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STRENGTH THROUGH “DIVERSE-CITIES” MULTICULTURAL SUMMIT

SEPTEMBER 21-22, 2012

PROCEEDINGS

www.aia.org/diversity

Center for Architecture 1909 Woodall Rodgers Fwy., Suite 100 Dallas, TX 75201 www.DallasCFA.com

1|Page Photos by Walter Street, AIA

TABLE OF CONTENTS AIA LEADERSHIP REMARKS………………………………………………………

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MISSION ……………………………………………………………………………….

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PURPOSE/THEME …………………………………………………………………..

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AGENDA ………………………………………………………………………………

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DALLAS ARTS DISTRICT WALKING TOUR ……………………………………

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MULTICULTURAL SUMMIT PROCEEDINGS …………………………………..

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KEYNOTE ADDRESS/HIGHLIGHTS …………………………………………

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MULTICULTURAL COLLABORATIONS PANEL …………………………..

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LUNCH PROGRAM ……………………………………………………………..

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REMARKS 2012 AIA PRESIDENT JEFF POTTER, FAIA …………………

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AIA/NOMA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING ………………………

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THE AIA GATEWAY COMMITMENT …………………………………………

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“I AM AIA” VIDEO PREMIER ………………………………………………….

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AFTERNOON BREAKOUT SESSIONS ………………………………………

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BREAKOUT SESSION KEY DISCUSSION POINTS ………………………..

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CLOSING KEYNOTE ADDRESS ………………………………………………

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FINAL REMARKS ………………………………………………………………..

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SPEAKER/PLANNING COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES ………………………….

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PLANNING COMMITTEE LESSIONS LEARNED ……………………………….

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HOST YOUR OWN MULTICULTURAL SUMMIT ……………………………….

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*Photo credits: Walter Street, AIA

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REMARKS FROM AIA LEADERSHIP 2012/13 Diversity & Inclusion Council Co-Chairs Wendy Ornelas, FAIA

Miguel Del Rio, AIA

2012-2014 Director, Central States Region, the American Institute of Architects

2013-2015 Regional Director Florida/Caribbean the American Institute of Architects

In September 2012, AIA Diversity and Inclusion held the inaugural “Strength Through Diverse-Cities Multicultural Summit,” in Dallas, TX, at the Dallas Center for Architecture. The National AIA Committee on Diversity and Inclusion’s (DivCo) goal for this event was to develop a multicultural leadership summit model that could be replicated at components and firms across the country. We wanted to create an event that would appeal to the profession, the community and even clients., and not simply practitioners who are already committed to increasing diversity within the profession. From the beginning we wanted the Summit to be inspirational. Much like in practice, we started with looking at the big picture of multiculturalism and ended with understanding the finer details of actually helping/learning how to celebrate diversity. The committee chose Dallas because the group AIA Dallas Latinos in Architecture was awarded the 2012 AIA Diversity Recognition Program. We felt by hosting the summit in Dallas, it would help this group to build on the momentum of their award, allow others to learn from their success, while celebrating diversity. We were very pleased to have as our first keynote Sylvia Acevedo, CEO of CommuniCard LLC, a company that develops scalable solutions which build capacity for education and healthcare in communities. One of the nation’s foremost Hispanic thought leaders and strategists on today’s demographic shifts, Sylvia spoke about the big picture of multiculturalism in the US now and into the future. The morning agenda also included a comprehensive panel discussion with representatives from several regional multicultural organizations who highlighted initiatives and shared success stories. 2012 AIA President Jeff Potter, FAIA, and 2012 NOMA President Sanford Garner, AIA, reconfirmed the AIA and NOMA’s memorandum of understanding. Later was the premier of the committee’s I AM AIA video filmed during the 2012 AIA national convention in Washington, DC. In the afternoon we continued refining the subject by breaking into smaller work sessions to discuss specific aspects of helping to invigorate multiculturalism into the profession; The Summit ended with a dynamic and inspiring speech from Clyde Porter, FAIA who is a Whitney M. Young, Jr. Award recipient. Through this Summit, we felt as if we came away with a strong framework for other components to create strategic initiatives that further diversity and inclusion efforts in their region. We chose to look into the future, learning from the past but not dwelling on what has been. The committee does not believe in allowing the weight of the status quo to keep us from moving forward. We all believe going the extra mile is essential to society and the profession in our ongoing efforts to celebrate multiculturalism. We thank everyone from the Diversity and Inclusion Committee, AIA Staff, and AIA Dallas for their hard work and tenacity in making this event a reality. We especially thank the participants who registered for this phenomenal program.

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ADDITIONAL REMARKS FROM AIA LEADERSHIP

Gabriel Durand-Hollis, FAIA 2012-2013 Treasurer, AIA National Board of Directors

Jan Blackmon, FAIA Executive Director, AIA Dallas AIA Dallas Center for Architecture

The AIA Board has supported the efforts surrounding the Multicultural Summit held in Dallas in September 2012. The Board sees that for the profession to stay and be relevant for society and practitioners, that Multicultural exchange should be supported with a goal of sustainable relevance. Several members of the Board have participated in developing their own content along with the efforts of the Diversity Council. There are tangible results that are useful for member recruitment, member engagement, and education for members to develop ideas and techniques to better our profession. The Board also recently reaffirmed the Gateway Commitment and recommends that it is read periodically at their meetings.”

As the event host and Executive Director of AIA Dallas, I would like to thank the Diversity Council for the opportunity to host the “Strength through Diverse-Cities Multicultural Summit” at the Dallas Center for Architecture. It’s not every day that I have the opportunity to introduce a rocket scientist as our keynote, Sylvia Acevedo. This was a tremendous opportunity for AIA Dallas to continue to engage our community in the diversity dialogue. Founded by AIA Dallas in 2008, the Dallas Center for Architecture is one of the nation's first centers devoted to bringing the public more actively into the conversation about the importance of architecture and design to transform the way we live. We examine a variety of topics--from sustainability and design excellence to preservation and urban planning.

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Curtis J. Sartor, Ph. D., Min., NOMA, Assoc. AIA, ALA, Madison Fellow Chair, Multiculturalism Working Group of the AIA Diversity Council Member, 2012-2013 AIA Diversity Council 2012 was the first year the Diversity and Inclusion Council organized and implemented a Multicultural Summit. This was a vital and muchanticipated event years in the making. In my opinion, it was a resounding success in bringing together diverse leaders in the design community to acknowledge, strategize and celebrate current and emerging issues surrounding multiculturalism. Dallas, with its rich history of political involvement and enculturation of pluralistic communities, was an ideal location to start such a Summit. It has been my honor to work with a diverse group of leaders who represent many areas of the design profession to make this Summit happen. The AIA is leading the way to empowering the many voices of a global society; but, there still is much work to be done. Let’s continue this Summit and make it a model for the next “diverse city”.

Joyce Raspa, AIA, Esq. Chair, “Strength through Diverse-Cities Multicultural Summit” Planning Committee Member, 2012-2013 AIA Diversity Council It has been my honor to serve on the AIA Diversity Council and as Co-Chair of the first AIA Multicultural Summit. The cooperation and interest leading up to the event, as well as the participation in Dallas, was great. The Summit allowed attendees a collaborative forum to have an open dialog focused on strategies and new approaches to increasing diversity within the profession. The program enabled and revitalized the participants through discussion of the challenges and opportunities of Diversity and Inclusion. I look forward to working with other AIA components, both locally and globally, to host many more Multicultural Summits. Special thanks to the AIA Leadership for their support and encouragement of this and other such events furthering Diversity and Inclusion within the profession of architecture.

MISSION To CREATE an infrastructure for diversity management To promote a CULTURAL change To COLLABORATE with others to improve the recruitment, education, training, promotion, and success of architects from diverse backgrounds and perspectives

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PURPOSE The Multicultural Summit was designed as a replicable regional program encompassing a collaboration of multicultural architectural communities within a chosen urban environment. The first Multicultural Summit, entitled “Strength Through Diverse-Cities,” was launched in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. Participant architectural organizations included: AIA Dallas, AIA Dallas Latinos in Architecture, the ACE Mentoring Program, the American Indian Council of Architects and Engineers (AICAE), the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA), Dallas Women in Architecture (WIA), and the architectural firm, Studio Red Collaborative. The Summit was a consolidation of walking tours, inspirational lectures, roundtable discussions, panel deliberations, and lunch & dinner encounters. The goal was and is to promote multicultural collaboration on a local level.

*Dallas Center for Architecture

THEME “Strength through Diverse-cities” Multicultural Summit Multicultural understanding is the foundation for the building of a diverse and inclusive profession. To encourage a greater awareness of effective strategies, programming opportunities, and the means by which they can be implemented, the AIA Diversity Council is producing the “Strength through Diverse-cities” Multicultural Summit. This forum has been generated for the exploration of programs promoting the action needed to achieve the profession’s diversity and inclusion goals. In being challenged by award-winning programs, inspirational speakers, and facilitated roundtable discussions, those attending the summit will have the chance to participate in the design and promotion of strategic solutions necessary to build diversity and inclusion.

The AIA Diversity Council’s “Strength through Diverse-cities” Multicultural Summit” provides the Empowerment Agenda leading to Action.   

Awareness without Action is an emotion. Action without Awareness is an attempt. Action with Awareness, supported by a plan, can accomplish any endeavor! *Lynn Paxson, Ph.D., Assoc. AIA, Brian McAlexander, AIA, Curtis Sartor, Ph.D., Assoc. AIA, NOMA

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AGENDA Dallas Center for Architecture 1909 Woodall Rodgers Fwy, Suite 100 Dallas, TX 75201

Friday: September 21st 1:30- 3:30pm: Pre-Conference Main Street Walking Tour [Dallas Center for Architecture] 1.5 LUs Please arrive between 1:15 and 1:30. The tour will depart the Dallas Center for Architecture at 1:30 Included With Registration 5:00-7:00 pm: Welcome Reception [Dallas Center for Architecture] Included With Registration

Saturday: September 22nd 8:00-9:00 am: Registration / Networking / Continental Breakfast Continental Breakfast Included with Registration 9:00 am:

Welcome Address and Introductions Wendy Ornelas, FAIA, and Miguel del Rio, AIA, Diversity Council Co-Chairs Opening Remarks / Review of Agenda Introduction of Jan Blackmon, FAIA Introduction of Keynote Speaker Host, Jan Blackmon, FAIA, RID, LEEDP AP, Executive Director, AIA Dallas

9:00-10:15 am: Opening Keynote Address 1.5 LUs Sylvia Acevedo, CEO of CommuniCard LLC. "The Kaleidoscope Shift, America's Changing Population” 10:15-10:30 am: Break

10:30-12:00 pm: Panel Discussion 1.5 LUs  7|Page

Introduction of Panel Speakers by DivCo Moderator, Miguel del Rio, AIA. Collaborate with others to improve the recruitment, education, training, promotion,

and success of architects from diverse backgrounds and perspectives. Applying Lessons Learned Through the Diversity Recognition Program

Morning Panelists: Collaborating for Success Moderator: Miguel del Rio, AIA 1. AIA Dallas Latinos in Architecture: Lorena Toffer, AIA 2. Studio Red Collaborative Houston: Pete Garrett, AIA 3. ACE Mentor Program Jessica Strong, EIT, LEED AP

12:00-1:15 pm:

4. National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) Dallas: Derwin Broughton, AIA, NOMA 5. AIA Dallas Women In Architecture: Nadine Crutcher, AIA 6. American Indian Council of Architects and Engineers (AICAE): Ken Rhyne

Introduction of the 2012 AIA President John Padilla, AIA Summary Remarks and Introduction of the 2012 NOMA President Jeff Potter, FAIA

Copyright 2012 The American Institute of Architects All Rights Reserved

Signing of the AIA/NOMA Memorandum of Understanding Jeff Potter, FAIA, 2012 AIA President and Sanford Garner, AIA, NOMA, 2012 NOMA President Premiere of the “I Am AIA” Video/Networking Lunch Included With Registration 1:15-1:30 pm: Break 1:30- 4:30 pm: Facilitated Roundtable Discussions (See Descriptions Below) 2 LUs  

Objective: To create a cultural change Each table will have a Diversity Council Member and local AIA Member as cofacilitator/discussion leader. Secure a recorder to take notes for summary presentation. Each participant will have the opportunity to select 2 themes in which to participate. There will be 2-one hour discussions with 15 minutes in between to allow participants to switch themes and take a break.

1:30-2:30 pm: First Roundtable Discussion (Choose between Themes 1, 2, 3 & 4) 2:30-2:50 pm: Report-Outs from First Roundtable Discussions (5 minutes each) 2:50-3:10 pm: Switch Discussion Groups/Break 8|Page

3:10-4:10 pm: Second Roundtable Discussion (Choose between Themes 5, 6, 7 & 8) 4:10-4:30 pm: Report-Outs from Second Roundtable Discussions (5 minutes each) Afternoon Break-out Session Descriptions: Theme 1: Dimensions of Diversity Co-Leaders: Walter Street, AIA, Pete E. Garrett, AIA, President of Studio Red Architects Through the discussion of cultural history, social justice, political correctness, and moving beyond “isms,� this topic will consider various elements of diversity examining the cultural intersections and divergences of the issues. Theme 2: Community in a Globalizing World Co-Leaders: Melissa Daniel, Assoc. AIA, NOMA, Gabriel Durand-Hollis, FAIA In considering the broader scale of a more interconnected world, this discussion will address leadership, first-nations issues, public service in diverse communities and civic pluralism. The roundtable will focus on pursuing solutions for cultural identity and strategies for community development responsive to the needs of a linked global community. Theme 3: The Influences of Global Media Co-Leaders: Amy Slattery, AIA, Nadine Crutcher, AIA In reviewing of the current trends in Social Media as an opportunity to reach a wider audience for globalization of diversity. Self-representations of cultural differences allows the transition away from the traditional view of architects to embrace a broader spectrum using local, community, national, and transnational media. Cultural competency through increased communication and dialog with a new generation through the media in which they can express their individuality, critical to furthering the influence of diversity and inclusion. Theme 4: Education in a World of Difference Co-Leaders: Wendy Ornelas, FAIA, Lynn Paxson, Assoc. AIA, PhD In order to promote the cultural change we want to see in others, we need to begin by nurturing the change in our own understanding and behavior. As education provides the pathway for change, this roundtable will focus on the aspects of education influencing the direction to inculcate a multi- cultural worldview into the profession. Theme 5: Diversity in Construction and Construction Management Co-Leaders: Donna DeJongh, AIA, Clyde Porter, FAIA, Sheila Kleinpeter, AIA It is insufficient to just influence and create change in the areas of practice, education and professional institutions without having a similar impact in the construction and construction management area. Therefore, this roundtable will take on the investigation of the project delivery community in discussing changes appropriate to produce an industry reflecting society in all aspects and considering how the industry can influence multi-cultural participation in the project processes. Theme 6: Diversity in Practice Co-Leaders: Gabriel Durand-Hollis, FAIA, Larry Edmonson, AICAE The traditional practice of architecture has come to embrace a broader spectrum of activities reflecting the 9|Page

creative dimensions of professionals. In this discussion, participants will explore the traditional and new domains of practice. The conversation will examine the influence of these new practice areas in re-defining the profession along with the opportunities and impact of diversity and inclusion. Theme 7: Diversity through Academics Co-Leaders: Curtis Sartor, Jr., PhD, Min., Assoc. AIA, NOMA, Ikhlas Sabouni, Ph.D., AIA, NOMA The academies of architectural educational are the ground zero in beginning to build a multi-cultural profession. Therefore, the academic institutions need to reflect, embrace and champion a character of educational delivery to instill the values of multiculturalism across the entire educational spectrum including students, teachers and administrators. In the roundtable, our discussion will focus on diversity in the academic community through the professorship, administrative structure, student admission policies, curriculum development, creative financial options, inclusive accreditation practices and inclusive internship practices to achieve the goal of creating change and influencing the profession’s future. Theme 8: Managing the Culture of Diversity Co-Leaders: Joyce Raspa, AIA, Esq., Brian McAlexander, AIA, Derwin Broughton, AIA, NOMA With a need to celebrate the differences of diverse cultures in developing further awareness and deeper understanding of the opportunities diversity can provide, this discussion will consider how to initiate the celebration of differences while maintaining identity. Participants will work toward the goals of managing and developing a diverse human resource base. The conversation will also include looking to the future beyond regulatory compliance and cultural assumptions to a broad acceptance of multicultural policies and practices.

4:30-4:45 pm: Break 4:45-6:00 pm: Introduction of Closing Keynote Speaker

Copyright 2004 The American Institute of Architects All Rights Reserved Copyright 2004 The American Institute of Architects All Rights Reserved

Walter Street, AIA, NOMA Closing Keynote Address Clyde Porter, FAIA, NOMA, Associate Vice Chancellor of Facilities Management and Planning/District Architect, Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD)

6:00 pm:

Concluding Remarks by Diversity Council Co-Chairs Wendy Ornelas, FAIA, and Miguel del Rio, AIA Adjourn

7:00 pm:

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Small Group Dinners (Not Included in Registration; Bring Cash or a Credit Card) On Saturday morning, sign up for small groups of 8-10 people for dinner at local restaurants. Thank you DHR Architects, our breakfast sponsor!

Walking Tour of the Dallas Arts District The attendees of the Multicultural Summit, were graciously treated to a walking tour of the Dallas Arts District by the AIA Dallas Chapter. From an architectural perspective, the tour provided an up-to-the-minute snapshot of Dallas’ Architectural Heritage. The tour began with the Dallas Museum of Art and proceeded to the Booker T. Washington High School that has been recently renovated and transformed into a School of Performing and Visual Arts. Photos of the tour have been provided by Walter Street, III, AIA, 2012-2014 member of the AIA Board of Directors and the Multicultural Summit Planning Committee. Following an excerpt from the Dallas Arts District web site: “The cornerstone and catalyst for * Dallas Arts District creative vitality in the region, the Arts District is home to the city’s leading visual and performing arts institutions, whose range and depth make Dallas a destination for the arts that is unique in our country. Starting as early as the 1970s the city hired a series of consultants to determine how and where to house its arts and cultural institutions. In 1978, Boston consultants Carr-Lynch recommended that Dallas relocate its major arts institutions from different parts of the city to the northeast corner of downtown. This location would allow for easy access through a vast network of freeways, as well as local streets, and leading into an area that would become a lively mix of cultural and commercial destinations, further defined by a mix of contemporary and historic architecture. The city progressed to define the boundaries and design guidelines with the assistance of Sasaki Associates. With the adoption of the Sasaki Plan, * Dallas Arts District developed by Sasaki Associates, and the opening of the Dallas Museum of Art, designed by Edward Larabee Barnes (1984), the formation of the Arts District was underway. Throughout the next 20 years, the development of the Arts District continued with the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, designed by Pritzker Prize winning architect I.M. Pei (1989); the Crow Collection of Asian Art in the existing Trammell Crow Center (1998); the Nasher Sculpture Center, designed by Pritzker Prize winning architect Renzo Piano (2003) and the Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, recently opening a new addition designed by Brad Cloepfil (2008). In 2009, with the opening of the AT & T Performing Arts Center the planned relocation of many of the major cultural institutions was * Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center complete. The 2012 opening of City Performance Hall, a commitment to small and mid-sized groups of the city, will complete the cultural build-out of the district.” 11 | P a g e

Note: Members of the tour were permitted to view the interiors of several of the Art District facilities. Some of these included: The Dallas Museum of Art; The Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center; The Nasher Sculpture Center; and The City Performance Hall. These interior visits were the highlight of this event.

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PROCEEDINGS 

Welcome by DivCo Co-Chairs: Wendy Ornelas, FAIA, and Miguel Del Rio, AIA. Opening Remarks / Review of Agenda

Welcome/Keynote Introduction of Jan Blackmon, FAIA. Host, Executive Director, AIA Dallas

KEYNOTE Highlights

"The Kaleidoscope Shift, America's Changing Population"

Sylvia Acevedo is the CEO of CommuniCard LLC, a company that develops scalable solutions which build capacity for education and healthcare in communities. Sylvia has a broad business career, serving as an executive for several Fortune 100 companies. She began her career literally as a rocket scientist and holds a master’s degree of science in industrial engineering from Stanford University, and her undergraduate bachelor’s degree in Industrial Engineering from New Mexico State University. Sylvia serves on the Executive Board of the Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders, is on the Stanford University Alumni Board and on the National Girl Latinos in Architecture (LIA) seeks to serve and support our local communities by establishing a forum for celebrating Latinos in the design related professions. LIA intends to be an open resource group involving Architects, Landscape architects, Interior Keynote address: Sylvia Acevedo designers, Educators, Students, and the Community. The mission of the LIA Committee is to serve and support our local communities and strengthen relationships and networks between professionals in the field of Architecture. LIA works to be a positive influence for Latino students aspiring to become Architects, by finding opportunities to volunteer and get involved in community issues, providing guidance and expertise and participating in mentoring programs.

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KEYNOTE HIGHLIGHTS Sylvia Acevedo set the stage for the day by reviewing the demographic shifts that are happening globally. A few important points from her keynote include: 

Growing Hispanic population in our communities. According to the 2005-2007 American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, Hispanics made up 42.4% of Dallas' population. Hispanics are growing in population in Dallas and this growth is also creating more challenges. As architects, we see and understand this as an opportunity to step up and take a leadership role.

Void in leadership in the Hispanic community. There are insufficient ethnic minority role models in architecture, and it sometimes does not occur to young people from such backgrounds (or their parents and teachers) to consider architecture as a career choice. Hispanics have been historically less represented. There is a lack of support regarding *Curtis Sartor, PH.D., Assoc. AIA, NOMA architectural guidance in the Hispanic community, and this is an opportunity for architects to intervene and find ways to help them with our expertise.

U.S. Census. Ms. Acevedo referred to the recently released 2012 United States Census data, especially with regard to population trends and how we should reframe our perspectives. She spoke very passionately, with expertise on topics such as the Rising Generation, Reaching Underserved Markets, America’s Changing Demographics, and Leadership in the Workplace.

 Globalization. The world is on the move globally and locally, requiring a need to shift our perspectives. Ms. Acevedo stated that “Innovation means taking on the Status Quo.” Architects are uniquely positioned to design and build to accommodate the shift in population. She noted that Texas is the 2nd most populated State, and this population growth is expected to continue. Texas and Florida have the largest population under five years old, which indicates that these states will require more schools as this generation grows.

* Amy Slattery, AIA

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Acevedo suggested that we learn from our failures, present our capabilities, and communicate our skills. Don’t overlook or underestimate your assets. And finally, don’t be caught up in the weight of the Status Quo.

MORNING Panel MULTICULTURAL COLLABORATIONS OBJECTIVES  Collaborate with others to improve the recruitment, education, training, promotion, and success of architects from diverse backgrounds and perspectives.  Apply Lessons Learned Through the Diversity Recognition Program

Moderator: Miguel Del Rio, AIA Panelists:      

Lorena Toffer, AIA, Dallas Latinos in Architecture Pete Garrett, AIA Studio Red Collaborative Jessica Strong, EIT, LEED AP Derwin Broughton, AIA, NOMA, President DaNOMA Nadine Crutcher, AIA, Dallas Women in Architecture Ken Rhyne, American Indian Council of Architects & Engineers *Miguel Del Rio, AIA

AIA Dallas Latinos in Architecture (LIA): Lorena Toffer, AIA, LIA 2012 Committee Co-Chair Latinos in Architecture (LIA) seeks to serve and support our local communities by establishing a forum for celebrating Latinos in the design related professions. LIA is an open resource group involving: architects, landscape architects, interior designers, educators, students, and the community. The mission of the LIA Committee is to serve and support our local communities and strengthen relationships and networks between professionals in the field of Architecture. LIA also works to be a positive influence for Latino students aspiring to become architects by finding opportunities to volunteer and get involved in community issues, providing guidance and expertise and participating in mentoring programs. *Lorena Toffer, AIA

There is a current interest by architecture firms in reorienting their practices and expanding to the Latin American Market. A committee of this kind could help maintain international relationships and partnerships and serve as a marketing tool for architecture firms.

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LIA PROGRAMS 

Professional Networking Component/Programs:

Networking/Informational Happy Hours: Promote networking between Latino architects in Dallas through a yearly happy hour hosted at a local architecture firm.

National Hispanic Heritage Month: In celebration of “Mes de la Hispanidad” in September: "National Hispanic Heritage Month - Celebrating the Work of Dallas Latin Architects and Designers.” The event is both a social event as well as an opportunity to continue the committee's design community outreach. The exhibition recognizes local Hispanic architects and designers and their participation and responsibility as role models for future practitioners.

Studio Red Collaborative Pete Garrett, AIA

* Pete Garrett, AIA

Studio Red Collaborative is a former recipient of the AIA Diversity Recognition Program. As stated by Pete Garrett, AIA, this is a whole new kind of architectural firm: Studio RED Collaborative is an employee-owned, employee-run firm. The make-up of the 25 firm partners includes 11 women and 9 from underrepresented groups; 52% of the partners are 35 years or younger and first time business owners. Studio RED Collaborative represents a new way of thinking about what an architectural partnership can be, and as a result, creates a new and exciting avenue to ownership for all its members, and particularly for those who are women and minorities. The firm supports community service, education, and mentoring of architectural interns.

ACE Mentoring Program Jessica Strong, EIT, LEED AP ACE (Architecture, Construction and Engineering) affiliates in Texas provide a fun and informative way for high school students to learn about the many exciting career opportunities available in architecture, engineering and construction. Volunteer mentors drawn from top firms in the area’s building industry assist teams of students with design projects similar to the ones professionals work on every day. These might range from high-rise hotels and condominiums to movie theaters, internet cafes, firehouses and more. To develop their projects, students use computerized tools, models, site plans and other materials. They also visit the offices of working professionals across a variety of disciplines and take “insider” tours of major construction sites. The program wraps up with special year-end events where students present their finished projects to mentors, parents and teachers. Some affiliates also award college scholarships and all students benefit from the college and career advice they obtain from their mentors. 16 | P a g e

NOMA Dallas Derwin Broughton, AIA, NOMA, President DaNOMA. Dallas NOMA (National Organization of Minority Architects) seeks to cultivate and foster growth among minority architects, interns and related disciplines within the Dallas/Ft. Worth Metroplex. History and Purpose Twelve African-American architects from different parts of the country met, some for the first time, during the AIA National Convention in Detroit in 1971. What these professionals recognized was the desperate need for an organization dedicated to the development and advancement of minority architects. Present at the creation were William Brown, Leroy Campbell, Wendell Campbell, John S. Chase, D. Dodd, Kenneth B. Groggs, Nelson Harris, Jeh Johnson, E.H. McDowell, Robert J. Nash, Harold Williams, and Robert Wilson. These African-American architects wanted minority design professionals to work together to fight discriminatory policies that limit or bar minority architects from participating in design and constructions programs. That was the beginning of the National Organization of Minority Architects, an increasingly influential voice, promoting the quality and excellence of minority design professionals. There are NOMA Chapters in all parts of the country, increasing recognition on colleges and university campuses and providing greater access to government policy makers. Mission NOMA, which thrives only when voluntary members contribute their time and resources, has as its mission the building of a strong national organization, strong chapters, and strong members for the purpose of minimizing the effect of racism in our profession. Strength in NOMA is built through unity in the cause that created the organization. Our impact is felt when our organization wrestles with the dilemmas that face this nation, particularly as they affect our profession. There is strength in numbers. By increasing the number of people in this organization, we add strength to the voice with which we can speak against apathy, bigotry, intolerance and ignorance; against abuse of the natural environment; and for the un-empowered, the marginalized and the disenfranchised. By building a strong organization, we develop a showcase for the excellence and creativity which have been ignored for so long. Through our publications and conferences, we are able to inform the world that minority professionals have the talent and capabilities to perform in design and construction with any other group. By building strong chapters of design professionals whose sensibilities and interests include promotion of urban communities, we are able to respond to the concerns that affect marginalized communities and people. Our goals are to increase the level of participation in the social, political and economic benefits afforded the citizens of this nation and to tear down the barriers that make full participation unattainable. Chapters give members a base from which to be involved in politics, to visit schools and reach out to children, to conduct community and civic forums, and to responsibly practice in our professional capacities.

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Dallas Women in Architecture Nadine Crutcher, AIA Our mission is to promote involvement of women in architecture by providing a platform for engagement. The Women in Architecture Committee is part of the Dallas Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Our committee serves as a networking platform for women in the profession of architecture and related fields. WIA aims to elevate the status of women in architecture through lecture series, panel discussions, planned social events and activities. WIA supports the next generation getting into our profession through guidance and mentoring activities.

Nadine Crutcher, AIA

AIA Dallas, the seventh largest AIA chapter in the country, encourages, promotes, advances and coordinates efforts to uphold the highest standards of the architectural profession, while creating positive change through design. AIA Dallas has a membership base of more than 2,000 members and 300 architectural firms.

American Indian Council of Architects and Engineers Ken Rhyne, Allied AIA, AICAE The American Indian Council of Architects and Engineers is a non-profit corporation established in 1976. Its membership is comprised of American Indian architecture, engineering, and design professionals throughout the United States of America. The purpose of the AICAE IS to:  Advance the role of American Indian professional engineers, architects and design professionals in practice and to advance their professional skills.  Promote recognition of member's professional excellence, service, projects and contributions. Ken Rhyne, AICAE

Encourage American Indians to pursue careers as professional engineers, architects, and design professionals.

Consolidate the expertise of members into a single focus for representation on a national level.

PANEL SUMMARY/CONCLUSIONS Overall this panel focused on the work that is being accomplished by each individual organization and/or committee. What quickly became apparent is that while many of the organizations are located in the same city and are aligned on the work they are doing to contribute to the profession, they are not collaborating effectively at the local level. The panelists quickly realized this and agreed to make efforts to collaborate more effectively after the conference in order to create a collective capacity and bigger impact. 18 | P a g e

LUNCH REMARKS AIA/NOMA MOU GATEWAY COMMITMENT

2012 President, the American Institute of Architects Jeff Potter, FAIA Good afternoon, I’m proud to have been invited to this Summit, and delighted it’s being held in my hometown. In the minds of a lot of the world, the Big “D” of Dallas evokes many diverse images: the Cowboys and Rangers; big hair and barbeque; cotton and oil; Neiman Marcus and the Ewings. After all, this is the city of J.R. and Sue Ellen. When conversations turn to Dallas, more often than not, my hometown doesn’t call up images of “diversity” itself. Yet, like the rest of America, we’re changing. I celebrate it on our streets, in our food, in our schools, in our architecture, and increasingly in our local architectural firms. For some, the change is a matter of deep concern. Typically, it’s a concern fed not by fact, but fear. And what, in the end, do we have to fear? What are the consequences of the demographic push transforming us into a more diverse society? Why on earth should we fear becoming a nation where everyone who has the talent and the will has the opportunity to play a creative part inside the big tent of a vibrant democracy? Isn’t that finally what makes us unique as a nation? Isn’t that the source of our strength? “Out of many, one,” “e pluribus unum”—it’s the motto of the United States. Fortunately, facts are stubborn things; and in the end, if we’re smart and willing to stand up for our rights and the rights of others, as all of you in this room are doing 24/7, facts will ultimately prevail. This is the Dallas I’m proud of. This is the Dallas I want you to see.

“Why on earth should we fear becoming a nation where everyone who has the talent and the will has the opportunity to play a creative part inside the big tent of a vibrant democracy? ... ‘Out of many, one’, “e pluribus unum”—it’s the motto of the United States.” Jeff Potter, FAIA

Look around: We’re gaining new strength through a commitment not simply to talk, but to embrace diversity. With a vibrant Latinos in Architecture Committee, an active Woman in Architecture community, Young

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Architects Forum, and our Committee on the Environment, the women and men of AIA Dallas are making a difference in this community, in this state, and in the nation. I’d like to focus for a moment on our Latinos in Architecture Committee. This group is building bridges between the Latino community and architects as well as city planners. For their good and hard work, they’re an AIA 2012 National Diversity Recognition Program recipient. Let’s give them a hand… [applause] We’ve come far. And in that spirit, I’d like to acknowledge a respected AIA leader and a leader in the National Organization of Minority Architects, Clyde Porter, FAIA. I value my conversations with Clyde, and I admire his work at the Dallas Community College, especially his commitment to mentoring the next generation of architects. In other words, it wasn’t just friendship that persuaded me to nominate him for the 2009 Whitney M. Young, Jr. Award. And it wasn’t just because he’s a great guy that the jury reviewing the nominations agreed that this man deserved to be honored.

“…..an inclusive and diverse profession IS the future if we expect to play a healing role in the shaping of a more livable, productive, sustainable, and just America.” Jeff Potter, FAIA

Bear with me as I share another experience. Last year I was invited to be a juror during the student competition for NOMA’s Convention in Atlanta. There were about 15 student teams. Their assignment was to develop a proposal for a new transit center for an under-served, primarily African-American neighborhood. The brief asked the teams to solve the problem functionally, but also asked the team to consider other issues. For example, the neighborhood had historical significance, cultural nuances, and some other overt and subtle community challenges. Two things struck me: The enthusiasm, creativity, and energy of these student teams; and second, the ongoing commitment of NOMA to be a mentor for the rising generation of young professionals. Working with our young people is one of the best ways I know to foster an environment that embraces people of all backgrounds, socio-economic status, gender, and abilities. In this, NOMA has been a leader. Earlier this month, at the AIA’s Board of Directors meeting in Santa Fe, the Board enthusiastically reaffirmed the AIA’s adherence to the 2008 Gateway Commitment, a commitment to the active pursuit in every way possible to the vision of a profession that is diverse and inclusive. Because an inclusive and diverse profession IS the future if we expect to play a healing role in the shaping of a more livable, productive, sustainable, and just America. I am here today not only to represent my hometown and the Institute, but to congratulate you on this first “Diverse-Cities Multicultural Summit.” I can’t think of a more appropriate way to celebrate the 40 th anniversary of NOMA’s history. Well, perhaps I can in fact add yet another candle to that birthday cake.

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AIA/NOMA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING The first Memorandum of Understanding between NOMA and the AIA was signed in 2009 in San Francisco at the AIA’s annual Convention. Since then, we have seen continued collaboration through our members on a national and local level. I’d like to ask the AIA’s 2011 Young Architect Award recipient and NOMA’s current President, Sanford Garner, AIA, to come on stage to jointly sign a 2012 Memorandum of Understanding that commits both organizations to continue our collaboration toward the shared goal of a profession that is not exclusive, but embracing; collaborative, not destructively competitive; a profession that is not hired by the few, but whose talents and creativity are available to all Americans; a profession whose heart is as big as the nation it serves. Please join me in welcoming the 2012 President of the National Organization of Minority Architects, Sanford Garner, AIA.

AIA/NOMA MOU reaffirmed with 2012 President Jeff Potter, FAIA and Sanford Garner, NOMA 2012 President

“AIA and NOMA was pleased to renew and re-execute the AIA_NOMA Memorandum of Understanding. This reaffirmation is exemplary of the advancement of both organizations since the initial execution of the MOU. It stands as a testament of our interaction to further our organizational and membership relationship. “ Sanford Garner, NOMA 2012 President.

THE GATEWAY COMMITMENT We are pleased to present to you a copy of the Gateway Commitment. The AIA Board of Directors signed the Gateway Commitment during the September 2012 Board meeting in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The Gateway Commitment was initially developed during the 2008 AIA Diversity Plenary in St. Louis. It was created to serve as a blueprint for diversity initiatives within the profession and to ensure continued focus and actions by AIA Leadership, Components and members to create a profession that mirrors the society it serves. On behalf of the National Diversity Council we ask that you:   

Update the first line of the document to reflect your meeting, committee or event name. Update the last line of the document to reflect the date the document is signed. Please print a large copy or poster of the Gateway Commitment to present at your meeting and have your constituents sign the document to demonstrate their support for a more diverse and inclusive industry. Upon having your constituents sign the document, please send a PDF of the signed document to diversityandinclusion@aia.org.

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GATEWAY COMMITMENT

We, the participants of the multiFORMity 2008 AIA Diversity Plenary, are committed to significantly improving the representation and management of diversity in architecture education and practice. We believe this requires a cultural shift in the Institute, in our workplaces, and in ourselves. We envision a continuing conversation to articulate a specific action 

agenda concerning:

Using our members’ expertise to expand our diversity with creative career mentoring opportunities from kindergarten to retirement. Learning from other colleagues and related organizations that have successfully addressed diversity issues. Focusing on a series of coordinated action items and ideas to promote diversity, with comprehensive oversight.

Asking our membership to initiate conversations and actions on the local level.

Sharing and celebrating best practices in promoting diversity.

Recruiting and retaining the best and brightest in our profession.

Employ the appropriate resources to implement these initiatives.

Our purpose in setting forth this commitment is to develop a profession that reflects the diversity of the communities, users, and the clients we serve. September, 2013

Warm regards,

Wendy Ornelas, FAIA

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Miguel Del Rio, AIA

I AM AIA

Miguel del Rio, AIA introduced the Premiere of the “I am AIA” video For over 150 years, members of the American Institute of Architects have worked with each other and their communities to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings and cityscapes. By using sustainable design practices, materials, and techniques, AIA architects are uniquely poised to provide the leadership and guidance needed to provide solutions to address climate change. AIA architects walk the walk on sustainable design. Visit http://www.aia.org/. As one of the 2012 Chairs of the Diversity & Inclusion Council, I was struck by the importance of diversity and inclusion, but more importantly I made an observation that while, perhaps not as diverse as we would like, the AIA is diverse in many ways. We have diversity of people, practice, ideas and geography. Thus, I was pleased to be able to champion the creation of the I AM AIA video. I felt that it was important to showcase the diversity of the institute while we continue to foster an environment to bring more architects to the table. This summit is the national launch of the video which will be used to promote the diversity initiative and also as a membership retention and recruitment tool at AIA local chapters. You probably are familiar with a couple of the photogenic actors and actresses in the video and hopefully we can engage more members from you component on a follow up video. PLEASE SHARE with other component leaders, members, staff, AIAS Chapters, professors, students, high school counselors, friends, family and ALL ARCHITECTURE FANS so that it can be posted to chapter websites, Facebook pages or run on a loop during meeting/convention or in any other way deemed appropriate. It was filmed at National Convention in DC. The video is set in an informal atmosphere with the intention to show a broad spectrum of architects and help promote membership retention and recruitment as well as general interest about what we do. I’m optimistic about our profession and its future leaders! Thanks and hope you enjoy it! Miguel Del Rio, AIA http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZW4-ypKB68&feature=youtu.be 23 | P a g e

AFTERNOON BREAKOUT SESSIONS: Objective: To create a cultural change. Goal: To develop strategic initiatives that can be utilized by the local components to create an action plan to make further progress towards Diversity and Inclusion. Method: Each table will have a Diversity Council Member and local AIA Member as Co-Facilitators / discussion leaders. Secure a recorder to take notes for summary presentation. Each participant will have the opportunity to select two Themes in which to participate. There will be 2-one hour discussions with 10 minutes in between to allow participants to switch Themes and take a break. At the end of each of the one-hour sessions, there will be report-outs and discussion of the outcomes from the discussion groups. 1:30-2:30 First Roundtable Discussion (choose between Theme 1, 2, 3 & 4) 2:30-2:50 Report on first round of discussions (5 minutes each) 2:50-3:10 Switch discussion groups 3:10-4:10 Second Roundtable Discussion (choose between Theme 5, 6, 7 & 8) 4:10-4:30 Report on second round of discussions (5 minutes each)

Theme 1:

Dimensions of Diversity

Co-Leaders:

Walter Street, AIA; and Pete E. Garrett, AIA. President of Studio Red Architects

Through the discussion of cultural history, social justice, political correctness, and moving beyond “isms�, this topic will consider various elements of diversity examining the cultural intersections and divergences of the issues.

Theme 2:

Community in a Globalizing World

Co-Leaders:

Melissa Daniel, Assoc. AIA, NOMA; and Gabriel Durand-Hollis, FAIA

In considering the broader scale of a more interconnected world, this discussion will address leadership, firstnations issues, public service in diverse communities and civic pluralism. The roundtable will focus on pursuing solutions for cultural identity and strategies for community development responsive to the needs of a linked global community.

Theme 3:

The Influences of Global Media

Co-Leaders:

Amy Slattery, AIA and Nadine Crutcher, AIA

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The current trends in Social Media are an opportunity to reach a wider audience for globalization of diversity. Self-Representations of cultural differences allows the transition away from the traditional view of architects to embrace a broader spectrum using local, community, national, and transnational media. Cultural competency through increased communication and dialog with a new generation through the media in which they can express their individuality is critical to furthering the influence of diversity and inclusion.

Theme 4:

Education in a World of Difference

Co-Leaders:

Wendy Ornelas, FAIA and Lynn Paxson, Assoc. AIA, AICAE

In order to promote the cultural change we want to see in others, we need to begin by nurturing the change in our own understanding and behavior. As education provides the pathway for change, this roundtable will focus on the aspects of education influencing the direction to inculcate a multi-cultural worldview into the profession.

Theme 5:

Diversity in Construction and Construction Management

Co-Leaders:

Donna deJongh, AIA; Shelia Kleinpeter, AIA; and Clyde Porter, FAIA

It is insufficient to just influence and create change in the areas of practice, education and professional institutions without having a similar impact in the construction and construction management area. Therefore, this roundtable will take on the investigation of the project delivery community in discussing changes appropriate to produce an industry reflecting society in all aspects and considering how the industry can influence multi-cultural participation in the project processes.

Theme 6:

Diversity in Practice

Co-Leaders:

Gabriel Durand-Hollis, FAIA; and Larry Edmundson, AICAE

The traditional practice of architecture has come to embrace a broader spectrum of activities reflecting the creative dimensions of professionals. In this discussion, participants will explore the traditional and new domains of practice. The conversation will examine the influence of these new practice areas in re-defining the profession along with the opportunities and impact of diversity and inclusion.

Theme 7:

Diversity through Academics

Co-Leaders:

Curtis Sartor, Jr., PhD, Assoc. AIA, NOMA; and Ikhlas Sabonui, Ph.D., AIA, NOMA

The academies of architectural educational are the ground zero in beginning to build a multi-cultural profession. Therefore, the academic institutions need to reflect, embrace and champion a character of educational delivery to instill the values of multiculturalism across the entire educational spectrum including students, teachers and administrators. In the roundtable, our discussion will focus on diversity in the academic community through the professorship, administrative structure, student admission policies, curriculum 25 | P a g e

development, creative financial options, inclusive accreditation practices and inclusive internship practices to achieve the goal of creating change and influencing the profession’s future through the academies.

Theme 8:

Managing the Culture of Diversity

Co-Leaders:

Joyce Raspa, AIA, Esq.; Brian McAlexander, Assoc. AIA; and Derwin Broughton, AIA, NOMA

With a need to celebrate the differences of diverse cultures in developing further awareness and deeper understanding of the opportunities diversity can provide, this discussion will consider how to initiate the celebration of differences while maintaining identity. Participants will work toward the goals of managing and developing a diverse human resource base. The conversation will also include looking to the future beyond regulatory compliance and cultural assumptions to a broad acceptance of multicultural policies and practices.

BREAKOUT KEY DISCUSSION POINTS The breakout sessions enabled all participants to have a voice in the diversity dialogue and set the stage for continued discussion and action on a local level. These facilitated discussions encouraged cross cultural dialogue and ongoing collaboration. After an intensive afternoon discussing the various themes, some of the ideas and thoughts were as follows: 

 

       

Set a platform for equality of educational access all groups. Specifically by helping with strong Education background AND money (& ’community’ etc.) to attend and stay in a schools and level the playing field Ensuring education curriculums support the teaching of “Diversity is or could diversity of peoples early in one’s education; be teaching us – if we General education (and all ed.) needs to encompass the breadth and diversity of our national and global world; listen well and want to Mandatory global cross cultural history should be required learn” Encourage learning not just from books but also social interaction with diverse people The beaux art / Western single point of view limited our understanding and knowledge of history not histories… Many times diverse education is seen as going abroad but it is also at home – we have 500 + nations to learn from within the US Learning through diversity of ideas -- at least 2 points of view like Mies vs FLW Diverse is not about how we look, it’s also about how we think about ideas and our values etc.… Quality of education depends on quality of teachers – teachers need to be inspiring and have differing points-of-view to challenge how we see and think Universities need to re-think who they hire…i.e. should everyone be licensed – or some licensed and some not (some Ph.D.’s and some not) so that you get the widest range of opportunities for learning We must celebrate different learning system/styles… more “others” a cohort or a support group… (and different teaching styles)

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   

    

Are we teaching all our students to practice more globally to go out of US and work somewhere else? What do the next generation of architect’s or architecture students look like? Do they learn differently, do they communicate differently – digital Can they also communicate old school as well as digitally Different styles teaching vs. different styles learning – celebrate differences rather than supporting only one or major/majority – give students and educators “permission” to teach and learn in multiple and diverse manners [which is relevant to how young people learn today – one size does not fill everyone] Encourage peer and professional mentors -- from outside in the profession that are diverse and can therefore mentor the students and the faculty… Students mentor students too … older students helping younger … students of color helping each other … diverse thoughts, ethnicities, gender, . . . Learning on the internet – what impact does this have especially in terms of what we said earlier about the importance of/on interaction with people … Critical thinking Inclusion + integration [it is not about ignoring it but accepting that difference might include work / balance family vs. single etc.] How can construction What is global education? Is the US the epicenter of administration and construction education – (since many come here to study) or better to management be incorporated into look at what we can learn from other countries…. to move architecture in a more positive us ahead… is it just the cache of US degree or are we manner. really providing great teaching or great learning Generally, one of the least opportunity; if it is just earning a degree from the US how inclusive areas of the Design and can we re-become the epicenter of learning and Construction field is the education? Construction Industry. The upper management level of the construction industry has been a privileged industry primarily available to middle and upper economic level white male Americans. The “good ole boy network” / system is in place and continues to function today. Within the U.S. it is estimated that there are about six (6) significant Construction and Construction Management Companies presently owned and operated by minorities. The control exerted on the industry by the majority companies is not just the construction, but it expands to and applies to the control of budgets as well as control of schedules throughout the country. Of those six companies, only two to three mid-size minority companies in this country (were named) have emerged in the last thirty years. How can the Glass Ceiling in Construction Management be penetrated: o Breaking through the ceiling of the industry is a substantial challenge. Minorities have been handicapped by the tradition of history, the lack of access to money, funding and even to projects. o It was pointed out that in the current Construction and Construction Management Industry, 15% of the current money in the industry goes for soft costs with the remaining 85% going to Hard Costs of Construction. And, if this is equated to the billions of dollars spent on an annual basis in Construction; approximately 15% of these construction dollars are allocated to the design fees and other costs.

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o

 

 

Also, if the Minority Design Profession is less than 10% of the current population of design firms, that equates to somewhat less than 1.5% of the total design and construction dollars earned or available to be earned by minorities. How can being more Diverse aid our profession? o Currently the minorities in the Design Profession are a blend of African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native-Indian Americans sprinkled with a mix of Asian Americans from various ethnicities (Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Malaysian, etc.). Within each group, there are some success stories, however, the goal of this Diversity Summit is to identify ways to increase the numbers, especially those who presently are less than 1% in numbers. o We do not have the answer today. Further study, constant consciousness, awareness commitment to “The Cause” is required. Is there a Political Element to Construction and Construction Management? No one really cares to acknowledge that “Politics” plays a vital role with the money in the industry. However, it does. In recent years, legislation that has been enacted on both the Federal and local levels for both Women Owned Businesses and Minority Business Enterprises has not lived up to the goals. Some are of the opinion that the “Money makers” – those who invest in, subsidize and facilitate construction are the only people who have benefitted. There is and has been degradation in the respect for these affirmative action-type programs as a result. As a part of this Summit, we must explore ways to alleviate this trend. We need to approach the topic to identify ways to win; and ways to mitigate--why is there a win lose situation. Everyone and all benefit in a win-win situation. How can this be achieved. It can be achieved by AIA as a political arm extending its reach into the ranks or the industry to work more closely with and set new examples for the minorities. AIA and other adjunct professional groups need to develop programs to stimulate participation at all levels of Design and Construction. How can we further cultivate diversity in construction management: o One approach is to be more intensely focused on the education aspect of Construction Management. A void in the education system must be addressed. The role of AIA, NOMA, AIAEC and other organizations is to find ways of addressing this “Lack of Diversity.” o Presently, there are some university curriculums, such as the one at Prairie View University’s School of Architecture which encourages its students to pursue a double major. In this way, they study Construction as well as Architecture and are availed of the opportunities to be derived from double majors in Architecture and in Construction Management. How do we understand the various aspects of Construction, such as the insurance and bonding process? Can minorities fill this void? Can minorities penetrate the area of scheduling and budget funding?? The curriculums have to be revamped. In this way, educational facilities can re-start and continue to provide the education of not only professionals but those who may desire to broaden their perspectives in other potential employment layers of the construction industry. The bottom line is also impacted by ECONOMICS. Over seventy percent (70%) of the labor workers in the construction industry is presently Hispanic, African American and other ethnic groups. Is there a generational difference in Construction? Yes, there is. Culturally, many people, of minority heritage and extract, perform construction for a life time. However, they do not wish to have their children work as laborers in construction. So, their progeny are discouraged from looking for ways to

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  

work in construction, even when it means working to become a manager, or someone who grows into the managerial level. Are there women only in design? o The number of women in Construction is miniscule. It is very difficult to change that perception. Because of this unfair and incorrect idea, this has created the view that women are somehow unsuited for the construction arena. Unfortunately, this has lingered. Credit should be given to those females who have successfully penetrated the upper ranks of construction and construction management. This show-casing will go a great distance in dispelling the unfortunate perception that lingers today. The dynamics of working and penetrating a male dominated employment sector will take time and concentrated effort. AIA should use its influence to expand the Diversity of the Design, Construction and Construction Management arena. AIA can do this effectively by collaboration with other minority and women’s organizations to showcase the successes of women and minorities in Design, Construction and Construction Management related industries, by constantly encouraging diversity in this field. In this manner, AIA can lead the way in making it known that perceptions are unfounded and are not always reality.

BY THE NUMBERS “Are We There Yet?” 

Students 2009 o 30,000 students in Architecture schools o 59% males, 41% females o 56% white o 6% African American o 10% Asian and other Faculty 2009 o 5,600 faculty in Architecture Schools o 75% males, 25% females o 3% African American, 7% Hispanic o 130 Accredited Programs o 7 Historically Black Colleges and Universities

o o

o

o o

12% Hispanic .5% America *Dr. Ikhlas Sabonui, AIA, NOMA n Indian 15.5% multi-racial/mixed

Administration Less than 12 Deans, Department Chairs and Directors are from underrepresented populations

Licensed Architects o 75% white males, 17% females, 4% Asian, 3% Hispanic, 1% African American

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“How do we get there?”              

A Systemic Challenge Create more diverse relationships and representation at the administrative level among different groups Develop better retention efforts for under-represented populations Strategies for increasing the diversity and inclusion in the profession Emphasis on scholarship and service Create bridge between Academy and Profession Involvement in NAAB accreditation of architectural programs Development of Community College Pre-Architecture programs and possible accreditation Be more involved in AIA, NAAB, ACSA, NOMA, Acquitectos, ACE Mentoring and other groups Development of teaching Architectural firms (practice and schools in partnerships) Student organizations involvement i.e. AIAS, NO14AS, etc. Mentoring with Professors (i.e. case studies with Architects) in the design studios CEU requirements for school partnerships (embedded in AIA membership) More initiatives to attend colleges as guest jurors, critics and lecturers

Managing the Culture of Diversity Diversity/Culture Considerations Grid Celebrating our Differences While Maintaining Identity - Recognition of the Individual - Events - Creating Opportunities (Leading a Group, making a presentation, etc.) - Personal Connections - Mentors

Managing and Developing a Diverse Human Resource Base - Exposure to Communities - Personal connections - The Touch! - Reaching out on individual base - Being strategic in recruitment - Succession Planning - Passing on the Knowledge - Pipeline - Diversity from Different Schools (Range of Experiences)

Who manages culture? - Television - The Media - Your Family - Where you go to school, church your social group - Workplace

Diversity Measures - "Blind Auditions" - Breaking Down Walls - More Diverse - Assessment Tool / Tracking /Where we are but not ending there. - Individual Identity vs. Team Player

Multicultural Policy -Same Sex Marriage/ Civil Unions -Single Parent Benefits -Equal Opportunity Statement needs to be embedded in the culture and not just on paper.

Recommendation for Managing Culture - Celebrating Differences through Award-Programs, Follow UP - Deliberate and Intentional

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CLOSING KEYNOTE Walter Street, AIA introduced Closing Speaker Clyde Porter, FAIA, NOMA. Clyde Porter, FAIA Keynote Speaker at the 2012 Dallas Multicultural Conference Dallas

Clyde Porter, FAIA, NCARB, IIDA, NOMA is one half of a set of twin men, sons of Texas. These men are the children of nurturing parents and a father carpenter/builder who aspired to develop themselves to the extent of their capabilities for positive contributions to their family, community, state and the world. Still hard at work, this architect is the current Associate Vice Chancellor of Facilities Management and Planning/District Architect for the Dallas County Community College District. This position places Mr. Porter at the head of responsibility for billions of dollars of capital projects for the College District. Clyde Porter is recognized by a plethora of awards for his many achievements from the State of Texas, the U.S. military, the American *Clyde Porter, FAIA, NOMA “It is clear that [Porter] has always charted a Institute of course that allowed room for those whose Architects, the National Organization of Minority paths are fraught with obstacles, and our Architects and many other institutions. culture and profession are better for it,” Throughout a career dedicated to architecture, he Written by AIA board member Jeff Potter, incorporated the intent to champion access to the FAIA, in his Whitney M. Young Jr. Award profession and mentorship for those excluded from nomination letter for Porter participation. Clyde Porter’s keynote presentation provided a brief glimpse into his journey through his architectural career. Along the way, he became a military veteran serving in combat in Vietnam with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. There were other military duties that enabled him to attain higher ranks of responsibilities and challenges. Clyde met the challenges. Along the way, he used his formidable creative energies to provide opportunities for others and to formulate institutional changes to nurture people and improve those very institutions.

*Sanford Garner, AIA, Lynn Paxton, AIA, Clyde Porter, FAIA

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During his presentation, Mr. Porter does not focus on his many honors and achievements. There is a poignant recollection on achieving a career unimagined in his youth. Such realization at an early age caused Clyde to commit to reach out to and encourage those who would aspire to achieve and share his lifelong dream of architecture and design. He determined he would encourage through mentorship and being available to speak at schools and other venues to reach youth. This was a very touching and emotional delivery that touched all present. The message in its tone was fitting for this conference that had at its purpose the highlight of achievements by minorities, women and others in the profession. The message and tone was also timely and fitting to reiterate the distance left to travel to achieve the requisite equity and institutional change.

FINAL REMARKS Wendy Ornelas, FAIA & Miguel Del Rio, AIA. The Diversity and Inclusion Committee want to thank Sylvia Acevedo for her inspirational morning keynote and Clyde Porter for his compelling story. Stories are important in giving context to our place in the world. Our thanks also go to Jan Blackmon, FAIA and everyone from The art of progress is to AIA Dallas for helping to make this summit truly a success. preserve order amid change, AIA Dallas opened their arms in allowing us to meet in their spaces and have been such gracious hosts. Thank you to and to preserve change amid President Potter and President Garner for your reaffirmation order. of the AIA and NOMA’s relationship and thank you to the Diversity and Inclusion Council for your commitment to Alfred North Whitehead diversity and inclusion and for helping to make this summit a success. We also thank AIA Vice President John Padilla, AIA, Treasurer, Gabriel Durand-Hollis, FAIA, Susan McDaid, Sherry Snipes and Yvette Morris for your undying support. To everyone who participated today. We could not have had a successful summit without each and every one of you. Thank you.

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SPEAKERS & PLANNING COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES

Speakers

Sylvia Acevedo – Opening Keynote Speaker Sylvia Acevedo, is the CEO of CommuniCard LLC, a company specializing in education and workforce solutions. Sylvia has had a broad business career, serving as an executive for several Fortune 100 companies, such as IBM, DELL and Apple. She started her career literally as a rocket scientist at Jet Propulsion Labs. Sylvia holds a master’s degree of science in Industrial Engineering (Stanford University, 1983), and her undergraduate bachelor’s degree in Industrial Engineering from New Mexico State University. Sylvia was recently named by US News and World Report as one of the top 100 American Women in STEM. In 2011, Sylvia was named by President Obama to the White House Commission for Educational Excellence for Hispanics. The Government of Mexico honored Sylvia with the Ohtli award, one of its most prestigious civil rights recognitions. She currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Girl Scouts of the United States and the Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders, the largest public single gender school in the nation. Sylvia has received many awards and recognitions for her innovative, social entrepreneurial work and is an in demand corporate and conference speaker as a visionary thought leader.

Sanford E. Garner, AIA, NOMA, LEED AP ND, NCARB 2012 President, The National Organization of Minority Architects Through his role as founding partner at A2SO4, Sanford Garner has focused on historic preservation, master planning, project assessment, and urban design. His experiences and interests in these areas were developed through his architectural studies at Howard University, in Washington DC, Helsinki, Finland and at University of California, Los Angeles, and through his work with DC Preservation League and HABS/HAER (Historic American Building Survey/Historic American Engineering Survey). In addition to his professional practice, Sanford has maintained a strong commitment to community service and development 33 | P a g e

through his involvement with local and regional advisory councils and boards.

Jeff Potter, FAIA 2012 President, The American Institute of Architects Jeff Potter, FAIA, is a long-time advocate for the architectural profession and actively seeks to raise the awareness of how design works to the world around us. A registered architect, Jeff has an extensive portfolio of primary and secondary educational facilities. He founded POTTER in 1983; the firm also engages in landscape architecture and planning of places. The firm has won numerous design awards and actively seeks to improve people's lives wherever it works. A native of Shreveport, Louisiana, and current resident of Dallas, Texas, Jeff holds a Bachelor of Environmental Design and a Master of Architecture degree from Texas A &M University. In 2009, he and his wife Shelley were the first husband- wife team to be honored as Outstanding Alumni of the College Architecture at Texas A & M. He is a long-time contributor to the success of Texas Architect magazine, and was President of the Texas Society of Architects in 2004. Jeff has been a member of the national board of directors of the American Institute of Architects, was elevated to the AIA College of Fellows of the AIA, and has led the AIA as chair of numerous committees and task forces.

Clyde Porter, FAIA,IIDA, NCARB, NOMA Closing Keynote Clyde Porter, FAIA, IIDA, NCARB, NOMA, is the Associate Vice Chancellor of Facilities Management and Planning/District Architect for the Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD), an organization that administrates and supports the traditional approach to design and construction contracting for the seven campuses, one institute and two administrative, plus five satellite facilities of the community college system, serving over 100,000 students and faculty annually. During his tenure, he has master planned and completed over $1 billion of district-wide new construction, renovation, and expansion projects, i.e.: student centers, classrooms, administrative and infrastructure improvements. Presently, he is directing the DCCCD sustainability and maintenance long-range master plan $100 million program. Prior to that, he served as the chief architect for the Dallas Area Rapid Transit $2.9 billion transportation project, where he completed 10 transit center designs and set the regional architectural vernacular for the DART rail and bus transit center program. Throughout his career, he as managed more than $6 billion in design and construction. In 2003, he was the first architect in the history of Texas to be honored by Governor Perry with the highest award Texas can bestow, a commissioned Admiral in the Texas Navy, for his outstanding contribution to the state. This was preceded by honors from both the Texas House of Representatives and Texas Senate by resolution for his outstanding contribution in architecture as a premier public architect. He is also a Fellow of 34 | P a g e

the American Institute of Architects, one of the highest honors the AIA can bestow upon a member. Again, he was honored by the State of Texas in 2007 by resolution for this achievement. In addition, Mr. Porter, FAIA, was awarded the 2009 Whitney M. Young Jr. Award by the National AIA Board of Directors and received the State of Texas Governor’s Recognition for that achievement. In 2011, he served on the National AIA Jury for Collaborative and Professional Achievement Awards, and was appointed to the National AIA Ethics Council for 2011-2013.

Derwin Broughton, AIA, NOMA Derwin Broughton, AIA, NOMA serves as a staff architect for Ron Hobbs Architects of Garland, Texas. The firm specializes in the design of churches, municipal facilities and other corporate structures. As an award winning designer his entry for the Gus Garcia Park Design Competition in Austin, Texas took top honors. He is an advocate for the inclusion of minorities within the design industry. In 2008 he served as the organizer and moderator for a forum entitled “Closing the Crack: Recruiting, Retaining and Registering Women and Minority Architects” at the national American Institute of Architects convention in Boston, MA. He has been identified as an Emerging Leader within the Dallas Chapter of AIA and currently serves as the chairman for their Young Architect’s Forum. Derwin is also the immediate past President of the Dallas Chapter of the National Organization of Minority Architects.

Nadine R. Crutcher, AIA, LEED AP BD+C Nadine R. Crutcher, AIA, LEED AP BD+C is a long time practicing architect. In her twenty (20) years of experience, she has worked on mixed-use buildings, multi-family, high-rise office, education and municipal facilities. She attended Oklahoma State University, receiving a 5-yr Bachelor of Architecture followed by a B.F.A. (emphasis in Painting). Earning licensure in 2000, Nadine became one of five (5) black female architects registered in the State of Texas at that time. Her interest in sustainability led to LEED AP credentials in 2004. In 2009, Nadine founded Allforms Green, LLC a firm focused on sustainable building and consulting. As a green consultant providing LEED administration, she has guided and supported the achievement of LEED certification on many projects. Nadine participated as a speaker and moderator for UNCF’s 2010 and 2011 conference series “Building Green Learning Institute.” Nadine teaches green as an adjunct for TCCD and also provides periodic 2-day continuing education classes at U.T. Arlington. Her professional and volunteer work includes membership in AIA. She co-chaired Retrospect 2012 and is an ongoing member of COTE (Committee on the Environment).

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Larry Edmonson, AIA Larry Edmondson is a licensed architect with 59 years’ experience in the design of hotels, casinos, wellness centers, medical centers/clinics, community centers, educational facilities (elementary, high school, and college), fire stations and correctional facilities. In addition, he has developed many master plans for a variety of mixed-use projects, and has distinguished himself because of his knowledge of value engineering. Larry has served as National Director for both the American Institute of Architects and the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards. He also served on the Board of Governors of Licensed Architects of Oklahoma. He is Past President of American Institute Architects of Eastern Oklahoma, Past President of Central States Regional Conference (NCARB), Past President of the American Indian Council of Architects and Engineers (AICAE) and currently serves on their Board of Directors. He is honored to be a distinguished Richard Upjohn Fellow of the American Institute of Architects. Larry has established himself as a gentleman architect able to consistently deliver quality design solutions for the most demanding projects. Pete Garrett, AIA Pete Ed Garrett, AIA, Founding Partner of Studio RED Architects, has over 25 years of award-winning architecture and design experience in the public and private sector with particular emphasis in entertainment, performing arts centers and public assembly facilities. Pete Ed has designed almost a million square feet of non-profit facilities. Some of his most impressive project experience is in conversion, renovation and adaptive re-use projects. He is responsible for Lakewood Church, Harris County Jail, Memorial City Mall, all of which are renovation and repositioning projects. In addition, he renovated smaller projects such as Houston’s First Baptist Church and the Alley Theatre. Pete Ed graduated from University of Houston, is a recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award from the College of Architecture and has taught design courses at the Hines College of Architecture.

Sheila Kleinpeter, AIA Sheila joined JHP in 1999 upon graduation from the University of Texas, Arlington with a M. Arch. degree. With a decade of boots-on-the-ground experience in many Housing and Mixed-use building typologies, Sheila is one of the firm’s most qualified and prolific project managers. Known for her commitment to detail and her can-do-attitude Sheila is routinely assigned some of the firm’s largest accounts. In recognition of Sheila’s contributions, she was promoted to the position of Senior Associate in 2008. In addition to her Project Management responsibilities, Sheila provides oversight to staff on issues related to Accessibility and Fair Housing requirements. Assisting each project team with compliance reviews and advising them on safe harbor measures for implementation of: The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Fair Housing Act (FHA) and Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards/ Section 504 (UFAS). Sheila’s specialized training and targeted experience assists Owners, Developers, state and local government officials, and contractors to make 36 | P a g e

informed decisions regarding regulatory compliance. Lynn Paxson, Assoc. AIA, PhD, AICAE Lynn Paxson, Assoc. AIA, PhD, AICAE, is a Professor in the Architecture department at Iowa State University. She holds degrees in both design and social science and is interested in students understanding architecture and design as a cultural phenomenon. She teaches social and cultural design classes as well as studios. She introduced the History of Native American Architecture class (cross-listed with the American Indian Studies Program) and has taught a number of studios related to First Nation projects and issues. A member of the American Indian Council of Architects and Engineers (AICAE) and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES), Lynn serves as co-advisor to the Native American student groups at ISU, and to the NOMAS group. She has been recognized by the ACSA (American Collegiate Schools of Architecture) for her work in diversifying the architecture curriculum through the incorporation of native cultures and issues. She has a visiting appointment with the School of Architecture + Planning at the University of New Mexico where she is working with two colleagues to develop a national exhibition of Contemporary Indigenous Architecture. She has also served as a member of the College of Design’s Diversity Board since its inception. Her teaching and research reflect an integrative, interdisciplinary, approach and focuses on architecture as a cultural practice and on peoples and spaces that are often considered marginal.

Ken Rhyne, Allied AIA, AICAE Urban Design Group’s newest shareholder, Ken has over 34 years of experience in conceptual architectural and interior design projects. His areas of expertise include museums, libraries, resorts, casinos, cultural centers and corporate offices. Ken’s award-winning projects include the National Museum of the American Indian, Cultural Resources Center for the Smithsonian Institution and the Kampen Eagle Wing Center in Lafayette, Indiana. Ken is nationally recognized through his published works, lectures and notable projects. This national exposure led to his selection as a spokesperson for Dupont’s Antron Nylon Division in 2001. He has also been recognized as the Minority Entrepreneur of the Year, by the Atlanta Minority Business Development Center. Ken is often asked to speak on the topics of Sustainable Design and Green Architecture. This passion for sustainable architecture principles translates into his work. A Tuscarora Indian, Ken is a member of the American Indian Council of Architects and Engineers.

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Dr. Ikhlas Sabouni Dr. Ikhlas Sabouni has been Dean and Professor at the School of Architecture at Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU) in Prairie View, Texas from 1998 to the Present. She has been awarded several teaching honors; The Texas Society of Architects Edward J. Romieniec, FAIA Award, The American Institute of Architects Houston Chapter Educator Award, the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Distinguished Professor, Prairie View A&M University Distinguished Professor, the Texas A&M University Systems Regents’ Professor, and the College of Engineering and Architecture Faculty of the year three times, to mention a few. She was an active participant in the first National AIA Diversity Plenary and in the AIA CEO Large Firm Roundtable Dean’s Meeting to improve diversity and education in the field of architecture. She also served as a member on several professional honor award juries in architecture, such as the first National AIA Diversity Recognition Program, the ACSA Distinguished Professor Award, the AIA Houston Young Architect Award and the TSA 25 Years Award. Jessica Strong Jessica Strong is a structural engineer at JQ Engineering with a strong focus on giving back to the community. After graduating from Texas A&M University in 2008 and moving to Fort Worth, she began participating in numerous philanthropic activities in the community such as the ACE Mentoring Program, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, CANstruction, Hearts & Hammers, as well as numerous others. She has commuted to Dallas each week after work for nearly a year and a half to participate in the ACE mentor program before introducing the program to the Fort Worth area. Jessica has brought together numerous firms in the area to mentor high school juniors and seniors in the architecture, construction and engineering field. Several other opportunities for community involvement have developed from her participation with these other endeavors and she is now a board member for the Career and Technical Education Committee with the Fort Worth ISD and helping with various activities other related to education.

Lorena Toffer, AIA Originally from Mexico City, Lorena Téllez Toffer, works for Corgan Associates Inc., specializing in higher education, aviation, adaptive reuse and museum facilities. Her clients include The University of Maine, DFW Airport, The Dallas Holocaust Museum and The Sixth Floor Museum, serving as Design Lead and Project Architect. A member of the Young Constructors Council, AIA Dallas, and the Dallas Center for Architecture, her work has been exhibited, garnered with construction awards, and published in AIA Dallas 2011 WIA Competition Catalog. She was recently honored as 2012 Leader of the Future by Latino Leaders Magazine, and was invited to speak at AIA National Convention this past May as 2012 Co-Chair of Latinos in Architecture, committee of 38 | P a g e

AIA Dallas that was the recipient of the Diversity Recognition Program. She is 2011 AIA Dallas Young Architect of the Year. In her spare time, Ms. Toffer enjoys road-trips, walking her dogs, water coloring, and cooking.

Wendy Ornelas, FAIA Wendy Ornelas, FAIA, is the 2012-2014 Regional Director for AIA Central States, 2012 Co-Chair of the AIA Diversity Council, and associate dean and professor at the college of architecture, planning and design at Kansas State University. She and her husband, Robert Condia –a professor in the department of architecture at Kansas State – also have a firm, Condia + Ornelas Architects, with offices in Manhattan, Kans., and San Diego. The firm does small commercial projects, limiting themselves to one a year. Wendy is the director of the PhD program in Environmental Design & Planning and the director of the Architecture Internship Program at the College of Architecture, Planning, and Design. From her work at Kansas State, to her work with her firm, Condia + Ornelas Architects, she has earned distinguished recognition from her involvement with the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, a past member of the IDP Coordinating Committee, her participation in the 2008 Accreditation Review Conference, and her term as 2009-2010 president of the National Architectural Accrediting Board.

Miguel del Rio, AIA Miguel Del Rio is 2012 Co-Chair of the AIA Diversity Council, and Past President of AIA Puerto Rico Chapter. Under his leadership, the Chapter organized the AIA Haiti Reconstruction Summit. Also during his presidency, he conceptualized the successful 2010 Puerto Rico Convention entitled Diverse City. The central themes of diversity, inclusion and collaboration were promoted beyond ethnicity, gender etc., but also in the broader sense of the word to encourage alternative practices, emerging professionals, students and general public participation. Since 2001, he has been principal of Del Rio Arquitectos, CSP, a design firm specializing in residential, mixed use and hospitality projects. His practice has resulted in several collaborations with local firms such as JC Deya & Associates and SCF Arquitectos. Both alliances resulted in the award of two major RFP competitions: Metro City Village Mixed Use Development and Los Altos Mixed Use Development respectively.

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Planning Committee Curtis Sartor, Jr., PhD, Min. Assoc. AIA, NOMA Planning Committee Co-Chair Dr. C., as most people prefer to call him, is the Dean of the School of Art, Design & Architecture. He has general charge of all academic areas in the School of Art, Design and Architecture. As an architectural professor, he has been teaching for over twenty years and in private practice with Architectural firms in San Francisco, Ca. and Atlanta, Georgia for over ten years. He has professional experience in the design and planning of commercial, residential and institutional projects in both the public and private sector. He teaches courses in architectural design, environmental design, environmental psychology, earth stewardship, multiculturalism & non-western architecture. He has also taught students at Tuskegee Institute, Morris Brown College and at Southern Polytechnic State University. Joyce Raspa-Gore, AIA, Esq. Planning Committee Co-Chair Ms. Raspa is a solo practitioner in the areas of Construction, Real Estate, Contracts, Collections, Wills/Estate, Corporate, Municipal and Personal Injury Law. She graduated from Virginia Polytechnic Institute, with a Bachelor of Architecture, and graduated cum laude from New York Law School with a J.D. Joyce is admitted to the New Jersey Bar, United States District Court, District of New Jersey and the New York Bar. She is a member of the New Jersey State Bar Association, Construction Law, Woman in the Profession and GLBT Committees, and the Bergen County Bar Association, Construction Law Committee. Ms. Raspa is Past President of the Architects League of Northern New Jersey, a chapter of the American Institute of Architects; Directing Editor of The Leagueline, the Architects League’s quarterly award winning publication; and a recipient of the 2008 Distinguished Service Award and Trustees Award from the Architects League.

Tamarah Begay, Assoc. AIA, AICAE, LEED AP Tamarah has over 8 years of experience working with Native American Tribes on schools, housing, office buildings, cultural centers and multi-purpose buildings. Her experience includes project management, marketing, proposal writing, specification writing, programming, master planning, design (all phases), construction documents and construction administration. Tamarah is one of the founding members of the University of New Mexico Student Chapter of the American Indian Council of Architects and Engineers (SC-AICAE). As a professional member she also serves as a board member for the AICAE and continues to help mentor Native American students in the field of architecture and related degrees. Tamarah is also an associate member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), a certified construction document technical 40 | P a g e

(CDT), and a LEEDÂŽ Accredited Professional.

Melissa Daniel, Assoc. AIA Melissa Daniel currently works on several standard embassy design and renovation projects for the U.S Department of State for Washington, DCbased firm Karn Charuhas Chapman & Twohey (KCCT). Ms. Daniel has significant experience with the design of major public and commercial projects, with particular expertise in construction administration. As an active member in AIA|DC Chapter Emerging Architect Committee, Ms. Daniel has worked on the Architecture Uncensored lecture series (Fall 2009) and implemented a weekly ARE study group called DCstudyARE. Recently elected board member for DC chapter of National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA), she serves as chair of the Education committee. Ms. Daniel received her Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of District of Columbia and currently sits for the Architecture Registration Exam. Outside of architecture, she is a PACK (People & Animal Cardio Klub) volunteer with the Washington Humane Society.

Donna deJongh, AIA, CSI, NCARB Donne deJongh co-founded The deJongh Group, Architects and Planners in 1973. Today, the Virgin-islands based professional has completed a significant body of work, with projects in the U.S. and British Virgin Islands, and Georgia. She has supported active development of the architecture profession for most of her career. She served on the Virgin Islands Board of Architects for over 16 years, and represented the Virgin Islands on the Southern Conference of NCARB. During much of that period, she actively participated ARE committees, in writing and grading of the ARE. She has continued to give time to NCARB, and is actively dedicated to encouraging youth to become involved in architecture. Presently, she is completing her fourth term as President of the Virgin Islands Chapter of the AIA. In this capacity, she has supported many goals and objectives of the AIA, throughout the Chapter and the Florida Caribbean region.

Gabriel Durand-Hollis, FAIA Gabriel Durand-Hollis was elected as the 2012-2013 Treasurer for American Institute of Architects. He was elected president of AIA San Antonio (1992), after serving on the local component‘s board and as it vice president (1998-1992). Gabriel was later elected president of the Texas Society of Architects/AIA (1999), after having been its vice president and chair of government affairs committee (1993-1997). He began a community service award program, the Jim Pfluger Award, which recognizes a Texas architect distinguished by their longstanding service to their community. Gabriel has 41 | P a g e

been a member of the national International Committee (1997-2000), and chaired the Small Project professional interest area (1992-1995). He was elevated to the College of Fellows in 2003. Gabriel is the president of Durand-Hollis Rupe, Inc. (DHR), a San Antonio firm that designs interiors, commercial, planning, municipal, aviation, research, medical and retail projects. DHR is noted for improvements to the San Antonio International Airport, Texas Medclinics, Alamo Colleges, and a portion of the restored Pearl Brewery that received Gold LEED certification. Judson A. Kline, FAIA, LEED AP Jud Kline served as Senior Director of Herschman Architects, Inc., a retail and shopping center design firm where he practiced for 34 years, until his recent retirement from the firm. He is an adjunct professor in the Kent State University College of Architecture. Jud is licensed in 11 states and has NCARB certification. He is a member of AIA (Cleveland past president AIA Ohio 2011 President-elect, AIA 150 Cleveland Champion), Greater Cleveland Real Estate Organization pastPresident, and Rotary Club of Shaker Heights past President, Chairman of the John Hay High School of Architecture and Design Advisory Board, a LEED Accredited Professional and certified as an Institute of Store Planners professional.

Brian McAlexander, Assoc. AIA, LEED AP Prior to his appointment to the 2012 AIA Diversity Council, Brian McAlexander served on the AIA Dayton High School Student Design Competition, AIA Dayton Associate Director, AIA Ohio Associate Director, AIA Ohio Valley Regional Associate Director, and the AIA National Associates Committee. He is also involved with Equality Ohio and the Human Rights Campaign (HRC).

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Amy Slattery, AIA Amy Slattery is a Senior Architect and Project Manager at Burns & McDonnell Architecture in Kansas City, MO, and was recently named a 2011 AIA Young Architects Award recipient. Through her leadership with the AIA at local, regional and national levels, she has emerged as a national voice advocating for diversity and emerging professionals. A recognized leader amongst her peers, Amy was named Emerging Professional of the Year by AIA Kansas City professionals in the community, to learn from their success, to advance the work women are doing and to improve the way our lives intersect that work. WiDKC was one of ten programs selected for the first annual AIA National Diversity Recognition Program in 2009 and the only program to receive that recognition for the second time in 2010. Amy currently serves on the Board of Directors for Kansas City Commercial Real Estate Women (KC CREW). in 2008 and was recognized by ENR Midwest’s Top 20 under 40 in 2012. In 2005, Amy initiated Women in Design Kansas City (WiDKC) as an attempt to reach out to established female architects.

Walter Street, AIA, NOMA Walter Street is currently serving a 3 year term on the AIA Board of Directors of (2012-2014). He is a member of the Board Advocacy Committee (BAC) and Practice Sub-Committee. Street is also on the Board of the AIA Chicago Foundation. A seasoned architect and entrepreneur, he recently re-launched his firm Walter Street Architect. He previously held the role of senior architect at Johnson & Lee, Ltd. Architects/Planners and has been a member of the AIA Chicago Board of Directors, serving as Treasurer in 2008. He is a regular and active participant in the National AIA Grassroots legislative conferences in Washington, DC, and the Illinois Prairie Grassroots conferences in Springfield. An active member of NOMA and an ongoing mentor to IDP candidates, Walter has also served as a member of the Chicago Architecture Foundation's committee to develop an architecture curriculum for K–12 students. AIA Diversity and Inclusion Center of Excellence Staff

Sherry Snipes, Director Diversity & Inclusion Center of Excellence

Director, Diversity & Inclusion, The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Ms. Snipes is a dynamic diversity authority passionate regarding the world’s changing face and changes facing the world. She has been the Diversity Leader at AIA since 2009 where she is committed and focused on providing diversity resources to AIA’s 80,000+ members. 43 | P a g e

Her diversity leadership experiences at Fortune500 and non-profit organizations inspired formation of Global Diversity Collaborative, a non-profit focused on creating a global practitioners network and the DANDI (aka diversity & inclusion) Awards. She previously led global diversity and human resources teams at Arrow Electronics, Inc., MSC Direct and John Kaldor Fabricmaker. She is a Hampton University graduate, speaker, blogger and social networker who was awarded TNJ’s Top 25 Most Influential Black Women in Business and the NAAAHRGNY’s Leadership Award. Personal quote: “Inspire & Aspire Greatness.”

Yvette Morris, Manager Diversity & Inclusion Programs & Initiatives Yvette is a graduate of the University of Albany. She joined AIA shortly after graduation and has been key member of the AIA Diversity continuum since 2004. Yvette manages content for www.aia.org/diversity, works closely with the Diversity Pathways Committee and provides operational guidance for the Diversity and Inclusion Center of Excellence.

Lessons Learned / Post-Event Follow-Up   

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Make sure the local component is committed and fully participates in the event. The component needs a champion, and not fully depend on the National Committee and Staff. If there is no champion it will look like National is insinuating ourselves in the local component. Multiculturalism is a grassroots effort. It must be intentional from grassroots up, and not be demanded from the top down. It is not just about diversity, but also more importantly about inclusion in every sense of the word. Have more community involvement – having it at a school or some other public location; inviting people in the community to the keynote lectures; having local sponsors; engage a university or tack this onto some other public event. . . Use the summit as a time for outreach to the public and to connect to other components or multicultural organizations. The summit does not have to be an entire day – it could be broken into bite-size pieces such as a halfa-day or an evening. Advertise a minimum of three months in advance. Extend invitations to local community colleges or universities with architecture programs.

If the event is organized from a national committee, introduce members and have some differentiating tag on their name badges.

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HOST A STRENGTH THROUGH DIVERSE-CITIES SUMMIT The Multicultural Working Group is committed to encouraging engagement on a local level and highly encourages developing similar programs on a local level. The Dallas program was conducted over the course of 1.5 days. However, this model can be customized. It can be shortened to 1 day, ½ day or even into an evening or morning event. The program can also be designed to ensure continuing education credit is received by participants. Key Steps to Design a Multicultural Summit 1. Create a Planning Committee to determine:  Event Theme/Purpose/mission  Event Location  Event Title  Date/time  Determine AV needs (videographer, microphones, internet, etc.)  Identify Catering options  Draft agenda  Draft Budget/summit costs 2. Other suggested committees to consider:  Venue Search Group Committee(identify location for event;  Keynote Speaker Search Committee (look at area schools, universities along with public and/or private sector professionals who may have related diversity interests to share;  Committee on Mentor Search Groups (seek out related public service organizations who have a diversified population who may be interested in spreading their message;  Committee to establish a definition and goal for subject outlines that may serve as the central theme for Round Table Discussion Groups;  Committee to identify Closing and Summary Objectives & Statements;  Committee to Record the event actions / activities and set up archive. 3. Speaker Management  Identify individuals and organizations to invite to participate  Identify keynote  Identify panelists  Speaker invitation letters  Confirmation letters/emails  Obtain speaker biographies and headshots  Obtain speaker presentations/handouts (sample document – LIA)  Host conference call with Speakers  Develop Summit header slides (sample document)  Speaker gifts

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Develop sponsor committee or Lead Develop Sponsorship Prospectus Identify potential sponsors

5. Create Marketing/Social Media Strategy         

Identify a lead person who is active in the social media arena to lead the charge and create engagement for potential participants. Prior to the event, posted links and registration information on Twitter. Establish hashtag (i.e. #AIADallasMC) to use on all tweets throughout the two-day event. In advance of event, collect the names of those in attendance or presenting who are active on social media and mention them in any related tweets. As the summit unfolds, take live photos of presentations and tours and quote the most relevant and exciting statements of the day. Following the event, build engagement by “following” and “friending” the attendees who are active in social media. This will encourage long term engagement by encouraging ongoing dialogue. Consider Pinterest Account for Images/Issu for any whitepapers that come out of it. Have a live blog going both before during and after the event, post event summaries as they conclude throughout the day, and use it to follow up after the summit Establish volunteer(s) to live tweeting/blog throughout the day, one volunteer taking notes and feeding them quotes and information bites throughout the summit, and one volunteer writing wrapup blog entries If the event is recorded, create pod-casts of all proceedings and post them in a series following the summit to continue the dialogue.

6. Prior to event  Finalize agenda (tours/receptions, etc.)  Create webpage and/or Online Registration site  Finalize contracts/schedule  Implement Marketing strategy  Create Email blast strategy  Develop media alerts/press releases (sample document)  Hold Planning Committee Run of Show meeting  Conduct pre-event walk through  Registration table  Final List of registrants  Determine catering delivery (times, contacts)

7. Post-Summit Checklist  

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Committee event summary meeting Evaluation Survey Thank you letters Develop event proceedings documentation

Contact Us! www.aia.org/diversity diversityandinclusion@aia.org

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AIA Multicultural Summit