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ECO-REPS MANUAL

sustainNU Office of Sustainability

Welcome to Eco-Reps Eco-Reps are students who mentor and help raise awareness about ecological issues and encourage environmentally responsible behavior among their peers. By informing their peers and leading activities within Residential Colleges, Residence Halls, Greek Houses, and even Off-Campus living; Eco-Reps enhance Northwestern’s efforts as a leader in sustainability. Eco-Reps operate on the philosophy that we can reduce our impact on the environment by making simple changes to our lifestyles. As an Eco-Rep, you will be able to take on a leadership role by participating in Eco-Reps Executive Board, Residence Hall or Residential College Government, or on your Greek Executive Board. Eco-Reps educate fellow residents about environmental issues, such as waste reduction and energy conservation, as well as help plan and promote sustainability-related events. An Eco-Rep’s dedication and enthusiasm for sustainability will motivate the students around them to start making more responsible decisions and ultimately lead to long-term behavior changes!

Eco-Reps Mission:

The Eco-Reps aim to educate the Northwestern community through events, activities, and campaigns that help create a culture of sustainability at Northwestern.

Eco-Reps Structure: There are three types of Eco-Reps:

On-Campus Hall/College Eco-Reps: Students living in the Residence halls or colleges apply for the Eco-Reps position through their hall or college government. There can be more than one Eco-Rep per college or hall, even if they are not “officially” recognized by their government. The only difference between hall and college Eco-Reps is elections. Colleges hold elections in the spring, while halls hold elections in fall.

Greek House Eco-Reps: Elected through their Greek house. Serves as the Green Cup contact. There can be more than one Eco-Rep per Greek house, even if they are not “officially” recognized.

Off-Campus Eco-Reps: Apply to be a part of the program via the Off-Campus Eco-Reps Chairs.

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Eco-Reps Letter of Support Congratulations on becoming a Northwestern University Eco-Rep! By choosing to become an Eco-Rep, you have demonstrated an exceptional sense of dedication to and passion for improving the world around you. We are excited to see how you will develop the program to encourage students to make more responsible decisions in their everyday lives on campus. We hope you view the Eco-Rep position not only as an opportunity to be an integral part of Northwestern’s sustainability goals, but also an opportunity to develop yourself as a program organizer, marketing coordinator, and leader in the community. You have the unique role of teaching peers how they can become responsible citizens. The knowledge and training you will impart to your fellow on-campus students will leave a lasting positive impression which will lay the foundation for lifelong behavior changes. We look forward to working with you over the coming months as you help make Northwestern cleaner, greener, and healthier for us all! Sincerely, Burgwell Howard Assistant Vice President for Student Engagement Division of Student Affairs Julie Payne-Kirchmeier Assistant Vice President for Auxiliary Services Division of Student Affairs Paul Riel Executive Director of Residential Services University Residential Services

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Eco-Reps Manual

Table of Contents WELCOME TO ECO-REPS            

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Eco-Reps Letter of Support             Commitment and Expectations              Eco-Reps Executive Board                

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RESOURCES FOR NU ECO-REPS           

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Tools            Events                  Programming Ideas                  Being an Effective Eco-Rep              Key Contacts                    

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SUSTAINABILITY AT NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY        

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Energy at NU                Food at NU                    Water at NU                     Waste at NU                    Transportation at NU                 Consumerism at NU                 

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GLOSSARY                   

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Commitment and Expectations All Eco-Reps: ---------

ttend weekly Eco-Reps meetings* A Encourage participation in the sustainNU Green Pledge* Facilitate student completion of sustainNU Green Room Certification* Assist in the planning and execution of Eco-Reps events Promote the sustainability-related events on and off-campus Be available for student inquiries via email and in person Send out emails to update peers about sustainability initiatives at NU and beyond Collaborate with other sustainability-related student groups, fellow students, and departments to integrate sustainability initiatives into existing events

On-Campus Residence Hall/College Eco-Reps: -----

Put on introductory presentation at a“Munchies” or “Fireside” meeting* Put on “Munchies” or “Firesides” throughout the year* Attend Residence Hall and Residential College Government meetings Work with other Hall Council/Executive members and RA’s to make activities more eco-friendly

Greek Eco-Reps: -----

Put on introductory presentation at a chapter meeting* Make Eco-Reps announcements throughout the year to chapter* Attend Greek Executive Board meetings Work with your chapter and other chapters to integrate sustainability initiatives into existing Greek events

Off-Campus Eco-Reps: -- Identify opportunities within off-campus living that reduce waste and conserve energy and water -- Collaborate with the NU Off-Campus Advisory Board, ASG Sustainability Committee, the city of Evanston Office of Sustainability, and Evanston environmental groups -- Serve as a resource for recycling and composting in Evanston, Off-Campus Green Cup, and Off-Campus Move-Out -- Share the Green Apartment Checklist and create other helpful materials * These expectations will be tracked as points weekly and the Eco-Reps with the most points will receive a Chipotle Card worth one burrito each month. At the end of the academic year, the Eco-Rep with the most points total will receive a larger Chipotle gift card.

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Eco-Reps Manual

Eco-Reps Executive Board President: Creates the Eco-Reps vision and plan for the year, runs the general and the executive board meetings, ensures all chairs and executive board members are fulfilling their responsibilities, contact person for the Office of Sustainability and other organizations on campus, and holds office hours for Eco-Reps if necessary. Brenna Ledvora: brennaledvora2015@u.northwestern.edu Mike Ziebel: MichaelZiebel2015@u.northwestern.edu

Residence Hall/College Chair: Creates a plan to further college/hall commitment to sustainability, responds to individual college/hall needs, holds all college/hall Eco-Reps responsible, ensures residential living is involved in Eco-Reps and environmental activities, and contact person for Residence Hall Association (RHA) and Residential College Board (RCB). Bob Sherman: RobertSherman2017@u.northwestern.edu

Greek Chair: Creates a plan to further Greek commitment to sustainability, responds to individual sorority and fraternity needs, holds all Greek Eco-Reps accountable, ensures the Greek community is involved in Eco-Reps and environmental activities, and contact for Interfraternity Council (IFC) and Panhellenic Association (PHA). Hannah Brady: HannahBrady2017@u.northwestern.edu

Off-Campus Chair: Runs the off-campus meetings, creates centralized information on how to be sustainable off-campus, works to get off-campus students involved in environmental activities and groups, and plans to further develop the off-campus Eco-Rep position. Danielle Faden: DanielleFaden2015@u.northwestern. edu Emily Northard: EmilyNorthard2016@u.northwestern. edu

Treasurer: Applies for funding, works with the university to set up the Eco-Reps chartstring, and organizes all fundraising initiatives. James Graham: JamesGraham2016@u.northwestern. edu

PR Chair: Creates flyers, posters, and all advertising materials, organizes advertising campaigns, maintains the Facebook page and all Facebook activity, and creates recruitment marketing strategy. Orko Manna: OrkoManna2016@u.northwestern.edu Shelbie Bostedt: ShelbieBostedt2016@u.northwestern.edu

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Resources for NU Eco-Reps

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Eco-Reps Manual

Tools Green Room Certification: Green Room Certification provides students with the opportunity to fill out a checklist online to assess how “green”they are living. Students are recognized for taking the certification by receiving a certificate for their door from their Eco-Rep. There are three levels of certification, which are distinguished by receiving one to three “wind-powered” leaves.

Green Pledge: The Green Pledge is an agreement to make small, simple choices in your daily life to help make our campus more sustainable.

Green Living Guide: The Green Living Guide shares what NU is doing to become a leader in sustainability and provides tips and tools for the NU community to reduce waste, conserve energy, save water, travel sustainably, eat locally, and purchase consciously.

Green Apartment Checklist: The Green Apartment Checklist provides a couple environmentally-focused questions to ask your landlord before choosing your next apartment or house.

Office of Sustainability Calendar: The sustainNU calendar features sustainability-related events on campus.

Recycling at NU: Learn what you can recycle at NU, including ink cartridges, light bulbs, plastic bags, and electronic waste (ex. computers, wires, cell phones). Eco-Reps are in charge of collecting students plastic bags to take them to the bottom floor of Norris and ink cartridges to take to the on-campus mail rooms. From Norris, the ASG Sustainability Committee takes the plastic bags to Whole Foods for recycling. Eco-Reps mail the ink cartridges to be recycled. Eco-Reps also collect batteries and electronic waste once during the academic year. More information regarding recycling off-campus. More information regarding recycling in Greek houses.

Maintenance Requests: Broken lightbulb, leaky faucet, or lost keys? If in a residence hall/college: School Dude If on-campus: Facilities Management If off-campus: Contact your landlord

Bike-Powered Smoothie Maker: All you need is fruit, ice, reusable cups, and some helpers to pedal!

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Events EPA Game Day Challenge: Since 2010, we’ve competed in the EPA Game Day Challenge – a national competition among colleges and universities to promote waste reduction at football games. Future Eco-Reps tend to volunteer in early Fall to make EPA Game Day a success.

Green Cup: Green Cup is a month-long competition which challenges NU students to reduce energy and water use. GC is a student driven initiative with SEED leading the effort and Eco-Reps planning events and providing updates throughout the month. The goal of Green Cup is to engage students in behavior change and give them a better understanding of the impact of daily activities. Scoring is based on a per person percent reduction.

Off-Campus Green Cup: Off-campus students can sign up to participate in Green Cup. There are a limit of seven people per team. Teams can earn points by posting pictures to the NU Green Cup Facebook page about being green off-campus, taking the Green Pledge, taking Green Room Certification, and by attending and signing in at Green Cup events. Points are divided by the number of people on a team.

Scavenger Hunt: Eco-Reps put on a scavenger hunt, highlighting solar panels, LEED buildings, water refilling stations, on-campus gardens, bike repair stations, and other green initiatives on campus and throughout Evanston.

Earth Hour: Earth Hour is an annual global initiative to raise awareness about climate change and to demonstrate that in working together, we can make a difference. For one Saturday in March (usually over spring break), individuals, businesses, landmarks, and organizations are asked to voluntarily turn off their lights and other unneeded electronic items to reduce energy consumption. Traditionally, Eco-Reps host an Earth Hour celebration when students return to campus, asking them to turn off all their lights and electronics and meet in a central location for food and fun.

“Take it or Leave It” Move-Out Program: NU Recycling conducts an annual clothing and food drive in all residence halls. Boxes for the “Take it or Leave it” program are placed in the lobby/entry of each location - one for clothing/linens and one for nonperishable food. The collection runs through finals week. Items collected are donated to local charities and Campus Kitchens. Up to 10,000 pounds are collected annually. For sustainability events throughout the year, organized by other student groups and departments, be sure to check out the sustainNU calendar. Eco-Reps usually organize and plan “outings” to get students to these events and programs. 10

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Programming Ideas Although Eco-Reps put on a lot of events as a group, don’t hesitate to put on events on your own or team up with other Eco-Reps. -- Talk to students about eco-related issues (such as energy, waste, water, etc) at Munchies/ Firesides and chapter events. -- In Residence halls/colleges: Ask your RA if you can host a Munchies/Fireside. -- Greek houses: Ask your president if you can make an announcement at a chapter meeting. -- Some Eco-Reps have gotten permission to require that students that bring reusable plates and utensils to munchies/firesides or chapter events get to be first in line for food. -- Get students together and participate in Meatless Monday. -- Bike or walk to the Evanston Farmers Market. -- Volunteer with Wild Roots or Plant-it Purple. -- Take the train to Chicago, rent Divvy bikes, and explore the city. Don’t forget a helmet! -- Host a local green restaurant tour, taking students to local restaurants to try samples of their specialties. -- Host a clothes and accessories swap, asking students to bring items they no longer need or want to “swap” with other students. -- Rent a Zipcar vehicle for a group outing to the Botanic Gardens or local nature preserves. -- Take public transportation to Chicago museums such as the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum or outdoor concerts/festivals.

Advertising Tips for Events -- Chalk the event around campus- this is a fun activity and grabs people’s attention when walking to class! -- Make announcements in class -- Write on classroom chalkboards -- Facebook/Tweet the event to sustainNU, ISEN, and student groups -- Send a reminder e-mail to the environmental listservs ( ex. SWAG) -- Go door-to-door -- Hang and distribute posters/flyers (if you must print, make it double-sided in black and white to save the most energy and ink!) -- Use bulletin boards to post about upcoming events

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Being an effective Eco-Rep (adapted from Penn State Eco-Reps Handbook)

Being an Eco-Rep is about creating a culture of sustainability among students. Provided below are a few tips to effectively engage and inform peers: Network- Working with other people and groups on campus is a great way to make your event more visible. You can increase attendance, make connections with outside groups, and receive more support. Be Resourceful-Try to reuse materials and host a zero waste event. Ask others how they effectively advertise and host successful events. Repetition is necessary- Habits are formed from repeating actions, thus messages on environmentally responsible behaviors have to be given repeatedly for them to be remembered. Innovate- What is going on in your living space that you can turn into an opportunity to showcase sustainable education or behavior? Be Unique- How can you make events more appealing? Perhaps by inviting Willie or think big and develop a visual- a light bulb bike to show peers how much energy it takes to power different types of light bulbs! Find balance- Don’t lecture, but engage your peers in healthy discussion and conversation, encouraging positive behaviors without being overbearing or annoying. Be sensible- Appeal to sensibilities and find connections between the environment and ecological behavior to relevant issues. This is an opportunity to open up to constructive conversations. Be a people person- Eco-Reps benefit from knowing neighbors and friends. People respond positively to those they have a relationship with, so get out there and say hello! Positivity is key- Focusing on the positive is always the best idea. Let your peers know what they can do, not what they are not doing. Remember to use humor and be friendly! Learn a lot- Be knowledgeable about what’s going on around you. Learn about and share where energy comes from and where trash, recycled items, and compost are to be deposited. Observe- Be a people watcher. Watch how actions are carried out compared to how they could be done in a “green” way. Identify roadblocks- Figure out what could be a barrier for peers to participate in eco-friendly behaviors: lack of knowledge (easiest to address), lack of opportunity to do the right thing (i.e. cannot control heating/cooling in dorms), lack of interest, lack of time, lack of money, lack of self-motivation and come up with creative solutions.

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Eco-Reps Manual

Key Contacts Office of Sustainability Allison Potteiger- Sustainability Communications Coordinator & Eco-Reps Advisor Phone: 847-467-4286 Email: allison.potteiger@northwestern.edu Useful for: tips on programming, marketing, and event-planning Northwestern Recycling Julie Cahillane- Manager of Recycling & Sustainability Projects Phone: 847-467-1374 Email: recycling@northwestern.edu Useful for: recycling at events, e-waste, and Move-Out questions Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern (ISEN) Jeff Henderson- Assistant Director of Marketing and Communications Phone: 847-467-1972 Email: jeffhenderson@northwestern.edu Useful for: curriculum and research questions University Residential Services Phone: 847-467-4663 Email: housing@northwestern.edu Useful for: event planning and community organizing Off-Campus Housing Tony Kirchmeier- Director of Off-Campus Life Phone: 847-491-8430 Email: offcampuslife@northwestern.edu Useful for: working with the off-campus student advisory board Residential Hall Association E-mail: andrewniederschulte2016@u.northwestern.edu Useful for: funding opportunities, planning events in residential halls Residential College Board E-mail: rcb@u.northwestern.edu Useful for: funding opportunities and planning events in residential colleges Transportation & Parking Services Shuttle Service Updates: 847-467-5284 University Parking Office: 847-491-3849 Email: uservices@northwestern.edu Useful for: learning about transportation alternatives other than driving Northwestern Dining/Sodexo Phone: 847- 491-2020 Email: food@northwestern.edu

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Key Contacts Useful for: providing food at events and learning more about dining at NU Facilities Management Customer Service Phone: 847-491-5201 Email: facilities-management@northwestern.edu Useful for: questions about buildings and operations Fraternity and Sorority Life Phone: 847-491-4522 E-mail: ofsl@northwestern.edu Useful for: collaborating with Greek Life and funding Moving In Moving Out (MIMO) Phone: 847-987-1478 E-mail: hello@movingmimo.com Useful for: donating or purchasing items for on or off-campus living Citizens for a Greener Evanston E-mail: info@greenerevanston.org Useful for: learning about Evanston’s climate action campaign Evanston Environmental Association Phone: 847-448-8256 E-mail: info@evanstonenvironment.org Useful for: learning about the Evanston Green Ball, Green Living Festival, and Wild and Scenic Film Festival City of Evanston Office of Sustainability Catherine Hurley- Sustainable Programs Coordinator Phone: 847-448-8069 E-mail: sustainability@cityofevanston.org Useful for: Learning about the city of Evanston’s sustainability initiatives

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There are several environmental student groups on campus, be sure to check out the full list on the sustainNU website. These groups plan several sustainability events throughout the year, from career fairs, to speakers, to waste-reduction competitions. Engineers for a Sustainable World (ESW) Students for Ecological and Environmental Development (SEED) Associated Student Government (ASG) Sustainability Committee Group Residence for Environmental Engagement at NU (GREEN) House NU Sustainable Food Talks NU Energy and Sustainability Consortium (NESC) Wild Roots Garden NU University Science Policy and Action Network (NUPAN) NU Energy Technology Group (NETG) Eco-Reps Manual

Sustainability at Northwestern University

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Energy at NU

Northwestern University consumes almost 250 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity annually. That’s about $23 million dollars’ worth and results in over 300,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the greenhouse gas emissions from more than 60,000 passenger vehicles each year. To reduce this usage, we are building smarter, more efficient buildings- our last six major projects have been LEED certified. The university has also initiated several energy reduction efforts, such as the transition to more efficient lighting options, the purchase of Energy Star equipment, maintaining summer, winter, and after hours temperature set points, and renovating HVAC systems. Northwestern is committed to leadership in the use of alternative energy, demonstrated on the Ford Motor Company Engineering Design Center’s solar panels. NU also offsets 38 percent (96 million kilowatt hours (kWh)) of its total use through the purchase of Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs). This commitment has placed NU in the EPA’s Green Power Leadership Club. Northwestern is a top purchaser in the Big Ten, contributing to the conference being recognized by EPA as Collective Conference Champions for using green power.

Northwestern students constructing the Tiny House.

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Eco-Reps Manual

NU’s ESW looking into the feasibility of small wind turbines on Evanston campus.

Energy Reduction Tips -- Beware of vampires Turn off lights, chargers, and all other electronics when not in use. Many electronic devices use significant electricity when turned off or in ‘stand-by mode,’ this is also known as “vampire energy.” -- Be a Power Saver Update your laptop’s power management settings to reduce energy consumption and prolong battery life. -- Shine brighter Use CFL or LED bulbs, a LED uses at least 75 percent less energy than incandescent lighting. -- Use the sun Utilize natural sunlight whenever possible and turn off the lights when you leave the room. -- Exercise Take the stairs instead of the elevator. -- Keep it tight Keep windows closed in winter when the heat is on and report drafts and leaks to School Dude, FM, or your landlord. -- Sharing is caring Share appliances with roommates or neighbors like refrigerators, TVs, and printers. -- Keep cold Washing clothes in cold water conserves energy and detergents are just as effective in cold water. -- Use a strip Turn off electronic devices when not in use and keep them plugged into a power strip or smart strip to reduce vampire energy draw. -- Focus on your tasks Use task lighting (ex. desk lamps) instead of overhead lights to illuminate the area you need and not the whole room.

Energy Consumption Facts -- Plasma TVs can suck up over 1,400 kilowatt hours of energy annually, which can cost over $150. -- Video game consoles waste around 230 kilowatt hours per year, which costs about $25. For more facts visit: dosomething.org

EPA: Energy Climate Impacts

Energy Use Monitors and Energy Saving Surge Switches (Smart Power Strips) are an easy way to reduce your energy usage especially in on-campus rooms. Both of the Belkin products shown here can be purchased on Amazon and may also be provided to Eco-Reps from the Office of Sustainability to showcase for the year.

-- How low can you go Set refrigerators and freezers to a slightly lower (warmer) setting.

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Food at NU

Northwestern’s food service partners have committed to sustainability and reducing their environmental impact. NU offers local and organic foods as well as vegetarian and vegan options in the dining halls and through catering. NU Dining is reducing waste by composting all food waste from the kitchen to the trayline. Composting at NU: Composting began spring 2011 in every dining hall and Norris. Composting provides a more environmentally friendly use for our food waste that can’t be donated. Food preparation scraps and plate leftovers, as well as paper waste, such as napkins and paper cups can be composted. Compostable items are collected and delivered to a local composting facility. The compost is then used in landscape and farming operations, where it is added to the soil, reducing the need for fertilizers.

Recycling & Waste Reduction in the Dining Halls: Unused portions of food are donated to Campus Kitchens, which delivers them to anti-hunger programs in the Evanston area. Used cooking oil from the dining halls and retail locations is utilized for biodiesel fuel via the Loyola University Biodiesel Lab and used in Free Enterprise Shuttles. Willie’s Food Court has eliminated the foam eat-in plate and soup bowls and replaced them with more sustainable paper boats, potato-ware plates, and eco-friendly soup bowls that are made from recycled paper with a cornstarch-based lining.

Water Conservation in the Dining Halls: Tray-free dining and the Ecolab Apex dishwashing system greatly reduce our water usage.

Sustainable Foods in the Dining Halls: NU Dining doesn’t use any endangered fish or seafood. Great efforts are being taken to increase procurement of food that is grown and processed locally. NU made Daily Meal’s list of 75 Best Colleges for Food in America in 2014.

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Sustainable Food Tips -- Right-size me Only take what you will eat. -- Go meatless Raising and transporting animals results in significant greenhouse gas emissions and environmental impact, try going meatless at least once a week. -- Go to the source Meet your local farmers at Evanston’s year round Farmers Markets. -- Eat green The Green Restaurant Association developed a rating system and the Green Chicago Restaurant Coalition complied a list of the green-certified Chicago restaurants. -- Shop green Buy local to reduce the miles your food has to travel and to support your local community. Buy organic to ensure your foods are pesticide free. -- Volunteer at a local farm or garden Support a nearby food provider by volunteering. Get to know farmers at the Evanston Farmers market or garden in one of NU’s three on-campus vegetable gardens, PlantIt Purple (graduate garden within Tech), Brady Scholars hoop house, and Wild Roots.

Sustainable Food Facts -- A typical carrot travels 1,838 miles to reach your dinner table. -- Farmer’s markets allow farmers to keep 80 to 90 cents of each dollar spent by the consumer. In grocery stores, farmers only see 16 cents of every dollar their goods bring in. In restaurants, it’s only 5 cents. -- About 88 percent of corn and 94 percent of soybeans were genetically modified in 2011. This number was less than 20 percent in 1996. For more facts visit: SciDev.net dosomething.org farmaid.org

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Water at NU

Northwestern University uses 423 million gallons of water annually. Sitting on Lake Michigan we are fortunate to avoid issues of water scarcity that are a major problem elsewhere in the world and even our country, but we need to be aware that potable water is a limited and critical resource. NU is working to create infrastructure that reduces water usage by at least 25 percent. Many residences halls and campus buildings have had faucets, showerheads, and toilets replaced with low-flow options. However these measures only get us so far in efforts to reduce and campus engagement is critical to maximize reductions in water use. Thinking about your individual water use habits can help you recognize opportunities to conserve. As an Eco-Rep, you can encourage students to follow by your example taking shorter showers, doing full loads of laundry, turning off faucets while brushing teeth and reporting leaks to School Dude, FM, or your landlord.

U.S. Residential Water Usage Breakdown Toilets: 27 percent Washing Machines: 22 percent Toilets:  27%   Washing  Machines:  22%   Bathing:  19%   Faucets:  16%   Leaks:  14%   Other:  2%  

Bathing: 19 percent Faucets: 16 percent Leaks: 14 percent Other: 2 percent

One of the most common ways we use water is by drinking it. The Bottled versus Tap Water debate has raged long and hard and as an Eco-Rep, it is your job to educate people about the pros and cons of this question. Here are some links that will help settle the bottle versus tap water debate: NRDC Story of Stuff National Geographic

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Eco-Reps Manual

Water Reduction Tips -- Take shorter showers For every minute in the shower, 3-7 gallons of water are used. By going from a 10 minute shower to a 5 minute one, you’ll conserve as much as 35 gallons of fresh water. -- Turn it off You can save up to 8 gallons of water each day by turning off the tap while you brush your teeth and shave. -- Do full loads You use 25-40 gallons of water per load of laundry whether its full or not – full loads mean fewer loads and water and energy savings. -- Fill the sink Filling the sink uses less water than washing dishes with running water. -- Report Leaks A leaking faucet can waste as much as 1,500 gallons of water per year, report it to School Dude, FM, or your landlord. -- Pitch in Keep a water pitcher (ex. Brita or Pur water filter) in your refrigerator and avoid letting the faucet run to get cold water. -- Mellow out Flushing the toilet unnecessarily is an easy way to waste water, every flush uses 1.6 gallons. Be sanitary, but don’t flush items you could throw away instead.

Water Use Facts -- Worldwide, 780 million people lack access to clean water. -- An American taking a 5 minute shower uses more water than the average person in a developing country slum uses for an entire day. -- More people on this planet have a mobile phone than have access to a toilet. -- Less than 3 percent of the world’s water is freshwater, and of that 2.5 percent is frozen. For more facts visit: water.org

unwater.org ngwa.org

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Waste at NU

NU recycles more than 1,800 tons of the 5,300 tons of waste generated annually, representing a 34 percent diversion rate. Reducing waste and increasing our diversion rate are an important part of our campus sustainability efforts. Recycling reduces greenhouse gas emissions, water pollutants, and saves energy. A small recycling bin is provided in on-campus rooms. Use it to collect recyclables and take them to the recycling station. There are stations on each floor in larger residences and on the main/ground floor in smaller halls. Greek houses establish their own recycling stations – please be sure they are convenient and accessible. Contact NU Recycling if bins are missing or replacements are needed. For off-campus students, Evanston collects recycling for single-family homes and multi-family properties with 4-units or less. The City provides the recycling containers for these properties and collects the materials. Residents of these types of properties can call 311 to report a missed pick-up or replacement containers.

As Eco-Reps, don’t forget to make sure there is recycling at all NU events! Contact NU Recycling (847-467-1374) if there aren’t bins available. E-waste There are many environmentally friendly ways to dispose of electronics (e-waste). Northwestern’s electronic recycling program ensures that all hard drive data is destroyed and the equipment is recycled in a way that is compliant with EPA standards. Evanston Campus: The WildCARD Office (Norris Center) 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday through Friday

Chicago Campus: Arthur Rubloff Building Loading Dock 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Monday through Friday

Books Don’t forget to sell your textbooks back to Norris. Using your campus bookstore reduces the environmental impact by keeping books on campus and avoiding the need to ship them across the country for redistribution. 22

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Waste Reduction Tips -- Shop Less Don’t buy what you don’t need and share or swap with others. When you do shop, avoid products with a lot of packaging and pass if you don’t need a bag for your items. -- Reuse it Use reusable water bottles, shopping bags, mugs, utensils, and plates whenever possible. -- Don’t Print View course materials online and use Dropbox or Google Drive to share documents and save paper. If you must print; print double sided and in black and white to use less paper and ink. -- Junk it Stop receiving junk mail by going to Catalog Choice or Paper Karma and unsubscribing. -- Eliminate e-waste Dispose of electronics (e-waste) properly with Northwestern’s electronic recycling program and EcoReps collection of CFL’s, batteries, plastic shopping bags, and ink cartridges. -- Pass it on Donate your old computer or phone to one of the recommended Chicago Recycling Coalition Programs. -- Give it Back Donate your old cell phone and ipods to organizations that can reuse their parts.

Waste Reduction Facts -- America’s waste industry manages 250 million tons of household and other municipal solid waste annually. -- The average American discards 4.43 pounds of garbage every day. -- Americans throw away 2.5 million plastic bottles every hour. They take 400 to 1000 years to degrade. -- About 80 percent of what americans throw away is recyclable, yet the recycling rate is only 30 percent. For more facts visit: EPA: Municipal Solid Waste

-- Zero waste Make your events waste free with BYO cup, silverware, plates, etc. -- Be prepared Be sure recycling bins are available at events/activities and contact NU Recycling (847-467-1374) if bins are needed.

NU students helping recycle at EPA Game Day Challenge. sustainNU

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Transportation at NU

Northwestern University has over 21,000 students between Chicago and Evanston and we are fortunate to have a highly walkable campuses and outstanding public transportation options. The University is committed to providing students with means to travel to and around campus with minimal environmental impact. Eco-Reps are responsible for educating students about these options and encouraging them to walk or bike when possible or the following use options other than driving – the CTA, Meta, and the Pace Bus stations are close and we have an Intercampus shuttle service which includes our pilot Hybrid Diesel Electric bus. If students don’t have a bike, be ready to guide them to our local bike shops. If students really do need to drive, encourage them to take advantage of reduced student membership fees for our car share programs, Enterprise CarShare and ZipCar!

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Shuttle schedules and routes are subject to change. For current information & timetables, visit www.shuttle.northwestern.edu. revised 08/12

Eco-Reps Manual

-- Switching from driving to public transportation can reduce an individual’s carbon emission by about 4,800 pounds per year. -- The CTA replaces the equivalent of about 400,000 vehicles on regional roads each weekday. A full 60-foot CTA bus replaces more than 70 cars. A full 8-car CTA train replaces more than 600 cars. -- The carbon dioxide emissions in the transport sector are about 30 percent in the case of developed countries and about 23 percent in the case of total man-made carbon emissions worldwide.

JUD SO

HIN

CHICAGO AVE.

RIDGE AVE.

ASBURY AVE.

ELMWOOD AVE.

FLORENCE AVE.

DEWEY AVE.

FAIRBANKS CT.

ASHLAND AVE.

MCCLURG CT.

n Chicago Express*

n Ryan Field*

FROSTBITE EXPRESS* operates during extreme weather .

n Intercampus

ONTARIO ST.

PL.

DEMPSTER ST.

Frostbite Sheridan*

MAN

n Campus Loop* &

Frostbite Express*

SHER

n Evanston Loop* and

ERIE ST.

R.

THELIN CT.

LAKE ST.

N RD

ED HOR

DARROW AVE.

ES LAK

HURON ST.

GREENWOOD ST. NMH

ST.

CHICAGO EXPRESS* shuttle goes to Chicago on select Saturdays RIDA SHE

ER

ST. MARK CT.

INN

SUPERIOR ST. INTERCAMPUS shuttle travels LAKE ST. between the Evanston and Abbott Chicago campuses

Lurie

DAV IS GRO VE S T.

HINMAN AVE.

WESLEY AVE.

R. ED HOR

Ward

MAN

RCH ST.

DAVIS ST.

GROVE ST.

RK S T.

JUDSON AVE.

ES

Rubloff

CLA

AVE .

CHU

CHIC

OAK AVE.

ING TON ORR

ASBURY AVE.

BENSON AVE.

DEWITT PL.

Fisk

LAK

GROVE ST.

Weber Arch

.

ELINOR PL. CHICAGO AVE.

Norris

RD

CHESTNUT ST.

PEARSON ST.

Library

CLARK ST.

CHURCH ST.

CHURCH ST.

EL GIN

ITEC

DELAWARE ST.

CHICAGO CAMPUS

Jacobs Center

EMERSON ST.

SHOP-N-RIDE* shuttle travels to Target, Best Buy, Office Max, LYONS ST. Jewel and Lincolnwood Town Center on select Sundays

MIES VAN DER ROHE WAY

FOSTER ST.

SHERIDAN RD.

SHERMAN AVE.

Engelhart

MAPLE AVE.

WESLEY AVE.

DEWEY AVE.

DODGE AVE.

JACKSON AVE.

DARROW AVE.

D.

R AY

GARNETT PL.

Annenberg

GARRETT PL.

LIBRARY PL.

HAMLIN ST.

EVANSTON LOOP* shuttle travels around campus and to the Davis St. CTA & Metra Stations

EMERSON ST.

ST. CLAIR ST.

ORRINGTON AVE.

RIDG

PRATT CT.

NB

EE

bit.ly/shuttletracker

GAFFIELD PL.

SIMPSON ST. LEON PL.

Tech Institute

HAVEN ST.

E AV

LEONARD PL.

GR

ASHLAND AVE.

DEWEY AVE.

ASBURY AVE.

C

MC

SIMPSON ST.

DODGE AVE.

COLFAX ST.

N AV E.

NB

EE

PR

LINCOLN ST.

SHERMAN AVE.

JACKSON AVE.

E. AV GR

LINCOLN ST.

GRANT ST.

VD BL

MILBURN PK.

CAMPUS LOOP* shuttle connects the north and south Evanston MILBURN ST. campus to downtown Evanston

.

ICK

M OR

Track the shuttles PAYNE ST. with the Mobile Shuttle Tracker!

BROWN AVE.

CENTRAL ST.

RIDGE TERR.

FOREST AVE.

AR

PL

CENTRAL ST.

ROSALIE ST.

RYAN FIELD* shuttle travels to campus, downtown Evanston, Ryan Field and the Central St. Metra Station DODGE AVE.

CLINTON PL.

SHERIDAN RD.

Ryan Field

INGLESIDE PL.

MONTICELLO PL.

GIRARD AVE.

ASHLAND AVE.

LIVINGSTON ST.

PO

BROWN AVE.

BRYANT AVE.

BROADWAY AVE.

JENKS ST.

CHANCELLOR ST.

24

Green Transportation Facts

Northwestern University Shuttle Overview

JENKS ST.

LIVINGSTON ST.

BROWN AVE.

SHERIDAN RD.

GARRISON AVE.

HAMPTON PKWY.

EASTWOOD AVE.

WOODBINE AVE.

SHERIDAN PL.

ISABELLA ST.

For more facts visit:

transitchicago.com unece.org

Green Transportation Tips -- Walk it Out Be clean, green, and healthy by being a pedestrian. -- Bike it Both Evanston and Chicago have outlined and are implementing more bike routes to encourage a greener and healthier form of transportation. And if you are tired, you can always take your bike onto the CTA or the NU Shuttle. -- Wheel and deal NU is working on revamping its bike share program, stay tuned! -- Be public Go with the masses and take public transit. Evanston and Chicago are served by the CTA, the Metra, and the Pace Bus. The trains can be used to access the city of Chicago, suburbs, and airports. -- Ride the shuttle The Campus Shuttles are free to students, faculty, and staff with a valid WildCARD. The Evanston and Campus Loop Shuttles provide a free and safe way to get around the Evanston campus during the evening and early morning hours. The Intercampus shuttle provides services between the Evanston and Chicago campuses. The Shop-N-Ride Shuttle visits shopping areas near Evanston on select Sundays. -- Share a ride If you need a car for a day or just a couple of hours, consider a car-sharing program to save on emissions. Check out Enterprise CarShare and Zipcar, which offers special programs and discounts to Northwestern students. -- Ride Safe Saferide offers the opportunity to ride in a hybrid vehicle and helps you get around safely at night.

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Consumerism at NU

Northwestern’s purchasing decisions have a large impact on campus sustainability and our environmental welfare. 21,000 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students represent a lot of purchasing power! There are a lot of “behind the scenes” environmental costs, such as raw material extraction, manufacturing, transportation, and final product disposal. These all require resources and energy that aren’t apparent when buying and using a product. Environmental consequences of these costs can be greenhouse gas emissions, air, water, or land pollution and harmful by-products during manufacturing. Northwestern Purchasing offers suggestions when purchasing products, including energy efficiency, shipping materials and recycled content. This would be a good place for Eco-Reps to start when conveying to peers the importance of being a green consumer. Eco-Reps can continue by promoting sites like craigslist and freecycle, resale shops like Crossroads Trading Co. or by hosting a floor clothing swap to encourage reuse! Lifecycle Assessment (LCA) of Products LCA is the process of determining and analyzing the cradle-to-grave environmental footprint of a product. The LCA below shares the steps required to make and use a ski jacket.

The Eco-Guide to Mountain Gear

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Eco-Reps Manual

Green Purchasing Tips -- Choose to reuse When you’re shopping, select reusable items like washcloths over disposable items such as paper towels. -- Be a digital book-worm Buy digital or used books. The Norris Bookstore offers students the option to purchase their school books in used print and digital forms. -- Be hip and thrift Consider second- hand items. They’ll be unique and reduce the energy and material needed to make new clothing. There are plenty of resale shops nearby, check them out on yelp or there is always craigslist and freecycle. -- Fix-it Try to repair before throwing them away and buying a replacement. -- Be a star Buy Energy Star-rated and EPEAT electronics (laptops, fridges, etc) and appliances to save energy. Check out the Green Shopping List ‘energy’ section on the sustainNU website. -- Ditch the toxins Buy less toxic cleaning and personal care products. Read the ingredients and look for natural or organic over chemical ingredients. Avoid products with chlorine bleach and detergents with phosphates.

Smart Purchasing Facts -- Each American on average consumes 749 pounds of paper products each year. -- More than 90 percent of printing and office paper still does not contain any recycled content. For more facts visit: stopwaste.org: batteries

stopwaste.org: paper

-- Ban the bottle Buy a Brita or Pur water filter to avoid using bottled water. -- Buy in bulk Bulk purchases reduces packaging waste. -- Something borrowed Borrow from a friend instead of buying something you won’t use often. -- LCD vs. CRT Flat-panel liquid crystal display (LCD) displays, are far more Eco-Reps “Take it or Leave it” clothes swap. energy-efficient. Spending more upfront proves costeffective over time.

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Glossary CFL Light Bulb- compact fluorescent lights are energy saving bulbs that use about 25 percent - 80 percent less energy than traditional incandescents and can last from 3 - 25 times longer than incandescent light bulbs. Climate Change- the phenomenon occurring right now where Earth’s average temperature is rising largely caused by human consumption of fossil fuels causing major changes to weather patterns and sea levels around the world. Composting- collecting organic waste such as yard clippings and food waste to facilitate the controlled breakdown of these materials for use as fertilizer or soil. Energy Star- rating program started by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to designate energy efficient appliances and electronics. Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (E-PEAT)- a comprehensive environmental rating system which helps identify greener computers and other electronics. E-waste- any electronic or electrical equipment that needs to be disposed of separately from landfill trash to avoid hazardous metals and chemicals in the product from polluting the air or water. Footprint (ecological or carbon)- refers to the amount of natural resources an individual uses or how much carbon emissions they are contributing to the atmosphere. Green Cup- a month-long competition which challenges Northwestern University students to reduce energy and water use as well as learn about sustainability initiatives by attending events. Greenhouse Gas Emissions- certain gases in the earth’s atmosphere including carbon dioxide, methane, water vapor, ozone, and nitrous oxide that absorb heat and emit it back to Earth’s surface. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC)- a building’s system of heating and cooling infrastructure. Zipcar/Enterprise CarShare- two car sharing programs in the Chicago area where vehicles can be rented for short periods of time and can be picked up and dropped off at any of their vehicle sites. Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern (ISEN)- umbrella organization on campus which encompasses science, technology, education, and policy goals for the university. Kilowatt Hour- one kilowatt of power delivered for one hour; common unit of energy used for billing consumers by utility companies. Leachate- liquid produced by landfills from decomposing waste and may be harmful to the environment. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)- a rating program started by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) to provide building owners and operators a framework for identifying and implementing practical and measurable green building design, construction, operations, and maintenance solutions. 

LED Lighting- light emitting diode form of lighting that uses 75 percent less energy than incandescent light bulbs, emits very little heat, and is incredibly durable and will not break like a light bulb. Lifecycle Assessment (LCA)- process of determining the cradle-to-grave footprint of a product taking into account energy and materials used through extraction, production, transportation,

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use, and disposal processes. Low Flow- faucets, toilets, or shower heads designed to use less water helping to conserve energy, water, and money. Move-Out (Take it or Leave it)- program by NU Recycling that aims to address the extra trash, food, and clothing generated by students moving out at the end of the year. Norris Recycling Hub- located on the bottom floor of Norris, near the elevators. Plastic bags are collected here for recycling. Norris Wildcard Office- located in the basement of Norris, a place to take electronic waste to be recycled, electronic waste includes broken cell phones, ipods, computers, or wires. Rain Water Harvesting- collecting rain water in containers such as rain barrels to conserve using tap water for uses such as garden and lawn watering or car-washing. Recyclables- materials such as certain plastics, glass, and paper that can be diverted from landfills to be reused in other products thus conserving natural resources. Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs)- certificates that represent proof that a certain amount of energy has been produced by renewable energy and can be sold or traded by the owner. Return on Investment (ROI)- a performance measure used to evaluate the efficiency of an investment. To calculate ROI, the benefit (return) of an investment is divided by the cost of the investment; the result is expressed as a percentage or a ratio. Reusables- items that can be used multiple times without being disposed of such as plastic or glass bowls, cups, silverware, etc. For example cloth/nylon grocery bags instead of plastic or paper sacks, silverware instead of plastic ware, and metal or Nalgene style water bottles instead of disposable water bottles. Smart Strip- power strip that uses auto-switching technology to automatically shut down devices that are not in use, saving you money and reducing your overall energy usage. SustainNU Green Crew- a volunteer opportunity with the Office of Sustainability, helping out with various programs and projects, such as promoting a “green” Move-In process. Sustainability- the ability of the current generation to meet the needs of the present without compromising future generations’ abilities to meet their needs. Task Lighting- alternative to overhead lighting use that can be wasteful such as smaller lamps that instead gives you only the light needed for the task you are doing. Vampire Energy- electric power consumed by electronic devices even when they are turned off or in shutdown mode. Zero Waste Event- an event which has been planned and carried out to create no additional waste from the event itself. Decorations and signs can be reused from past events, attendees could be asked to bring their own dish-ware/silverware, food scraps can be composted, recycling can constitute a zero waste event, but it is encouraged to try to avoid any waste.

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Eco-Reps Manual


Eco-Reps Handbook