do The Color Tour LEFT: Former club president Wendell Alumbaugh on Otto Mears toll road. BELOW: Riders pass historic ghost mining towns on the Hancock/Tin Cup loop.

A PUBLICATION EXCLUSIVELY FOR ATVA MEMBERS

which included many of the mines from long ago. We finished the tour with a donationsonly poker run to benefit a local food bank, which included a chance to see a natural arch in a rocky hillside and to take part in a hilarious egg-on-a-spoon-race tie breaker in anticipation of matching poker hands. My New England roots, where fall colors are legendary, surfaced again in terms

of my view of the event’s name. Knowing that Colorado fall colors meant Aspen only, I expected a sea of green-needled pine trees and yellow-leaved Aspens. Despite my hosts’ apologies for not having perfectly timed the event to match Mother Nature’s unpredictable schedule, I was wowed by the range of oranges, reds and golds that greeted us in streamside stands of pure aspen and a range of dramatic hillside vistas. Not surprisingly, the Aspen Ridge trail, where the aspen trees extend for miles, was the most impressive. The closing dinner on Saturday night was a celebration worthy of the event. Roughly 190 people enjoyed a catered meal, live music, door prizes from handcrafted keepsakes to ATV equipment and more. There was also a slide show of the tour as well as presentations from club members about the tour’s origin and goals for the future tours. Finally, a few words on the importance of ongoing OHV access advocacy were well received by the crowd, which was obviously familiar with the challenges we all face. Anyone looking for a great high mountain ATV adventure would do very well to consider the diverse trails, scenery, hospitality and wellrun organization offered by The High Rocky Riders OHV Club and Buena Vista Chamber of Commerce Historical Color Tour.

My host, Wendell Alumbaugh, has a long history with the area and the High Rocky Riders. As a past president of the club, he has been deeply involved in organizing the Color Tour itself. Alumbaugh says riders come from all across the United States to attend the rally, with attendance ranging from 140 riders to almost 200 over the years. “This is a family event,” Alumbaugh says. “Ages range from young couples to retirees. There is a 50/50 mix of men and women with many women riding their own machines. The event has been well received and we always get many very favorable remarks afterwards.” Alumbaugh says the trails range from easy U.S. Forest Service roads to much more challenging trails. All of the trails are on public land, either Forest Service or federal Bureau of Land Management, and the proper permits are acquired. A guidebook that tells about the routes used during the tour is available for purchase but isn’t necessary for participation in the event. The $19 book includes information about 14 popular routes, route maps, the history of the area, things to see, where to get fuel, food and more. “Each day, four or five trails are selected for that day and participants sign up for their choice of rides at breakfast,” Alumbaugh says. Alumbaugh says that this year there will be a special presentation on Friday night by the Buena Vista Historical Society called “Madams of Central Colorado” to raise money for the historical society. The Colors Tour is actually a fundraiser, raising money for local charities. Organizations that have benefited from the event include Chaffee County Search and Rescue, a Christian Mission that provides food to the needy, the Boys and Girls Club, Buena Vista parks, the Colorado Off-Highway Vehicle Coalition and the Trails Preservation Alliance. The Colors Tour pre-registration deadline is Aug. 31. Those who register after that date may not receive a t-shirt. The registration fee is $90 for adults and $59 for children. For more information, or to register, go to www.coloradoohvtour.org.

Photos by Jeff Guciardo

S R E C A R P TO

’S Y A D O T G N I L P RO F I

BLAKE SARVER ATV SCHOOLBOY JR. PRODUCTION CHAMP Blake Sarver of Peru, Ind., had a busy 2013 season in the AMA ATV Motocross National Championship Series. “I competed in the 13-15 Quad Schoolboy Jr. Production, Quad Schoolboy Jr. Open and 14-17 Quad Schoolboy Sr. Production,” he says. “I finished first overall in the Schoolboy Jr. Production, fifth in the Schoolboy Sr., and, after a late start and electrical problems, ninth in the Schoolboy Jr. Open. “Depending on the class, my toughest

competition consisted of Cole Sepesi, Hayden Mickelson, Tyler Mack, and Cam Vistain,” he says. “They all have fast equipment, lots of talent and charge hard.” The 15-year-old has been racing since he was 6. “I like racing in the AMA ATV MX Championship Series because you know you are racing the best ATV motocross riders in the Midwest,” he says. “It is always a challenge and you know you have done something if you can pull off an event win—even a moto win.” For 2014, he plans to race in the Quad Schoolboy Jr. open class and the Quad Schoolboy Sr. class. “I would like to continue racing this series until I am over the hill (ha ha),” he says, “but will probably need to concentrate on college in another four years.”

MADDISON GUYER GIRLS ATV MX CHAMP Maddison Guyer of Peru, Ind., has a lot to be proud about after a successful 2013 season competing in the AMA ATV Motocross National Championship Series. Guyer captured the national No. 1 plate in the Girls 12-15 class. She also finished fourth in the Schoolboy Junior class. This year is her ninth year as a racer. She enjoys the MX series because “it is the most competitive ATV motocross series.”

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When not riding quads, Guyer plays soccer, swims and dives for Maconaquah High School. She also takes four dance classes a week. Her sponsors incude JB Racing, Makson, Cheerwine, ITP, SSI Decals, 88 Live to Ride, Jody Bateman & Debi Bartosek, Fly, Sandridge, Maximum RPM, DWT, Renthal, ODI, FMF, Guyer the Mover and her dad and mom, who she thanks “for letting me do what I love! “I would like to thank the entire JB Racing team and all the families under the tent for helping me all year long and getting me here today,” she says. “I cannot thank them enough for all they have done for my family and me!”

KYLE HAYNES

ATV HILLCLIMBER EXTRAORDINAIRE

MULTI-CLASS ATV MOTOCROSS COMPETITOR

George Loring, 42, of Upton, Mass., pulled off an incredible feat in ATV Hillclimb competition in 2013, winning all his races. His list of first-place wins is impressive, and his victories include earning the Open ATV class and Over 30 ATV class titles. “[Some of my toughest competitors were] Jamie Margalot, Justin Lindy and Vern Lloyd III,” he says. “They are all great riders and have been racing for many years. They know their machines and they know the hills.” What does he enjoy about the racing, which he has been doing for more than 13 years? “I love the friendship, meeting new people and the family environment,” he says. “I get my adrenaline going thinking about and watching the hillclimb events.” This year he plans to defend his title. After that? “I plan on racing for a number of years to come as long as I am in good health,” he says. Who would he like to thank? “Most important is my wife,” he says. “She is very supportive and helps out where she can. But I also would like to thank my two sons, Trinity Racing, Hinson clutch, JJA axle

Eighteen-year-old Kyle Haynes is a competitor in the AMA ATV Motocross National Championship Series who did well in 2013, finishing third in the 450C class, second in Open C and second in Four-stroke C. He finished just shy of some national championships but he faced some very tough competition. “Corey Powers and Ty Templeton, they were always right there with me,” Haynes says. “We always had a good battle if we all got out front. I really look forward to racing with them in [2014].” Haynes has been racing since 2008. He enjoys the MX series because “it has some really tough competition and it’s just a fun time all around.” This year, Haynes hopes to earn the national No. 1 plates in the Production B and 450B classes. How does he spend his free time? Haynes says: “I work on a farm after school, but I like to work out in my spare time and ride as much as I can to get ready for the next race, and put in the extra hours for racing.” His sponsors for 2013 were SSI Decals, Fly Racing, Fox Shox, Dynamite ATV, Rath Racing, Gaerne boots, DWT wheels, ITP tires “and most importantly mom and dad,” he says. “For the 2014 season I got picked up by Media-Allstars to be on their team and I couldn’t be more happy about it!”

and K&T performance.” He adds: “In my hillclimb career I have raced against some of the best people and riders and I admire all of them. I love meeting new riders and helping develop them into great riders: just mentoring them, from little kids to grown adults just starting out. I feel great pride when someone asks me for help or advice. “That is what I love most about this sport,” he says. “I would also like to add that every day I have a goal and that is to impress my wife.”

LEE SMITH ATV MID AMERICA CROSS COUNTRY CHAMP Lee Smith of Morgantown, Ind., earned the national champion title in the ATV 300cc Four Stroke (13-15) class in 2013 in the AMA ATV Mid America Cross Country Racing Series. To earn the title, he had to defeat Micheal Anderson and Cole Fletcher. “Both are very good riders,” he says. “They are very competitive and ride smart.” He enjoys racing MAXC “because they are very organized and set up nice tracks.” Smith wants to thank Mud Motorsports and his parents for their help.

A PUBLICATION EXCLUSIVELY FOR ATVA MEMBERS

GEORGE LORING

RACING Three Decades Of ATV Racing Advancing The Sport

N

ationally organized ATV racing began almost 30 years ago. Today, the sport includes competition from the AMA ATV Motocross National Championship Series to the AMA Extreme Dirt Track National Series to the GEICO AMA Grand National Cross Country Series and more. But it wasn’t easy getting where we are today. In 1986, a year after the American Motorcyclist Association created the framework for officially recognizing ATV racing champions, the Consumer Federation of America asked the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission to ban all three-wheeled ATVs, known at that time as “All-Terrain Cycles” or ATCs. ATV manufacturers, as well as the AMA and other partners, defended the sport, including the then-new four-wheeled ATVs. Eventually, however, the industry agreed to stop selling ATCs and focused on four-wheeled models. Nevertheless, the sport took a big hit and factory racing support faded for a time. Fast forward to 2001. ATV sales were picking up with the four-wheeled machines proving to be very popular. The AMA re-energized its commitment to ATV competition, and the result was the ATVA. The ATVA not only provides a mechanism for recognizing the best ATV racers of today, but it also continues to recognize the greatest champions of the past. In 1985 there were Grand National Championship ATV races in California, Texas, Colorado, Kansas, Ohio, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Three Pro national champions were named that year: Curtis Sparks was the first pro 200cc four-stroke champion, Steve Wright was the first pro 200cc two-stroke champion and Marty Hart was the first pro 250cc champion. For the following year, the championships were combined, crowning one pro national champion each year based on finishes in motocross and TT. Gary Denton earned the national title in 1986. He went on to win the ATV Grand National Championship title seven times, from 1986 to 1992. Doug Gust took the title away from Denton in 1993, but Denton gained it back in 1994. In 2002, amid increasing specialization in the sport, recognition was again split and national champions were recognized in separate categories. That year, Tim Farr earned the motocross title, Shane Hitt won the TT title and Darin Ogden earned the short-track title. In 2014, motocross, Extreme Dirt Track and Grand National Cross Country are considered the “big three” in the ATV racing world. All of these AMA-sanctioned series offer a lot of excitement for both racers and spectators. The best ATV racers on the planet compete in AMA-sanctioned events. To find an event, see the racing section of www.atvaonline.com.

12 May/June 2014

AMA ATV Motocross Airs On MAVTV The AMA ATV Motocross National Championship returns to the airwaves in 2014 with coverage of the AMA Pro ATV class airing on MAVTV. The schedule includes coverage of all nine rounds of the AMA Pro ATV class. The series began in late March with the Aonia Pass MX National in Washington, Ga. With programs such as AMA Endurocross, The Motocross Files, Lucas Oil Off Road Racing, and now the Mtn. Dew ATV Motocross National Championship Series and Lucas Oil Pro Motocross, MAVTV is quickly becoming the go-to place for motorsports enthusiasts. MAVTV is currently available on Dish Network and DirecTV satellite services as well as through many cable providers. RacerTV, a West Virginia production company, produces the ATV motocross shows that air on MAVTV. For more information on the ATV motocross series, visit www.atvmotocross.com.

Maxxis Offering Cash Contingencies ATV and motorcycle racers in major series are poised to win cash contingencies from Maxxis, with the company offering a total of more than $1.2 million in 2014. Maxxis is offering cash to eligible riders in various series including the AMSOIL Grand National Cross Country Series Presented by Maxxis, the ATV Extreme Dirt Track National Series, the AMA ATV MX National Championship Series and the AMA District 37 Big 6 Grand Prix Series. Although payouts will vary from class to class, riders in all classes will be eligible. Depending upon the class, contingencies will be available to riders posting a first, second or third place finish. To be eligible, a rider must display a minimum of four (4) 6½-inch Maxxis decals on the motorcycle or ATV. Riders may only submit one contingency request per race weekend, for an event with a minimum of 10 racers competing in the relevant class. Racers should submit contingency forms as soon as possible, because forms postmarked later than 30 days after a race will be denied. For forms and additional information, visit www.maxxis.com/MotorcycleATV/ Contingency-Programs.aspx.

AMA ATV MX Rule Changes There are some rule changes for 2014 in the AMA ATV Motocross National Championship series. Section A.1, subsection (b) of the 2014 ATV MX National Championship Supplemental Rules, provides: b. Pro Am riders who have earned 130 class points (Section J.2) in the current or previous season are eligible for the Pro class as an additional class. Pro Am Riders ranked in the Top 5 of the previous year are only eligible for the Pro class as an additional class. All other Pro Am riders are also eligible for the Open A only as an additional class. Otherwise, once a rider advances to the Pro Am class that rider is no longer eligible for an “A” class without petitioning for re-classification.

The following are some of the teams and riders that DP Brakes is supporting this year: ATV MX Pro/Pro-Am: JB Racing’s Joel Hetrick, Jeff Rastrelli and William “Duck” Lloyd; Baldwin Motorsports Josh Upperman; JanssenRacing’s – Cody Jannsen, Team BCS’s – Josh Creamer and Ronnie Higgerson, Root River Racing’s, Sean Taylor, Bubba Hicks, Sam Rowe and Megan Manshack and others. ATV GNCC, Pro/Pro-Am: Chris Borich, Walker Fowler, Adam McGill, Chris Bithell, Kevin Yoho, Braden Henthorn, Johnny Gallagher, Jeff Pickens, Brycen Neal, Jarrod McClure and others. “Many of these riders have chosen to use DP Brakes products year after year, and have continued to provide us with the feedback needed to maintain our performance leadership in brakes and clutches. We are very proud to have them [as]part of our team. We wish them great success in 2014,” says Larry Mills, president of DP Brakes North America.

Class structure previously announced included the following class: Girls Sr. (12-15): 71-90cc 2-Stk, 125cc 4-Stk, Auto/CVT/ Shifter. The class will be limited to shifter models to ensure machine and equipment equity. Further, as there are other classes available for Girls (12-15) to compete on CVTs, they will not be excluded from competition. Classes are changed as follows: Girls Sr. Shifter (12-15): 71-90cc 2-Stk, 125cc 4-Stk, Shifter. For questions or comments, email: info@atvmotocross.com.

“BRP understands the passion and commitment required to compete for racing championships. That’s why we created both our Can-Am Amateur Racer Support and Can-Am X-Team contingency programs as a way to bolster and reward racers for their efforts,” says Jeff Leclerc, Can-Am’s racing project leader. “We view it as a way give back to those who choose to support the brand and, win or lose, we’re thrilled that they selected Can-Am,” he says. Amateur racers who want to take part in the program must buy a qualifying new or unused ATV and register with an authorized Can-Am dealer. The list of ATVs includes the all 2012 or newer DS 450, Renegade and select Outlander models. Once they become eligible, racers who

compete in applicable regional or national racing series can qualify for a vehicle rebate. Qualified racers can receive up to a $1,000 factory discount on all eligible ATVs. However, the number of eligible vehicles is limited and the program will conclude once BRP reaches that number. Qualified racers can receive cash payouts in the amount earned based on their qualifying finishes. Payments are mailed directly to the participant or legal guardian. Upon the conclusion of the 2014 season, BRP will also award contingency payouts for overall championships earned. Contingency cash is paid out in numerous racing series, including the AMSOIL Grand National Cross Country Series presented by Maxxis. For complete details visit www.can-amxteam.com.

A PUBLICATION EXCLUSIVELY FOR ATVA MEMBERS

DP Brakes Provides ATV Sponsorships in 2014

To ensure competitors have adequate experience to compete at the Pro level, it is necessary to amend this provision: b. Pro Am riders who have earned 130 class points (Section J.2) in the current or previous season are eligible for the Pro class as an additional class. Pro Am riders earning a Top 3 overall national ranking or finishing 1st place overall 5 or more events, in the Pro Am class the two previous consecutive years, are only eligible for the Pro class as an additional class. All other Pro Am riders are eligible for the Open A class only as an additional class. Otherwise, once a rider advances to the Pro Am class that rider is not eligible for an “A” class without petitioning AMA for re-classification. The changes were necessary to ensure Pro Am riders have had ample opportunity to prepare for competition at the highest level. Meanwhile, the 2014 ATV MX National

Former ATV motocross national champion Josh Creamer, who took third overall last year in the AMA ATV MX Pro class, will once again compete for BCS Performance / Can-Am in 2014.

BRP Continues Its Can-Am Amateur Racer Support Can-Am

BRP announced that it will continue its Can-Am Amateur Racer Support program for 2014. Owners with eligible 2012 or newer Can-Am ATVs can apply for the program.

May/June 2014 13

MARKETPLACE

CALENDAR

STI Outback Tire

The following is a listing of events sanctioned by the ATVA. To find the events nearest you, locate your state and contact the promoter for complete details.

STI Tire & Wheel says its Outback tire is a true “all conditions” performer that provides the comfort and control of dedicated hardpack trail rubber while still delivering the grip and cleanout capabilities of a deep, open-lugged bogger. The company says the tire’s six-ply bias carcass and robust rim guard provides exceptional reliability while remaining surprisingly light. The tread pattern’s center “V” design provides OEM-like ride on hard surfaces, while deep, dimpled lugs aggressively dig into loose, soft terrain. STI says the unique, stepped lug profile sheds mud like nothing else. MSRP: $113 - $128 Info: www.stitireandwheel.com

CALIFORNIA EUROPEAN SCRAMBLES MAY 10: RIDGECREST: 2 DAY EVENT, BADGERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (661) 242-2712, BADGERSMC.ORG JUN 7: LUCERNE VALLEY: 2 DAY EVENT, RACERS UNDER THE SON, INC., (714) 264-8570, RUTS.ORG

GEORGIA MOTOCROSS JUN 14: DALTON: 2 DAY EVENT, LAZY RIVER MOTOCROSS, (706) 278-1620, LAZYRIVERMOTOCROSS.COM

ILLINOIS

Sedona Mudder Inlaw If you’re looking for an aggressive ATV mud tire, take a look at Sedona Tire & Wheel’s Mudder Inlaw. It’s a deep lug, eight-ply, puncture-resistant radial tire that the company says offers a smooth ride and long wear. The center lug is 2 inches that increases to 2-1/4 inches at the edge. In fact, the lugs wrap around the sidewall to allow paddling traction. Sedona says the self-cleaning tread pattern offers exceptional deep mud traction. MSRP: $229.95 Info: www.sedonatires.com

Kolpin ATV Wheel Spacer Need some extra wheel clearance on your quad? The Kolpin ATV Wheel Spacer may be just what you need. The 50 mm aluminum spacer increases wheel clearance from shocks, struts or your exhaust. It also extends the wheel width for greater stability. The studs are 10 mm by 1.25 mm. MSRP: $50 each. Info: www.kolpinpowersports.com

TRAIL RIDE - RECREATIONAL MAY 18: OTTAWA: VARIETY RIDERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (815) 434-3669, VARIETYRIDERS.COM JUN 8: OTTAWA: VARIETY RIDERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (815) 434-3669, VARIETYRIDERS.COM JUN 29: OTTAWA: VARIETY RIDERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (815) 434-3669, VARIETYRIDERS.COM MOTOCROSS JUN 1: ALTON: SPLINTER CREEK DIRT RIDERS INC, (618) 372-4355, SPLINTERCREEK.COM TTS MAY 10: ALTON: SPLINTER CREEK DIRT RIDERS INC, (299) 6TE-RPEN, SPLINTERCREEK.COM

INDIANA HILLCLIMB MAY 18: MIDDLEBURY: GOSHEN IRON HORSEMEN, (574) 825-3399 JUN 28: CAYUGA: PLEASURE RIDERS MC, (217) 247-2216, PLEASURERIDERS.NET JUN 29: CAYUGA: PLEASURE RIDERS MC, (217) 247-2216, PLEASURERIDERS.NET MOTOCROSS MAY 4: AKRON: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM MAY 4: CULVER: PLYMOUTH BLACKHAWKS MC, INC., (574) 259-0103, PLYMOUTHBLACKHAWKSMC.COM MAY 25: PIERCETON: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM JUN 1: CAYUGA: PLEASURE RIDERS MC, (217) 247-2216, PLEASURERIDERS.NET JUN 8: AKRON: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM JUN 29: PIERCETON: READS RACING, (574) 893-1649, READSRACING.COM

MICHIGAN DRAG RACES JUN 27: BRIDGTON: MUSKEGON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, (231) 733-9856, MUSKEGONMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM

14 May/June 2014

MAY 10: NEW BERLIN: UNADILLA ENTERPRISES, LLC., (607) 965-8450, UNADILLAMX.COM MAY 11: NEW BERLIN: UNADILLA ENTERPRISES, LLC., (607) 965-8450, UNADILLAMX.COM MAY 24: CAROGA LAKE: ROYAL MOUNTAIN SKI AREA, (518) 835-6445, ROYALMOUNTAIN.COM MAY 25: CAROGA LAKE: ROYAL MOUNTAIN SKI AREA, (518) 835-6445, ROYALMOUNTAIN.COM JUN 1: AUBURN: FROZEN OCEAN MOTOCROSS INC, (315) 784-5466, FROZEN-OCEAN.COM JUN 15: CAROGA LAKE: ROYAL MOUNTAIN SKI AREA, (518) 835-6445, ROYALMOUNTAIN.COM JUN 22: NEW BERLIN: UNADILLA ENTERPRISES, LLC., (607) 965-8450, UNADILLAMX.COM JUN 29: AUBURN: FROZEN OCEAN MOTOCROSS INC, (315) 784-5466, FROZEN-OCEAN.COM

TTS JUN 8: PARKESBURG: E PA PISTON POPPERS MC INC, (484) 336-9160

NORTH CAROLINA HARE SCRAMBLES MAY 18: IRON STATION : IRON STATION MOTORSPORTS, INC., (704) 732-8200, ALLANEMOTORSPORTSINC.COM JUN 1: ELLERBE: WINDY HILL SPORTS, (910) 895-4387, WINDYHILLSPORTSMX.COM

CROSS COUNTRY MAY 24: MASONTOWN: 2 DAY EVENT, RACER PRODUCTIONS INC, (304) 2840084, GNCCRACING.COM JUN 21: SNOWSHOE: 2 DAY EVENT, RACER PRODUCTIONS INC, (304) 284-0084, GNCCRACING.COM

OHIO

WISCONSIN

TRAIL RIDE - RECREATIONAL JUN 21: HELENA: 2 DAY EVENT, CAPITAL TRAIL VEHICLE ASSOCIATION (CTVA), (406) 439-4540, CTVA-OHV.COM

CROSS COUNTRY JUN 7: MILLFIELD: 2 DAY EVENT, RACER PRODUCTIONS INC, (304) 284-0084, GNCCRACING.COM HILLCLIMB MAY 10: WATERFORD: PIONEER MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (740) 678-0082, PIONEERMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM MAY 11: WATERFORD: PIONEER MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (740) 678-0082, PIONEERMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM JUN 14: WATERFORD: PIONEER MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (740) 678-0082, PIONEERMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM JUN 15: WATERFORD: PIONEER MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (740) 678-0082, PIONEERMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM MOTOCROSS MAY 4: SUGAR GROVE: CENTRAL OHIO COMPETITION RIDERS INC., (740) 983-3937, COCR MX JUN 15: SUGAR GROVE: CENTRAL OHIO COMPETITION RIDERS INC., (740) 983-3937, COCR MX

NEVADA

PENNSYLVANIA

GRAND PRIX MAY 3: PRIMM: 2 DAY EVENT, SUNLAND SHAMROCKS, (818) 767-4594 HARE SCRAMBLES MAY 3: PRIMM: 2 DAY EVENT, SUNLAND SHAMROCKS, (818) 767-4594

1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK MAY 17: GRATZ: SHIPPENSBURG MC, (717) 796-0294, BAERMOTORSPORTS.COM HARE SCRAMBLES JUN 8: PLYMOUTH: BACK MOUNTAIN ENDURO RIDERS, (570) 675-1814, BMER. ORG SHORT TRACK MAY 3: SPRING RUN: PATH VALLEY SPEEDWAY, (717) 368-5902, PATHVALLEY. COM JUN 21: HANOVER: TRAIL-WAY SPEEDWAY, (717) 359-4310, TRAILWAYSPEEDWAY.COM

MINNESOTA HILLCLIMB JUN 7: MANKATO: KATO CYCLE CLUB, KATOCYCLECLUB.COM

MONTANA

NEW YORK HARE SCRAMBLES MAY 4: : DREAM RIDERS, (607) 589-6337 MOTOCROSS MAY 4: WALLKILL: WALDEN MX, (845) 895-2537, WALDENMX.COM

TENNESSEE CROSS COUNTRY MAY 10: HURRICANCE MILLS: 2 DAY EVENT, RACER PRODUCTIONS INC, (304) 284-0084, GNCCRACING.COM MOTOCROSS JUN 29: BLOUNTVILLE: VICTORY SPORTS INC, (423) 323-5497, VICTORY-SPORTS.COM

UTAH HARE & HOUND MAY 3: LITTLE SAHARA: SAGE RIDERS MC, SAGERIDERS.COM

VIRGINIA MOTOCROSS MAY 4: WYTHEVILLE: VICTORY SPORTS INC, (423) 323-5497, VICTORY-SPORTS.COM

WEST VIRGINIA

1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK JUN 7: JUNEAU: BEAVER CYCLE CLUB, INC., (920) 885-3586, DODGECOUNTYFAIRGROUNDS.COM HILLCLIMB JUN 29: HIXTON : CMJ RACEWAY LLC, (608) 220-6853, CMJRACEWAY.COM HARE SCRAMBLES MAY 4: BURNETT: BEAVER CYCLE CLUB, INC., (920) 319-6889, BEAVERCYCLECLUB. COM MOTOCROSS MAY 17: BARABOO: CMJ RACEWAY LLC, (608) 220-6853, CMJRACEWAY.COM MAY 18: MARSHFIELD: MARSHFIELD T&T RIDERS, INC., (715) 384-4555, HTTP://T-NTRIDERS.COM JUN 28: HIXTON: CMJ RACEWAY LLC, (608) 220-6853, CMJRACEWAY.COM JUN 28: HILLPOINT: SUGAR MAPLE MX LLC, (608) 393-8812, SUGARMAPLEMX.COM JUN 29: HILLPOINT: SUGAR MAPLE MX LLC, (608) 393-8812, SUGARMAPLEMX.COM SHORT TRACK MAY 17: BURNETT: BEAVER CYCLE CLUB, INC., (920) 319-6889, BEAVERCYCLECLUB. COM MAY 30: PLYMOUTH: SOUTHEASTERN SHORT TRACKERS, LTD, (262) 339-7430, DAIRYLANDCLASSIC.COM JUN 21: LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, (414) 265-1582, AZTALANMX. COM JUN 22: LAKE MILLS: AZTALAN CYCLE CLUB INC, (414) 265-1582, AZTALANMX.COM TTS MAY 18: BURNETT: BEAVER CYCLE CLUB, INC., (920) 319-6889, BEAVERCYCLECLUB. COM

May/June 2014 15

A PUBLICATION EXCLUSIVELY FOR ATVA MEMBERS

1/2 MILE DIRT TRACK MAY 10: LAKE ODESSA: I-96 SPEEDWAY LLC, (616) 642-0555, I96SPEEDWAY.COM JUN 14: MIDLAND: POLKA DOTS M/C, (989) 832-8284, POLKADOTSMC.NET JUN 21: CROSWELL: PORT HURON MOTORCYCLE CLUB, INC., (810) 327-1062, PHMC-USA.COM HARE SCRAMBLES JUN 22: ROSE CITY: BENT WHEELS COMPETITION CLUB, INC., (248) 895-6740, BENTWHEELS.COM MOTOCROSS MAY 4: CADILLAC: CADILLAC MOTORCYCLE CLUB INC, (231) 884-3729, CADILLACMC.COM JUN 7: ATLANTIC MINE: RANGE MX/HOUGHTON, (906) 369-2558, RANGESNOWMOBILECLUB.COM JUN 8: ATLANTIC MINE: RANGE MX/HOUGHTON, (906) 369-2558, RANGESNOWMOBILECLUB.COM JUN 14: CHRISTMAS : X-MAS FAMILY MOTORSPORTS PARK, (906) 202-2681, XMASFAMILYMOTORSPORTSPARK.COM JUN 15: CHRISTMAS: X-MAS FAMILY MOTORSPORTS PARK, (906) 202-2681, XMASFAMILYMOTORSPORTSPARK.COM JUN 28: BELDING: GRATTAN RACEWAY, (616) 691-7221, GRATTANMX.COM JUN 29: BELDING: GRATTAN RACEWAY, (616) 691-7221, GRATTANMX.COM SHORT TRACK MAY 17: DEFORD: LUCKY THUMB MOTORCYCLE CLUB, INC., (810) 404-2895, LUCKYTHUMBMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM JUN 28: DEFORD: LUCKY THUMB MOTORCYCLE CLUB, INC., (810) 404-2895, LUCKYTHUMBMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM TTS MAY 18: DEFORD: LUCKY THUMB MOTORCYCLE CLUB, INC., (810) 404-2895, LUCKYTHUMBMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM JUN 29: DEFORD: LUCKY THUMB MOTORCYCLE CLUB, INC., (810) 404-2895, LUCKYTHUMBMOTORCYCLECLUB.COM

Harlen Foley/ATVRiders.com

Chad Wienen AMA Member

Where Riders Belong W

hat do Chad Wienen, Thomas Brown and Josh Creamer have in common? They’re members of the American Motorcyclist Association. You don’t need to be an AMA Pro ATVMX super star to be an AMA member. You can join just to support the sport and be a part of a national grassroots movement of riders who fight anti-ATVing forces to protect your freedom to ride and race. It’s where riders belong. With an AMA membership you get a special ATVA affinity card, ATVA News and American Motorcyclist magazine, hundreds of dollars in discounts, and AMA Roadside Assistance at no cost*. Most of all, you’ll stand with Chad, Thomas and Josh to protect the sport we all love and safeguard it for future generations. AMA is where you belong. Join us.

Join at AmericanMotorcyclist.com or (800) AMA-JOIN *Restrictions apply.


05 2014 ATVA News