Issuu on Google+

THE ALMANAC | 2014 EDITION

Atherton Menlo Park Portola Valley Woodside

;ur:eighborhoods

Profiles, maps and vital facts of featured neighborhoods in the community TheAlmanacOnline.com

New Construction, Atherton California 297 Polhemus Avenue | 297polhemus.com

Offered at $9,950,000 Bedrooms 7 | Bathrooms 9.5 Home ±11,843 sf | Lot ±48,787 sf | Plus Guest House

Michael Dreyfus, Broker/CEO 650.485.3476 michael.dreyfus@dreyfussir.com

Summer Brill, Sales Associate 650.701.3263 summer.brill@dreyfussir.com

Noelle Queen, Sales Associate 650.427.9211 noelle.queen@dreyfussir.com

BRE 01121795

BRE 01891857

BRE 01917593

Downtown Palo Alto 728 Emerson Street, Palo Alto 650.644.3474

Sand Hill Road 2100 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park 650.847.1141

dreyfussir.com )EGL3J½GIMW-RHITIRHIRXP] 3[RIHERH3TIVEXIH

Successfully Representing Sellers & Buyers for 31 years

Woodside • Menlo Park Portola Valley • Atherton • Palo Alto Los Altos Hills • Redwood City • Los Altos

SEAN FOLEY YOUR ADVOCATE IN EVERY TRANSACTION!

Homes, Estates & Investment Properties Direct: 650-529-2486 | Cell: 650-207-6005 SeanFoleyCB@gmail.com 2969 Woodside Road, Woodside

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 3

Representing over 462 buyers & sellers in Menlo Park & Atherton since 1999. SOLD by Tom LeMieux

Superior real estate representation for those who expect only the very best. W W W. T O M L E M I E U X . C O M

Map data Š2013 Google

650 329 6645 tom@tomlemieux.com

tomlemieux.com CalBRE# 01066910

4 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

Coldwell Banker Top 1% Internationally Top 50 Nationally, Wall Street Journal, 2013

;ur:eighborhoods

ATHERTON MENLO PARK PORTOLA VALLEY WOODSIDE

INDEX Atherton ........................................7 Lindenwood .............................................12 Atherton Oaks ..........................................14 Lloyden Park.............................................16 West of Alameda ......................................18 West Atherton ..........................................20

S

tagecoaches brought settlers to the Midpeninsula, then trains, buses, planes and automobiles. Burgeoning towns incorporated, with the 1920s and period after World War II seeing the establishment of the communities we know today as Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley and Woodside. Neighborhoods are extensions of our homes, in a way. Beyond the living room, the characters of the people who make up a place inform our daily life experience. We can retreat or engage, celebrate or stroll in reverie. These pages are filled with stories told by people who inhabit a handful of neighborhoods. Some of their views are personal, from recollections about Halloween gatherings to opinions about high-speed rail and schools. What drew residents to settle into their neighborhood?

Menlo Park ..................................23

Michelle Le

Brookside Park, Portola Valley

Veronica Weber

What makes each neighborhood come alive? From local hangouts to book groups, races, parks and gatherings, Almanac Neighborhoods offers a sampling of what residents say makes their place the best. A fact box for each neighborhood provides information about schools, fire stations, shopping and homes and maps of each city or town show the location of each neighborhood. Want to know more? You can download neighborhood maps online or learn about other neighborhoods not in this book by visiting www.almanacnews.com/ real_estate. Other neighborhoods, as well as neighborhoods in Palo Alto and Mountain View, are profiled online. Elena Kadvany, Editor ekadvany@paweekly.com

Mountain Home Road, Woodside

STAFF

Vice President Sales and Marketing:

Tom Zahiralis Sales representatives:

Publisher: Tom Gibboney Editor: Elena Kadvany Art director: Linda Atilano Map designer: Scott Peterson

J. Robert Taylor, Taylor Properties

Additional copies of The Almanac Neighborhoods, as well as companion publications — Palo Alto Neighborhoods and Mountain View/Los Altos 450 Cambridge Ave. Neighborhoods — are available at the Almanac for $5 Palo Alto, CA 94306 each. Palo Alto and Mountain View Neighborhoods 650-854-2626 are available at the Palo Alto Weekly, 450 Cambridge www.TheAlmanacOnline.com Ave. for $5 each. All three publications are available online at www.almanacnews.com/real_estate.

Portola Valley...............................53 Blue Oaks .................................................54 Brookside Park .........................................54 Central Portola Valley ...............................56 Los Trancos/Vista Verde ............................56 Ladera ......................................................59 Portola Valley Ranch ................................60 Westridge.................................................62 Woodside Highlands ................................64

Woodside .....................................67

Connie Jo Cotton, Neal Fine, Rosemary Lewkowitz, Carolyn Oliver, Irene Schwartz, Brent Triantos Home-sales data: Courtesy of

Allied Arts / Stanford Park ........................24 Fair Oaks ..................................................28 Central Menlo Park ..................................30 Belle Haven .............................................30 Downtown Menlo Park ............................32 Felton Gables ...........................................34 Linfield Oaks ............................................36 Menlo Oaks..............................................40 Stanford Weekend Acres ..........................40 Sharon Heights.........................................42 Stanford Hills ...........................................42 South of Seminary/Vintage Oaks ..............44 Suburban Park/Lorelei Manor/ Flood Park Triangle .................................46 Park Forest ...............................................48 The Willows ..............................................48 University Heights ....................................50

Kings Mountain........................................68 Skywood/Skylonda ...................................70 Woodside Heights ....................................70 Woodside Glens/Woodside Hills ...............72

Copyright (c) 2014 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. On the Cover: Top: A home in the Menlo Oaks neighborhood, photo by Michelle Le. Below: A home in the Blue Oaks neighborhood, photo by Michelle Le. Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 5

6 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

ATHERTON ■ Atherton Oaks ■ Lindenwood

101

Ba

■ Lloyden Park lroa d Sou the rn Pac ific Rai

e

ad

enu

Av

al

rr

a

Fr ee

wa

Ave

e.

d

Rin

ad

Menlo Oaks

e

Av

en

ue

oo G le

nw

Se

Ca m

k Oa

ue en

ino

Va lp

o

g A l La

ara

iso

ro

Ro

Av

Ath

2013-14 TOWN OPERATING AND CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS BUDGET: $10.4 million

pe

d

Gr ov

ue

en Av on

ne

er t

La

West Atherton

Menlo Park

las

Pu Bear Gulch Res.

iel

Av

al cin En

ue en

FACTS

ni

da de

Woodside Ju

me

nue

Av

La lby Se St

Ala

lef

e

Fa

dd

Av ge r id

lby

oc

kb

Se

lg a

s



West of Alameda

y

280

POPULATION (2011):

6,914 HOUSEHOLDS (2009):

2,479 SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSING (2000):

99 percent MEDIAN HOME PRICE:

$3,505,000 MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2005-09):

$185,000

T

y

od

Mi

ne

Redwood City

wa

Lindenwood

ir

Re

Fr ee

d

gwo

N

ino

rsh

m

Ma

Ca

Lloyden Park

AI

Atherton Oaks

Roa

re

ks

■ West of Alameda

LT R

Oa

CA

El

Bay

ho

Ro

■ West Atherton

ys

he privacy gained by lots of at least one acre, winding streets with mature trees, gracious mansions set well back from the curbless streets — this is Atherton today. Once part of a Spanish rancho, the town was incorporated in 1923. One of its first rules was to assure that lots would not be subdivided into parcels smaller than an acre.

With a few exceptions — primarily former San Mateo County streets acquired through annexation — that remains the rule today. A few of the early homes remain, including three built by Timothy Hopkins for his daughters between 1901 and 1908 on Parkwood Drive, Altree Court and Lowery Drive. Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 7

C INDY

LIEBSCH

For A Stress Free Real Estate Transaction Contact me! “It was the most pleasant, time saving, professional, and stress-free large financial transaction we have ever completed! Cindy was “off the charts” wonderful! Not only did Cindy do what she said she was going to do, she also did much more than that. All along, Cindy made sure that my wife and I were communicated to quickly and accurately. There was never anything left for chance. We were both amazed at the level of service Cindy gave us, knowing that she had other listings she was working on, and other things going on that were probably more pressing than our issues! We have highly recommended Cindy to anyone that is talking real estate!” Scott and Lisa -Menlo Park “Cindy is tenacious, a skillful negotiator, easy to work with and fun, smart, very knowledgeable and savvy. She has that special touch in everything that she does.” Tony and Renee -Woodside

Atherton • Los Altos • Menlo Park Palo Alto • Woodside

C INDY LIEBSCH 650-591-7473

cindy.liebsch@cbnorcal.com • www.propertiesbythebay.com DRE#01324217

8 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

Why Julie when it comes to real estate? • Palo Alto, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Mountain View, Menlo Park, Atherton area specialist • Over 20 years experience in real estate investment, construction and development • Mid-Peninsula resident for over 24 years • Detailed knowledge of the neighborhoods and well connected with the community • Access to top-notched professionals in the industry • Consistent top producing agent • Highly educated and exceptionally skillful in every aspect of her profession, highly respected by her peers. • Wonderful marketer & tactful negotiator • Resourceful, diligent, loyal and truthful to her clients • She has her team ready to go and we handle all the details! • Direct communication with you and keeps you updated • She actively works for you! • Over 80% of Julie's businesses are from referrals and repeated clients as a result of her unsurpassed level of service and unmatched dedication • Fluent in Mandarin Chinese, Julie’s clients got an edge locally and globally • B.S. Engineering, UC Berkeley • MBA, Cal State University

Full Listing Service • Market analysis & strategic market planning • Assist you preparing your property for sale: Julie has access to reliable inspectors, contractors, painters, landscapers, professional stagers, etc. • Help you complete necessary paperwork & disclosures • Professional designed open house flyer & marketing materials • Direct mailing to target groups • Multiple Listing Services • Open house ad on local newspaper • Open houses & broker tour • Screening for qualified buyers • Follow up with agents and buyers • Facilitate showings and offer presentation • Contract negotiations • Escrow coordination and sign off

Julie Tsai Law

Broker Associate, CRS, SRES, MBA Top agent of the nation, according to Wall Street Journal rankings DRE # 01339682 Cell Phone: (650) 799-8888 Email: julie@julietsailaw.com

www.JulieTsaiLaw.com Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 9

REPRESENTING

Buyers & Sellers to achieve their

real estate goals

MENLO PARK | MOUNTAIN VIEW LOS ALTOS | LOS GATOS PALO ALTO | PORTOLA VALLEY REDWOOD CITY | SAN CARLOS

BRIGID VAN RANDALL

brigid@vanrandall.com

OFFICE: 650.566.5348 CELL: 408.221.3175

Lic# 01139489

10 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

Silicon Valley Expert Savides Real Estate is a boutique residential real estate company providing high quality personalized service to buyers and sellers of properties in Menlo Park, Atherton, Palo Alto, Portola Valley, Woodside, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, and surrounding areas.

STEPHANIE SAVIDES has lived in the Menlo Park/Palo Alto area her entire life and has many local connections: U Grew up in Los Altos//Los Altos Hills U Graduated from Gunn High School in Palo Alto U B.A from Stanford University U J.D. from Santa Clara University School of Law U Central Menlo Park Homeowner since 1992 U Parent of children who have attended Oak Knoll Elementary School, Hillview Middle School and Menlo-Atherton High U Competed worldwide on professional tennis circuit

“Stephanie is simply an outstanding realtor--she is extremely intelligent, amazingly thorough on the details, a great strategist, and is truly driven to win for her clients.”

ALUMNI

— F.A. from Atherton

STEPHANIE S AV I D E S Owner/Broker Attorney

650-464-3581 www.SavidesRealEstate.com stephanie.savides@gmail.com BRE# 01177101 650-464-3581

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 11

Lindenwood

S

till retaining its private-estate atmosphere from the days when the “Silver King of the Comstock Lode,” James C. Flood, lived there on 600 acres, Lindenwood’s twisting lanes and roads are accessible via two impressive gates on Middlefield Road and one on Frederick Avenue. Flood built Linden Towers, a 44-room, three story home that was considered among the most ospulent on the Peninsula. He adorned his 1878 estate house with towers, gables and cupolas and furnished with exotic treasures from around the world. Fittingly, all the plumbing fixtures were sterling silver. Between 1937 and 1955, the area now known as Lindenwood was developed after the death of Flood’s son. But Flood’s presence still presides over the neighborhood. Many of the artifacts from the estate, which was torn down in 1934 — fountains, statues, street lights — still exist, in some cases, on private properties. Lindenwood has retained its private estate atmosphere because it is totally enclosed. Lindenwood’s lanes, avenues and roads take a winding course. James Avenue, the “Main Street,” is one of its few straight streets. “A visitor coming from either of our two

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS:

entrances is likely to get lost unless they know where they are going,” board member Phillip Lively noted, adding that the meandering roads contribute to the overall safety of the tricky-to-navigate neighborhood. Most parcels are just under one acre and may not be subdivided by city code, which contributes to Lindenwood’s low population density. The lush foliage-lined neighborhood draws out strollers and cyclists that appreciate the wide streets’ low rate of destination-driven traffic. Despite the private atmosphere, organized events such as block parties draw residents together. The Lindenwood Homes Association is active in the neighborhood, planning social events as well as taking care of such things as repairing the gates and maintaining the plantings in the public areas, according to Lively. Mr. Lively estimates 63 percent of the 470 homes belong to the association, each paying $40 annual membership dues. Lindenwood is known as a tight-knit community, according to Mr. Lively. “We’re a very ‘neighborly’ neighborhood, he says. — Susan Golovin

The Playschool, Holbrook-Palmer Park, 150 Watkins Ave., Atherton FIRE STATION:

300 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park LOCATION:

Marsh Road, Ringwood Avenue, Bay Road and Middlefield Road NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION:

Marion Oster, 650-325-0714 PARK:

Holbrook-Palmer Park, 150 Watkins Ave., Atherton PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Menlo Park City Elementary School District — Laurel School, 95 Edge Road, Atherton; Encinal School, 195 Encinal Ave., Menlo Park; Hillview Middle School, 1100 Elder Ave., Menlo Park Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton SHOPPING:

Downtown Menlo Park MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$3,687,500 ($2,560,000$8,300,000) HOMES SOLD: 20

Michelle Le

12 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

SOLD [fÆeTge[`WeeSegegS^

SOLD

UNIVERSITY AVENUE LOS ALTOS REPRESENTED THE BUYER

SOLD

SOLD

SELBY LANE ATHERTON

SOLD

COLORADO AVENUE PALO ALTO

MAYFIELD AVENUE STANFORD

REPRESENTED THE SELLER

REPRESENTED THE SELLER

REPRESENTED THE SELLER

SOLD

SOLD

HOBART STREET MENLO PARK

HAWTHORNE AVENUE PALO ALTO

REPRESENTED THE SELLER

SOLD

REPRESENTED THE SELLER

SOLD

GREENOAKS DRIVE ATHERTON

SOLD

MENLO OAKS MENLO PARK

BERRYESSA STREET PALO ALTO

REPRESENTED THE BUYER

REPRESENTED THE SELLER

REPRESENTED THE SELLER

SOLD

SOLD

CREEK ROAD MENLO PARK

UNIVERSITY DRIVE MENLO PARK

REPRESENTED THE SELLER

SOLD

SOLD

STONEPINE LANE MENLO PARK

SAN CLEMENTE AVENUE MENLO PARK

REPRESENTED THE BUYER

SERVING YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MENLO PARK ATHERTON PALO ALTO STANFORD WOODSIDE PORTOLA VALLEY LOS ALTOS LOS ALTOS HILLS

REPRESENTED THE SELLER

REPRESENTED THE BUYER

SOLD

ALPINE ROAD MENLO PARK

REPRESENTED THE BUYER

SOLD

BISHOP OAK COURT MENLO PARK REPRESENTED THE BUYER

monicacormanbroker BRE #01111473

mcorman@apr.com

650.543.1164 monicacorman.com

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 13

Atherton Oaks

W

edged between the Caltrain tracks and Middlefield Road, it’s easy to confuse Atherton Oaks for one of the well-established surrounding neighborhoods. What’s more, Holbrook Palmer Park and Felton Gables cleave it nearly in two, leaving one side running from Watkins Avenue to Fair Oaks Lane and the other from Encinal Avenue to Glenwood Avenue. Tom Holt, who has lived in the area for more than 30 years, doesn’t mind the Atherton Oaks’ odd shape, but said that it’s sometimes overlooked. “In our experience this place is kind of a sleeper,” Mr. Holt says. “When people think of Atherton, they think of Lindenwood, Felton Gables or West Atherton and they kind of forget about this little corridor.” Still, being on the edge of Atherton and Menlo Park has its perks, he says. “We really enjoy the rural sense of Atherton while being really close to Menlo Park,” he says. “It’s an easy walk to downtown. It’s the kind of community where you know folks, and as you encounter them you can catch up on how their family is doing and what they’re up to.” The area is surrounded by a number of schools, including Encinal Elementary, Menlo-Atherton High School, Sacred Heart

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS:

and Menlo School. Of course, Holbrook Palmer Park is extremely close, as well. Mr. Holt, whose two children attended nearby public schools, said these amenities make the neighborhood a perfect place for young families to start. Its proximity to the schools can make it difficult to navigate traffic once school gets out, but commuter traffic isn’t bad, and it’s easy enough to plan alternate routes to avoid El Camino Real and Middlefield Road, Mr. Holt says. “Everything is kind of an easy drive,” says Mr. Holt, who works in Menlo Park. “We don’t really buy into the whole traffic problem idea.” Another perk of living in the area is the comparatively larger lots it contains. “One of the nice things is the sense of space,” he says. “Some places in Menlo are quite pricey and they’re typically a half acre or a quarter acre, where we have a whole acre.” In the end, Mr. Holt says the neighborhood isn’t negatively affected by being divided by Felton Gables and Holbrook Palmer Park. While distinct, it’s similarly pleasant compared to surrounding neighborhoods. “I wouldn’t say there’s some kind of great differentiating aspect,” he says. “Everywhere in this area is really delightful.” — Eric Van Susteren

The Playschool, Holbrook-Palmer Park, 150 Watkins Ave., Atherton FIRE STATION:

300 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park LOCATION:

Between Laurel Street and Middlefield Road. From Glenwood Avenue to Encinal Avenue and Watkins Avenue to Fair Oaks Lane. PARK:

Holbrook-Palmer Park, 150 Watkins Ave., Atherton PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Menlo Park City Elementary School District — Laurel School, 95 Edge Road, Atherton; Encinal School, 195 Encinal Ave., Menlo Park; Hillview Middle School, 1100 Elder Ave., Menlo Park Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton SHOPPING:

Downtown Menlo Park MEDIAN 2012 HOME PRICE:

$2,790,000 ($235,000-$3,700,000) (No sales in 2013) HOMES SOLD: 0

Michelle Le

14 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

THANK YOU Jackie and Richard thank you for trusting us to help You achieve your Real Estate Success M & J Abidari M & A Armsby D Atkinson H & D Axtell R & S Bachman Y Baur G Bomze A Borkovsky L & V Brannen B & L Bruce R Callaway T Carmack D & K Chen R & C Chen J Chen A & J Chu M Chubb B & B Cleveland M Clyde V & S Conrad M Cummings R Davidson D Degroff S Detering D Doherty A Drzewiecki O Efromova M & B Egbert A & M Eisenberg D & C Emmerson

S Farhadi J Feghhi G Friedman B Ghoorah D & B Graham H Green M & M Griffith D & A Hagan S Hirmanpour M Jacobson S & M Jados F Kashef K & J Kennedy R & M Kennedy S Khan V Komin C & A Koo M Kopell E Kuo N Laird K & K Lashkari L & A Lau B & D Lawson D Lesikar S Li J & K Linley C Magill S Mahoney M & A Maarleveld E & M Marth

L Martin P McBurney R Menager V Menager T Mock N Nadvornik L Naimark P & M Narth W Ng R Onizuka J Paul N & A Pedreiro A Peters L Portnoy S Puza R & T Quintana B Rhodes A Richards A Riley C Robinson J Rortveit L Rost T & B Sana S Sadjadi M Sarhaddi J Sasaki C Scal J Schneider B & A Schumacher I Shilov

L Shilova N Shokrani C Sholtz A Shook M Shull M & L Sims S Solum K Sonntag A & D Srivastava E Stock A Tabazadeh M Tabazadeh J & O Tarvin G & V Toney N Uy C & C Van Zandt P & N Wade A Wang R Ward K Washington J & C Whitty K Winer B & L Wingard M Wojtowicz S Wolff M Wozniak D Xu B & A Yatovitz W Young B Zaslow

Call Jackie and Richard for Your Free Home Consultation

Jackie

Richard

650-855-9700

650-566-8033

jackie@schoelerman.com

richard@schoelerman.com BRE # 01413607

BRE # 01092400

www.schoelerman.com

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 15

Lloyden Park

FACTS FIRE STATION:

C

LOCATION:

Wilburn Avenue and Lloyden Drive, and El Camino Real and Southern Pacific Railroad tracks NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION:

Lloyden Park Homeowners’ Association, David Barca, president, 650-368-1427 PARK: Veronica Weber

harming, friendly, and quaint — that’s how Michelle Hayes describes Lloyden Park. The area was once owned by Joseph B. Coryell, who bought his home in 1902 for $30,000. His estate was subdivided in 1927, and most of the development took place in the 1940s, dividing the land into mostly one-third acre lots. Home styles run the gamut from a Streamlined Moderne built for the 1939 World’s Fair, to traditional, complete with picket fence. Tear-downs are rare in this part of town, but remodeling is common. There is less of a rural and a more neighborhood feel to Lloyden Park. The neighborhood is zoned for smaller lots than the rest of Atherton. Sidewalks and underground utilities, eschewed elsewhere in Atherton, encourage walking and socializing. “It’s not what people normally think of Atherton. It’s a family neighborhood,” David Barca says. He moved to the neighborhood in 1982, to a home his grandparents built in 1953. Most of the residents send their children to private schools. Lloyden Park is part of the Redwood City school system, whereas the rest of Atherton has access to the Menlo Park school system. When he moved to the neighborhood with his wife and two small children, they were not planning to stay long because of the

32 Almendral Ave., Atherton

schools. But Mr. Barca and his wife lived the neighborhood so much that they stayed and sent their kids to private school, he says. Michelle Hayes and her husband Steve were well aware of the discrepancy when they moved to Lloyden Park more than 26 years ago. However, they wanted to provide their four children with the same kind of wholesome childhood they had growing up in the Midwest. Ms. Hayes fondly remembers the neighborhood Christmas caroling, where one of the residents always played Santa; Fourth of July plays, bicycle parades, Easter egg hunts and other group activities. “We’re within easy walking distance to Holbrook-Palmer Park and the library,” she adds. Mr. Barca, president of the Lloyden Park Homeowners’ Association, says the small neighborhood of about 84 homes gets together when the need arises.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Redwood City School District — Selby Lane School, 170 Selby Lane, Atherton; Kennedy Middle School, 2521 Goodwin Ave., Redwood City; plus magnet schools Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton SHOPPING: Downtown Menlo

Park MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$2,600,000 ($1,310,000$3,600,000) HOMES SOLD: 14 MEDIAN 2013 CONDOMINIUM PRICE: $775,000 CONDOMINIUMS SOLD: 1

Veronica Weber

16 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

Holbrook Palmer Park, 150 Watkins Ave., Atherton

In the past, neighbors successfully encouraged Caltrans to re-route traffic away from the area for the sake of children and the elderly. The neighborhood is the best of all possible worlds because it is close, yet private, he says. A potential high-speed rail system is currently causing concern among homeowners who fear it could affect property values, he says. This issue has been the main focus of the homeowners’ association for the past few years. The homeowners association is also responsible for planning social events which bring Lloyden Park residents together, residents say. “Atherton has this image of being the parochial home on big properties, but this is the more affordable part of Atherton. This is the neighborhood for people who want to be neighborly,” he says. — Susan Golovin

ELYSE BARCA – Discover the Difference – • • • • •

Successfully representing some of the most distinctive homes in Silicon Valley since 1988 Renowned innovative marketing Dedicated Resource Team of home improvement specialists Seniors Real Estate Specialist (SRES) to best represent seniors in our community Strong negotiating and listening skills

“We interviewed several agents, but Elyse’s communication skills, superb organization and attention to detail put her above the others. What clinched the decision was Elyse’s reputation.” C.C. – Menlo Park ”How fortunate I am to have found Elyse Barca. She is not only extremely knowledgeable and resourceful, but also a very genuine and patient person, who made a major life decision nearly stress-free. She was there to guide me every step of the way.” M.B. – Palo Alto “In Elyse, we found a gold mine! She is sharp and compassionate and she definitely knows her business. She was our cheerleader when we needed encouragement, our library when we needed information and our therapist during the transition.” M.K. – Atherton “We have the peace of mind that Elyse will always add value to our most significant assets. Her resource team is amazing.” J.H. - Woodside

Elyse@ElyseBarca.com ElyseBarca.com Lic.# 01006027

3500 Alameda de las Pulgas, Suite 200 | Menlo Park, CA 94025 Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 17

West of Alameda

FACTS FIRE STATION:

R

LOCATION:

Alameda de las Pulgas to Hwy. 280; Menlo Park city border near Walsh Road to the Redwood City border near Fletcher Drive PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Michelle Le

esidents agree that their neighborhood, West of Alameda — the area west of Alameda De Las Pulgas, between Walsh Road and Stockbridge Avenue — is a quiet part of Atherton with a natural feel. Mysterious estatelike properties with high gates and hedges spring up along roads that wind through hills covered with oaks, redwoods, eucalyptus and even olive trees. Some of the hilltop homes have sweeping views of the bay and the rolling hills. “It’s wonderful, that’s why I built,” says Patricia Arthur, who built a home in the neighborhood in 1955. While it neighbors Woodside High School and is just minutes from highway 280, this western-most area of the town of Atherton is secluded. West of Alameda residents can be seen enjoying the peaceful scenery while walking their dogs in the hills.

3322 Alameda de las Pulgas, Menlo Park

“It’s like being in the country and yet we’re five minutes from Stanford Hospital and shopping centers,” Ms. Arthur says. While the streets are quiet, Ms. Arthur says there have been problems with people speeding in the neighborhood. Neighbors say you can sometimes hear coyotes, owls and mountain lions up in the hills at night. Judith Finch says her family moved to the neighborhood from San Francisco for the school district. She says her three children took the bus to school. “While the neighborhood holds an annual

Las Lomitas School District — Las Lomitas School, 299 Alameda de las Pulgas, Atherton; La Entrada School, 2200 Sharon Road, Menlo Park Sequoia Union High School District — Woodside High School, 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside SHOPPING:

Woodside Road, Woodside MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$4,672,500 ($2,800,000$7,650,000) HOMES SOLD: 12

block party, there is not a sense of community because the houses are so far apart,” she says. — Sally Schilling

Michelle Le

18 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

Expert Knowledge | Proven Results 4th generation Peninsula resident 6th generation San Francisco Bay Area resident Over 70 years of Real Estate Experience Lyn Jason Cobb & Associates brings an emphasis on innovation and service to the local real estate market and our connections to the areas we serve go back for generations. That personal experience and in-depth market knowledge give our clients a distinct advantage when buying or selling a home. Our Clients Receive:

s%XPERT-ARKET!NALYSIS

s3UPERIOR.EGOTIATION3KILLS s0ROFESSIONAL0HOTOGRAPHY"ROCHURES 0ERSONALIZED %FFECTIVE-ARKETING3OLUTIONSINCLUDING% &LYERS .EWSPAPER-AGAZINE!DS #USTOM7EBSITES 6IRTUAL 4OURS 7ORLDWIDE% -ARKETING#AMPAIGNSxANDMORE

s!CCESSTOOURPRIVATELISTOFHOMEREPAIRSPECIALISTS

s&ULL TIME3ERVICE3UPPORT s3TAGING#ONSULTATION #ERTIlED(OME-ARKETING3PECIALISTS

Other QualiďŹ cations: s0ROPERTY-ANAGEMENT s%XCHANGE%XPERTISE

s2EAL%STATE,AWAND#ORPORATE -!%XPERTISE

s#ERTIlED2ELOCATION3PECIALISTS

s$IGITAL-ARKETING3PECIALIST

s3ENIOR2EAL%STATE3PECIALISTS

s%COBROKERv'REENv#ERTIlED

,YN*ASON#OBB!SSOCIATES !THERTON\-ENLO0ARK\7OODSIDE\0ORTOLA6ALLEY\0ALO!LTO\2EDWOOD#ITY\3AN#ARLOS -OUNTAIN6IEW\,OS!LTOS\,OS!LTOS(ILLS\"ELMONT\3AN-ATEO\(ILLSBOROUGH\"URLINGAME\-ILLBRAE\&OSTER#ITY

Lyn Jason Cobb: 650.566.5331 LynJason.Cobb@cbnorcal.com

Herschel Cobb, J.D.: 650.566.5331 HRCobb@gmail.com

Regan Byers: 650.678.7765 Regan.Byers@cbnorcal.com

President’s Premier Team WWW,YN*ASON#OBBCOM Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 19

West Atherton

FACTS CHILD CARE AND PRESCHOOLS:

R

FIRE STATION:

32 Almendral Ave., Atherton LOCATION:

Alameda de las Pulgas and El Camino Real; Selby Lane and Valparaiso Avenue PRIVATE SCHOOLS:

Michelle Le

esidents will tell you there is no shortage of space and peacefulness in West Atherton. The rural feel of the area, boasting big lots and lanes without sidewalks, has been preserved through a long history. In 1860, Faxon Dean Atherton purchased more than 600 acres, essentially what is now West Atherton. He built his home at the center of this plot, what is now the Menlo Circus Club, a private country club, which hosts polo games and charity events. Atherton’s city government encourages the preservation of the community’s country feel. Most of the town is zoned for one-acre lots and a town ordinance that protects the heritage trees in the area; oaks, redwoods, cedars and pines. Dean Sivara, who has lived in the neighborhood for a few years, says “it is nice to have the space and the maturity on a quieter street.” Mr. Sivara previously lived in Menlo Park, which he said was far more crowded than West Atherton. “We can walk the dogs and there is not a lot of traffic. The freeway is a little faster to get to and there is less congestion, so we have the ability to enjoy neighborhood.” Mr. Sivara says the large lots prevent him from having much contact with the neighbors. “There are a lot of gates and fences so you

St. Joseph’s Montessori Preschool and Kindergarten, 150 Valparaiso Ave., Atherton

Michelle Le

only see the neighbors if they’re walking, you wouldn’t go through the gate.” Helen Carey, who has lived in the neighborhood for more than 59 years, agreed. “It isn’t like Menlo Park, the neighbors are more separated here. We like to live a quiet life.” Ms. Carey says she chats with other neighbors by phone and some of the neighbors were very friendly with her kids when they were in school. “I love everything the town has to offer,” she says. Tom Owen echoed Carey’s praise for Atherton. “I feel very privileged to have been raised in this town,” Mr. Owen, says. He was born and raised on Robleda Drive and moved back to the neighborhood in 1995. While there was nothing extraordinary that drew him back to his old stomping grounds, the climate and the big yard of his new home were appealing. “My kids have room to run and play,” he says. Mr. Owen, who has two young daughters, says they don’t get together much with the other young families in the neighborhood because the houses are so spread apart. Despite the separation by large lots, Mr. Owen says he still feels a strong sense of community because of the uniquely personable police department in Atherton. The police

20 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

St. Joseph’s School, 50 Emilie Ave., Atherton; Menlo School, 50 Valparaiso Ave., Atherton; Sacred Heart Prep,150 Valparaiso Ave., Atherton; Menlo College, 1000 El Camino Real, Atherton PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

(Eligibility for school districts depends on resident’s address) Menlo Park City Elementary School District — Oak Knoll School, 1895 Oak Knoll Lane, Menlo Park; Encinal Elementary School, 195 Encinal Ave., Menlo Park; Hillview Middle School, 1100 Elder Ave., Menlo Park Redwood City School District — Selby Lane School, 170 Selby Lane, Atherton; Kennedy Middle School, 2521 Goodwin Ave., Redwood City; plus magnet schools Sequoia Union High School District — MenloAtherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton SHOPPING:

Downtown Menlo Park; Stanford Shopping Center MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$4,150,000 ($1,275,000$29,880,000) HOMES SOLD: 39

will come out if someone loses their dog or they will check up on your home while you are on vacation. “The police department does a phenomenal job, truly a level of service, they’re not just out there writing tickets. If your daughter is home with a babysitter, they can put another guy in the area to make her feel more comfortable,” he says. — Sally Schilling

FOR SALE

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

MARY & BRENT

GULLIXSON TOTAL REAL ESTATE SALES VOLUME EXCEEDS $3 BILLION BRENT

SOLD

SOLD

BRE 01329216

MARY

BRE 00373961

650.888.4898

650.888.0860

BentG@apr.com

Mary@apr.com

gullixson.com

SOLD

SOLD

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 21

#1 Market Share in Menlo Park

Adding Value to Your Most Valuable Asset... EVERYDAY.

bre: #01198898

k eri nicholas Top 30 Agents Nationwide - Wall Street Journal International President’s Premier | Top 1% Internationally - Coldwell Banker

22 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

MENLO PARK  Ro a

Redwood City

Suburban Park/ Lorelei Manor/ Flood Triangle

101

d 84

Bayfront

no

Re

Mi

dd

lef

iel

e dA ven u

woo

Felton Gables

N

d

Ro

al

Avenue

d

Menlo Oaks

101

ad

The Willows

ad

mi

AI

Road

Ro

■ Sharon Heights ■ South of Seminary/ Vintage Oaks

Ca

Bay

Ring

El

LT R

Roa

W ill

Roa

rsh

South of Seminary/ Vintage Oaks

Ma

CA

Belle Haven

University

Ma

rsh

ific Rai lroa d Sou the rn Pac

d

Fair Oaks

Expressway

ow

■ Allied Arts/ Stanford Park ■ Belle Haven ■ Central Menlo Park ■ Downtown Menlo Park ■ Fair Oaks ■ Felton Gables ■ Linfield Oaks ■ Menlo Oaks ■ Park Forest

Ba

isq

Creek

u ito

F

ra

da

de

las

Hill

FACTS

POPULATION (2010):

ero

Ser

ra

Palo Alto

ive

Sa

Un

nta R

nip

ay

Sa

Road

Alpine

Ju

Ro

ad

nd

Allied Arts/ Stanford Park

Stanford Hills

Stanford Linear Accelerator

2013-14 CITY GENERAL FUND BUDGET: $42.3 million

ll

s

Jun

Sand

ew

rs

n

ue en Av

lga

Sharon Heights 280

Hi Sa

Pu

Fre

Cr

uz

iso ara

Central Menlo Park me

ity

ue

en Av Al a

Va lp

University Heights

re

en

Downtown Menlo Park

Atherton

nc

■ Stanford Hills ■ Stanford Weekend Acres ■ Suburban Park/ Lorelei Manor/ Flood Park Triangle ■ University Heights ■ The Willows

Linfield Oaks

ho

Av

Park Forest

ys

ue

Willo

w

82

East Palo Alto

Blv

d.

Stanford Weekend Acres

d.

Fre

ipero S erra

Stanford University

ewa

y

32,026 HOUSEHOLDS (20072011): 12,347 SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSING (2010):

61.3 percent MEDIAN HOME PRICE:

$1,500,000 MEDIAN CONDOMINIUM PRICE: $851,500 MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2010):

$105,909

O

nce known as the “Sleepy Hollow of California,” Menlo Park did not take off as a community until after World War II. Despite its proximity to Stanford University, Sand Hill Road venture capitalists, dot-com start-ups and research institutions, “Menlo Park still at least seems like a small town,” notes Michael Svanevik and Shirley Burgett in their published “Menlo Park:

Beyond the Gate.” Landowners first incorporated back in 1874, but chose to “disincorporate” a mere two years later. It wasn’t until 1927 that today’s city was established. Menlo Park now offers a suburban enclave with many urban amenities: from a bustling downtown and strong public school district, to plenty of parks and recreation facilities.

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 23

Allied Arts/Stanford Park

W

ith its old-town charm, Allied Arts/ Stanford Park seems a world away from the hustle of El Camino Real to its east, and the promise of developments to be built on El Camino. But tucked inside the neighborhood, a country feel remains. A lack of sidewalks results in a perfect place for strolling among 1925 bungalow homes, attractive flower gardens and fruit trees on roads named after colleges — Yale Road, Cambridge Avenue, Princeton Road, Cornell Road and Harvard Avenue. Lamp-topped pillars mark the entrance to the neighborhood. And old and shady trees grace the streets. Small enough that one could run laps around it, the neighborhood is marked by four distinct streets: Middle Avenue on the north, San Francisquito Creek to the south and Allied Arts Guild on Arbor Road to the west. Allied Arts Guild is a centerpiece of the neighborhood and a main attraction. The Spanish-Colonial designed complex came into existence in 1929 and developed as an artisan’s workspace of studios and shops. James Hill owned a candle shop and a gourmet cookware shop called “Batterie de Cuisine” in the guild from 1963 to 2002. He

moved to Allied Arts in 1972 with his wife Elaine and the couple live in a 1935 Tudorstyle house that allowed him to be “living over the store, so to speak,” he says. Stephanie Brown moved in more than 30 years ago. The “distinctive, autonomous, individual design of the homes creates a sense of individuality,” she says. That individuality has allowed the neighborhood to keep its identity over the years as it has matured, she says. A local meeting spot for residents is “The O” — The Oasis Beer Garden. It’s a burger and pizza bar located in a WWI building that had peanut shells on the floor and was one of the first places with a big-screen television. The neighborhood is close to just about anything a resident might need: Draeger’s Market, Stanford University and Stanford Shopping Center and downtown Menlo Park are all within walkable distance. Residents say more families are moving in and residents says some homes have been renovated or newly-built. “The architecture is eclectic,” Ms. Brown says. But one characteristic has stayed constant: The “caring and kind people in the neighborhood,” she says. — Kris Young

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS:

Menlo-Atherton Cooperative Nursery School, 802 Middle Ave. FIRE STATION:

700 Oak Grove Ave. LOCATION:

Middle Avenue to San Francisquito Creek; Arbor Road to El Camino Real PARK:

Nealon Park, 800 Middle Ave. PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Menlo Park City Elementary School District — Oak Knoll School; Hillview Middle School; Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo-Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton SHOPPING:

Downtown Menlo Park, Stanford Shopping Center MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$1,700,000 ($1,138,000$3,547,500) HOMES SOLD: 27

Veronica Weber

24 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

St

Fremont Park Nealon Park

19

nd's vt.)

7

3

22

20

21 11 10 24

17

15 16 12

8

2

18

23

14 1 9

4

5

13

6

Allied Arts Homes Sold in 2013 1. 253 University Drive

7. 678 College Avenue

13. 114 University Drive

19. 759 Middle Avenue

2. 940 College Avenue

8. 145 Cornell Road

14. 849 Cambridge Avenue

20. 660 Harvard Avenue

3. 736 College Avenue

9. 317 Yale Road

15. 712 Harvard Avenue

21. 628 Harvard Avenue

4. 888 Harvard Avenue

10. 629 Harvard Avenue

16. 925 Middle Avenue

22. 811 Middle Avenue

5. 215 University Drive

11. 642 Harvard Avenue

17. 865 Middle Avenue

23. 720 Creek Drive

6. 139 Yale Road

12. 490 Yale Road

18. 757 Harvard Avenue

24. 646 Creek Drive

Average Days on Market Average Size Average List Price Average Sale Price Average $/Sqft

16 Days 2,039 Sqft $1.806M $1.920M $978 Downtown Palo Alto 728 Emerson Street, Palo Alto 650.644.3474

Sand Hill Road 2100 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park 650.847.1141

dreyfussir.com EEGL 3J½GI MW -RHITIRHIRXP] 3[RIH ERH 3TIVEXIH

List Price Min $1.095M Max $3.595M Median $1.597M

Sale Price $1.300M $3.547M $1.700M

Annette Smith, Sales Associate 650.766.9429 annette.smith@dreyfussir.com annettesmithhomes.com BRE

01180954

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 25

LESLIE WOODS  

real estate

“At the end of the day, I want to make sure my clients feel like they were taken care of with highest level honesty and integrity. Whether you are looking to sell your house, buy a new home, or buy an investment property, I hope we get a chance to work together.�



 

LWOODSREALESTATE.COM

650.796.9580

LWOODS@SERENOGROUP.COM LIC # 01855901 LET’S MEET FOR COFFEE!

26 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 27

Fair Oaks

FACTS FIRE STATION: 4101 Fair Oaks Ave., Menlo Park

R

LOCATION: Fifth Avenue at the Redwood City border to Marsh Road and north of Middlefield and Semicircular roads NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION:

Fair Oaks Beautification Association, www.fobaneighbors.org PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Redwood City School District — Garfield School, 3600 Middlefield Road, Redwood City Michelle Le

esidents in the Fair Oaks neighborhood in Menlo Park enjoy the best of both worlds: the quiet, tree-lined neighborhood streets contrast with El Camino Real and Middlefield Road, busy streets lined with restaurants and retail. Traffic chicanes dot many of the roads, and tall trees provide shade while walking through the neighborhood. Margy Kahn, a playwright who lives on 8th Avenue, moved to the neighborhood in 1981. She said she was drawn to the area’s interesting vibe, diversity and the Mexican restaurants that line Middlefield Road. She works from home and has held various occupations throughout her time living in Fair Oaks, including teaching at Garfield Elementary School down the road. “This neighborhood was far more diverse than any other neighborhood I saw in the Peninsula,” she said. “It’s between Atherton and the heavily Latino part of Redwood City. It doesn’t look like a development.” After living in Fair Oaks for more than 30 years, Kahn said she has noticed an increase of neighbors who work in technology and a decrease of people in the arts. There are few rental homes in the area, which makes it hard for artists to afford housing, she added.

“There used to be a lot of community involvement here, but the people who have moved in over the years have to work long hours now,” she said. There are many resources available throughout the neighborhood, which she describes as “very walkable”: a coffee shop, the Atherton library (a “gem”), a market and the Riekes Center for Human Enhancement. However, she said that sheís always hoping that biking along the busy Middlefield Road will get better. Another Fair Oaks resident, Anja Stadelhofer, said she likes the landscaping in the area and its sense of community. “I love all of the old trees. It’s all very friendly. People have been living here forever. I like that there is not a lot of traffic,” she said. Stadelhofer moved into a home on 8th Avenue across the street from Kahn in 2011 with her husband. He works in aerospace

Michelle Le

28 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo-Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton SHOPPING: Middlefield Road, Redwood City; Marsh Manor MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$887,500 ($305,000-$2,498,000) HOMES SOLD: 48 MEDIAN 2013 CONDOMINIUM PRICE: $715,000 ($615,000-

$815,000) CONDOMINIUMS SOLD: 2

engineering, while she works in marketing. They have a 14-month-old son. “We have a baby and the last thing I wanted was being scared all day that he could be hit by a car. I like that the streets are narrow — they have all these chicanes built in.” Sadelhofer, who moved to the area with her family from Los Gatos, said that she fell in love with the area because it doesn’t have a lot of commercial, industrial space surrounding it. However, she fears this might change. “I hear there are plans to develop the area, which is scaring me because I hear there are talks about making the streets here a lot wider,” she said. However, for now, it’s all just pre-planning talk, she said. She enjoys the bike-friendly, quiet atmosphere and doesn’t mind making the short drive to downtown Menlo Park. There are grocery stores and markets within walking distance where she can buy produce. One of her favorite resources in the area is the U-ME indoor children’s playground — a 10-minute walk from her home. “With children, living here is fantastic,” she said. — Sam Borsos

Cass Way, Palo Alto

I’ve been busy in your neighborhood! If you are thinking of Buying or Selling, call me!

E. Meadow Dr., Palo Alto

Friendly Ct., Redwood City

Dartmouth Ave., San Carlos

Space Park Way, Mountain View

Chamisal Ave., Los Altos

ROD CREASON Borregas Ave., Sunnyvale

BROKER ASSOCIATE, e-PRO Cell: 650-255-2977

Sharon Rd., Menlo Park

Rod@RodCreason.com www.RodCreason.com

Eden Bower Ln., Redwood City

Ascension Dr., Los Altos Hills

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 29

Central Menlo Park

M

ary Beth Suhr has lived on Cotton Street in Central Menlo Park since 1996, but even 17 years later, the charm of the neighborhood hasn’t worn off. She and her husband originally moved to Menlo Park so that their two sons could take advantage of the “great schools” in the area, as well as for the “proximity to employment” that their home permitted. Today, they said they’ve come to love the active lifestyle that Central Menlo Park encourages. “We like it that we can walk downtown and to the farmers market on weekends. And we can ride bikes; it’s very outdoorsy,” Suhr said. She added that “the traffic on El Camino Real is a problem,” and that downtown Menlo Park would benefit from more “vibrant and diverse” shops, but otherwise, Central Menlo Park has been a great fit for her family. Sam Perry has also lived in Central Menlo Park since 1996. He chose his home on Hobart Street because the location allowed him to tap into Silicon Valley job opportunities, while still remaining close to friends and family around the Bay Area. An avid biker, Perry appreciates both the

flat terrain that surrounds his home and the nearby hills for the variety they provide. Like Suhr, Perry said he’s grateful for the active environment of Central Menlo Park. “Living here, it’s like going to college forever, because of all the athletic facilities in the area,” he said. Central Menlo Park benefits from its proximity to Stanford University in that Menlo Park residents often make use of the Cobb Track at Angell Field and the hiking trails around the Stanford Dish. But these facilities are available to anyone in the greater Menlo Park and Palo Alto areas; it is Central Menlo Park’s open and sociable atmosphere that makes it stand out, residents said. Perry said he especially appreciates the close friendships he’s been able to cultivate with longtime neighbors, thanks to the strong sense of community that persists in the neighborhood. Almost paradoxically, Central Menlo Park combines all the opportunities of Silicon Valley with an unmistakably small-town feel; its tree-lined sidewalks and quiet cul-de-sacs give it a peaceful residential appeal. — Emma Marsano

Belle Haven

C

onceived as an enclave of affordable housing for the working class when built during the Great Depression, the Belle Haven neighborhood, separated from the rest of Menlo Park by Highway 101, now houses the most diverse community in the city. A 540-acre triangle on the south side of Highway 101, the neighborhood’s boundaries are marked by the Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board Railroad to the north and Willow Road on the east end. The mostly residential neighborhood home to single-family residences, apartments and duplexes was first diversified by African Americans in the 1950s, with Hispanic and Pacific Islanders moving in the 1980s. The neighborhood remains diversified in the 2010s with many children raised in the neighborhood returning as adults, and young workers from nearby Facebook moving in. “Everyone loves this neighborhood that we live in,” Whitney Pine Hoermann says. After spending two years as a Teach for America corps member at Belle Haven Elementary School, she moved to the community and says she has had former students live on her 30 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS: The

Kirk House Preschool, 1148 Johnson St., Menlo Park; St. Joseph’s Montessori Preschool and Kindergarten, 150 Valparaiso Ave., Atherton; Littlest Angels Bethany Preschool, 1095 Cloud Ave., Menlo Park PRIVATE SCHOOLS: Menlo School, 50 Valparaiso Ave., Atherton; Sacred Heart Prep, 150 Valparaiso Ave., Atherton; St. Joseph’s School, 50 Emilie Ave., Atherton; St. Raymond’s Elementary School, 1211 Arbor Road, Menlo Park PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Menlo Park City Elementary School District — Oak Knoll School, 1895 Oak Knoll Lane, Menlo Park; Hillview Middle School, 1100 Elder Ave., Menlo Park

Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo-Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$2,667,500 ($1,550,000-$4,500,000) HOMES SOLD: 40

FACTS CHILD CARE AND PRESCHOOLS:

street. Ms. Pine Hoermann added square footage to her Terminal Avenue home after purchasing it in 2007. Many in Belle Haven, a designated redevelopment zone, are remodeling and improving their properties despite what some say is an unfriendly city building permit process. Building-savvy residents have been steadily upgrading their properties, says resident Matthew Harris. Raised in the neighborhood, he returned to Belle Haven upon his retirement in 1995. The community, residents say, is a neighborhood on the upswing. “I’ve seen a real change for the better,” resident Ms. Escobedo says. “New families are moving in, houses are being well-kept, and there is more eagerness to get involved in the community.” Neighborhood amenities include two parks, schools, a Boys and Girls Club, a senior center and the Onetta Harris Community Center, where residents say students enjoy art and cooking programs. — Sarah Trauben

Belle Haven Child Development Center, 410 Ivy Drive, Menlo Park; Belle Haven After-school Program, 415 Ivy Drive, Menlo Park; Family Connections, 415 Ivy Drive, #14, Menlo Park LOCATION: East of U.S. Highway 101 between Willow Road and Southern Pacific Railroad tracks, near Terminal Avenue PRIVATE SCHOOLS: Beechwood School, 50 Terminal Ave., Menlo Park PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Ravenswood City School District — Belle Haven Elementary School, 415 Ivy Drive, Menlo Park

Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo Atherton, Carlmont or Woodside High School MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$519,500 ($435,000-$1,720,000) HOMES SOLD: 32

*No slogan needed 925 Forest Avenue, Palo Alto

1030 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto

1861 Waverley Street, Palo Alto

1350 Harker Avenue, Palo Alto

1131 Lincoln Avenue, Palo Alto

SOLD - Buyer & Seller Representation

SOLD - Seller Representation

249 Lowell Avenue, Palo Alto

SOLD - Buyer Representation

SOLD - Seller Representation

SOLD - Seller Representation

SOLD - Buyer Representation

Over

$1 BILLION in Peninsula Sales

1959 Emerson Street, Palo Alto

2175 Emerson Street, Palo Alto

SOLD - Seller Representation

SOLD - Seller Representation

24551 Summerhill Avenue, Los Altos

271 S. Castanya Way, Portola Valley

2421 San Carlos Avenue, San Carlos

512 San Benito Avenue, Menlo Park

SOLD - Seller Representation

SOLD - Seller Representation

SOLD - Seller Representation

SOLD - Buyer Representation

150 Churchill Avenue, Palo Alto

SOLD - Buyer & Seller Representation

108 Dundee Lane, San Carlos

SOLD - Buyer Representation

272 Hudson Street, Redwood City SOLD - Buyer Representation

Miles McCormick Number One Team out of 79,000 Keller Williams agents

H o m e s O f Pa l o A l t o. co m Averaging 10,000 Visits Per Month

650-400-1001 DRE 01184883

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 31

Downtown Menlo Park

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS:

R

FIRE STATION:

700 Oak Grove Ave., Menlo Park LOCATION:

Valparaiso to Middle avenues and El Camino Real to Johnson Street and Arbor Road PARKS:

Veronica Weber

esidents of downtown Menlo Park will tell you: It has the best of both worlds. “If what you want is the convenience of living near a downtown with the benefit of being in a small town, this is a great combination of that,” resident Amy Judy said. Judy moved from downtown Palo Alto in 2012 for a shorter commute to work at Stanford Hospital and cheaper rent. Even though Judy lives by herself in an apartment, she said she never feels unsafe and even feels quite welcomed. “When I moved into my apartment, within 36 hours, the person who lives across the hallway came over and invited me over for dinner,” she said. “It’s small enough ... that people are sort of like that even in the apartment building setting.” Judy said she quickly learned that her new home was not like other downtowns. Walking down Santa Cruz Avenue, there is a blend of a vintage feel — with old-time dry cleaners,

Menlo-Atherton Cooperative Nursery School, 802 Middle Ave., Menlo Park

Fremont Park, Santa Cruz and University Drive; Nealon Park, 800 Middle Ave., Menlo Park SHOPPING:

Downtown Menlo Park, Stanford Shopping Center PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

colorful bakeries and traditional barbers — and a modern ambience — with restaurants like Amici’s East Coast Pizzeria and Left Bank. “I don’t think that I appreciated the small town-iness of it before I was here,” Judy said. “I kind of perceived it as an extension of Palo Alto. I think it really has its own individual identity and really has a small-town appeal.” Even though the hustle and bustle of the farmers market, bikers and pedestrians keep the town lively, Judy said downtown Menlo Park doesn’t offer the same convenient nightlife that she left in downtown Palo Alto. But Michelle Bernard, who moved with her family to Downtown Menlo Park from Los

Menlo Park City Elementary School District — Oak Knoll School, 1895 Oak Knoll Lane, Menlo Park; Hillview Middle School, 1100 Elder Ave., Menlo Park Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo-Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICES:

$1,540,000 ($1,351,000$1,667,000) HOMES SOLD: 6 MEDIAN 2013 CONDOMINIUM PRICE: $1,417,500 ($720,000-

$2,200,000) CONDOMINIUMS SOLD: 12 CONDOMINIUMS SOLD NEARBY: 10

Michelle Le

32 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

Altos in 2005 with her family, said she doesn’t have any complaints about her area. A major pro of the area is how family friendly it is, she said. Her block hosts several barbecues and parties and she said many families that have moved out of the area still come back to these get-togethers. “You never know whose backyard you’re going to end up in on any given weekend or any given day in the summertime,” she said. But you do know that you are living in one town that blends two very different worlds. — Karishma Mehrotra

Local Knowledge with Global Reach

Downtown Palo Alto 728 Emerson Street, Palo Alto 650.644.3474

Sand Hill Road 2100 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park 650.847.1141

dreyfussir.com EEGL 3J½GI MW -RHITIRHIRXP] 3[RIH ERH 3TIVEXIH

David A. Weil, Realtor 650.823.3855 david.weil@dreyfussir.com davidaweil.com BRE

01400271

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 33

Felton Gables

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS:

The Playschool, Holbrook Palmer Park, 150 Watkins Ave., Atherton; Trinity Early Childhood Program, 2650 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, Menlo Park

A

FIRE STATION:

32 Almendral Ave., Atherton LOCATION:

West of Southern Pacific Railroad tracks and south of Holbrook Palmer park, between Watkins and Encinal avenues Michelle Le

lmost surrounded by Atherton, the small Menlo Park neighborhood of Felton Gables is named for the 1870s-era estate on which it was built: the former home of Senator Charles Norton Felton. Bordered by Holbrook Palmer Park, Encinal Avenue, and the Southern Pacific Railroad tracks, Felton Gables homes were built between the 1920s and 1950s. Because lots were built and sold individually, the neighborhood’s 115 custom homes were built in an eclectic range of architectural styles, residents say. “It doesn’t feel like a cookie-cutter neighborhood and has nice winding streets,” Gayle Blumberg, a resident since 1993, says. Home designs ranging from modern, Spanish villa, cottage and ranch styles to Craftsman and New England architecture dot the streets lined with mature oak, beech, maple and magnolia trees. Diana Beuttler says each lot in Felton Gables, at an average size of 1/4 acre, housed a small home when she moved to the “enclosed neighborhood” in 1968 for its “convenient location and attractive homes.” Felton Gables residents developed stricter zoning requirements which limit the size of second floor rebuilds, but many homes have since been rebuilt with second stories. The neighborhood now houses a mix of larger and smaller homes. Despite architectural changes, residents say

the area’s secluded geography has meant for consistent camaraderie among residents and a general sense of neighborhood safety that draws up to two hundred trick or treaters each Halloween. “It’s so inviting that at Halloween people across Menlo Park bring their children here because it’s so small and safe,” says Barbara Wood, who has been a resident for more than 36 years. Residents say nearby Holbrook Palmer Park serves as an extended backyard for neighborhood children. and Encinal School makes Felton Gables attractive to people with families. While many original residents moved to the neighborhood seeking to downsize from large country lots in Atherton and Woodside, now younger families live alongside established residents. “It’s a very nice mix of older, middle-aged, and young families,” Ms. Blumberg says. Community get-togethers are common, with the Felton Gables Homeowners’ Association running a fall adult cocktail party, a general meeting in the spring, and a widely attended Fourth of July picnic complete with a

PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Menlo Park City School District — Laurel School, 95 Edge Road, Atherton; Encinal School, 195 Encinal Ave., Atherton; Hillview Middle School, 1100 Elder Ave., Menlo Park Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo-Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton SHOPPING:

Downtown Menlo Park MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$2,137,000 ($1,385,000$3,200,000) HOMES SOLD: 8

Michelle Le

34 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

PARK:

Holbrook-Palmer Park, 150 Watkins Ave., Atherton

children’s parade and a range of barbeque fare. Association dues are modest, but the board voted recently to donate a surplus to an organization representing community members on plans for High Speed Rail. Concerns about railroad expansion plans are widespread, as many residents on the railway border fear they could lose their properties to eminent domain. Despite such concerns, turnover remains low, and residents say neighbors appreciate one another. “It’s really an incredibly friendly neighborhood,” Ms. Beuttler says. Neighbors keep in touch on strolls through the shady streets of Felton Gables. “You know everyone in your own little pocket in the neighborhood, and people watch out for each other,” Mrs. Wood adds. — Sarah Trauben

Let Jackie Help You Achieve Your Real Estate Dreams! # !# "!"!# # Jackie Copple

has been helping clients on the Peninsula achieve their personal ďŹ nancial goals for over 30 years, as a tax accountant, a ďŹ nancial planner, and since 1989 as a Realtor. Enjoy what Jackie’s clients are saying: “My husband and I could not agree for 7 years, then Jackie came along and she

(Excelled at listening to each of our concerns ( $#!"& strong market knowledge"! $% (Intuitively brought us together # !!# (!strong negotiation skills"$#   "& ) “We sold my mother’s home from 700 miles away when Jackie gave

( """dedication &#!'" (Extensive ďŹ nancial background  &&! ( % #marketing skills  $ !  Serving the communities of Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, Woodside, Redwood City and north to San Mateo; Palo Alto, Mountain View, Los Altos and south to San Jose where I was raised.

pple o ackie The Professional for Professionals MBA, CRS, SRES (650) 465-9160 jcopple@cbnorcal.com www.JackieCopple.com

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 35

Linfield Oaks

FACTS CHILD CARE AND PRESCHOOLS:

O

FIRE STATION:

300 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park Michelle Le

n a recent Sunday afternoon at Burgess Park, Isaac Armenta outlined the benefits of living in Linfield Oaks as he watched his young son play on a swing. “There’s a lot of stores nearby ... lots of trees, easy access to all the freeways and transportation, like the train,” he said. But the quality of life comes at a price. “It’s a great place to live. I wish I could buy a house,” said Armenta, a traffic signal electrician for the city of Palo Alto who rents a unit in a four-plex. Linfield Oaks was developed in the 1950s and has a mix of single-family homes and multi-family units in addition to office space around its edges. Stanford Research Institute, the U.S. Geological Survey and Sunset Magazine are all based on the outskirts of the neighborhood, which is bordered by San Francisquito Creek, Middlefield Road, Ravenswood Avenue and Alma Street. Seeking a family-friendly environment to raise their children, Frank and Margaret Carney moved to Menlo Park from New York City in 1972. They bought their one-story ranch house in Linfield Oaks in 1979. Frank said different streets in the neighborhood are characterized by the trees that line them: camphor trees on Claremont Way, liquid ambers on East Creek, and ash on Willow Road. Today, there are fewer Camphor trees than when the Carneys first arrived. Frank

Geokids Day Care Center, 345 Middlefield Road #204, Menlo Park; Burgess After-school Program, Burgess Kindercat Program, Menlo Park Recreation Center, 701 Laurel St., Menlo Park, Menlo Children’s Center, 801 Laurel St. Menlo Park

remembers when their overhanging branches would cause logistical problems when he threw the football around with his two sons. “You couldn’t throw it too high, because it would hit the trees,” he said. The Carneys expressed some misgivings about development and the cost of homes. One of their sons is a schoolteacher, while the other works at Dreamworks, and neither can afford to live in the neighborhood they grew up in. “In the early seventies, you didn’t have to be wealthy to live in Menlo Park,” said Frank, who worked as a probation officer and family court mediator for San Mateo County before retiring. “You had to have savings and a good middle class (job).” A block from the Carneys, Roland Kelly lives with his wife and three children in a onestory home built in 1955. Originally from Ireland, Kelly moved to Linfield Oaks in 2005 and spends some of his evenings in a detached home office built by the original owner. He believes it was one of the first home offices in Silicon Valley, predating the current widespread use of telecommuting.

Michelle Le

36 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

LOCATION:

West of Middlefield Road to Alma Street and San Francisquito Creek to Ravenswood Avenue NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION:

Email coordinator: JoAnne Goldberg, 650-327-4716 PARK:

Burgess Park, Alma Street and Mielke Drive, Menlo Park PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Menlo Park City Elementary School District — Laurel School, 95 Edge Road, Atherton; Encinal School, 195 Encinal Avenue, Menlo Park; Hillview Middle School, 1100 Elder Avenue, Menlo Park Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton SHOPPING:

Downtown Menlo Park MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$1,550,000 ($826,888-$2,160,000) HOMES SOLD: 18

Kelly, who works for SAP, said many of his neighbors also work in Silicon Valley and include a number of executives. But he said residents have tried to maintain the character of the neighborhood. “For the most part, homes are not completely demolished,” said Kelly. “They are tastefully remodeled.” Kelly’s children take advantage of their proximity to Burgess Park, using the swimming pool, baseball diamond and soccer field. Other facilities at the park include basketball and tennis courts and the new Arrillaga Family Gymnastics Center. —Bryce Druzin

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 37

Meet Your Area Professionals Menlo Park, Woodside, Atherton & Portola Valley

Linda Hymes, REALTOR

®

Virginia Supnet, REALTOR

415.377.6061

650.575.1932

lhymes@interorealestate.com

VSupnet@InteroRealEstate.com

Your luxury home expert in Woodside and Portola Valley

Integrity, Honesty and Results

Visit me Online: www.lindahymes.com

Karen Gunn, REALTOR

®

When Sales Skills, Experience And Professionalism is what You need… Call Virginia!

Visit Me Online: www.VirginiaSupnet.com ®

Denise Villeneuve

650.888.9457

650.274.8560

kgunn@interorealestate.com

Denisev.homes@gmail.com

Woodside, Portola Valley 25+ years of market knowledge and local relationships working to sell or find your California Dream Home

Making home selling & buying smooth & stress-free!

Visit Me Online: www.KarenGunnHomes.com

Visit Me Online: www.peninsulahomesbydenise.com

Melissa Lindt

Cutty Smith, REALTOR

650.430.2931

650.580.8286

Melissa@melisalindt.com

cuttys@interorealestate.com

I turn contacts into contracts

The partner you demand, The results you expect!

Visit Me Online: www.MelissaLindt.com

®

Visit Me Online: www.CuttySmith.com

Xinxin Guo, JD/MBA

Alex Sandoval

650.722.1833

650.605.5980

xguo@interorealestate.com m

asandoval@interorealestate.com m

“17 years of Woodside knowledge”

“Security, Results & Peace of Mind”

Visit Me Online: www.homesbyxinxin.com 38 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

Visit Me Online: www.alexsandoval.net

Woodside 1590 Canada Lane Woodside, CA 94062 650.206.6200

Menlo Park 807 Santa Cruz Avenue Menlo Park, CA 94025 650.543.7740

Tom Dallas, REALTOR

www.InteroRealEstate.com

David Kelsey

®

650.222.2788

650.223.5588

tom@dallaskelsey.com

david@dallaskelsey.com

Over $70 million currently listed $300 Million Standing Sales Volume Record in Just 1 Year $2 Billion in total sales volume

Over $70 million currently listed Serving Atherton, Menlo Park, Woodside and Portola Valley Highest SFR Sale in Menlo Park ($7.625M)

Visit Me Online: www.PeninsulaEstatesGroup.com

Visit Me Online: www.PeninsulaEstatesGroup.com

Greg Goumas

Dana Cappiello

650.492.1764

650.206.6205

Greg@GregGoumas.com

dcappiello@interorealestate.com

Realtor, Licensed Appraiser, MBA

Woodside & Portola Valley Expert

Visit Me Online: www.GregGoumas.com

Young Jacob, REALTOR

Visit Me Online: www.danacappiello.com ®

Ken Johnson, REALTOR

®

650.384.1430

650.793.3838

yjacob@interorealestate.com

kenjohnson@hotmkt.com

Broker Associate, fluent in Korean, Japanese & English

BUY SELL INVEST Creating wealth and security through ownership and investment in Real Estate.!

Visit Me Online: www.youngjacobteam.com

Visit Me Online: Web.HOTMKT.com

Sam Zerarka 650.996.2911 samznoah@gmail.com FINE PROPERTY COLLECTION

Local Expertise, Team Work, Track Record

Visit Me Online: www.SailingHomes.com Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 39

Menlo Oaks

F

lanked by the comparatively busy Ringwood Avenue and Bay Road, streets within Menlo Oaks are often shaded by trees and narrow enough that cars must slow down to a crawl to pass each other. Yards with vegetation running wild and the lack of street lights adds to the area’s atmosphere. “We liked the trees, we liked the big lots, we liked the rural feel,” said Michael Johnston, explaining his decision to move to the area with his wife in 2003. Johnston is president of the Menlo Oaks District Association, an organization for residents of the 106-acre island of unincorporated county land surrounded by Menlo Park and Atherton. The association publishes a tri-annual online newsletter and holds a yearly community meeting. It also puts on an annual summer picnic at the Peninsula School, located in the heart of the neighborhood. The private, progressive K-8 school was founded in 1925 and is the site of the historic Coleman Mansion. Residents said an influx of new families has

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS: Pen-

enlivened the area. “There was a period when there were hardly and young children around ... and then there was a resurgence in the last 10 years,” said longtime resident Elizabeth Gheleta, who lives in the single-single story ranch house her husband helped build in 1960. When Gheleta arrived with her three young children, her neighbors included not only people but horses, sheep, chickens and rabbits. Land owned by neighboring St. Patrick’s Seminary was not yet developed. Gheleta said her children used the area as their private playground. Today, her daughter runs a plant nursery and one of her sons practices environmental law, careers Gheleta said are connected to their childhood experiences. Despite the lack of sidewalks, residents of Menlo Oaks and surrounding communities regularly stroll the narrow roads. “The streets are fun to walk in, and there’s not a lot of traffic,” said Flood Park resident Michael Geary. — Bryce Druzin

A

40 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

LOCATION: Ringwood Avenue to Berkeley Avenue, adjacent to the Veterans Administration Medical Center; Bay Road to Arlington Way PRIVATE SCHOOLS: Peninsula School, Peninsula Way, Menlo Park PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Menlo Park City Elementary School District — Laurel School, 95 Edge Road, Atherton; Encinal School, 195 Encinal Ave., Menlo Park; Hillview Middle School, 1100 Elder Ave., Menlo Park

Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo-Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$2,527,500 ($2,275,000$2,590,000) HOMES SOLD: 4

Stanford Weekend Acres bent, beat-up green sign declaring “End County Road” greets drivers turning off Alpine Road onto Bishop Lane. The sign hints at the relative isolation of Stanford Weekend Acres, a strip of unincorporated San Mateo County that lies next to the Stanford University golf course and is bordered by Alpine and San Francisquito Creek. “It’s a real rural flavor, rural sense,” said Ron Miller, who has lived in the neighborhood since 1988. “We’re one minute from the freeway, yet I never see it or hear it.” Miller lives in one of 10 tightly packed oneroom cabins at the end of Homer Lane on an acre collectively owned by cabin residents. Residents of the “Tenants in Common” share expenses for the upkeep of the property and use a communal washer and dryer, slipping two dollars into a wooden container every time they do a load. Barbara Ann Barnett has lived on the property since 1969. At that time, residents of the cul-desac were active in the counter culture, including the Midpeninsula Free University. She compared the official legal arrangement cul-de-sac residents currently have with the atmosphere of the late 1960s. “There is a way in which the freedom of that

insula School, 920 Peninsula Way, Menlo Park; The Roberts School, 641 Coleman Ave., Menlo Park

era was apparent everywhere,” she said, “both in terms of the lack of any kind of structure (and) the lack of anybody’s need to have rules or regulations of any kind.” Stanford Weekend Acres is now dotted with larger, modern looking houses. Some residents have gone to the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors in an attempt to limit the size of developments. “The biggest concern of mine is people purchasing and building ... a huge mansion that’s out of step, out of character with the neighborhood,” Miller said. Barnett praised her neighbors for their efforts in opposing the building of large homes, but was disappointed that past efforts haven’t been successful. “That’s just the way it’s going now,” she said. “It’s very sad.” Miller said he often sees egrets, herons and ducks when he walks down into the creek in the neighborhood. When the water level is low enough, he does exercises on the creek bed. “It lends itself to meditative quietness, and you start listening to the water,” he said. “So it’s very unique in the middle of all this urban area to have this.” — Bryce Druzin

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS: Trinity School, 2650 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park LOCATION: Between Alpine Road and San Francisquito Creek and south of Stowe Lane, between Stanford Linear Accelerator and Stanford Golf Course PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Las Lomitas School District — Las Lomitas School, 299 Alameda de las Pulgas, Atherton; La Entrada School, 2200 Sharon Road, Menlo Park

Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo-Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$2,150,000 ($1,425,000$2,695,000) HOMES SOLD: 3

COLLEEN FORAKER ATHERTON

LOS ALTOS MENLO PARK PALO ALTO PORTOLA VALLEY WOODSIDE

Delivers outstanding results to clients who expect the highest quality of service:

FOR SELLERS

Manages thorough preparation of listings with excellent network of service providers Conducts careful assessment of comparables for market pricing Executes a tailored marketing plan whether the property is on or off market

FOR BUYERS

Ibgihbgml[^lmÛmikhi^kmb^l_hk\eb^gml Reviews disclosure packages with a keen eye to identify risks/opportunities Assesses competitive landscape, then structures offer mh\eb^gmlZ]oZgmZ`^

FOR SELLERS & BUYERS

Provides highly effective professional representation focused on strategic advice and skilled negotiation

COLLEEN FORAKER 650.380.0085 colleen@colleenforaker.com

ColleenForaker.com BRE# 01349099

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 41

Sharon Heights

S

itting atop the West Menlo Park hills is the Sharon Heights neighborhood. Developed for residential use by Duncan McDonald and Mark Radin in the 1960s, the neighborhood is home to a variety of residences, including houses, condominiums, townhouses and apartments. Neighbors say they love the hilly community with ample greenery and neat landscaping. “I love where I live,” says Dorothy Saxe, who moved with her husband to the neighborhood from Palo Alto in 1979. “The views and the neighbors are lovely, and the neighborhood is well-maintained and convenient to shopping and 280.” Sharon Heights retains a quiet allure despite its proximity to commerce and thoroughfares. “The trees are beautiful as they change in the different times of year,” saus Cora Wiegard, who moved to the neighborhood in 1983. Although residents boast a choice of schools from among Phillips Brooks School, Trinity

FACTS School, Las Lomitas School, La Entrada School and Menlo-Atherton High School, Ms. Wiegard and Mrs. Saxe both say that the townhomes and condominiums are home to mostly adult neighbors. Golf, athletics and social activities keep some residents involved with the Sharon Heights Golf and Country Club, which borders the 574-acre community along with Alameda de las Pulgas, Santa Cruz Avenue, and Sand Hill Road. The Sharon Heights Homeowners Association provides other opportunities for volunteering and socializing. It holds an annual summer party and an annual holiday party, Ms. Wiegard says. The condominiums tend to have community parties as well, Mrs. Saxe says of 1000 Sharon, a development home to spacious townhouses and condominiums. “Generally, we have annual holiday parties, which a condo resident hosts. We also have pool parties on Labor Day and the Fourth of July.” — Sarah Trauben

CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS: Trinity School, 2650 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park LOCATION: Sand Hill Road and Hwy. 280; Santa Cruz Avenue and Alameda de las Pulgas PRIVATE SCHOOLS: Phillips Brooks School, 2245 Avy Ave.; Trinity School, 2650 Sand Hill Road PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Las Lomitas School District — Las Lomitas School, 299 Alameda de las Pulgas, Atherton; La Entrada School, 2200 Sharon Road, Menlo Park

Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo-Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$1,755,000 ($880,000-$3,940,000) HOMES SOLD: 27 MEDIAN 2013 CONDOMINIUM PRICE: $635,000 ($332,500-

$1,556,000) CONDOMINIUMS SOLD: 40

Stanford Hills

P

hil Endliss, a resident of Stanford Hills since 1986, describes the neighborhood as “a rural setting in the middle of an urban area.” Chuck Jones, his neighbor since 2002, echoes that idea. “We’re so isolated, but we’re not isolated.” It’s not isolated because of the easy access to Highway 280, the less than 10-minute drive to Palo Alto, Menlo Park and the Sharon Heights Shopping Center across Sand Hill Road. But Sand Hill Road is also the reason Stanford Hills residents say they are isolated. It’s the only road one can use to get in and out of the miniature enclave of 78 houses amongst the rolling, golden hills, where Endliss says he can relax and watch a local herd of cattle graze. When Endliss left Los Angeles for Northern California nearly three decades ago with his family, he knew right away that this was where he was going to move. “We took a look at this house,” Endliss said. “It took us about five minutes. (My wife and I) looked at each other and said, ‘Done.’” He said the neighborhood was perfect: the convenient location, the remodeled feel of all the houses in the area, the great school district and a sense of serenity.

42 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

FACTS “(And) what’s interesting is that it is today the same as when we moved in,” he said, adding that in 30 Stanford Hills homes, the families have lived there for 20 years or more. “The trees get a little bigger, the weeds get a little taller, the cows get a little fatter,” he said. “Things don’t really change very much, which is why people stay for so long.” Jones said his neighborhood embodies a “1950s feeling.” When his two daughters were young, he said he felt comfortable letting them walk their dog, ride their bikes or go visit a friend’s house in the neighborhood because there is no through traffic in the area. “Nobody knows about this neighborhood because there is only one way in and one way out,” Jones said. He also said that that this tucked-away microcosm of neighborhood has created a close-knit community that holds at least three holiday block parties a year. Jones remembered when almost 70 people joined in on a water balloon toss at a recent party. “I can’t find another area that has as much to offer as where I’m living right now,” Endliss said. “You can’t beat it. There really isn’t anything negative about where we live.” — Karishma Mehrotra

CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS: Trinity School, 2650 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park LOCATION: Branner Drive off of Sand Hill Road, includes Anderson Way and Campbell Lane PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Las Lomitas School District — Las Lomitas School, 299 Alameda de las Pulgas, Atherton;

La Entrada School, 2200 Sharon Road, Menlo Park; Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo-Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$2,175,000 ($2,150,000$2,200,000) HOMES SOLD: 2 MEDIAN 2013 CONDOMINIUM PRICE: $755,000 ($317,500-

$2,395,000) CONDOMINIUMS SOLD: 55

Homes SOLD by Maya and Jason in Sharon Heights 2013

1256 Sharon Park Drive

9 Brent Court

2006

2365 Sharon Oaks Drive

1300 Trinity Drive

2332 Crest Lane

1262 Sharon Park Drive

1320 Trinity Drive

955 Siskiyou Drive

2332 Crest Lane*

3 Carriage Court

522 Sand Hill Circle*

1100 Sharon Park Drive #35

584 Sand Hill Circle

16 Biltmore Lane

777 Sharon Park Drive

3 Alexis Court

2007

1052 Sierra Drive

16 Biltmore Lane* 1021 Sierra Drive

562 Sand Hill Circle

2010

1100 Sharon Park Drive #37

1080 Deanna Drive

1280 Sharon Park Drive #38*

1015 Monte Rosa Drive

1026 Cascade Drive

1065 Continental Drive

9 Alexis Court

300 Sand Hill Circle #302

28 Sunset Lane

8 Sunset Lane

675 Monte Rosa Drive #821

2332 Crest Lane

2009

1280 Sharon Park Drive #26

5 Shasta Lane

945 Siskiyou Dive

855 Sharon Park Drive

940 Siskiyou Drive

2315 Eastridge #712

1010 Monte Rosa Drive

977 Continental Drive

1150 Klamath Drive

980 Siskiyou Drive

24 Anderson Way

977 Continental Drive*

2323 Eastridge Ave #523

921 Siskiyou Drive

2419 Sharon Oaks

2401 Sharon Oaks Drive

1290 Sharon Park Drive #48

1010 Continental Drive

675 Monte Rosa #822

1055 Whitney Drive

2335 Crest Lane

929 Siskiyou Drive

1280 Sharon Park Drive #28

1165 Monte Rosa Drive

1130 Trinity Drive

472 Sand Hill Circle

1280 Sharon Park Drive #36

1280 Sharon Park Drive #24

995 Lassen Drive

1045 Whitney Drive*

1280 Sharon Park Drive #40

1025 Lassen Drive*

702 Monte Rosa Drive

646 Sand Hill Circle*

1204 Sharon Park Drive #85

1230 Sharon Park Drive #65*

1204 Sharon Park Drive #85*

2012

300 Sand Hill Circle #203*

2011

2008

2402 Sharon Oaks Drive

924 Siskiyou Drive

1040 Whitney Drive

1202 Sharon Park Drive #71

Maya and Jason Sewald Broker & Sales Associate International President’s Premier Top 1%

650.346.1228 (MAYA’S CELL) 650.307.8060 (JASON’S CELL) Maya@MayaSewald.com Jason@JasonSewald.com

(MAYA SEWALD YOUR SOURCE FOR REAL ESTATE Since 1996

*Represented Buyer

(MAYA SEWALD YOUR SOURCE FOR REAL ESTATE Since 1996

(MAYA SEWALD YOUR SOURCE FOR REAL ESTATE Since 1996 (MAYA SEWALD YOUR SOURCE FOR REAL ESTATE Since 1996

(MAYA SEWALD YOUR SOURCE FOR REAL ESTATE Since 1996 (MAYA SEWALD YOUR SOURCE FOR REAL ESTATE Since 1996 (MAYA SEWALD YOUR SOURCE FOR REAL ESTATE Since 1996

(MAYA SEWALD YOUR SOURCE FOR REAL ESTATE Since 1996

(MAYA SEWALD YOUR SOURCE FOR REAL ESTATE Since 1996

(MAYA SEWALD YOUR SOURCE FOR REAL ESTATE Since 1996 Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 43

South of Seminary/Vintage Oaks

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS:

T

Footsteps Preschool, 490 Willow Road, Menlo Park; The Roberts School, 641 Coleman Ave., Menlo Park FIRE STATION:

300 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park

Michelle Le

he twin neighborhoods of South of Seminary and Vintage Oaks, though enclosed by the northern intersection of the busy thoroughfares of Willow Road and Middlefield, maintain a quiet, residential flavor. Mature redwoods, oaks, walnut and liquid ambar trees shade the streets in South of Seminary for locals strolling on curb-less sidewalks and sparse street traffic along the mostly one-story homes on modest lots. “It’s not a quaint neighborhood, but it is very comfortable,” says Sally Mendiola, who was raised in South of Seminary on property bought by her grandfather on Nash Street in the 1920s. She returned to a home on built in 1949 by her father, developer J. W. Fryckman, in 2003 to raise her daughter. Bordered by Santa Monica Road and Seminary Oaks Park, South of Seminary is named for its proximity to St. Patrick’s Seminary, which occupied 85 acres donated to the Catholic Church by Kate Johnson and was dedicated in 1898. The neighborhood’s residences were built in the post-war period and into the 1950s, but many have been rebuilt or remodeled. Modest apartment complexes dot the neighborhood’s edges on Coleman and Willow. A sense of community feeling runs high, residents say, with Fourth of July festivities bringing neighbors together and the annual Nash Bash closing a block of Nash Avenue an afternoon each September. The potluck and barbeque, planned by Nash residents over an email list, attracts a large turnout of local families.

Residents also deploy the email list when a pet goes missing or when they’d like to schedule a shared garage sale, residents say. “We look out for each other in this neighborhood,” Ms. Mendiola says. Jeanne DePrau, who lived on Santa Margarita Avenue for 33 years, says South of Seminary attracts a range of residents, from younger families to more established homeowners. The quiet neighborhood’s proximity to area shopping is a draw. “I can get to both downtown Menlo Park and downtown Palo Alto easily,” she says, adding that the library, recreation center, Willow Market and area schools are also within biking distance. Neighborliness draws young residents outdoors on three cul-de-sacs on the southern side of Santa Monica, and chalk-drawn pictures and games like hopscotch are a common sight. “On most weekend afternoons, everyone convenes outside and plays until the sun goes down,” especially in the summer months, says Lexy Eaton, a resident since 2008. Opposite Santa Monica Avenue lies a younger neighborhood development, built

PARK:

Seminary Oaks Park, Santa Monica Avenue, near Middlefield Road, Menlo Park PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Menlo Park City School District — Laurel School, 95 Edge Road, Atherton; Encinal School, 195 Encinal Avenue, Atherton; Hillview Middle School, 1100 Elder Avenue, Menlo Park Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton SHOPPING:

Downtown Menlo Park MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

South of Seminary/Vintage Oaks: $1,460,000 ($1,350,000$2,650,000) HOMES SOLD: 7

Michelle Le

44 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

LOCATION: Middlefield Road and Coleman Avenue; Willow Road to Ringwood Avenue and Arlington Way

in the 1990s and named for its fully-grown foliage: Vintage Oaks. A 46-acre area with 131 larger homes and 14 townhouses, the development was built on fields formerly belonging to the seminary it surrounds. The subdivision houses a mixture of city workers, older residents and families with children who enjoy easy access to neighboring schools and public transit, as well as local restaurants. “We can bike and take the train everywhere,” says Armando Castellano, who moved to Vintage Oaks with his wife and sons in 2007. Both South of Seminary and Vintage Oaks have a reputation for safety. Neighborhood children enjoy access to Seminary Oaks Park at its center on Santa Monica Avenue. Mr. Castellano’s young sons Andries and Wim play there often. “It’s really quiet here,” Andries says. — Sarah Trauben

NO ONE KNOWS VINTAGE OAKS LIKE ELAINE.

“Elaine, you are a ROCK STAR! Anyone selling in Vintage Oaks would be silly not to hire you, you are THE go-to expert... Your knowledge and connections were critical in pricing the house correctly, negotiating and getting things resolved very quickly... You earned every penny of your commission and then some.” – Jesse and Alison Deutsch “Elaine is completely knowledgeable about the market and what appeals to buyers. She was available whenever we needed, had answers to all of our questions, and is a skillful negotiator—all while maintaining the utmost integrity.” – John Stacey

No one has sold more homes in Vintage Oaks than Elaine—except the original developer. Contact Elaine for a free consultation at 650.566.5323. Learn more about buying or selling a Vintage Oaks home at www.vintageoakshomes.com. Elaine Berlin White ewhite@cbnorcal.com www.elainewhite.com Top 1% of Coldwell Banker #179 Team of Wall Street Journal's Top Realtors of 2013

Find me on Facebook

BRE#01182467

Broker Associate, Attorney at Law www.elainewhite.com

www.facebook.com/EBWRealEstate www.facebook.com/VintageOaksHomes Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 45

FACTS

Suburban Park / Lorelei Manor/ Flood Triangle

CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS:

James B. Flood School, 320 Sheridan Ave., Menlo Park FIRE STATION:

300 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park

T

LOCATION:

between Marsh Road, U.S. Hwy. 101 and Bay Road NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATIONS:

Lorelei Manor: Salim Shaikh, president; Suburban Park: Tim Yaeger, president PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Michelle Le

ucked between Marsh Road, U.S. Hwy. 101 and Bay Road, the unassuming Suburban Park, Lorelei Manor and Flood Triangle neighborhoods of Menlo Park provide mid-century family homes and a charming community feeling for a (relatively) affordable price. All three neighborhoods share access to popularbut-beleaguered Flood Park, recently spared again from budget-cutting closure. The Friends of Flood Park nonprofit works to raise funds and plan improvements for the community gathering point. For Henry Riggs, Lorelei Manor resident since 1998, it was the lovely ash trees that sold him on the neighborhood. Now that he’s made the area his home for a decade and a half, he’s still a fan of the foliage, declaring his favorite part of living there is a “tie between great neighbors and those big street trees.” Those great neighbors form the small community (89 homes) Riggs called, “unusually friendly,” with annual events including barbecues, hay rides and ice-cream socials. Another perk is being within walking

distance of several parks and Marsh Manor shopping center, and easy access to both downtown Menlo Park and Redwood City. Homes in the three neighborhoods date to tracts built in the 1950s, with many receiving renovations and/or additions over the years. And thanks to the action of Riggs and others, Lorelei Park clarified its zoning regulations in 2004, giving residents more freedom in development and improvements. As for what the future holds, Riggs noted that when he first moved in, “the freight train lumbered by at 5 mph a couple times a week; kind of charming. It hardly runs any more.” He hopes one day to see an electric light rail installed to better serve public-transportation needs, though the long hoped-for Dumbarton Rail project has been shelved for the moment.

Michelle Le

46 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

Menlo Park City Elementary School District — Laurel School, 95 Edge Road, Atherton; Encinal School, 195 Encinal Ave., Menlo Park; Hillview Middle School, 1100 Elder Ave., Menlo Park Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton SHOPPING:

Marsh Manor MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$1,163,500 ($850,000-$1,740,000) HOMES SOLD: 28

Current Suburban Park Neighborhood Association President Tim Yaeger moved to the neighborhood four years ago. Events spearheaded by the active neighborhood association include holiday parades and festivals and a special street dance complete with children’s games, dinner and a DJ for late-night dancing. The population of young families, as well as convenient location, initially attracted Yaeger to the area, which he called “a beautiful community marked by tree-lined streets.” He called his fellow residents friendly and helpful, and willing to go the extra mile to make people feel at home. “When a new family moves in there is a welcome committee that drops off a small gift, and new babies are met with organized baby dinners prepared by other families who know the busyness of bringing home a newborn,” he said. “Stroll through the neighborhood in the afternoon and you’ll find impromptu play dates all over the place. It’s also a place of mixed generations with young families, empty nesters and elderly.” — Karla Kane

Coldwell Banker

#1 IN CALIFORNIA

Carla Anisman 650-888-9521

Steve Bellumori 650-752-0826

Buffy Bianchini 650-888-6379

Lyn Jason Cobb 650-566-5331

Erika Demma 650-740-2970

Canisman1@aol.com

Sbellumori@cbnorcal. com

Bbianchini@cbnorcal.com

lynjason.cobb@cbnorcal.com

edemma@cbnorcal.com

Sean Foley 650-207-6005

Doug Gonzalez 650-566-5324

Kim Hansen 650-330-6240

SeanFoleyCB@gmail.com

dgonzalez@cbnorcal.com

Pam Hammer & Katie Riggs 650-515-5255

Jean & Christopher Isaacson 650-387-8427

Rebecca Johnson & Karen Fryling 650-329-6620

Ginny Kavanaugh 650-400-8076

Margot Lockwood 650-400-2528

Gwen Luce 650-566-5343

Jim McCahon 650-851-7226

gkavanaugh@camoves.com

homes@margotlockwood.com

gluce@cbnorcal.com

Jmccahon@cbnorcal.com

karen.fryling@cbnorcal.com

Katie.hammer@cbnorcal.com

Kim.Hansen@cbnorcal.com

Christopher.Isaacson@cbnorcal.com

Karin Riley 650-324-4456

Brigid Van Randall 650-566-5348

Elaine White 650-566-5323

Dan Ziony 650-201-1010

Karin.Riley@cbnorcal.com

brigid.vanrandall@cbnorcal.com

Ewhite@cbnorcal.com

www.DanZiony.com

MENLO PARK | PALO ALTO | PORTOLA VALLEY | WOODSIDE ©2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office Is Owned And Operated by NRT LLC. DRE License #00313415

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 47

Park Forest

T

rees that predate surrounding buildings by many decades tower over Menlo Park’s aptly named Park Forest neighborhood. Before homes were built, the area was an undeveloped park full of trees, Bernadette Wahle says. Though trees were removed to make room for buildings, many old ones remain. In addition to homes and businesses, Park Forest is also home to lofty redwoods, oak trees with twisted and curved branches, and two considerable stone pine trees just off El Camino Real. The two stone pines are the namesakes for Stone Pine Road, one of the three streets in Park Forest, Wahle says. Construction on homes in Park Forest started in 1961. Wahle and her husband moved from Palo Alto three years later. “We saw the houses and we thought, that was it,” Wahle says. Park Forest homes are simple, with clean lines and a modern feel, which also appealed to new resident Vittoria Deloulay. Deloulay, who moved to Park Forest with her husband and children in June 2013, described her and other Park Forest homes as being reminiscent of Bauhaus, or modernist German architecture. “My husband and I both like modern architecture, and we were attracted to the design

FACTS CHILDCARE & PRESCHOOLS: The

of the homes,” she says. The neighborhood consists of three separate homeowner’s associations, with each association having their own private park and pool. Though one contractor built the majority of the homes at the same time, today homes are differentiated by pops of color — such as a colorful front door, entryway artwork and landscaping added by homeowners. Living in Park Forest is as convenient and comfortable as it is colorful. Deloulay says she and her family enjoy Park Forest’s proximity to downtown Menlo Park, Atherton and downtown Palo Alto. “We’ve walked to the Atherton library, to Holbrook-Palmer Park,” Deloulay says, adding that she also bicycles to downtown Palo Alto and walks her kids to school. Unlike the constant presence of the trees that define Park Forest, the neighborhood is changing, as more families with children buy homes. When Wahle moved to Park Forest 49 years ago, she said all of the residents were older. “When I moved in, there were no children. Most of the residents were elderly, in their fifties and up. Now there are many children; there are nine on just our street.” — Kimberlee D’Ardenne

The Willows

T

he Willows, bordered by Willow Road, Highway 101 and East O’Keefe Street, Middlefield Road and San Francisquito Creek, was known as North Palo Alto following the Depression. Developer Si Simon built a series of “Simon Built” homes along Central Avenue. In 1953, after the incorporation of Menlo Park, and with its contemporary borders, the area was given its present name. Residents say there’s no tract feeling in most of the area — but many mature trees and rambling, twisty roads. Gary Smith has lived on O’Connor Street since 1981. This December he celebrates the 21st anniversary of his Willows business, Menalto Cleaners, which is located in the same mini-strip as La Hacienda Market, Caffe Zoe, at the corner of Menalto and Gilbert. Mr. Smith remembers the floods brought on by El Nino in 1997-98, and says that the neighbors dealt with the damage the same way they have dealt with other crises. “Our neighborhood comes together to discuss and resolve. This neighborhood does

48 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

Playschool, Holbrook-Palmer Park, 150 Watkins Ave., Atherton; Trinity School Early Childhood Program at Holy Trinity Church, 330 Ravenswood Ave., Menlo Park LOCATION: El Camino Real to Southern Pacific railroad tracks; Buckthorn to Stone Pine lanes PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Menlo Park City Elementary School District — Laurel School, 95 Edge Road, Atherton; Encinal School, 195 Encinal Ave., Menlo Park; Hillview Middle School, 1100 Elder Ave., Menlo Park

Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo-Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$1,191,500 ($826,888- $1,550,000) HOMES SOLD: 5 MEDIAN 2013 CONDOMINIUM PRICE: $1,392,000 ($1,149,000-

$1,635,000) HOMES SOLD: 2

FACTS LOCATION: 300 Middlefield Road,

not mess around.” Although he’s not aware of a neighborhood association, he says that there is an earthquake preparedness committee, a Willows traffic group and several Yahoo groups, as well as a moms and babies group. The neighborhood is served by the Menlo Park School District, which annexed it from Ravenswood in 1982. When asked if there’s anything he doesn’t like, Mr. Smith pauses. “There’s a disregard for littering.” Since he feels that the neighborhood is “aesthetically beautiful,” it pains him to see the amount of debris, he says. Gentrification has taken place due to the influx of professionals in the popular neighborhood. He contributed to the trend by remodeling his own home in 1999, he adds. The neighborhood is an accepting one, Mr. Smith notes. “It’s a wonderful place. It’s warm, friendly, and diverse — racially and culturally.” —Susan Golovin

Menlo Park PRIVATE SCHOOLS: GermanAmerican School of San Francisco, 275 Elliott Drive, Menlo Park PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Menlo Park City Elementary School District — Laurel School, 95 Edge Road, Atherton; Encinal School, 195 Encinal Ave., Menlo Hillview Middle School, 1100 Elder Ave., Menlo Park

Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo-Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$1,361,000 ($820,000-$2,350,000) HOMES SOLD: 30 MEDIAN 2013 CONDOMINIUM PRICE: $1,028,000 CONDOMINIUMS SOLD: 3

Exceptional Agents

Palo Alto

s

Menlo Park

Atherton

Exceptional Results

Portola Valley

Woodside

Your Neighborhood Experts Longtime residents and community supporters. Professionally representing buyers and sellers in the Willows, Menlo Park and entire Mid-Peninsula. Certified International Property Specialists

Penelope Huang Broker/Owner GRI, CRS, CIPS (650) 281-8028 Penelope.Huang@remax.net Cal BRE #01023392

Omar Kinaan Realtor速 GRI, CIPS (650) 776-2828 Omar@Kinaan.com Cal BRE #01723115

Experience the difference: Work with professionals who care about you.

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 49

University Heights

FACTS CHILD CARE AND PRESCHOOLS:

I

Michelle Le

n the past 50 years, University Heights in unincorporated San Mateo County has changed dramatically. Once a sleepy neighborhood of small homes and summer cottages, it is now a lively blend of longtime residents and families with children. Many of the older homes have been replaced with large two-story residences. The business section along the Alameda de las Pulgas caters to young families drawn to the area because of the excellent Las Lomitas School District and the proximity to Stanford University. There’s many new businesses as well as the now-remodeled Lutticken’s, which added a wine bar in recent years. Even the Dutch Goose, the venerable burger-and-beer hangout, has been given a new look. University Heights has been shaped by leaders determined to save its small-town charm. In the 1970s environmentalists worked to prevent the Alameda from turning into a four-lane thoroughfare. Thirty years later, civic-minded residents campaigned to make the business section visitor friendly with street trees and paved sidewalks Christine Stahler certainly qualifies as a longtime University Heights resident. She’s lived on Valparaiso Avenue all her life. So has her mother, Anne Affrunti, who resides next door. Ms. Stahler lives in the house her grandparents built in 1936. Mrs. Affrunti, Ms. Stahler, and her daughters, Amanda and Kathleen, all attended Las Lomitas

Children’s Creative Learning Center, Las Lomitas School, 299 Alameda de las Pulgas, Atherton; Littlest Angels Preschool, Bethany Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave., Menlo Park; the Phillips Brooks School, 2245 Avy Ave., Menlo Park; University Heights Montessori Children’s Center, 2066 Avy Ave., Menlo Park

Elementary School. Ms. Stahler fondly remembers her childhood in University Heights: walking to the All-American market (corner of the Alameda and Avy Avenue) for candy and shopping at the dime store. “The area has always been family oriented. It’s cozy and down-to-earth,” she says. Christine’s husband, Al Stahler, puts on an elaborate Halloween display every year, drawing hundreds of visitors. Gwen Faulkner, a psychologist and nurse, has lived in University Heights for seven years. The Las Lomitas School District, which her daughter attends, was a major factor in choosing the area. “It’s one of the best in the state,” she says. She also likes the sense of community. “I know most of the neighbors and they’re really nice.” A Starbucks regular, she likes being close to shopping on the Alameda and at Sharon Heights Shopping Center, eliminating the need to drive downtown. David and Tracy Williams already knew

LOCATION: East and West of Alameda de las Pulgas to Altlschul Avenue to the west; Vine Street and Santa Cruz Avenue, Atherton border PRIVATE SCHOOLS: Phillips Brooks School, 2245 Avy Ave., Menlo Park; Trinity School, 2650 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Las Lomitas School District — Las Lomitas School, 299 Alameda de las Pulgas, Atherton; La Entrada School, 2200 Sharon Road, Menlo Park

Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo-Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton SHOPPING: Alameda de las Pulgas, Sharon Heights Shopping Center MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$1,775,000 ($735,000-$3,880,000) HOMES SOLD: 50

Michelle Le

50 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

FIRE STATION: 3322 Alameda de las Pulgas, Menlo Park

the neighborhood before moving to Sherman Avenue, having lived on Siskiyou Drive in Sharon Heights as grad students. Both have MBAs from Stanford University. The Williams family chose the area because of its convenience and, again, the outstanding Las Lomitas school district. After living in the hills in Belmont, says Mr. Williams, “It’s also great to be in flat land, where we can walk and ride our bikes everywhere.” They like being close to Alameda businesses instead of having to drive to downtown Menlo Park. The pair recently enjoyed their first Halloween on Sherman Avenue, where the street is closed and almost every house is decorated. “We went through 1,600 pieces of candy that night,” says Mr. Williams. — Jane Knoerle

SUCCESSFUL MARKETING

WITH THE

MERKERTS

PROVEN RESULTS !

!

D OL

D OL

S

S

BRENT COURT MENLO PARK

SHERMAN AVENUE

D!

MENLO PARK

OL

S

TRINITY DRIVE

LASSEN COURT

BRYANT STREET

MENLO PARK

MENLO PARK

PALO ALTO

!

!

D OL

D OL

S

S

HOMES SOLD - REPRESENTED BUYERS 311 Oakwood Place, Menlo Park 1320 Trinity Drive, Menlo Park 2140 Santa Cruz Ave., Menlo Park 2071 Camino a Los Cerros, Menlo Park We have been honored to represent many buyers and sellers this year. We are committed to always offering personable and comprehensive real estate services with exceptional attention to detail. We welcome the opportunity to explore any real estate needs you may have. As clients, you are our ďŹ rst priority, and we look forward to building the personal relationship that will enable us to assist you.

JOE MERKERT PROVEN RESULTS & SERVICE

650-387-5464 CELL 650-543-1156 DIRECT CALBRE# 01365311

MARY MERKERT 650-303-2221 CELL 650-543-1157 DIRECT CALBRE# 01756592

apr.com | 1550 EL CAMINO REAL SUITE 100, MENLO PARK

650.462.1111 Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 51

2013 ACTIVITY D

D

D

SOL

D

D

SOL

SOL

SOL

SOL

Represented buyer Offered for $5,600,000

Sold in 9 days over asking Offered for $4,000,000

Represented buyer and seller Offered for $3,950,000

Sold in 7 days Offered for $3,795,000

Represented buyer Offered for $3,500,000

Golden Oak Drive, Portola Valley

Cervantes Road, Portola Valley

Antonio Court, Portola Valley

Alhambra Court, Portola Valley

Lupine Lane, Los Altos Hills

D

D

D

SOL

SOL

D

D

SOL

SOL

SOL

Portola Road, Portola Valley

Represented buyer and seller Offered for $3,400,000

Westridge Drive, Portola Valley

Represented buyer Offered for $2,899,000

Sold in 14 days Offered for $2,495,000

co-listed with Hugh Cornish

Sioux Way, Portola Valley

co-listed with Helen Yen

Robleda Road, Los Altos Hills

Alpine Road, Portola Valley

Offered for $3,475,000

D

D

D

SOL

Offered for $3,375,000

D

D

SOL

SOL

SOL

SOL

Offered for $2,480,000

Represented buyer Offered for $2,398,000

Sold in 8 days Offered for $2,350,000

Offered for $2,100,000

Sold in 11 days over asking Offered for $1,795,000

Pinon Drive, Portola Valley

Corte Madera Road, Portola Valley

Hawkview Street, Portola Valley

Echo Lane, Portola Valley

Ohlone Street, Portola Valley

D

Sold over asking Offered for $1,779,500

Arastradero Road, Portola Valley

Campo Road, Portola Valley

D

SOL

Represented buyer Offered for $1,395,000

Sold in 12 days Offered for $1,250,000

Pending with multiple offers Offered for $925,000

Old Spanish Trail, Portola Valley

Los Trancos Road, Portola Valley

Alpine Road, Portola Valley (Lot, pending)

VE

VE

VE

VE

ACTI

ACTI

ACTI

D

SOL

SOL

SOL

Multiple offers over asking Offered for $1,795,000

SOL

D

D

D

SOL

ACTI

Offered for: $659,000

5922Alpine.com Offered for: $7,700,000

280Nathhorst.com Price upon request

AlpineRd.com Offered for: $3,795,000

6Montecito.com Offered for: $2,750,000

Los Trancos Road, Portola Valley

Alpine Road, Portola Valley

Nathhorst Avenue, Portola Valley

Alpine Road, Portola Valley

Montecito Road, Woodside

Ginny Kavanaugh 650.400.8076 | gkavanaugh@camoves.com | K a v a n a u g h G r o u p . c o m | BRE #00884747 /KavanaughRealEstate | 52 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

/GinnyKavanaugh |

/Ginny Kavanaugh

|

GinnyKavanaugh

oad Hill R

M nt a

Sa

ou Rd

.

Freew

ay

Westridge Searsville Lake

Road

Po

rto

We

la

Central Portola Valley

strid ge D ri ve

Ro

L a H o nd a

ad e

Aras

ta

de Rd

Wa y

s

Rd

.

d

id

ro

Ol

r

■ Portola Valley Ranch

Serra

Ladera

Woodside Woodside Highlands

ro

Drive

■ Ladera

pe

ni

Portola

Ju

■ Central Portola Valley

280

Road

Stanford University

e R oa d in Hom

■ Brookside Park

■ Los Trancos/ Vista Verde

H ill

nd

We s t r i d g e

■ Blue Oaks

PORTOLA VALLEY

key

Alpine Road

W

his

Brookside Park

pin

e

Va l l e y O a k

ine

ncos Tra

Alp

Blue Oaks

Sk

Lo

s

Reservoir

Palo Alto

C reek

Windy Hill Open Space Preserve

ad

cos

Al

Ro

Lo s

Road

Tra n

■ Woodside Highlands

Portola

Road

■ Westridge

.

Foothills Park

yli ad

vard

Portola Valley Ranch

rt o

wn

limi

s

Los Trancos Woods/ Vista Verde

ek

y to

C re

la

lle

co

Po

Va

Tran

ule

Los

Ro

ne Bo

ts

Alpi

FACTS

ne

Ro

2013-14 TOWN OPERATING BUDGET:

ad

$6.2 million

Roa

d

ag

eM

POPULATION (2011):

ill

4,348

P

HOUSEHOLDS (2010):

1,689 SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSING (2007-11):

81.9 percent MEDIAN HOME PRICE:

$2,225,000 MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2007-11 ESTIMATE): $331,667

A

stride the San Andreas fault, with views extending from across the Bay to San Francisco, Portola Valley’s history begins with the logging town of Searsville. Its most famous 19th-century settler was Andrew Hallidie, inventor of the cable car, who purchased property in 1883, then donated land for a school and post office. Farming and stock ranching were major enterprises between 1860 and 1920, but as

with much of the Peninsula, the real surge for development came after World War II. The town of Portola Valley was incorporated in 1964 with the goals of preserving the beauty of the valley, fostering low-density housing, and limiting services to those necessary for local residents. To this day, the goal is to maintain a balance between the rural, quiet neighborhoods and the need for modern development. Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 53

Blue Oaks

L

ocated in the southern tip of Portola Valley, the town’s newest development is overlooked by Coal Mine Ridge and surrounded by open space. Residents regularly see coyotes, bobcats, rabbits and other wildlife roaming the area. The development’s first homes were constructed in the early 2000s, and more than half of its 34 two-acre lots are now filled. Jim Pollock was one of the original land buyers and headed the Blue Oaks Homeowners Association for its first 10 years. He said he was intimately involved with finalizing the plans for the neighborhood. “The density .... the type of architecture, and the amount of landscaping were issues that I think worked out fine,” he said. Pollock built his home to accommodate large groups of frequent houseguests: He and his wife have five kids and 11 grandchildren. “The house often houses all or some of them,” he said. Pollock has lived in Portola Valley since 1973. He said residents of Blue Oaks are like other residents of the town, and that over the years the type hasn’t changed. “They’re largely successful combined with being down to earth, i.e., no flaunting their

FACTS wealth,” he said. Pollock is founder of Portola Valley-based Pollock Financial Group. He started the company in 1960 and now two sons of his sons work with him. Long driveways and large properties also give residents a degree of seclusion. “It’s an interesting combination of retaining your privacy and having relationships with your neighbors,” said Pollock. Joey Putnam, a teenager who was raised in Blue Oaks, said he felt the private vibe of the neighborhood while growing up. “In the suburbs, you grow up with kids around you. But here you don’t really get that,” he said. But Putnam said he enjoyed the flexibility of living in an area that is relatively remote, but only a 20-minute drive from densely populated Menlo Park and Palo Alto. “It’s just far enough away that you can be isolated if you want to be, but you’re not too far away,” he said. Putnam said that while growing up, he took advantage of the area’s location and the walking paths that criss-cross and surround it. “When I was younger, every day I’d go up on these trails,” he said. —Bryce Druzin

Brookside Park

K

elly and Conor Flannery moved to Portola Valley more than four years ago. “(We moved) to be close to hiking trails and for the school system,” said Kelly, who has a young son. “And to be more in a rural area, quiet neighborhood.” The couple said they see deer, raccoons, and foxes. But sometimes the wildlife can be a bit intrusive. “We had a wild turkey trapped in our garage (once),” Kelly said. John Richard remembers when Corte Madera was a dirt road. “Played in the dirt, mostly,” Richard said, describing what it was like growing up in the neighborhood during the 1950s and ‘60s. Richard, an architect, lives on land his parents owned and in a house he designed and built in 1985. His do-it-yourself ethic extends to his backyard. He raises vegetables, grows fruit and keeps chickens, ike his parents did. Richard said many of his neighbors do the same thing. “I like the ability to go out and dig in the ground,” he said. “That’s a big one, be a little more self-sufficient.” Richard said the neighborhood was tighter 54 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS (NEARBY): Windmill Preschool,

4141 Alpine Road, Portola Valley; New Horizons School-Age Center (after school care), 200 Shawnee Pass, Portola Valley; Carillon Pre-School at Christ Church, 815 Portola Road, Portola Valley; Woodside Priory School, 302 Portola Road, Portola Valley LOCATION: Redberry Road, Buck Meadow Drive, Blue Oaks Court, between Los Trancos Road and Alpine Road PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Portola Valley School District — Ormondale School (K-3), 200 Shawnee Pass, Portola Valley; Corte Madera School (4-8), 4575 Alpine Road, Portola Valley; Sequoia Union High School District — Woodside High School, 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$2,367,000 ($1,150,000$6,250,000) HOMES SOLD: 5

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS:

knit when he was young. He recalled his dad and four other families building a pool together and his mother leading groups of carolers from home to home during Christmas time. But he said that feeling isn’t completely gone, and that his immediate neighbors get together for dinners and parties. Below the hill lies Brookside Orchard, named for the time when, prior to development in the 1920s, the land was home to apple and pear treas. The u-shaped Brookside Drive serves as the neighborhood’s only entrance and exit, and the narrow road is flanked by wood fences and a mix of single and multi-story homes. “When I was in college I used to do (yard) work here and loved it,” said resident Dan Cornew, who graduated from Stanford in 1984. “And I never thought I’d be back.” Cornew, a management consultant, arrived in the neighborhood more than 13 years ago with his wife and four children. Portola Valley’s proximity to popular bike routes was another benefit for Cornew, who goes riding once a week with a cycling group.n —Bryce Druzin

Windmill Preschool, 4141 Alpine Road, Portola Valley; Ladera Community Church Preschool, 3300 Alpine Road, Portola Valley; Carillon Preschool at Christ Church, 815 Portola Road, Portola Valley; New Horizons (after school care), 200 Shawnee Pass, Portola Valley LOCATION: Brookside Drive and Portola Road PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Portola Valley School District — Ormondale School (K-3), 200 Shawnee Pass, Portola Valley; Corte Madera School (4-8), 4575 Alpine Road, Portola Valley

Sequoia Union High School District — Woodside High School, 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside PRIVATE SCHOOLS: Woodside Priory School, 302 Portola Road, Portola Valley MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$2,065,000 ($1,710,000-$4,900,000) HOMES SOLD: 9

Making The Difference For You...

Extensive Neighborhood Knowledge

Creative, Resourceful, Connected

Exceptional Service

Dedicated Advocate

Trusted Partner

Dan Ziony 650.201.1010 Dan.Ziony@CBNorCal.com CA DRE #01380339

www.DanZiony.com

Serving buyers and sellers in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, Woodside, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and other Peninsula communities for more than a decade Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 55

Central Portola Valley

CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS: Car-

W

illon Preschool at Christ Church, 815 Portola Road, Portola Valley; Windmill Preschool, 4141 Alpine Road, Portola Valley

hen Sue Crane moved to Portola Valley nearly 50 years ago she and her husband, Hew, were drawn to Alpine Hills by the open space and exquisite views, but she felt isolated. With three little boys, she was used to backyards, to walking with a stroller in her old neighborhood in Barron Park. “I was very lonesome,” she recalls. After the boys entered school, that changed, however. She became involved in her sons’ school activities, then went on to become mayor of Portola Valley, serving 12 years on the Town Council. Now she has come full circle. Her youngest son, Dan, and his two daughters are living in a separate unit in her home and she is learning about the fine local schools again. “Now I’m re-visiting Corte Madera School.” “This gives me a new prospective and a great pleasure,” says Ms. Crane about living in a multi-generational family. “And there are more people that I know who are doing the same thing.” Her granddaughters enjoy watching the deer and the sense of open space. She also feels it is a very safe environment for them.

When Karen and Karel Urbanek moved to Portola Valley a few years ago, it was primarily for a better school system. The older of their two daughters is attending kindergarten at Ormondale, right across the street from their home. Karel Urbanek is a cyclist and rides his bike to work at Stanford University. “He used to take long bike rides through Portola Valley and was taken with its beauty, trails, and open space,” says Ms. Urbanek. Another draw for the family was to be close to Irene Ruiz, Karel’s sister, who is also a Portola Valley resident. “Moving from Redwood City, I didn’t know the sense of community we would have here,” says Ms. Urbanek. “There is a smalltown feeling.” For family activities, she says, “I love the park at Town Center and we go to the little library. The children can also ride their bikes on the trails.” Are there any disadvantages to living in the valley? “It takes a little bit longer to get to shopping, but it’s worth it,” she says. — Jane Knoerle

Los Trancos / Vista Verde

P

eople live here precisely because it’s up in the woods a bit, away from the hustle and bustle of Silicon Valley — no sidewalks, no streetlights — and they like it that way. But their community is also tightly knit because they’ve worked to be prepared for emergencies and to help each other through. Their system was put to the test one recent year when a house caught fire. One of the people on the emergency preparedness committee “kicked in the system and calls went out,” said Linda Nightingale, who produces a bimonthly newsletter for the area’s neighborhood associations. Every house has a set of walkie-talkies, so word quickly went out and the house was salvaged but for water and smoke damage. Only the garage was destroyed. The residents of the house stayed with people in the neighborhood for a few days until they could secure longer-term housing while their house is repaired. Other neighbors pitched in to loan them clothes and feed them while they dealt with the fire’s

aftermath, said Rob Kalman, president of the Vista Verde neighborhood association. “People help each other out in a way that I haven’t experienced living in Silicon Valley,” Kalman said. The Vista Verde and Los Trancos Woods neighborhoods are adjacent and very similar, but have kept separate associations over the years, according to Kalman. Vista Verde is newer, he said. But you wouldn’t know by driving the streets where one begins and the other ends, he said. More and more, the associations are banding together for events and information sharing. Each year there are at least two parties: a “spring fling” and a summer picnic, Kalman said. Kalman also said that the Los Trancos Woods and Vista Verde neighborhoods occupy a special place. “We’re very appreciative that we live in a unique and beautiful area,” he said. “People often stay for decades and get to know each other.” — Kathy Schrenk

FACTS

LOCATION: south of Westridge Drive to Portola and Alpine Roads and west of Alpine Road PRIVATE SCHOOLS: Woodside Priory School, 302 Portola Road, Portola Valley PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Portola Valley School District — Ormondale School, 200 Shawnee Pass, Portola Valley; Corte Madera School, 4575 Alpine Road, Portola Valley

Sequoia Union High School District — Woodside High School, 199 Churchill, Woodside MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$3,400,000 ($1,375,000$13,000,0000) HOMES SOLD: 20

FACTS LOCATION: between Page Mill and Alpine roads and Los Trancos Road PUBLIC SCHOOLS: (Eligibility depends on the resident’s address)

Palo Alto Unified School District — Lucille M. Nixon School, 1711 Stanford Ave., Palo Alto; Jane Lathrop Stanford Middle School, 480 E. Meadow Drive, Palo Alto; Henry M. Gunn Senior High School, 780 Arastradero Road, Palo Alto Portola Valley School District — Ormondale School, 200 Shawnee Pass Road, Portola Valley; Corte Madera School, 4575 Alpine Road, Portola Valley Sequoia Union High School District — Woodside High School, 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$1,040,000 ($580,000-$1,350,000) HOMES SOLD: 5

56 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

A LAIN P INEL R EALTORS

apr.com

Specializing in the Marketing of Distinctive Properties and Estates

Gary Bulanti

Diane Chesler

Judy Citron

Susan Clay

Monica Corman

Marybeth Dorst

gbulanti@apr.com

dchesler@apr.com

jcitron@apr.com

sclay@apr.com

mcorman@apr.com

mdorst@apr.com

650.543.1186

650.888.7899

650.543.1206

650.743.6786

650.465.5971

650.245.8890

Willa Falk

Mary Gilles

Quetzal Grimm

Rachel DiNapoli Hardyck

Nancy Hobson

Heidi Johnson

wfalk@apr.com

mgilles@apr.com

quetzal@apr.com

rhardyck@apr.com

nhobson@apr.com

heidi@apr.com

650.207.1093

650.814.0858

650.400.7879

650.434.4315

650.464.3284

650.868.3714

Peter Kitch

Steve Korn

Joe & Mary Merkert

Edward Moritz

Mani Razizad

Wayne Rivas

pkitch@apr.com

skorn@apr.com

jmerkert@apr.com

emoritz@apr.com

mrazizad@apr.com

wrivas@apr.com

650.391.3444

650.208.5425

650.387.5464

650.798.7996

650.465.6000

650.740.5746

Diane Rothe

Deirdre Sauvage

Diana Shen

James Steele

Katy Thielke Straser

Kay Wang

drothe@apr.com

dsauvage@apr.com

dshen@apr.com

jsteele@apr.com

kthielke@apr.com

kwang@apr.com

650.787.9894

650.714.8303

650.575.9675

650.796.2523

650.543.1204

650.543.1161

Cynthia Wehbe

Doss Welsh

Agnes Williams

Jolaine & Jack Woodson

Mary Gebhardt

cwehbe@apr.com

dwelsh@apr.com

awilliams@apr.com

jwoodson@apr.com

VP-Manager

650.543.1184

650.543.1174

650.400.6729

650.740.9694

650.462.1111

MENLO PARK | 1550 El Camino Real, Suite 10 0 6 50.4 62.1111 WOODSIDE | 2930 Woodside Road 6 50.529.1111 Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 57

Ladera

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS:

“P

Ladera Community Church Preschool, 3300 Alpine Road, Portola Valley; Woodland School (also a private elementary school), 360 La Cuesta Drive, Portola Valley LOCATION:

West of Alpine Road and north of Westridge Drive to Lucero Way and La Cuesta Road PRIVATE SCHOOLS: James Tensuan

eople who live in Ladera value it for the sense of community and belonging,” says Judith Weber, a resident since 1994. “It’s like a small town in the Midwest where the people look out for each other.” Ms. Weber loves when the Ladera Community Association (LCA) publishes a directory listing local kids who will baby sit and pet sit. She also likes the fact that many of the neighborhood children who compete on the swim team, and go to summer or tennis camp at the centrally located Ladera Recreation Center later go on to become lifeguards and camp counselors there when they’re older. “It’s a wonderful facility,” she says, also giving credit to the Caryotakis family who raised money from neighbors to put in a large playground next to the pool and tennis courts for all to enjoy. Peter Caryotakis grew up in Ladera and is now raising his own family there. Former LCA President Rob Decker says he sees this happen a lot, where the kids return and maybe even buy their old family home. A resident since 1983, he says once you’ve lived in Ladera it’s hard to find anything that compares. “One thing that makes the neighborhood

special is that there are amenities to which you can walk,” he says. A “network of pathways separate from the roads” leading to local restaurants and shopping are among Ladera’s draws, he adds. The neighborhood started out in the 1940s as an experiment in cooperative living, where the goal was to set up “a diverse community of modest homes, not too far apart, with shopping and nature,” Mr. Decker says. The plan ran into money trouble and ended up in the hands of developers. He estimates less than half of the 535 homes date back to the originals, but most are still ranch-style and situated on anywhere from quarter- acre to two-acre lots in the oakstudded hills of unincorporated San Mateo County, surrounded by Stanford University and Portola Valley. Anna Plume, her husband and their four children have lived in Ladera for more

PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Las Lomitas School District — Las Lomitas School, 299 Alameda de las Pulgas, Atherton; La Entrada School, 2200 Sharon Road, Menlo Park Sequoia Union High School District — Menlo Atherton High School, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton SHOPPING:

Ladera Country Shopper MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$1,727,500 ($1,600,000$2,047,500) HOMES SOLD: 10

Michelle Le

58 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

Woodland School, 360 La Cuesta Drive, Portola Valley

than 13 years. She chose the neighborhood specifically because of the sense of community she felt there — even when just looking for a house. “As a stay-at-home mom, I felt I needed a place where we could connect with other families,” she says. The sense of camaraderie in her neighborhood is wonderful, she adds. Her third child spent time in the hospital when he was a four-week-old; the neighbors fed the family for almost a month. And her older children can play in the cul-de-sac away from their house, without much adult supervision. Ms. Plume says she knows it is safe and that neighbors watch out for them. It is “very much like a neighborhood of the ‘50s,” she says. The Plume’s children make use of the Ladera Recreation Center as members of the swim team in the summer and take tennis lessons at the center. Overall, she couldn’t be happier with the choice they made to live in Ladera, she says. — Kate Daly and Karen Canty

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 59

Portola Valley Ranch

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS:

I

Windmill Preschool, 4141 Alpine Road, Portola Valley; Ladera Community Church Preschool, 3300 Alpine Road, Portola Valley; Carillon Preschool at Christ Church, 815 Portola Road, Portola Valley; New Horizons (after school care), 200 Shawnee Pass, Portola Valley Michelle Le

f you’ve ever gone hiking in the hills of Portola Valley, you know exactly how isolated the area feels from the traffic of Sand Hill Road and I-280. Portola Valley Ranch, a planned community that emphasizes the importance of living in harmony with nature, allows residents to immerse themselves in the serenity of such an environment full-time. Even after 28 years, Nancy Thompson can find no fault with the way of life that Portola Valley Ranch offers residents. “We’re living in clean air, we’re communing with all the animals that were here before us ... and it’s just a little enclave of, I think, protection in the town of Portola Valley,” she said. When the first Portola Valley Ranch houses were built in 1975, strict rules were put in place to minimize the disruption of the natural environment. Developer Joe Whelan’s vision for Portola Valley Ranch was to “take 453 acres of open land, and to preserve over 75 percent of it in open space,” Thompson said. Houses were built on half-acre parcels of land, and “each individual house was sited so that it would take advantage of ... unique, special, and wonderful views.” Whelan ensured, she added, that the houses were designed to “blend into the natural environment.” Most Portola Valley Ranch houses are painted in shades of green, brown and gray and aren’t perched conspicuously on ridges or hilltops where they might disrupt the flow of the landscape. What’s more, the houses are clustered together, meaning the community requires few paved roads. Finally, Whelan

insisted that only native plants be cultivated around the houses — though other species of flowers could be grown in planter boxes or pots without a problem. Though Portola Valley Ranch boasts two swimming pools, three tennis courts, a community garden, a half acre of cabernet sauvignon grapes, miles of hiking trails and a community ranch house that serves as a “hub of social activity,” Thompson said most of all, she appreciates the people who make up the neighborhood community. “This concept, this way of life, draws people of like minds together. People generally have a love of the outdoors ... (and know that) people, volunteers, are the engine that keeps the community going.” Mike and Suzy Housman chose to move to Portola Valley Ranch a few years ago precisely because of the community spirit that Thompson described. “We moved here after our youngest went off to college,” Mike Housman said. “When you move to a new place, he continued, “you meet people usually through your children and their activities. Without that, it’s harder to meet people. ... The groups and committees and the ability to have an instant community ... that’s really what attracted us.”

LOCATION: south and east of Alpine Road and west of Los Trancos Road NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION:

Portola Valley Ranch Association, Pete Steiner, president PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Portola Valley School District — Ormondale School (K-3), 200 Shawnee Pass, Portola Valley; Corte Madera School (4-8), 4575 Alpine Road, Portola Valley

Sequoia Union High School District — Woodside High School, 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside SHOPPING: Nathhorst Triangle, Portola Road at Alpine Road; Village Square, 884 Portola Road; Ladera Shopping Center, 3130 Alpine Road, Portola Valley MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$2,250,000 ($1,800,000$2,425,000) HOMES SOLD: 7

Vivian Wong

60 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

FIRE STATION:

Woodside Fire Protection District, Portola Valley Station, 135 Portola Road, Portola Valley

Portola Valley Ranch’s monthly social gettogethers and varied volunteer committees provide easy ways to connect with people. The committees are made up of residents who run everything from the Ranch’s infrastructure, to its landscape, to its emergency-response procedures. Housman said that the one negative aspect of the Ranch is the small-town atmosphere: “Most people know everyone else (in the community) ... so people are more aware of your business and your activities.” But the intimacy of the community is also beneficial in many ways; everyone is so invested in the success of the community, he said. “People watch out for one another.” — Emma Marsano

JEAN & CHRIS ISAACSON Serving buyers and sellers in Portola Valley and surrounding communities for over 25 years.

Coldwell Banker International President’s Elite Team Call or visit our website: jeanandchris.com 2969 Woodside Rd. Woodside, CA

Jean Isaacson 650.387.8427 jean@jeanisaacson.com CalBRE #00542342

Chris Isaacson 650.352.3430 chris@chrisisaacson.com CalBRE #01754233

Portola Valley ∙ Woodside ∙ Atherton ∙ Menlo Park ∙ Los Altos Hills ∙ Palo Alto

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 61

Westridge

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS:

W

Windmill Preschool, 4141 Alpine Road, Portola Valley; Ladera Community Church Preschool, 3300 Alpine Road, Portola Valley; Carillon Preschool at Christ Church, 815 Portola Road, Portola Valley; New Horizons (after school care), 200 Shawnee Pass, Portola Valley FIRE STATION:

James Tensuan

hen Lorraine and Noble Hancock moved to the Westridge neighborhood in 1957, Mapache Drive stopped at their house on the third lot. The neighborhood retained its rural, small-town feel as development continued, with a sense of camaraderie that Mrs. Hancock says came from local mothers’ coffee dates and shared efforts to pick neighborhood children up from school. “In the first five years, there were many children of the same age, and it was a treat for our five children and for all of the mothers at home.” Developed back in the 1920s after serving as ranch land, Westridge is an oasis that feels far removed from the hustle and cramped conditions of Silicon Valley. Each lot in the rolling hills and oak-tree dotted neighborhood is a minimum of 2.5 acres, and bridle path easements on each property preserve the open-space feel. “Originally, the neighborhood catered strongly to horse owners, and so each lot has natural trails for horse rides. There aren’t as many horses anymore, but now the trails are being used by others,” Mrs. Hancock says.

Keeping the natural allure of Westridge alive is a priority for the residents’ association, which sponsors annual clean-up days and a picnic and barbeque as well as holding an annual meeting in the winter. “We cherish our open spaces, and I regret that some people have been digging out the natural landscaping and digging wells,” Mrs. Hancock says. Homebuilders must adhere to strict design guidelines enforced by the Westridge Architectural Supervising Committee, which aims at preserving the rural character of the neighborhood. Adaline Jessup, who was 26 when she moved to Westridge Drive with her pediatrician husband in 1951, has seen the community evolve since its early days. She has hosted around 60 students, mostly medical students, in the apartment off of her garage.

Woodside Fire Protection District, Portola Valley Station, 135 Portola Road, Portola Valley LOCATION:

Westridge Drive between Alpine and Portola roads NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION:

Westridge Architecture Supervising Committee PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Portola Valley School District — Ormondale School (K-3), 200 Shawnee Pass, Portola Valley; Corte Madera School (4-8), 4575 Alpine Road, Portola Valley Sequoia Union High School District — Woodside High School, 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside SHOPPING:

Nathhorst Triangle, Portola Road at Alpine Road; Village Square, 884 Portola Road; Ladera Shopping Center, 3130 Alpine Road, Portola Valley MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$3,400,000 ($2,755,000$5,230,000) HOMES SOLD: 7

Michelle Le

62 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

She and her husband chose Westridge for its openness and natural space, which she and her husband picnicked on before they decided to develop a lot. “We had two children when we moved in, and promptly got a dog. Then came the sheep, goats, and chicken, and even a boarded a horse.” While the neighborhood has since become more developed, grasslands have grown wooded, and the demographics have changed, Westridge is again attracting new families. “Kids kind of disappeared for awhile,” Mrs. Jessup says “Now there are many kids, and it makes me realize how much I missed hearing children’s voices.” — Sarah Trauben

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 63

Woodside Highlands

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS:

M

Windmill Preschool, 4141 Alpine Road, Portola Valley; Ladera Community Church Preschool, 3300 Alpine Road, Portola Valley; Carillon Preschool at Christ Church, 815 Portola Road, Portola Valley; New Horizons (after school care), 200 Shawnee Pass, Portola Valley FIRE STATION:

Woodside Fire Protection District, Portola Valley Station, 135 Portola Road, Portola Valley Vivian Wong

ore and more people have been relocating to the rural retreat of Woodside Highlands, drawn to the open feel and beautiful views. Beginning at Portola Road and stretching through the Hayfields pastures, the small community once acted as a summer getaway for San Franciscans in the 1920s. A notable feature of the area is the Larry Lane Trail, a hiking trail that winds through the oak trees to overlook the San Francisco Bay. “I just love the weather here, I love the environment,” says resident Paul Swietek, who values using the hiking trail. Mr. Swietek has lived in Woodside Highlands all his life, and hopes to one day buy his family home. The Woodside Highlands Improvement Association is an important asset to the neighborhood as it keeps the roads safe and brings neighbors together. According to Mr. Swietek many of the roads are safe, but some

LOCATION: Portola Road and Wayside Road to Santa Maria and Russell avenues NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION:

Woodside Highlands Improvement Association, president, Richard Crevelt, 650-851-4518

are too narrow, remembering a scary moment when he was run off the road. He participates in what he referred to as “Road Day,” the street-clearing event. The community bonds through the bi-annual road clean-ups that help keep Woodside Highlands drivers safe through each season. Neighbors gather to clear debris from the roads and trim overhanging branches to prevent accidents, says resident Ann Willard. “It’s a very nice neighborhood and most people are interested in keeping up their property,” Ms. Willard says. Ms. Willard, who has lived in Woodside

PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Portola Valley School District — Ormondale School (K-3), 200 Shawnee Pass, Portola Valley; Corte Madera School (4-8), 4575 Alpine Road, Portola Valley

Sequoia Union High School District — Woodside High School, 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside SHOPPING: Nathhorst Triangle, Portola Road at Alpine Road; Village Square, 884 Portola Road; Ladera Shopping Center, 3130 Alpine Road, Portola Valley MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$1,640,000 ($970,000-$2,025,000) HOMES SOLD: 4

Highlands for more than 18 years, finds other ways to stay connected with her neighbors. She and her husband host an annual Christmas party at their house. They also enjoy attending community barbecues each fall. “It’s kind of been a traditional thing, it’s been going on since before we were here,” she says. — Kelly Jones

Vivian Wong

64 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

We believe you deserve the right doctor. That’s why doctors at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation, part of Sutter Health, make you their No. 1 priority, whether it’s in person or online. It’s one more way we plus you. 1 (888) 398-5677 pamf.org/findadoctor

Palo Alto Medical Foundation

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 65

WOODSIDE

650.740.2970

edemma@cbnorcal.com erikademma.com

Top U.S. Realtor, The Wall Street Journal, 2013

66 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

U

Relocation Specialist

U

CalBRE# 01230766

WOODSIDE d.

W

sid

e

wn

M

li

d Roa ve.

i

Al

Atherton

Menlo Country Club

am

pe Se

rra

n

Ro

Fr

Road ad

Wo o

dsid

e

Wh

ee

wa

Hill

ad

e Roa d n H om tai

Ro

Portola

Wunderlich County Park

Rd

Sa

Road

un

si

d

s

Bear Gulch Reservoir

y

nd

Hill Road

Mountain Home Road Searsville Lake

.

Road

Family Farm/ Hidden Valley

yline

Po

rto

Ro

B ou

Portola Valley

vard

le

La Honda Creek Open Space Preserve

La

H onda

Westridge

ad

Skywood/ Skylonda

FACTS

lga

la

Sk

Pu

280

y

Mo

ts

de

Boulevar

l im i

d

Skyline

id e t ow n

o Wo

Wo o d s

as

i

sk e

■ Woodside Heights ■ Woodside Hills

el

Woodside Heights

ro

tai

ad

ni

K ings Mou n

Purisima Creek Redwoods Open Space Preserve

ed

Ju

■ Skywood/Skylonda ■ Woodside Glens

Dr

id e

e tt s A

ad

Woodside Glens

Huddart County Park

ds

Cañada College

Kings Mountain/ Skyline

h us

ods

to

sac

Wo

da

d oo

as

Ro

■ Mountain Home Road

Kings Mountain

ña

Bl v ts mi

Wo o

■ Kings Mountain

Ca

Hill

ve



Fa rm

Dr.

■ Family Farm/ Hidden Valley

Woodside Hills

Redwood City

ide

Emerald Hills

■ Emerald Hills

2013-14 TOWN OPERATING BUDGET:

$5.15 million POPULATION (200711): 5,263 HOUSEHOLDS (2011):

2,126 SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSING (2007-11):

95.1 percent MEDIAN HOME PRICE:

$1,995,000 MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2007-11):

$336,577

F

or more than 100 years, beginning in the 1830s, the area now called Woodside was gradually developed, first as sawmills that supplied redwood to build San Francisco, later as farms, small cattle ranches and vineyards. As early as 1852, a regular stagecoach service connected Woodside to San Francisco, and by the 1880s, prosperous San Franciscans began building country estates. Their ranks included coffee tycoon James Folger, lumber baron

C.F.A. Talbot, heirs to the H.M. Newhall land and cattle fortune, as well as millionaire spice magnate August Schilling. But it wasn’t until the post World War II building boom brought more than 500 new houses to the area that local residents decided to get together to protect the rural nature of their community. In 1956, the Town of Woodside was incorporated, bringing road maintenance, management, planning and zoning under local control.

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 67

Kings Mountain

A

lthough the homes of the redwoodstudded enclave of Kings Mountain are spread out, residents say the community is very tight-knit. “There’s a feeling of espirt de corps in the neighborhood,” says Carol Forster, a resident since 1966. The higher altitude on Kings Mountain can lead to more severe weather than in other parts of the region, but life in the wellappointed community among the redwoods attracts a wide range of residents. “We were cautioned about the weather patterns and do get more rain and wind than San Mateo does, but the atmosphere, views and greenery more than make up for it,” Mrs. Forster says. “Some people have simply wonderful views of the Peninsula and the ocean.” The neighborhood attracts hikers and Sierra Club enthusiasts who “are quite invested in nature,” she says. Nonetheless, residents don’t sacrifice community investment to live in the low-density community. Among community organizations are the Kings Mountain Association, a monthly newspaper called The Echo, and a resident-run volunteer fire brigade that protects Kings Mountain. A Yahoo group keeps the community connected, where residents can post neighborhood updates or ask for help with issues. Whether a tree has fallen, a resident has welcomed a new baby or a resident has put out the word about something up for sale, Kings Mountain residents keep informed, Mrs. Forster says. Sheena Mawson, former president of the Kings Mountain Association, also praises the

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS:

Kings Mountain Children’s Center at Kings Mountain School, 211 Swett Road, Woodside

Yahoo group. “Recently someone needed a ride to the airport and in less than 30 minutes they had a ride arranged, just by asking for help on the board,” she says. “I love knowing that if there were ever a crisis, the community would come together and get through it together.” According to Ms. Mawson, cell reception, Internet connections and reliable cable were sometimes difficult to find on the Mountain in the past, but service access has improved. Power outages can still be a problem, Mrs. Forster notes. What the area lacks in reliable cell reception residents make up for with community events, they said. The Mawsons say the Kings Mountain Association hosts five major events each year: a Halloween Party, a holiday party featuring Santa, spring brunch, an annual dinner, and a summer barbeque, which kicks off the Kings Mountain Art Fair. The Art Fair is hosted in Kings Mountain over the Labor Day weekend to benefit the Kings Mountain Volunteer Fire Brigade, the award-winning elementary school in Cabrillo School District and the Kings Mountain Association, Mrs. Forster says. The allvolunteer event features paintings, jewelry and ceramics from a variety of artists who are selected by an art fair jury. Between the natural beauty of the area and the array of community activities and cooperation, residents of Kings Mountain say they love where they live. “We’re all very proud of where we live,” Mrs. Forster says. — Kelly Jones

FIRE STATION:

CDF Skylonda Station, 17290 Skyline Blvd., Woodside; Kings Mountain Fire Brigade, 13889 Skyline Blvd., Woodside LOCATION:

Surrounding Skyline Boulevard and Kings Mountain Road around Purisima Creek Redwoods Open Space Preserve NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION:

Kings Mountain Association, Sheena Mawson, president, 650346-9993 PARK:

Huddart County Park, 1100 Kings Mountain Road, Woodside; Wunderlich County Park, 4040 Woodside Road, Woodside; Purisima Creek Redwoods Open Space Preserve, Skyline Boulevard, Half Moon Bay PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Cabrillo Unified School District — Kings Mtn. Elementary School, 211 Swett Road, Woodside; Cunha Intermediate School, Kelly Avenue and Church Street, Half Moon Bay; Half Moon Bay High School, Half Moon Bay Woodside Elementary School District — Woodside Elementary School, 3195 Woodside Road, Woodside Sequoia Union High School District — Woodside High School, 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside SHOPPING:

Crystal Springs Shopping Center, Half Moon Bay shopping district, Woodside MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$1,372,000 ($576,000-$10,000,000) HOMES SOLD: 13

Veronica Weber

68 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

Quetzal and Diane REAL ESTATE TEAM Providing in-depth local knowledge to savvy sellers & discerning buyers throughout the Mid-Peninsula

Woodside

La Honda

Woodside Please call for details regarding this retreat-style estate or other properties in our local market.

DIANE CHESLER

QUETZAL GRIMM

650.888.7899 dchesler@apr.com

650.400.7879 quetzal@apr.com

License #00675583

License #01405453

QuetzalandDiane.com a p r. c o m | W O O D S I D E 2 9 3 0 Wo o d s i d e R o a d Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 69

Skywood/Skylonda

N

estled in the Santa Cruz Mountains at the intersection of highways 35 (Skyline Boulevard) and 84 (Woodside Road), the communities of Skywood and Skylonda perch high above the rest of the Peninsula, with sweeping Bay and woodland views. With their neighborhoods bordering such outdoor treasures as the La Honda and Thornewood open space preserves and Wunderlich County Park, residents say Skywood and Skylonda can’t be beat for nature lovers looking to make their home in the secluded Coast Range while still enjoying (relatively) quick access to the bustling Silicon Valley world below. “We have fabulous views. More than half the homes here have an incredible view of the bay and the others have the woods,” says Kathleen Braunstein, a Skywood resident Skywood is a planned community (within Woodside borders, but kids go to Portola Valley schools) of around 80 homes, each of which has 1.5 to 3 acres of land, insuring a rural, peaceful home atmosphere. The homes are all custom built. Unincorporated Skylonda, across the highway, has fewer homes, including some log cabins, and is more of a “hodgepodge” of

rustic styles, she says. “There are a lot of unique styles, but each has to fit into the environment and be friendly to the layout of the properties and hillsides,” Ms. Braunstein says. Skywood home designs must be approved by the local design committee, she adds. Though it may seem remote from the rest of the world, there is a real sense of community among neighbors. An active homeowner’s association holds an annual picnic, barbecue or event of some kind and maintains a community website. Residents enjoy monthly get togethers, Ms. Braunstein says, and the community association hosts happy hours in Skylonda. The demographics have changed somewhat for the community since she moved to Skywood in 1978, “There’s greater variety. It’s much more a cross section of ages and interests,” she says. For the neighborhood’s many professionals, Skywood and Skylonda are havens from the pace of work in Silicon Valley, Ms. Braunstein says. “It’s a wonderful place to retreat from the bustle of their professional lives,” she says. — Karla Kane

Woodside Heights

W

oodside Heights is a quiet residential neighborhood sandwiched in the southwestern corner of Woodside Road and Alameda de las Pulgas, next to Woodside High School. “The neighborhood character combines a rural feel with maintained convenience to 280,” resident Regan Avery says. Some drivers cut through the neighborhood, which has no sidewalks, to bypass traffic congestion around the school. Nonetheless, stop signs discourage speeding on the popular loop on Eleanor and Northgate drives. “The big draw of the neighborhood is a onemile loop popular for strollers. Neighbors pass by each other and meet to chat,” Avery says. Regan and Brenda Avery have two children, now young adults. When they bought their ranch-style home on the cul-de-sac, Eugenia Lane, in 1993, Mrs. Avery says she felt like they were one of the few families with young children. “It was kind of an older neighborhood,” she says, but now their home is known as “party central” on Halloween for kids of all ages. She 70 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

estimates about 200 people come through their haunted house before dark, then go off in groups to trick-or-treat. “It’s a nice mix of families and retired people, and everyone in between,” Mr. Avery adds, noting a demographic shift. The Woodside Heights Neighborhood Association also helps coordinate the Halloween celebration and also organizes two potlucks each year at which neighbors connect with each other. “The committee is very active in promoting a neighborhood feeling,” Mr. Avery says. The Averys have noticed a fair amount of construction on the 1- to 3-acre lots in Woodside Heights. Several homes on Northgate have been rebuilt in recent years, replacing their 1950s predecessors. But the neighborhood features a wide range of architectural designs in keeping with Woodside conventions. “There’s a very nice range of styles, including some new homes that have built built recently but kept within the guidelines of the town.” — Kate Daly

FACTS FIRE STATION: 3111 Woodside Road, Woodside LOCATION: South of Wunderlich County Park between Highway 84 and La Honda Open Space Preserve PARK: Wunderlich County Park, 4040 Woodside Road, Woodside PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Portola Valley School District — Ormondale School, 200 Shawnee Pass Road, Portola Valley; Corte Madera School, 4575 Alpine Road, Portola Valley

Sequoia Union High School District — Woodside High School, 199 Churchill Avenue, Woodside MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$1,650,000 ($801,000-$2,175,000) HOMES SOLD: 8 MEDIAN 2013 CONDOMINIUM PRICE: $1,250,000 CONDOMINIUMS SOLD: 1

FACTS CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS:

Woodside Parents’ Nursery School, 3154 Woodside Road, Woodside; Woodside Preschool, 3195 Woodside Road, Woodside LOCATION: South of Woodside Road and Alameda de las Pulgas adjacent to Woodside High School to Stockbridge Avenue and Eleanor Drive PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Las Lomitas School District — Las Lomitas School, 299 Alameda de las Pulgas, Atherton; La Entrada School, 2200 Sharon Road, Redwood City School District — 750 Bradford Street, Redwood City; Sequoia Union High School District — Woodside High School, 199 Churchill Avenue, Woodside MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$2,850,000 ($1,915,000$5,605,000) HOMES SOLD: 5

Neighborhoods | The Almanac | 71

Woodside Glens

CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOLS

W

Woodside Parents’ Nursery School, 3154 Woodside Road, Woodside; Woodside Preschool, 3195 Woodside Road, Woodside

ith its redwood trees, creek, wildflower preserve and narrow, winding roads, the hilly Woodside Glens neighborhood feels like country, but is just minutes away from Woodside’s commercial center and Interstate 280. The Glens’ 80 acres were originally developed as vacation homes for San Franciscans seeking summer sunshine. A 1925 Woodside Glens ad in the San Francisco Chronicle mentions “cabin site lots for $250 and up.” Because of small lot sizes and steep slopes, many of the homes, erected in the 1920s and 1930s, were built on two or more adjoining lots. “Our house was built on five combined lots,” says caterer Doris Coonrad, a resident of the Glens for more than 40 years. She and her husband, who were house sitting in the Glens after returning from seven years living in West Africa, found a cabin for sale just across the street. They decided it would be the ideal place to teach their four teenagers how to build a house. “It kept them busy for three summers,” says Ms. Coonrad. “Even their friends joined in, it

was so much fun.” She loves living in the Glens. “It’s friendly. It’s safe — there’s not a lot of through traffic. It’s close to a good school and you can buy a home for less money than almost anywhere else in Woodside,” she says. Centered around Glenwood Avenue off Canada Road, the Glens seems to be attracting more young families, says Ms. Coonrad. In the 1990s Maria Quimby formed the “Glens Moms” as a “girls night out” for young mothers, often isolated at home. Now known as Glens Neighbors, the group organizes family events: a back-to-school party, pizza supper and Halloween party, summer picnics, and Christmas caroling. Susan Doherty, who has taken over the reins for the Neighbors, has lived in the Glens for more than 13 years. She joined the group when her 9-year-old twins were born. “This is one of the best neighborhoods for children. The kids can ride their bikes all over. They never want to move. They want to stay here with their friends,” she says. —Kathy Schrenk

Woodside Hills

G

rant Huberty grew up in Woodside Hills in a simpler time — when Interstate 280 didn’t run through Woodside, when there were no fences between homes and views went forever because the only trees in the neighborhood were native oaks, and when there were fruit orchards on Woodside Road. Things have changed, but a few years ago, when Mr. Huberty had a chance to move back into Woodside Hills after 25 years of living elsewhere, he took it. He and his wife, Carol Welsh, are now living in the house Mr. Huberty grew up in. “My wife and I remodelled it to make it ours,” he says. “I’ve always liked Woodside. It’s got a desire to stay rural,” Mr. Huberty says. In fact, he says, the town may even be “a little less polished than some people like” since it still has no sidewalks and no street lights. Another advantage of the neighborhood of about 250 homes is that the lots are large. “We

FACTS

LOCATION: Hwy. 280 and Canada Road and Glenwood Avenue to Alto Road PARKS: Huddart County Park, 1100 Kings Mountain Road, Woodside; Wunderlich County Park, 4040 Woodside Road, Woodside PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Woodside Elementary School District — Woodside Elementary School, 3195 Woodside Road, Woodside;

Sequoia Union High School District — Woodside High School, 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$1,450,000 ($1,010,000$3,450,000) HOMES SOLD: 9

FACTS CHILDCARE & PRESCHOOLS:

enjoy the space,” Mr. Huberty says. While he has plenty of neighbors, they are far enough apart to give each home a sense of privacy. Perry Vartanian has lived in the Hills since 1961 and has seen it grow around him. The area was developed by David Bohannon who bought over 300 acres and developed it in phases beginning in the 1930s. “When I moved in here it was a bare acre,” Mr. Vartanian says of his lot. He designed and built the home where he and his wife raised five children. Now there are oak trees everywhere, and many wild animals. “We’ve got deer, we’ve got coyotes,” he says. The neighborhood must have suited Mr. Bohannon, who lived there until his death. It’s not unusual for more than one generation to live in the Hills, Mr. Vartanian says, and he knows of at least one family where a home now has a third generation making it their own. — Barbara Wood

Woodside Parents’ Nursery School, 3154 Woodside Road, Woodside; Woodside Preschool, 3195 Woodside Road, Woodside LOCATION: north of Woodside Road and Interstate 280 between Canada College and Menlo Country Club to Las Pulgas Road NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION:

http://www.woodsidehills.org PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Redwood City School District — Henry Ford School, 2498 Massachusetts, Redwood City; Kennedy Middle School, 2521 Goodwin Ave., Redwood City; plus magnet schools

Sequoia Union High School District — Woodside High School, 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside MEDIAN 2013 HOME PRICE:

$2,500,000 ($1,550,000$8,400,000) HOMES SOLD: 15 72 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

MARGOT LOCKWOOD 650.529.2410 Office 650.400.2528 Cell h o m e s @ m a r go t l o c k wo o d . co m

2 BRIDLE LANE, WOODSIDE OFFERED AT $4,850,000

320 JANE DR, WOODSIDE PRICE UPON REQUEST

This stunning contemporary is located on 3.7 level acres in central Woodside. Spacious 4bd/3.5ba w/ 2 offices, formal LR/DR, FR/kitchen. This level acreage has a pool, garden, fruit trees, and ideal for pasture, barn or guesthouse.

Private estate 5BD/4.5BA home. Light and open floor plan with vaulted ceilings spanning 3 levels. 6+ acres with views of the western hills. The property is located on 6.2 acres within a gated community.

12465 LA HONDA RD, WOODSIDE OFFERED AT $1,095,000

17600 SKYLINE BLVD, WOODSIDE OFFERED AT $299,000

Lovely country 3 bed/2 bath home on 2.35 acres. Kitchen/ dining area with high ceilings, large living room w/fireplace. Sunny location also has 2 car garage, orchard, and corral.

Woodside lot on 4.8 acres located 15 minutes from hwy 280. The is not for the average buyer! Septic will be a challenge to get in. Great buy for those with patience.

THANKS FOR ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL YEAR

WOODSIDE

WOODSIDE

WOODSIDE

SAN CARLOS

HALF MOON BAY

HALF MOON BAY

HALF MOON BAY

FOSTER CITY

SAN MATEO

EAST PALO ALTO

SANTA CLARA

SANTA CLARA

SANTA CLARA

CAPITOLA

FAWNSKIN

For more information or Virtual Tour visit www.margotlockwood.com

Menlo Park Atherton Palo Alto Los Altos Woodside Portola Valley

Start with a

dream make it your home Specializing in helping individuals buy & sell homes on the Peninsula

San Mateo San Carlos

SUE CRAWFORD

San Carlos

Woodside

Atherton

Menlo Park

San Mateo

Woodside

San Mateo

Palo Alto

(650) 566-5341 scrawford@cbnorcal.com www.suecrawford.com

1377 El Camino Real Menlo Park, CA 94025

74 | The Almanac | Neighborhoods

Stanford Express Care Express Care When You Need It Stanford Express Care clinic is an extension of Primary Care services at Stanford, offering same or next day appointments for minor illness or injuries that require timely treatment. Our dedicated team of Primary Care physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants treat all ages and most minor illnesses and injuries, including:

EL

Upper respiratory infections

6

Bladder infections

6

Cuts

6

Sore throats

6

Dog bites

6

Gastrointestinal problems

6

Sprained ankles

6

Joint pain

6 CA

MI

NO

RE

AL

DOWNTOWN PALO ALTO

PALO ALTO TRAIN STATION & TRANSIT CENTER

ST

RS

MA

RD

HOOVER PAVILION

M Sh arg ut ue tle ri St te op

Construction area

PALM D

R

QU

AL

IVE

O

UN

PA L

AR

RY R

D

IT Y

AV E

STANFORD SHOPPING CENTER

Stanford Hoover Pavilion 211 Quarry Road 6 Palo Alto, CA 94304 stanfordhospital.org

Express Care is open Monday–Friday, 10:00am–7:00pm to the general public and is located at the newly renovated Hoover Pavilion. For more information, please call 650.736.5211 or visit us online at stanfordhospital.org/expresscare

#1 Agent, Menlo Park – El Camino Office, 2012 Ranked #85 Nationally by The Wall Street Journal, 2013 Over $1.5 Billion in Sales WWW.HUGHCORNISH.COM

650.566.5353 hcornish@cbnorcal.com CalBRE# 00912143

Providing A Network of Reputable Home-Improvement Professionals


Our Neighborhoods 2013