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Temple City

Spring 2013 news events people

READY FOR

ACTION

INSIDE!

SPRING RECREATION GUIDE PAGE 25

9 PARDON THE DUST

13 MANAGING THE UNEXPECTED

20 PLANNING FOR BIKES

TEMPLE CITY’S ANNUAL

Easter Egg Hunt and Breakfast with the Easter Bunny Saturday, March 30 Live Oak Park 10144 Bogue St. SCH E D U LE O F E VE NTS :

Breakfast with the Easter Bunny

Easter Egg Hunt

9–11 a.m.

8:30–11:30 a.m.

$5 for two pancakes, bacon or sausage, and beverage

10 a.m.: Ages 1–4 & 4–5 10:30 a.m.: Ages 6–7 & 8–9

Co-sponsored by the Temple City SuperSTARS Drill Team and Kiwanis Club of Temple City

Event will be canceled in the event of rain

Candy-filled Eggs! Free Crafts!

Face Painting! Petting Zoo!

CITY OF TEMPLE CITY ✿ 9701 LAS TUNAS DR., TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780 ✿ (626) 285-2171

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE 4 City Manager’s Message

9 Pardon the Dust

Ready to go

A new grand boulevard

5 Perspectives

12 Counterparts

Surviving a zombie takeover

In full bloom

6 Snapshots

13 Managing the Unexpected

Capturing the community spirit

Prepping for the next emergency

18 Shift Happens

9

Pardon the Dust

Dealing with earthquakes

20 13

Pedaling into the Future

20 Pedaling into the Future

33 Ask City Hall

Planning for bike infrastructure

Las Tunas Drive redesign

25 Recreation Guide

34 People

Spring 2013 classes and activities

Li Jing, Hollywood stuntwoman

Managing the Unexpected

Temple City Connect

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temple city

city manager’s message

READY TO

GO!

Since we first committed to taking City Hall to high-performance in 2011, it’s been our

TEMPLE CITY CONNECT is the City’s quarterly magazine that connects the community to City Hall.

EDITOR Jose Pulido

philosophy that strategic planning and focused coordination are essential to achieving

MANAGING EDITOR

success. Two years later, after countless community engagement sessions and numerous

Brian Haworth

planning studies, we’re ready for action. Whether dealing with an emergency, coping with the Rosemead Boulevard transformation now in construction, or looking forward to

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

upcoming bike lanes, forethought and preparation has us braced and eager to take on

Wendy Chung

the progress coming our way. In no other aspect of government is preparedness more consequential than emergency management (page 13). After the November 2011 windstorm, despite Temple City being one of the worst hit, we emerged as one of the first to complete cleanup. This was largely thanks to proactive pre-disaster coordination, not just by the City and local public safety agencies, but also our Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), which sprang into action providing critical assistance to first responders. As recent studies show that

COPY EDITOR Roger Grody

WRITERS Stephanie Chan Chelsea Wood

communities with strong social ties tend to be more resilient in crises, I urge everybody to

PHOTOGRAPHERS

learn more about emergency readiness (page 18), and even consider signing up for the

Bryan Ariizumi Jerry Jambazian

upcoming round of CERT trainings in May. Beyond survival in crisis situations, our emphasis on strategic planning has paid— literally. Of the $10 million in windstorm damages, staff has successfully recuperated more than half a million in grants and

Whether dealing with an emergency…or looking forward to upcoming bike lanes, forethought and preparation has us braced and eager to take on the progress coming our way. JOSE PULIDO, CITY MANAGER

recovered costs. More impressive is the Rosemead Boulevard Enhancement Project now under construction (page 9).

TRANSLATOR Stella Yu

CONTRIBUTOR Steve Nathan

Of its $20.7 million cost, more than

DESIGNER

90 percent is covered by non-General

Fuel Creative Group

Fund dollars. While the two years of planning and preparation may

CITY COUNCIL

seem extensive, considering that the

Vincent Yu

improvements will enhance local economy

MAYOR

and livability for the next 50 years and beyond, it is all a worthy investment. By the time Rosemead Boulevard is completed next year, we’ll be seeing the city’s first bike lanes—also distinguished as the San Gabriel Valley’s first protected bike lanes. Since adopting the Bicycle Master Plan in 2011, things have moved swiftly with implementation

Cynthia Sternquist MAYOR PRO TEM

Carl Blum COUNCILMEMBER

(page 20). Already, we’ve received two Caltrans grants totaling $922,000 to construct more than half of the proposed routes. Before the lanes arrive, get ready to ride at the inaugural Bike Ride and Rodeo on March 23. Staff is planning a great time featuring live entertainment and raffles. Everyone’s invited and you won’t want to miss out! Even if cycling, street improvement plans and emergency management aren’t your cup of tea, we’ve got tons of other planning initiatives in which you can participate. In the next few months will be community workshops for the Parks and Open Space Master Plan and an upcoming fixed-route transit system, while sometime next year will be the General Plan update. We’re always planning for success here in Temple City, and as usual, I invite you to continue being part of the process.

Fernando Vizcarra COUNCILMEMBER

Tom Chavez COUNCILMEMBER

COVER PHOTO Training for the next emergency. PHOTO BY BRYAN ARIIZUMI City of Temple City 9701 Las Tunas Dr. Temple City, CA 91780 ©2013 City of Temple City. All rights reserved. If you have questions or comments regarding our magazine, please email us at connect@templecity.us.

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perspectives

“WHAT’S YOUR STRATEGY TO SURVIVE A ZOMBIE TAKEOVER?”

As an unpleasant reminder that disaster can strike at anytime, the 2011 windstorm prompted many to rethink emergency preparedness. Though a zombie apocalypse may be a little extreme, we believe if you’re set for zombies, you’re set for the worst disaster situations. To test our community’s readiness, we visited with some local zombie experts at Temple City High School and asked: BY CHELSEA WOOD

“If zombies attacked I would be “I think it’s important to pack scared and definitely wouldn’t money for emergencies. If carry too many supplies so I zombies showed up, I would could escape easily if I needed to. probably freak out, scream and I would go to the roof, lock the find a hiding place upstairs.” doors and barricade the building!” LYNETTE ALEXA

“I would pack all of my favorite foods—fries and ketchup. They just mix well together!” JONATHAN

“I would find a place to hide first and then make some barriers around my house. Since we might be trapped for a long time, I’d make sure to pack American comfort food and also store plenty of water.” HARRY

“A first aid kit and food would be essential. I’d also find things to distract the zombies. In the event of a zombie takeover, I’d build a fort. Barricades aren’t a good idea, since zombies can break through barricades pretty easy. My fort “If zombies took over I would would be underground because move to Utah to be closer with it would be harder for zombies to my family so we could protect surround you. There would only each other. If a zombie attack ever be one or two entries that the actually happened I’d probably zombies could come into. If you have a spaz attack!” have a fort above ground, zombies can come in from the sides, and KATHLEEN from the top.” “I’d board up all my windows, lock ELIJAH all my doors and make sure my “The most important thing to pack cat was inside. If there were a few is food. If zombies took over I things I would make sure to have, would barricade my home, and it’d definitely be money and food. board up the windows with wood And my cell phone.” or any other sturdy materials.” ALYSON

“In case of a zombie attack I would pack Girl Scout Cookies, and imperishable foods like Cup Noodles. A first aid kit and some spare clothes would also be in my survival kit.” RYAN

“The first thing I would do is go to Walmart or K-mart and stock up on all the goods I might need, just in case they run out of stock. Having a flashlight on hand is really important, also non-perishable foods. We have to be prepared.” ELIZABETH

RAFAEL

ELIZABETH

RAPHAEL

ALYSON

JONATHAN

Temple City Connect

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temple city

snapshots

WHILE WINTER’S COLD TEMPERATURES AND NUMEROUS HOLIDAYS DON’T USUALLY BODE WELL FOR PRODUCTIVITY, OUR COMMUNITY KEPT ON THE MOVE. FROM FESTIVE PARADES AND CARNIVALS, TO STREETSCAPE REDESIGN AND RECONSTRUCTION EFFORTS—WE CAN’T STOP, WON’T STOP IN TEMPLE CITY!

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1 WINTER WONDERLAND On Dec. 6, Lights On Temple City brought crowds of families to Temple City Park to enjoy snow play, photos with Santa, live holiday entertainment and lighting of the 100-foot redwood tree. 2

ROADWORK AHEAD

Construction on the Rosemead Boulevard Enhancement Project has been virtually nonstop since its Jan. 28 groundbreaking. Work began with median reconstruction and will proceed outward toward sidewalks. Completion is expected next summer.

Jan. 29

‘ONCE IN A LIFETIME’ February was all about the 69th Annual Camellia Festival. From the royal coronation on Feb. 1, to parade and carnival during the last weekend of the month, festivities put Temple City front and center on the regional stage. 3

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Feb. 6

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CITY CALENDAR FOR DETAILS, CALL (626) 285-2171.

MARCH 10 13 14 21

23 26 27 30

Daylight Saving Time begins (2 a.m.) Arbor Day Celebration Spring class enrollment begins Neighborhood Watch Meeting: Area 1 Parks and Recreation Open House

Bike Ride and Rodeo Parks & Open Space Planning Workshop (Longden Elementary) Parks & Open Space Planning Workshop (Live Oak Park) Easter Egg Hunt & Breakfast with the Easter Bunny

APRIL 5 8 10

15 Deadline to apply: Sheriff’s Community Academy 27 Food Truck Festival

Spring Fling Spring classes begin Neighborhood Watch Meeting: Area 3

MAY 1 9 14

Reservation deadline: CERT Training Neighborhood Watch Meeting: Area 8 Jazz in the Park

15 27

Enrollment begins for summer youth camps Memorial Day (City offices closed)

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Neighborhood Watch Meeting: Area 11 Summer class enrollment begins Summer Concert in the Park

JUNE 3 8 12

Enrollment begins for summer sports camps Oak Avenue Intermediate Concert Summer Concert in the Park

Farmer’s Market Locally grown fruits, vegetables, plants, flowers, honey, cheeses and baked goods. 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m. City Hall 9701 Las Tunas Dr.

every sunday

STAY CONNECTED Get updates on City events @ConnectwithTC facebook.com/ConnectwithTC

SEND US YOUR PHOTOS: Have you attended a recent Temple City event? Submit your favorite photos to connect@templecity.us for possible publication in our next issue.

Temple City Connect

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CA CRV

Temple City Doesn’t Cry Over Spilt Milk. Instead, we turned 5,600 milk containers into durable waste receptacles and park furniture. So next time you spill your drink—whether milk, water or juice—keep calm and recycle on. Deliver your empty beverage containers with the CRV-eligible symbol to any California Recycling Center. Then turn your frown upside when you get cash back in return. To find a center near you, visit calrecycle.ca.gov.

CITY OF TEMPLE CITY

9701 LAS TUNAS DR., TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780

(626) 285-2171

temple city

feature

The only place we know of where ‘success’ comes before ‘work’ is in the dictionary— unfortunately. With Rosemead Boulevard construction anticipated to last through summer 2014, there’s much work to be done in the next 16 months. But if all goes according to plan, the temporary inconveniences will pay off. Big time.

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FIVE REASONS TO PARDON THE DUST BY WENDY CHUNG

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WE LIKE TO MOVE IT, MOVE IT

I FEEL PRETTY, OH SO PRETTY

REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE

DESIGN ON A DIME

IF YOU BUILD IT, THEY WILL COME

Whether you’re a pedestrian, cyclist, driver, bus rider or all of the above, there’s at least one incoming amenity that will make your trip a safer, more enjoyable one. Brand new ADA-accessible sidewalks and the city’s first bike lanes will provide new paths for locals to navigate Temple City by foot and pedal power; while traffic calming features and transit improvements will better manage traffic for enhanced safety and flow.

From “pass-through thoroughfare” to “unsightly strip of asphalt,” we’ve heard it all. While today’s Rosemead Boulevard has little to offer visitors seeking to explore the great Temple City outdoors, when the project is done, new public art and plant life will transform the existing street into a grand boulevard. Plus, with construction bringing in new sidewalks, bike lanes, public benches and al fresco dining, you’ll also have a place to sit back and take in the street life all around.

Thanks in part to a grant from CalRecycle, Rosemead Boulevard will soon be where the rubber makes the road. Street surfaces will be paved with rubberized asphalt concrete, a ‘green’ material blended from used tires. Another notable sustainability feature of this project is the diversion of rainwater from storm drains to help grow plants.

You must be thinking Temple City’s got expensive taste. Although the project comes with a hefty price tag of about $20.7 million, less than 10 percent is from the City’s General Fund. The rest is paid for by a combination of federal, state and local resources including grants from the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Caltrans and CalRecycle.

The transformation underway on Rosemead Boulevard has already generated its share of “oohs” and “aahs.” Area cyclists eagerly await the installment of protected bike lanes, while surrounding businesses are looking forward to the incoming improvements drawing new customers. Overall, the project is expected to jumpstart the local economy, as the City also works on revitalizing the downtown district on Las Tunas Drive.

By the time construction finishes next year, Temple City will be home to the San Gabriel Valley’s first protected bike lanes.

About 500 new trees and more than 60,000 plants will transform the concrete jungle into a verdant garden walk.

The project’s use of rubberized asphalt concrete will divert more than 1.75 million used tires from local landfills.

Using minimal General Fund dollars to generate maximum impact on Rosemead Boulevard, the City takes “strategic funding” to a whole new level.

The creation of a destination on Rosemead Boulevard is anticipated to attract visitors to Temple City, revitalizing the local economy.

Temple City Connect

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temple city

feature

CONSTRUCTION

PHASING PLAN ROME WAS NOT BUILT IN A DAY... and neither will be Rosemead Boulevard. But with an accelerated 16-month construction schedule, the project is powering through more than $1 million in construction work every month, ambitious to even the most seasoned of field professionals. “I don’t think I’ve ever been involved in a street project with a schedule quite this aggressive. Especially considering its complexity,” says Superintendent Jack Togneri, who’s been tearing up and rebuilding roads for 34 years. “Typically, a project is either in

residential or commercial zones—this one’s in both. And there are a lot of components involved—including artwork, a whole lot of trees and plants, signage and bus shelters.” To keep on schedule, Togneri’s crew works Monday through Friday, and on occasion, even weekends. “When a workday is rained out, we carry on the next available workday to ensure that progress stays on track,” he explains. While pushing hard to keep on target, the construction team is also mindful when it comes to minimizing inconvenience.

羅斯密大道美化工程—羅斯密大道美化工程現在已經開始施工,預料在2014年底完工,新大道落成之後,街 景會煥然一新,除了有創新的保護式單車徑和人行道之外,還會栽種新的樹木和植物,新車道材料採用再造 車胎橡膠鋪成,兩旁更設置公共藝術。新大道完工後周圍環境會更為優美,不但有助提昇天普市的形象聲譽, ���吸引外來訪客,刺激經濟的發展。

“Construction inevitably comes with impacts, which we understand are unsavory— but we are doing our best to minimize disruption.” As work proceeds, Togneri advises that on occasion, community members may find crews in front of their properties sooner than scheduled—in which case, there will always be advance notice. “Our goal is to quickly come in then out,” he said. “This timeline is already so fast and so accelerated; to finish even a month ahead would be monumental.”

VIEW THE PROJECT PHASING SCHEDULE, including detailed construction plans at www.rosemeadblvd.com.

ROADWORK AHEAD: ROSEMEAD BOULEVARD SAFETY ENHANCEMENT & BEAUTIFICATION PROJECT CONSTRUCTION PHASING As part of a strategic approach to minimize traffic impact, construction started with center medians, allowing two outer traffic lanes to remain in operation during the first phases. Work will then proceed outward from the south end of Rosemead Boulevard moving northward. 10

Spring 2013

www.templecity.us

KEEPING YOU MOVING

PROGRESS DOESN’T STOP ON ROSEMEAD BOULEVARD—AND NEITHER SHOULD YOU. STAY UP TO DATE WITH CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED IMPACTS WITH THESE INFORMATION RESOURCES.

ON THE WEB

ROADSIDE E-BOARDS

Explore the project on the web at www.rosemeadblvd.com. View project designs and see what’s coming into your neighborhood.

Keep an eye out on the electronic message boards in and around the construction zone for safety advisories and announcements of new AM 1690 broadcasts.

LIVE TRAFFIC Know before you go and plan ahead for road conditions by checking live traffic at www.rosemeadblvd.com/traffic.

WEEKLY ADVISORIES Every Friday, the City releases construction notices of work to be performed the following week. Subscribe at www.rosemeadblvd.com.

AM 1690 Dial forward to move forward. Tune to AM 1690 weekdays for regular construction updates and traffic advisories. New messages air every Monday at noon, and are also available at www.rosemeadblvd.com/am1690.

TEXT MESSAGING To get Rosemead Boulevard construction updates sent directly to your phone, text ROSEMEAD to 888777. Standard messaging rates apply.

SOCIAL MEDIA Connect with Temple City on Facebook and Twitter for updates on Rosemead Boulevard and beyond.

DIRECT CONTACT Speak directly with a project representative by calling the project hotline at (626) 476-7376, or e-mailing rosemeadblvd@templecity.us.

No parking on Rosemead Boulevard. Residents directly affected by the ban on street parking, especially in the evening, may receive free, temporary overnight parking permits for use on adjacent side streets. Address verification is required. For more information, call the Public Safety Divison at (626) 285-2171, ext. 2333. 600 work zone fatalities occur in the U.S. every year. This number is among an estimated 38,000 injuries suffered by crew and passing travelers. To keep Rosemead Boulevard safe, proceed cautiously when in the vicinity of construction, watching for cyclists and pedestrians. Observe the 25 mph speed limit, and obey flaggers and the law at all times.

N CALLITA

D RO A

25 mph speed limit strictly enforced. In the first week of construction alone, sheriffs issued more than 50 citations. Keep in mind that fines for moving violations in construction zones are doubled.

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R A IL

Though many drivers are used to cruising Rosemead Boulevard at speeds upward of 45 mph, please remember to slow down in construction zones for your safety and that of crews at work.

ROSEMEAD BLVD.

L AS TUN

R.

Phase

SAFETY TIPS AND REMINDERS

WINTER 2013

SPRING 2013

SUMMER 2013

FALL 2013

WINTER 2014

SPRING 2014

SUMMER 2014

MEDIANS: RAILROAD TO LAS TUNAS MEDIANS: LAS TUNAS TO CALLITA E SIDEWALKS: RAILROAD TO LAS TUNAS E CORNERS AT LAS TUNAS W CORNERS AT LAS TUNAS W SIDEWALKS: ELM TO RAILROAD E SIDEWALKS: ELM TO CALLITA W SIDEWALKS: CALLITA TO ELM Phasing schedule shown as of February 2013. Please note that construction may be subject to such variables as inclement weather and other unforeseen circumstances that may affect the above timeline. To view the latest project information and learn about incoming improvements, visit www.rosemeadblvd.com.

Temple City Connect

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temple city

counterparts

Full Bloom

BY STEPHANIE CHAN

Roses are red Violets are blue These are the shops That bloom for you With spring in the air, celebrate the fresh new season with fresh bouquets at two floral boutiques in Temple City!

FLOWER MART

FANNY’S FLOWERS

“Flowers make people happy,” says owner Wendy Liu of Flower Mart. “So everyday is happy [for me].” A florist who’s been around the block—previously owning a floral boutique in Hollywood—Liu’s been local for over a decade, offering floral services to Temple City and the surrounding region. “She preferred being here,” said daughter Shirley Liu, who also takes part in the business. “She felt a little more safe, a little more comfortable.” Having served the area for so long, Wendy’s gotten a variety of floral arrangement requests. One of the most extravagant orders she’s received? “999 roses ordered by one person,” she recalls. “It cost about $600 to $700.” A more common request of late, however, has been the customer-favorite Hong Kong-style flowers. These individually wrapped roses, colored and decorated with glitter, are popular especially among high school students. “That’s usually what they’ll order when they’re asking someone to homecoming or prom,” Shirley explains. Whether holiday, graduation or wedding, this mother-daughter team works year-round to prepare and design floral bouquets to meet their customer’s desires—even if it means helping their younger ones score a date for a school dance.

What started as a hobby eventually led Fanny Wataru to realize her dream of opening Fanny’s Flowers. With the help of her husband, Bruce, and their experience of working with flowers at home, the couple decided to open their floral shop in 2006. Seven years later, the quaint boutique remains a family-run business with additional support from their son, Josh. “It’s something new every day and you have the chance to be creative,” says Josh of working in the floral industry. “It also brings you into contact with a lot of different people, especially in Temple City. You get a chance to connect with the community.” A favored flower amongst local customers is the rose—whether for weddings, anniversaries, or especially, apologies. “A lot of guys come in for ‘I’m sorry’ [bouquets]—that’s really popular,” says Josh, adding that one of their biggest requests was six dozen roses to send just that message. From helping clients with an apology bouquet to handling extravagant wedding arrangements, patrons always come first for the Watarus. “We pride ourselves in customer service,” Josh emphasizes. “We try to accommodate and go above and beyond on all customers’ requests, and hope to be known for that.”

Flower Mart, 9177 Las Tunas Dr., (626) 286-8858 www.flowermarttc.com

Fanny’s Flowers, 5947 Oak Ave., (626) 287-1653 www.fannysflowers.net

A Home Grown Tradition

Wonder how Temple City got its reputation as “Home of Camellias?” It all started in 1944, when the local Women’s Club held a contest to select an official flower and slogan for the community. At the time, the city was home to about 25 nurseries dedicated to growing this delicate flower. While not as pervasive now as then, camellias remain a celebrated Temple City tradition—continuing to serve as the namesake of the annual Camellia Festival, adorning the City seal and beautifying the landscapes surrounding City Hall.

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feature

Emergencies don’t make appointments, but Temple City will be ready BY STEVE NATHAN

MANAGING THE

UNEXPECTED One of the functions of government, arguably the most important, is keeping its citizens safe. This applies to every level of government, but comes into play most frequently at the local level. Whatever the threat may be, residents have a reasonable expectation that they will be protected from harm. Most crises, however, are totally unexpected, which makes the response of government—in respect to speed, efficiency and compassion— so challenging. More than most municipalities, Temple City is ensuring it is prepared for the unexpected.

In November 2011, Temple City experienced an unprecedented natural disaster that renewed its commitment to emergency preparedness, so that its residents could rest reasonably assured of their safety in future disasters. The event was not an earthquake, the fear Southern Californians constantly live with, but a violent and sustained windstorm that claimed nearly 500 trees, deprived thousands of local households of electricity for up to a week, and traumatized elderly Temple City Connect

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residents. Remarkably, there was no loss of life, but the storm damage was estimated to exceed $10 million. Training for emergencies is paramount to consultant Roger Mason, Ph.D., Vice President of LECMgt, a firm specializing in preparing public agencies for all types of natural and man-made disasters— particularly those that are unexpected. “There was no historical indication of the potential for such a severe windstorm in this area,” he explains. After the incident, Mason prepared a report analyzing the City’s response, including various lessons learned. While some improvements are necessary to meet future challenges, Temple City received high marks for its overall performance. One impressive aspect of the response—and one that will have applications far beyond the realm of disaster management—was the community’s ability to come together. Despite the vast cultural differences within its citizenry, people worked together in an inspiring way, motivated by compassion and community pride. As a result, Temple City was one of the first cities in the San Gabriel Valley to complete cleanup, despite being among the hardest hit. Beyond windstorms, the Hazard Mitigation Plan prepared by Mason’s firm—currently under review by state and federal emergency management agencies— addresses how the City and community should respond to a broad range of natural and manmade crises, including earthquakes, fires and floods, plane crashes, hazardous materials spills, terrorism and mass shootings. Mason insists that training is what makes

EXPANDING INTO THE DIGITAL REALM FOR MORE INSTANTANEOUS REACH, THE CITY RECENTLY CONTRACTED WITH NIXLE—A LEADING COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY THAT PROVIDES ASSISTANCE TO NEARLY 5,000 PUBLIC SAFETY AGENCIES, DISSEMINATING EMERGENCY INFORMATION VIA TEXT MESSAGE AND E-MAIL. the difference in any kind of disaster situation. “There are cities that have the finest emergency plans available and they’ve never looked at them, so when a disaster strikes, they’re not prepared,” says the consultant. Robert Sahagun, the City’s Public Safety and Services Manager, adds poignantly, “Those plans just become expensive paperweights if they’re not implemented.” The essential value of training has been validated through Mason’s consultations with recovery operations personnel from the Hurricane Sandy disaster in New York and New Jersey last October. “One of the lessons learned was that a huge amount of resources was sent there, but there was no way to use them efficiently because the [pre-event] training was not sufficient,” he says. And proper training must extend far beyond public safety professionals like police officers or firefighters. Bryan Ariizumi, the City’s Public Safety Officer, explains that all Temple City employees have specific obligations to the community during a local emergency. Pursuant to the California Emergency Services Act, every individual hired by the City—or any municipality in the State—becomes a registered disaster service worker, an obligation reflected in their oaths of office. After first taking care

During the 2011 windstorm, emergency management specialist Roger Mason provided staff with expert guidance on disaster response.

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of their homes and families, staff members are expected to transition into their respective roles based on the Temple City Emergency Operations Plan. “Everybody has a role, from the City Manager to a part-time recreation leader,” Ariizumi explains. If they live far from Temple City, they may assist in disaster relief at another locality struck by the same regional disaster. Sahagun explains that Mason’s training has a great deal of built-in redundancy, so if one employee is not immediately present to fill his or her particular role, another one has been trained in those responsibilities.

REACHING OUT In addition, staff is dedicated to mobilizing a group of dedicated volunteers from throughout the community. “We have 35 employees and 35,000 residents, so we can’t do it alone,” stresses Sahagun. The philosophy behind the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) therefore recognizes that because first responders (e.g. firefighters, medical emergency personnel) will not be able to meet the demand for services in a major disaster, citizens will need to jump in to assist their neighbors. “CERT is one of the most important tools we have. It allows citizens to be trained by emergency professionals, preparing them to take care of their families and respond to the community,” says Mason, noting that one of the biggest problems in any emergency situation is when untrained people, while well intended, show up and complicate the work of trained professionals. Since 2009, the City has conducted regular CERT trainings, with the next three-day City-sponsored training in May. And its benefits are clearly evident. As Ariizumi notes, just three weeks before the windstorm, the City graduated a CERT class and were able to call on additional trained volunteers. As part of the curriculum, residents learn to carry out basic medical emergency procedures, light search and rescue operations, and deal with the psychological traumas experienced by victims and/or workers—skills which allow

After losing 500 trees in the windstorm, the City has since received a $70,000 grant to recuperate the damage.

CERT-trained civilians to intervene until first responders arrive on scene. Ultimately, says Mason, the goal is “to have at least one CERT member on every block.” Ariizumi welcomes all community members, and encourages CERT graduates to continue being involved in trainings, rather than stop at a single round of classes. “If you don’t use it, you lose it,” he quips, insisting that recurrent training keeps these individuals response-ready. Aside from CERT being a proven strategy for reducing loss of life in major disasters, it is consistent with City Hall’s philosophy to expand citizen engagement. The City has already successfully implemented programs such as a Community-Oriented Policing Strategy (COPS), Neighborhood Watch and Citizen’s Academy to foster community participation and leadership. Now these established programs are serving as recruitment tools for CERT. “We integrate CERT with programs like Neighborhood Watch, where we have kind of a captive audience,” says Ariizumi, who is proud of the success achieved by both programs so far. In any emergency situation, effective communications are essential. “Information is sometimes as important as relief supplies,” insists Mason, who was extremely impressed with the amount and quality of communications issued by City Hall during

the windstorm. Staff did everything from providing an easel outside of City Hall to using reverse 911 calls to issuing a couple of press releases every day. As an example of a resourceful partnership and smart crisis management, the City also provided use of its telephone system when the windstorm downed that of Temple City Unified School District. Expanding into the digital realm for more instantaneous reach, the City recently contracted with Nixle—a leading communications company that provides assistance to nearly 5,000 public safety agencies, disseminating emergency information via text message and e-mail. Other tools include the City’s recently established Facebook page and Twitter feeds, which while are regularly used to generate interest for public meetings and recreational events, will become increasingly important during future emergency situations. Residents will also be able to tune to AM 1690 on their radios for evacuation notices and updates on an emergency situation. “Our strategy is that we tell everything there is to know, even if the news isn’t that good,” explains Mason. While encouraging good public information, Mason also encourages citizens to reach out to provide critical emergency information. One way is through the Specific Needs Awareness Planning (SNAP) Disaster

Voluntary Registry. Through it, citizens with physical, emotional or developmental disabilities, or those reliant on specialized medical treatment, can register with the County so that in case of emergency, first responders will know where to find them and how to address their special circumstances. Sahagun explains, “SNAP gives participating cities a list of people with special needs. In the windstorm, when the power was out, we didn’t know who was on a ventilator, for instance.” While emergencies are terrifying for all residents, for those with severe limitations, the experience is compounded. SNAP therefore has the ability to limit loss of life and reduce emotional trauma for those individuals. (Turn to page 16 for more information on SNAP.)

THE PLAN AHEAD In spite of everything the City has already achieved, there is much more to be done to ensure the public is well served during the next emergency. The most critical deficiency Mason identified in his after-windstorm report was the need to improve the City’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) facility, originally designated in the Temple City Library basement. As Sahagun explains, that location is not ADA-accessible for disabled individuals, and also subject to compromise

Temple City Connect

15

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY Stay one step ahead of crisis situations. Participate in these preparedness training programs and follow these readiness tips. CERT The City and Los Angeles County Fire Department holds free Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training sessions throughout the year, preparing residents to properly intervene in disasters until first responders arrive. Curriculum includes basic first aid procedures and light search and rescue operations. The next session is held three consecutive Saturdays beginning May 11. Reserve your spot before May 1 by contacting the Public Safety Division at (626) 285-2171, ext. 2333. SNAP Los Angeles County’s Specific Needs Awareness Planning (SNAP) Disaster Voluntary Registry helps first responders maximize resources during crisis situations by prioritizing assistance to those who identify as vulnerable persons—the elderly, and those who require special medical attention or have mobility difficulties. To learn more and sign up, visit snap.lacounty.gov. COMMUNICATIONS CHANNELS During an emergency, access situation updates by tuning into local news stations. Temple City information will be provided through AM 1690 radio station, social media, or the City’s Nixle and Blackboard Connect mass notification systems. To follow our social media, or sign up for Nixle and Blackboard Connect, logon to www.templecity.us. COMMUNITY ACADEMY/NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH With recent studies showing that communities with strong social ties cope better in disasters, get to know your neighbors at an upcoming Neighborhood Watch Meeting. Also participate in the five-session Sheriff’s Community Academy in May to learn the roles of local law enforcement in preserving public safety. For more information about either program, visit the City website at www.templecity.us, or contact the Public Safety Division at (626) 285-2171, ext. 2333. PARTICIPATE IN EARTHQUAKE DRILLS When you feel the earth move under your feet, experts advise to “drop, cover and hold on”—meaning drop to the ground, take cover under something sturdy and hold on until the shaking ends. Practice this move with friends and family at least twice a year, and during the statewide Great ShakeOut drill, observed yearly on Oct. 18 at 10:18 a.m.

16

Spring 2013 www.templecity.us

“SOME CITIES JUST WANT TO DO THE MINIMUM REQUIRED UNDER THE LAW, BUT TEMPLE CITY OBVIOUSLY PLACES A HIGH PRIORITY ON PREPAREDNESS.” —ROGER MASON, PH.D., VICE PRESIDENT OF LECMGT

Approximately 8,000 tons of debris was removed in the windstorm cleanup effort.

during certain types of crises. For example, during the windstorm, the entry was blocked by downed trees. “The current EOC is not functional in certain emergencies and the City is in the process of creating a new, improved EOC adjacent to the Council Chambers,” reports Sahagun. Much of Mason’s recent training with Temple City staff focuses on lessons learned from two very recent but very different disasters on the East Coast: the devastation in New York and New Jersey from Hurricane Sandy, and the tragic shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. One positive lesson learned was the ability to draw from the incredible contributions of faith-based organizations, like churches and synagogues. Mason emphasizes that in multicultural Temple City, this is a particularly important resource. “They are part of these diverse cultures,” he says, adding, “We have at least one Chinese pastor involved already—a trusted person that people know.” Especially in times of crises, emergency shelters can becoming overwhelmed by visitors not in need of urgent care or shelter, but simply looking for information, a hot cup of coffee or place to recharge their cell phones. Faith institutions can therefore serve

as “comfort centers,” providing basic needs in a nurturing, familiar environment, while allowing emergency centers—typically scarce of resources—to attend to those who truly need them. Already, Ariizumi reports that churches have been instrumental in assisting with CERT recruitment. Not only would he and Mason like to see CERT members in every congregation, but they want churches to understand the concept of a comfort center and the critical communications role their efforts can play during a crisis. Overall, Mason is impressed with the commitment to emergency preparedness, not only demonstrated by City staff, but also the community at large. “Some cities just want to do the minimum required under the law, but Temple City obviously places a high priority on preparedness.” And while no crisis is routine, the City’s degree of readiness will serve residents the next time an unexpected event blows into town.

LEARN MORE on how you can get involved in the City’s emergency preparedness planning and what you can do to be disaster ready, by visiting the City website at www.templecity.us, or calling the Public Safety Division at (626) 285-2171, ext. 2333.

zzz Temple City’s First-Ever zzz

Food Food Truck Truck

Festival Festival

BEWARE THIS EVENT COULD RUIN YOUR DIET

FEATURING

SEOUL SAUSAGE COMPANY

SEASON 3 WINNER OF FOOD NETWORK’S “THE GREAT FOOD TRUCK RACE”

Saturday, April 27

11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. South Parking Lot at

Live Oak Park 10144 Bogue St.

GRINGOS TACOS | TORTAS TO DIE FOR | EL BURGER LUCHADOR PARADISE COOKIES | BELLY BOMBZ | THE LOBOS TRUCK | MAUI WAUI ...and more! LINE UP SUBJECT TO CHANGE

CITY OF TEMPLE CITY z 9701 LAS TUNAS DR., TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780 z (626) 285-2171

temple city

feature

Without warning, one earthquake can demolish a home, crumble a freeway and alter the landscape of our community. While there’s no telling when Mother Earth decides to shake, rattle and roll, being prepared and knowing how to respond during and after an emergency is critical for survival.

BY CHELSEA WOOD AND WENDY CHUNG

EARTHQUAKE-PROOF YOUR HOME Strap down bulky appliances like refrigerators and television sets; anchor large furnishings like bookshelves and cabinets; and affix smaller items like glassware and photo frames with putty. Doing so will not only protect your belongings, but allow for clear escape paths during an emergency.

DISASTER

READY

LEARN TO SHUT OFF GAS AND UTILITIES Gas leaks and exposed live wires after disasters increase risk of explosion and electrocution. Turn the main gas valve off, and do not attempt to turn it back on yourself; call the utility company to do so. Shut off electricity if you smell burning.

FAMILIARIZE YOURSELF WITH LOCAL RESOURCES A large part of the City’s

PRACTICE A FAMILY EVACUATION PLAN Make sure all family members know the locations of fire extinguishers and go-bags (see below). Designate emergency exits and determine a nearby emergency meeting location.

IDENTIFY AN EMERGENCY CONTACT Leave copies of vital documents with someone out-of-state and away from the immediate disaster area. This person may also serve as point-of-contact for family members unable to contact each other.

disaster preparedness strategy is identifying local resources and developing trained volunteers so as to be able to share responsibilities during emergency response. From knowing where to go for critical information during an emergency, to participating in Temple City’s Community Emergency Response Team, residents can learn how to maximize efficiencies during emergencies. Read the sidebar on page 16 for more tips and ways to help.

EMERGENCY ARMORY STOCK AND STORE EMERGENCY GO-BAGS YOU CAN TAKE AWAY QUICKLY, PACKED WITH SUPPLIES TO GET YOU THROUGH AT LEAST THREE DAYS:

18

Spring 2013

✓ FOOD When packing ready-to-eat imperishables, remember to include a mechanical can opener and eating utensils.

✓ COMFORT Stock toiletries, blankets, a change of clothes and sturdy shoes to keep you comfortable, safe and warm while away from home.

✓ WATER Enough for one gallon per person per day. Purification tablets will also come in handy to purify drinking water from other sources.

✓ ESSENTIALS Leave spare home and car keys in your go-bag, as well as cash in small denominations. If you have vision impairment, also include an extra pair of glasses.

✓ FIRST AID In addition to bandages, scissors and antiseptic, kits should include over-the-counter drugs and any prescribed medication.

✓ VITAL DOCUMENTS Photocopy important insurance and identification, and prepare a list of emergency contact numbers.

✓ LIFE LINES Carry a portable radio and flashlight with extra batteries. Also pack a home and car charger for your cell phone. www.templecity.us

✓ SURVIVAL Keep available multipurpose tools like pocketknives, a wrench, dust masks, duct tape, paper and markers for use in a variety of situations.

AFTERSHOCKS When the shaking stops, take these precautions to begin your road to recovery:

CHECK FOR INJURIES Determine if you are in a hazardous area prior to evacuating. If not, stay where you are and conduct a personal body examination before checking others for injuries.

BE SAFE If you are in an

WHEN THE BIG OR LITTLE ONE HITS, STAY SAFE BY FOLLOWING THESE THREE SIMPLE STEPS: DROP Violent shaking will cause you to lose balance standing, so it is best to stay low on the floor. COVER Get underneath a sturdy table or furniture. If there is no furniture in your immediate environment, do not attempt to run into another room. Instead, stand against an interior wall—usually built to withstand stress— and cover your face and head with your arms. HOLD ON The floor underneath you may jerk sideways, so grab onto something sturdy and stay in position until the shaking stops.

KEEP IN MIND… WHILE IT MAY BE HARD NOT TO PANIC IN AN EMERGENCY, REMEMBER THESE TIPS TO RIDE OUT AN EARTHQUAKE: • Avoid windows, mirrors, and tall furniture or appliances, which are dangerous as glass may shatter, larger items may topple and wires may become exposed. • If you are outside, beware of falling power lines and multistory buildings. If possible, seek refuge in a clear open space. • If you are in a multistory building, avoid the elevators and take the stairs.

• If you are driving, cautiously pull over while watching for traffic. Turn off our engine and put on our handbrake. Turn on your radio for information and stay inside until the shaking stops. • Look out for broken gas lines and refrain from using matches and open flames, as they may catch fire and explode in the presence of gas leaks.

unstable environment, relocate cautiously, being prepared for aftershocks and looking out for broken glass and other hazards like damaged bridges, power lines and roads. After a severe earthquake, do not reenter buildings until they have been inspected and deemed safe. Untrained civilians should also keep in mind to stay out of the way of trained first responders.

STAY INFORMED Go online if possible, or listen to your portable radio. During an emergency, the City will broadcast immediate information through social media and AM 1690 radio station. Regular updates thereafter can be expected

through news releases, and for those with landlines, the City’s mass notification system.

ACCESS RESOURCES Depending on the severity of a disaster, different temporary facilities will be available, providing community members critical communications and services. From comfort centers to evacuation shelters, learn what’s open by staying tuned to City updates.

GETTING BACK TO NORMAL In addition to physical and emotional impacts, individuals may face financial challenges after disaster. To file claims, contact your insurance company as soon as possible to report damages, documenting through photos, receipts and a list of lost or damaged items. Keep track of any lost vital documents, including driver’s licenses, passports and birth certificates, and contact the appropriate government agency to replace them.

LEARN MORE about preparing for earthquakes at www.earthquakecountry.info. For more information on general emergency readiness, visit www.ready.gov. Sources: Temple City Public Safety Division, The American Red Cross, San Francisco Department of Emergency Management, Southern California Earthquake Center

Temple City Connect

19

temple city

feature

Pedaling Into the

FUTURE Photo courtesy of Bike SGV

BIKE LANES ARE NOT ONLY SAFE AND ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND, BUT GOOD FOR BUSINESS TOO BY STEVE NATHAN AND WENDY CHUNG

Years ago, when globetrotting American tourists visited major metropolises where bicycles vastly outnumbered cars, they regarded that curious transportation imbalance as a Third World phenomenon. These days, the most prosperous and progressive cities in the world are aggressively promoting bike ridership. Pedaling to work or school is anything but backwards, and even people who haven’t been on a bicycle since third grade are beginning to understand why the trend toward two wheels benefits everybody. 20

Spring 2013 www.templecity.us

Master-Planning for Two Wheels

Temple City is suddenly one of the nation’s leaders in bike planning, committed to developing a comprehensive network of bikeways that will make cycling more attractive and accessible to the entire community. After the City Council adopted a Bicycle Master Plan in 2011, staff moved swiftly to implement, resourcefully looking to available grants to fund proposed routes. Already, the City has secured two Caltrans Bicycle Transportation Account awards— in 2011, it received $443,000 for 1.9 miles of “cycle tracks” (bike lanes completely buffered from automotive traffic) as part of the Rosemead Boulevard Enhancement Project; and last year, $479,000 for the development of 12.6 miles of bike paths.

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The 2011 Bicycle Master Plan identifies 27 miles of bikeways for Temple City: Golde

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improvements. “Dollar for dollar, it’s much less expensive to install bike lanes than to widen a road or install a mile of freeway,” says Vincent Chang, founding president of local bicycle advocacy group Bike SGV. But to plan bike lanes that will actually be utilized takes special consideration. Many people who would like to bike don’t because they are concerned about the hazards of pedaling alongside semitrailers. “We’ve come to realize that to shift people out of their cars, you really need to provide fully protected bike lanes that we refer to as ‘low stress’ facilities,” reports Hondorp. That is what’s so significant about the incoming Rosemead Boulevard cycle tracks. While lanes physically buffered from automotive traffic have been shown to reduce injury risk by up to 90 percent, they are amenities that very few cities in the nation can claim. Currently, Long Beach is the only municipality in Los Angeles County with such physically protected bikeways. “We’re truly at the cutting edge,” insists Yu. “People are very excited about the sophisticated infrastructure that we’re implementing, and Temple City is now being viewed as a national leader in bicycle master planning.” As the bike lanes arrive, they will be part of a comprehensive plan to redesign Temple City roadways into “complete streets” that safely accommodate a diverse range of travelers: motorists, public transit passengers, pedestrians and cyclists. Dedicated bike lanes will work in conjunction with accessible transit stops, highly visible pedestrian crossings and state-of-the-art signal timing to improve local mobility. Looking ahead—with the City currently in construction to transform Rosemead Boulevard and in design to revitalize Las Tunas Drive— the trend is toward developing a multimodal transportation network that addresses the safety and comfort of all roadway users.

Le m on

Rosemead Blvd.

TEMPLE CITY MAYOR VINCENT YU, WHO IS OFTEN SEEN RIDING HIS BIKE TO CITY HALL, SUGGESTS, “IT’S OUR RESPONSIBILITY TO PLAN FOR A SAFER, CLEANER AND MORE SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS.”

GEARING UP for bikes in Temple City

Encinita Ave.

E

Alta Planning + Design assisted the City in developing its Bicycle Master Plan, which began when the City initiated a redesign of Rosemead Boulevard. Brett Hondorp, a principal of the firm— and someone who’s commuted on two wheels his entire career— suggests Temple City’s proposed 27-mile network of paths, lanes and routes is quite ambitious for a small suburban community of four square miles. “Lots of cities do bike plans, but to take it to the level of exceptional design, like on Rosemead Boulevard, takes vision and strong political will,” he says. Temple City Mayor Vincent Yu, who is often seen riding his bike to City Hall, suggests, “It’s our responsibility to plan for a safer, cleaner and more sustainable community for future generations.” Getting people out of their cars and onto bikes creates a ‘greener,’ healthier Temple City. Not only does it reduce the community’s carbon footprint—as required by California law (SB 375)—but it also encourages and promotes exercise and healthy living. As an added bonus, it reduces traffic congestion on city streets—something Southern California communities have been struggling with even before Temple City was incorporated. The cost of building safe bike lanes is also a relative bargain compared to other transportation

Azusa

Rd .

With 15 miles of new bikeways coming into town over the next few years, locals will want to dust off the old wheels and take to the streets. But before doing so, check out these tips from Temple City Bike Shop Manager Ron McKiernan on safe and comfortable riding.

FIND THE RIGHT FIT New to cycling? McKiernan recommends the Specialized Sirrus model or the women’s Vita Road Bike, both of which retail at about $500. For cyclists looking for a comfortable ride, try the Expedition or Crossroads models. The shop offers customers free repairs for up to one year with the purchase of a new bike.

SUIT UP • Wear shorts padded for cushion and jerseys designed to wick off moisture. • Find a helmet that crosses your forehead about an inch above the eyebrows and doesn’t slip or slide backwards. • Equip bicycles with head and taillights for nighttime riding.

RULES OF THE ROAD • Always use a helmet. At night, wear visible clothing. • Cyclists on public roads have the same rules and responsibilities as motorists. Ride in the same direction as auto traffic, obeying all signs and signals. • Use appropriate hand movements when turning. • Don’t pass a car on the right side; they may not see you coming. • Pedestrians always have the right of way. • Riding a bike on the sidewalk is illegal. • Ride far enough from parked cars to avoid being hit by an opening door. Temple City Connect

21

Unexpected Economic Benefits

Skeptics are often surprised to learn that bike lanes actually have a positive impact on local economies. In fact, when choosing where to locate corporate facilities, CEOs of creative companies—including those in the high-tech, biotech and creative industries, like film production and fashion design—admit to factoring in the presence of bike lanes and progressive cycling policies, as such places will usually attract young, high-skill, high-knowledge prospective employees. This 16 to 34 age demographic—often referred to as the Millennial Generation or Generation Y—drives less, and favors mass transit and cycling as commuting options. In fact, during the first decade of the 21st century, annual miles driven by this group dropped an astounding 23 percent, according to the Frontier Group, a Santa Barbara-based think tank. And it’s not because they’re trying to save money. Motor Trend, a magazine for automobilephiles, noted that today’s young professionals appear more interested in the latest smart phones and $2,000 bikes than the hottest sports cars. As a result, policy makers are rethinking their strategies to attract this new workforce to their communities. In Minneapolis, Mayor R.T. Rybak recently said of his city’s aggressive bicycle planning, “We want young talent to come here…And good biking is one of the least expensive ways to send that message.”

bike culture KEEPIN’ IT WHEEL While Temple City’s getting going on the San Gabriel Valley’s first cycle tracks, check out how innovative amenities in other global cities are encouraging more commuters to embrace urban cycling.

Copenhagen, Denmark, is home to the world’s first “Cycle Superhighways,” a network of 26 routes connecting more than 20 cities that prioritize bike traffic with more direct routes and fewer stops. They also provide specific accommodations like smooth pavement, signage, bike pumps and repair services. With authorities aiming to have half of commuters cycling by 2015, the City is also planning a $47-million expansion of the already extensive 200-plus mile network. London and Chicago are following suit with superhighways of their own. In Amsterdam, Netherlands, where there are more bicycles than residents, not even snowfall keeps riders off the streets. That’s why Dutch officials are considering heated bike paths—which use geo-thermal energy to prevent ice from forming on the pavement—to address the problem of road slippage. In Bogotá, Colombia, cyclists rejoice every Sunday and holiday. From 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., certain streets are blocked off to cars, instead serving pedestrians and cyclists. The weekly block party has touched off similar, albeit less frequent, “open streets” events in other cities, including Los Angeles’ triannual CicLAvia— one of which is upcoming on April 21.

“WE’RE TRULY AT THE CUTTING EDGE,” INSISTS MAYOR YU. “PEOPLE ARE VERY EXCITED ABOUT THE SOPHISTICATED INFRASTRUCTURE THAT WE’RE IMPLEMENTING, AND TEMPLE CITY IS NOW BEING VIEWED AS A NATIONAL LEADER IN BICYCLE MASTER PLANNING.”

Up in Davis, California, whose city logo incorporates a vintage high-wheel bicycle, cars get no love, as they’re kept off the bike and pedestrian tunnels that are for riders and walkers only. In nearby Long Beach’s Bicycle Friendly Business Districts, non-profit organization Bikeable Communities has opened a Bikestation facility, offering cyclists 24/7 indoor parking with free valet, storage lockers, repair services— even shower stalls. Spring Street in Downtown L.A. is now living up to its name with designated green bike lanes, which studies have shown reduce injury risk by more than half. In April, the City will also launch its first bike-sharing program with a fleet of 4,000 bikes and 400 renting kiosks. Here in Temple City, the Public Safety Division, Parks and Recreation Department and Youth Committee will host a Bike Rodeo on March 23. The event begins with a group ride along proposed routes, and ends with festivities at Live Oak Park—including a mini bike path for kids, bike stunt show, skills course and raffles for prizes.

22

Photo courtesy of CicLAvia

Los Angeles

Spring 2013 www.templecity.us

The economic impact is not limited to the corporate boardroom, but can be felt on Main Street, USA—or Las Tunas Drive, Temple City. “How much of a business’ window display or signage do you see when driving by at 30 or 40 miles per hour?” asks Chang. The Bike SGV President, who very recently headed the Monterey Park Chamber of Commerce, lends credibility to the assertion that biking generates tangible economic benefits. “I believe in shopping local,” he says, insisting that bike lanes and pedestrian infrastructure promote that very behavior. Recent economic studies point out that bike riders tend to shop closer to home, and while they may not spend as much on single visit, are more likely to return and become loyal customers. In Fort Worth, Texas, sales at restaurants on Magnolia Street skyrocketed 200 percent after bike lanes and racks were installed, and sales jumped on Valencia Street in San Francisco, too. Additional studies documenting the positive impact of cyclists on local revenue have come out of New York City and Portland, Oregon, with results most impressive in situations involving cycle tracks. Closer to home, Long Beach recently established the nation’s first “Bicycle-Friendly Business Districts,” comprised of four commercial neighborhoods with designated shops and restaurants that offer discounts to anybody arriving on a bike. For its innovative concept of working with local businesses while promoting an active lifestyle, the City of Long Beach received a grant from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health to implement the program— representing the very kind of resourceful collaboration and publicprivate partnerships frequently promoted in Temple City. Furthermore,

as any downtown knows, space is precious. An added benefit of encouraging biking is the reduction in demand for car parking— bike racks are much more compact than parking garages. According to Alta’s Hondorp, businesspeople that have witnessed economic revitalization through cycling are anxious to encourage greater ridership, recognizing it as a means of broadening their customer base. Merchants responded favorably to the complete street design of Rosemead Boulevard, says the consultant. “When they saw the quality of the design, they understood how the new environment— which includes pedestrian access, seating and other amenities—would benefit them.” As the City begins installing bike lanes, it may soon see the same rejuvenation as Fort Worth and Long Beach. For several decades, local businesses have lost revenue to neighboring cities, as residents drive out of town to shop or dine. The revitalization of the downtown area through the Las Tunas Drive Project—which proposes bike lanes—can reverse that trend, making Temple City businesses more competitive. “People want to live in cities that have walkable and bikeable destinations—and those are the places businesses want to be,” says Hondorp. Physically closer and more keenly aware of their environments than motorists, cyclists can more easily and spontaneously stop and park to visit a shop or café that interests them. While recognizing that “cars and trucks are not going away,” Chang points out that bike lanes “offer an alternative for those who choose to live a much more healthy and sustainable way of life.” Furthermore, cyclists enjoy extra discretionary income, saving an average of $8,000 per year on gas, car payments and repairs.

Broad Appeal

Transportation planners are hopeful that enthusiasm for bike riding can be broadened well beyond Generation Y, and that construction of a safe and comprehensive network of bike lanes will attract cyclists of all ages and backgrounds. In Temple City, the community’s incredible cultural diversity is sometimes perceived as a barrier to implementing new public policies. But in the case of bike planning, City officials are hopeful that will not be the case. A reason for optimism is that many ethnic immigrants residing in Temple City come from cultures in which cycling is not only popular, but long considered the primary means of transportation. “The San Gabriel Valley is home to one of the largest Asian immigrant communities in the nation,” said Chang, noting that many cycled their entire lives prior to immigrating. “I see them all

the time—sometimes riding with bags and boxes full of stuff,” he says. “We should all be so lucky!” In developing Temple City’s bike master plan, Hondorp observed many Chinese residents as avid bike riders, but were unlikely to respond to online surveys, as they were not part of any organized advocacy group. “We do our best to reach out to these groups through other community channels,” he says. “Broader stakeholder diversity makes our work more informed and, in the end, more successful.” Aside from planning to accommodate cultural audiences, Alta also coordinates with surrounding cities on any existing or future plans to ensure the development of user-friendly, regionally connected routes—supporting a larger effort spearheaded by Bike SGV to integrate all of the local plans in the San Gabriel Valley into a comprehensive network. Chang agrees that Temple City needs to be aware of that regional context, for which his organization is a major proponent. “Like freeways and city streets, bike lanes and bike infrastructure cannot exist in a vacuum,” he says. While half a century ago, it was the Southern California freeways—heralded as a grand innovation at the time—that connected dozens of bedroom communities into a world-class metropolis; looking into the future, it may very well be this equally ambitious network of bike lanes, as part of a comprehensive multimodal transportation system, that will take Temple City residents to work, school and beyond. TO SEE proposed bike improvements for Temple City, download a copy of the Bicycle Master Plan from the City website at www.templecity.us. To speak with the City’s bicycle coordinator, call the Public Safety Division at (626) 285-2171, ext. 2333.

Temple City Connect

23

FRIDAY, APRIL 5 6 – 9 P.M. LIVE OAK PARK COMMUNITY CENTER

Spring Fling

Featuring

LIVE DJ SPINNING TOP 40S NIGHTTIME PRIZE HUNT MINIATURE GOLF ROCK CLIMBING VIDEO GAMES TRUCK

HEY TEENS and TWEENS! ONLY AT SPRING FLING CAN YOU ENJOY FOOD, FUN AND ENTERTAINMENT—ALL IN ONE PLACE! SO GET OUT OF THE HOUSE AND EXPERIENCE THIS HOP-PENING SPRING PARTY! OPEN TO AGES 10-14.

TICKETS: PRESALE $10 / AT THE EVENT $15 FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL (626) 285-2171, EXT. 2360.

24

Spring 2013 www.templecity.us

recreation guide

Get Active!

temple city

Don’t just stand there! Get your body moving and your brain thinking with stimulating classes offered by our Parks and Recreation Department.

Sign up for classes starting March 14 online at www.templecity.us or by mailing in completed registration forms, which can be obtained at Live Oak Park Community Center, 10144 Bogue St. In-person enrollment begins March 18 at the Community Center. Incomplete applications or checks may result in failed enrollment. Space is limited, so reserve your spot early! For more information, call the Parks and Recreation Department at (626) 579-0461. Classes begin the week of April 8 at Live Oak Park unless otherwise noted. No class will be held May 27, in observance of Memorial Day.

Class schedules and prices are subject to change.

Temple City Connect

25

temple city

recreation guide

Youth and Adult Activities

EDUCATIONAL BRICKS 4 KIDZ / Bricks 4 Kidz

Have loads of fun—and learn a bunch!—using LEGO® bricks to explore the worlds of engineering and architecture.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT LITTLE STARS / Recreation Leaders

DATES

AGE

9239

4/9-6/13

2 yrs. T/Th

DAY

TIME

FEE

9:30-10:45 a.m.

$100

TINY TOTS / Sarah Nichols Tiny Tots

Toddlers can build social skills, make new friends and learn independence while experiencing music, art projects and group activities. Children must be at least three years old and potty-trained by the first class. In-person registration required; bring proof of birth date and immunization record. CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY

9240 9241

4/8-6/21 4/9-6/20

3-5 yrs. M/W/F 3-5 yrs. T/Th

DATES

AGE

9256

4/9-5/7

6-10 yrs. T

TIME

FEE

9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

$330 $240

TIME

FEE

3:30-4:30 p.m.

$85

It’s never too late to learn! Get hands-on practice with basic computer usage and word processing. $5 materials fee due at first class. CODE

DATES

AGE

9257 9258

4/12-5/10 5/17-6/14

50+ yrs. F 50+ yrs. F

DAY

TIME

FEE

11 a.m.-12 p.m. 11 a.m.-12 p.m.

$78 $78

COMPUTER ADVENTURE FOR ALL AGES / AGI Academy

Sharpen your computer skills and take a crash course in Microsoft Office applications including Word, PowerPoint and Excel. $10 materials fee due at first class. CODE

DATES

AGE

9259 9260

4/12-5/10 5/17-6/14

8+ yrs. F 8+ yrs. F

DAY

TIME

FEE

7-8 p.m. 7-8 p.m.

$78 $78

INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM / AGI Academy

DANCE BALLET & TAP / Shekinah Glory School of Dance

Students from beginning to advanced levels will be instructed in classical and modern dance techniques, including barre work for advanced students. Tap and ballet shoes are required. CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY

TIME

FEE

9242 9243 9244 9245 9246

4/12-5/31 4/12-5/31 4/12-5/31 4/12-5/31 4/12-5/31

2 yrs. 3 yrs. 4-5 yrs. 6-8 yrs. 8+ yrs.

F F F F F

1:30-2 p.m. 2-2:30 p.m. 3:15-4 p.m. 4-4:45 p.m. 4:45-5:45 p.m.

$58 $58 $68 $68 $68

BALLROOM DANCE / Robert Chin

Have fun while learning the latest routines and techniques. Dances include the Cha-Cha, Rumba, Samba, Waltz, Tango and Foxtrot. Dance shoes required. CODE

DATES

LEVEL

9247

4/13-5/14

Beg./Int. 16+ yrs. S

AGE

DAY TIME

11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

FEE

$55

LINE DANCE / Bill Chang

Step into this old Western dance—with a twist! Learn basic line dancing set to country and non-country music. Level I for beginners, levels II and III for experienced dancers. CODE

DATES

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9248 9249 9250 9251 9252 9253 9254 9255

4/19-6/21 4/19-6/21 4/16-6/18 4/15-6/24 4/18-6/20 4/16-6/18 4/17-6/19 4/19-6/21

Level II Level III Level II Level I Level II Level I Level I Level II

15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs.

F F T M Th T W F

$60 $60 $60 $60 $60 $60 $60 $60

6:20-7:50 p.m. 8-9:30 p.m. 7:40-9:10 p.m. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. 9-10:30 a.m. 6-7:30 p.m. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.

Dreaming of publishing your article in a newspaper one day? Learn to write enticing news stories, headlines and captions in this journalism course. $10 materials fee due at first class. CODE

DATES

AGE

9261 9262

4/12-5/10 5/17-6/14

10-14 yrs. F 10-14 yrs. F

Spring 2013 www.templecity.us

DAY

TIME

FEE

3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m.

$78 $78

FITNESS 45+ CARDIO DANCE & STRENGTH TRAINING / Amy’s Health & Fitness

Burn calories as you build strength through a fusion of low-impact, high-energy dance and exercise. Bring two light hand weights that are 2-3 lbs. each. CODE

DATES

AGE

9263 9264 9265

4/7-6/17 4/9-6/12 4/7-6/17

45+ yrs. M 45+ yrs. W 45+ yrs. M/W

DAY

TIME

FEE

8:15-9:45 a.m. 8:15-9:45 a.m. 8:15-9:45 a.m.

$43 $43 $73

KICKBOXING CARDIO DANCE CHALLENGE / Amy’s Health & Fitness

Combine the intensity and power of kickboxing with the playfulness and fun of dance for a unique workout. Exercise mat required. CODE

DATES

AGE

9267

4/11-6/13

16+ yrs. Th

DAY

TIME

FEE

7-8:15 p.m.

$50

SENIOR FITNESS SWEATING TO THE OLDIES / Amy’s Health & Fitness

Burn calories and strengthen your heart while singing along to your favorite hits of the ’50s and ’60s. You’ll have so much fun, you’ll forget you’re exercising! Must register for this class in person. CODE

DATES

9268 4/12-5/30

26

DAY

COMPUTERS FOR ACTIVE ADULTS / AGI Academy

Bond with your tot through song, game, stories and crafts in this parent participation class. CODE

CODE

AGE

DAY

60+ yrs. F

TIME

FEE

8:30-9:45 a.m.

Free

SLIM & TONE PILATES: RESISTANCE BAND TRAINING / Amy’s Health & Fitness

Up your fitness routine with core exercises that trim your waistline and help stabilize your entire body! Yoga mat required. CODE

DATES

AGE

9269

4/13-6/15

16+ yrs. S

DAY

TIME

FEE

8:45-10:30 a.m.

$55

SUN-MOON YOGA / Michael Appleby

Balance, strengthen, align and flex. A well-developed mind-body rapport brings better health and wellbeing. Yoga mat required. CODE

DATES

AGE

9270

4/8-6/17

16+ yrs. M

DAY

TIME

FEE

7-9 p.m.

$60

TOTAL YOGA: BEAT STRESS AND TONE / Amy’s Health & Fitness

Feel invigorated from the inside out through a series of flowing and dynamic poses suitable for beginning and intermediate level students. Fitness mat required. CODE

DATES

9266 4/10-6/12

AGE

DAY

16+ yrs. W

TIME

FEE

7-8:30 p.m.

$50

ZUMBA / P&C Dance Studio

High-energy, exotic rhythms set to Latin and international beats get your energy level soaring in this calorie-burning dance exercise! CODE

DATES

9326 4/9-5/16 9327 5/21-6/27

AGE

DAY

15+ yrs. T/Th 15+ yrs. T/Th

TIME

FEE

3-4 p.m. 3-4 p.m.

$45 $45

MUSIC AND PRODUCTION CHILDREN’S MUSICAL THEATER / Kids Music N’ Motion

Learn basic theater skills and vocal techniques in this fun and improvisational class! Performance for family and friends will be held at the end of the session. $25 materials fee due at first class. CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY

TIME

FEE

9276 9342 9277 9343

4/13-5/11 5/18-6/15 4/13-5/11 5/18-6/15

5-8 yrs. 5-8 yrs. 8-13 yrs. 8-13 yrs.

S S S S

3:45-4:15 p.m. 3:45-4:15 p.m. 3:15-3:45 p.m. 3:15-3:45 p.m.

$65 $65 $65 $65

Here Comes the Sun If you’re looking for an excuse to head outdoors and enjoy the spring sunshine, check out these March festivities. For more information, call (626) 285-2171, ext. 2360.

ANNUAL ARBOR DAY CELEBRATION Wednesday, March 13, 1:30–6 p.m., Temple City Park Cherry picker rides, crafts, face-painting and bouncing off the walls of an obstacle jumper—in Temple City, it’s all part of the educational process! Kids are welcome to have some fun and learn about planting and caring for trees.

BIKE RIDE AND RODEO Saturday, March 23, 9 a.m.–2 p.m., Live Oak Park Celebrate the city’s incoming bike lanes and get some exercise while you’re at it! Our first-ever Bike Ride and Rodeo kicks off with a five-mile road ride along a route identified in the Bicycle Master Plan, and leads into festivities at Live Oak Park including a mini bike path for kids, a live BMX stunt and breakdance show, classic bike displays and booths by local bike shops. Freebies and raffle prizes will also be up for grabs! 9–10 a.m.       9:30–10 a.m. 10 a.m.–Noon       Noon–2 p.m.      

Check-In/Registration Pre-Ride Safety Seminar Five-Mile Bike Ride Bike Rodeo

BIKE RIDE ROUTE MAP

Le m o n

GROUP PIANO LESSONS / Kids Music N’ Motion

Golde

Hit that key with basic note recognition, keyboard scales and music theory foundation in a group setting. Each class includes keyboards for students. $25 materials fee due at first class. DAY

TIME

FEE

4-6 yrs. 4-6 yrs. 7-10 yrs. 7-10 yrs. 11-15 yrs. 11-15 yrs. 11-15 yrs. 11-15 yrs.

S S S S S S S S

1-1:45 p.m. 1-1:45 p.m. 1:45-2:30 p.m. 1:45-2:30 p.m. 4:45-5:30 p.m. 4:45-5:30 p.m. 5:30-6:15 p.m. 5:30-6:15 p.m.

$65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $165

t

AGE

4/13-5/11 5/18-6/15 4/13-5/11 5/18-6/15 4/13-5/11 5/18-6/15 4/13-5/11 5/18-6/15

n Wes

DATES

9278 9344 9279 9345 9280 9346 9281 9347

Encinita

CODE

LIVE OAK PARK

way

Daines

ly Clover

Broad

ak

in Baldw

Live O

Temple City Connect

27

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recreation guide

KIDS MUSIC N’ MOTION-MUSIC CLASSES / Kids Music N’ Motion

Sing weekly new tunes and learn about percussion instruments. Kids will enhance their awareness of music and movement at an early age through rhythm and multicultural songs.

CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT

CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9271 9337 9272 9338 9273 9339 9274 9340 9275 9341

4/9-5/7 5/14-6/11 4/13-5/11 5/18-6/15 4/13-5/11 5/18-6/15 4/13-5/11 5/18-6/15 4/13-5/11 5/18-6/15

0-6 yrs. 0-6 yrs. 0-5 yrs. 0-5 yrs. 19 mos.-2.5 yrs. 19 mos.-2.5 yrs. 2.5-5 yrs. 2.5-5 yrs. 0-2.5 yrs. 0-2.5 yrs.

T T S S S S S S S S

$55 $55 $55 $55 $55 $55 $55 $55 $55 $55

5:45-6:30 p.m. 5:45-6:30 p.m. 9-10 a.m. 9-10 a.m. 10-11 a.m. 10-11 a.m. 11-12 p.m. 11-12 p.m. 12-1 p.m. 12-1 p.m.

PIANO, PIANO! / Music, Math & More

Let’s Kick It!

Learn to read piano notes and play basic songs. Bring a three-ring binder and 20 sheet protectors to the first class.

Hey kids—spring into action and get active this season!

DATES

LEVEL

9288 9289

4/8-6/3 4/8-6/3

Beg. 5+ yrs. Int. 7+ yrs.

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

M M

$85 $85

4-4:30 p.m. 4:30-5 p.m.

UKULELE LESSONS / Kids Music N’ Motion Staff

Learn to read music notes and master the treble clef scale—before you know it, you’re on your way to strumming cool island tunes! Students must provide their own ukulele. $25 materials fee due at first class.

PENTATHLON—TRACK & FIELD Various Locations Open to boys and girls in grades 3 through 6, the City’s Pentathlon is based on an Olympic sport originating from Ancient Greece, which combines five different track and field events. Participants challenge a diverse set of athletic skills, training in the 50-meter dash, 400-meter run, softball throw for distance, standing long jump and standing triple jump. The competition will be at Live Oak Park on Saturday, June 1 at 4 p.m. Winners will be determined through combined scores in all five events. Instructional clinics begin April 22 at various sites throughout the city. Fee includes T-shirt and award.

CODE

DATES

AGE/GRADE SITE

DAY

TIME

FEE

9219 9220 9221 9222 9223 9224

4/22-6/1 4/22-6/1 4/22-6/1 4/22-6/1 4/22-6/1 4/22-6/1

3rd-6th 3rd-6th 3rd-6th 3rd-6th 3rd-6th 3rd-6th

M/W M/W M/W M/W M/W M/W

4-5 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 4-5 p.m.

$10 $10 $10 $10 $10 $10

Cloverly Cleminson Emperor La Rosa Longden Live Oak Park

CODE

REGISTER AT LIVE OAK PARK AND STARS CLUB LOCATIONS BEGINNING APRIL 1

CODE FEE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

9282 9334 9283 9335 9284 9336

4/9-5/7 5/14-6/11 4/9-5/7 5/14-6/11 4/9-5/7 5/14-6/11

5-8 yrs. 5-8 yrs. 9-13 yrs. 9-13 yrs. 14+ yrs. 14+yrs.

T T T T T T

3:30-4:15 p.m. 3:30-4:15 p.m. 4:15-5 p.m. 4:15-5 p.m. 5-5:15 p.m. 5-5:15 p.m.

$65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $65

SELF DEFENSE AND MARTIAL ARTS JAPANESE SWORD–IAIDO / Rojen Recreation

Iaido is a traditional art of Japanese swordsmanship. Learn traditional forms and how to cut with the samurai sword in this hands-on class. CODE

DATES

9290

4/12-6/14 15+ yrs. F

AGE

DAY TIME

8-9 p.m.

FEE

$51

JU-JITSU & JAPANESE SWORD / Rojen Recreation

MINI-SOCCER Live Oak Park Score a goal this spring! Participate in the world’s most popular game of soccer right in your hometown. Take advantage of this opportunity to learn sportsmanship and make new friends, while learning the fundamental skills and rules of the game. Fee includes instruction, plenty of fun, a trophy and souvenir T-shirt.

CODE

DATES

AGE/GRADE LEVEL

DAY

TIME

FEE

9217 9218

4/23-6/6 4/23-6/6

3.5-5 yrs. 6-7 yrs.

T/Th T/Th

4-5 p.m. 5-6 p.m.

$60 $60

Beg./Int. Beg./Int.

REGISTER AT LIVE OAK PARK BEGINNING APRIL 1

28

Spring 2013

www.templecity.us

Learn the fundamentals of traditional martial arts—Judo, Aikido, Kendo—and the weapons of self-defense. Second hour of instruction covers the basics of Iaido, the art of Japanese swordsmanship. CODE

DATES

9291

4/12-6/14 15+ yrs. F

AGE

DAY TIME

7-9 p.m.

FEE

$61

JU-JITSU & KARATE / Jennies Gym

Build strength while learning martial arts techniques for self-defense. Lessons include Judo, Aikido, Kendo and Karate. CODE

DATES

9292 4/9-6/13 9293 4/9-6/13 9294 4/9-6/13

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

All 13+ yrs. T/Th 8-9 p.m. New 8-12 yrs. T/Th 6-7 p.m. Grn. Belt+ 8-12 yrs. T/Th 7-8 p.m.

FEE

$61 $61 $61

LITTLE KICKERS JU-JITSU / Jennies Gym

TENNIS ACADEMY / TJP Tennis Professionals

Teaches self-esteem and discipline through age-appropriate martial arts lessons. CODE

DATES

9295 4/12-6/14 9296 4/12-6/14 9297 4/12-6/14

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

New 5-7 yrs. F Ylw. Belt+ 5-7 yrs. F All levels 8+ yrs. F

4:30-5:15 p.m. 5:15-6 p.m. 6-7 p.m.

FEE

$49 $49 $56

NIPPON KEMPO KARATE / Do Mar

Develop respect, discipline and self-confidence through this self-defense system based on punching, kicking, blocking, joint locks and ground combat. CODE

DATES

LEVEL

9298 9299 9300

4/8-6/10 4/10-6/5 4/8-6/10

All 7+ yrs. M/W 6:30-8 p.m. New 5-9 yrs. W 5:40-6:25 p.m. Ylw. Belt+ 5-10 yrs. M 5:40-6:25 p.m.

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

$55 $34 $34

Have fun while preparing for match play. Challenge yourself with physically demanding court workouts and drills. Tennis shoes required. Bring a racquet and new can of three tennis balls to the first class. CODE

DATES

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9318 9319 9320 9321 9322 9323 9324 9325

4/8-6/3 4/10-5/29 4/8-6/3 4/12-5/31 4/12-5/31 4/10-5/29 4/10-5/29 4/10-5/29

Beg./Int. Beg./Int. Int./Adv. Beg./Int. Int./Adv. Beg. Int. Adv.

8-12 yrs. 8-12 yrs. 10+ yrs. 8-12 yrs. 10+ yrs. 14+ yrs. 18+ yrs. 18+ yrs.

M W M F F W W W

$85 $85 $85 $85 $85 $85 $85 $85

6-7 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 7-8 p.m. 6-7 p.m. 7-8 p.m. 6-7 p.m. 7-8 p.m. 8-9 p.m.

SPECIAL INTEREST KIDS IN THE KITCHEN / Jennies Gym

Let’s get cooking! Little chefs can learn their way around the kitchen practicing new skills, techniques and recipes. $25 materials fee due at first class. CODE

DATES

9301 9302

4/10-5/29 4-7 yrs. W 4/10-5/29 8-12 yrs. W

AGE

DAY TIME

4-4:45 p.m. 5-6 p.m.

FEE

$53 $53

SPORTS GYMNASTICS & TRAMPOLINE / Jennies Gym

Young gymnasts will learn basic tumbling skills and exercises on the balance beam, bars, vault and trampoline. New students will be evaluated and grouped by ability. CODE

DATES

9310 9311 9312

4/13-6/1 4-7 yrs. S 4/13-6/1 7-15 yrs. S 4/13-6/1 13+ yrs. S

AGE

DAY TIME

10:30-11:30 a.m. 11:30-12:30 p.m. 11:30-12:30 p.m.

FEE

$71 $71 $71

KINDERGYM / Jennies Gym

Kids are not the only ones allowed to have fun, since parents get to come too! You’ll learn forward rolls, back rolls, handstands and more with your kids. Together, you’ll walk the balance beam, swing on bars and jump on the trampoline! One parent per child must attend each class. CODE

DATES

9313 9314

4/13-6/1 9 m.-2 yrs. S 4/13-6/1 3-4 yrs. S

AGE

DAY TIME

9-9:45 a.m. 9:45-10:30 a.m.

FEE

$71 $71

TABLE TENNIS / L.A. Table Tennis Association

Learn table tennis from the pros! Former U.S. Olympians and National Champions teach rules and proper techniques. Dress in athletic wear and light shoes, and bring your own paddle. Equipment is available for purchase on-site. All classes held at the L.A. Table Tennis Association facility, 10180 Valley Blvd., El Monte. CODE

DATES

AGE

9315 4/9-6/11 6+ yrs. 9316 4/6-6/8 6+ yrs. 9317 4/7-6/9 6+ yrs.

DAY TIME

FEE

T S Su

$190 $250 $250

7-8:30 p.m. 2-4 p.m. 3-5 p.m.

TEMPLE CITY WANTS YOU! Calling all students! Do you have big dreams for your little town? Then apply for Temple City’s Youth Committee and turn your ideas into action!

Work with City leaders and staff, as well as students from local middle and high schools, to develop policies and programs that impact youth in the community. We can’t think of any better way to gain leadership skills, while having tons of fun! Youth Committee members are appointed by the City Council through an interview process. Members must be residents of Temple City at the time of appointment to office and throughout the entire period of service. For more information, call (626) 285-2171, ext. 2360. To download an application, logon to the City website at www.templecity.us.

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temple city

recreation guide

Senior Programs FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL (626) 579-0461.

AARP DRIVER SAFETY

SENIOR BINGO LAST THURSDAY OF THE MONTH, 1–3 P.M. Studies show that bingo can enhance memory skills and improve concentration. Play free at Live Oak Park Community Center— it’s fun and all games are played for prizes!

MAY 13 & 14, 8:30 A.M.–12 P.M., $12-14 As you age, driving proficiency becomes increasingly important. The AARP Driver Safety Program is the largest and most respected refresher course, designed to help those 55 and older tune up their driving skills, allowing for normal age-related physical changes. Classes are offered at Live Oak Park Community Center. $12 for AARP members, $14 for non-members. Fee is payable by check at the first day of class. Pre-registration is recommended.

SENIOR LUNCH WEEKDAYS, 11 A.M., $2 DONATION

LINKAGES PROGRAM

Seniors over 60 years of age are invited to Live Oak Park Community Center for a hot lunch, activities and socializing with friends and neighbors. Monthly menus are available at the Community Center and on the City’s website, www.templecity.us. Hot tea and coffee are available for just 25 cents per cup—best price in town! Reservations are required 24 hours in advance by calling (626) 579-0461.

FIRST & THIRD MONDAY OF THE MONTH, 10:30 A.M–12 P.M.

SENIOR WELLNESS SERIES

Offers free case management services to frail seniors (ages 60 and over) and adults with disabilities (ages 18 and older), affording them the ability and independence to remain safely at home and in the community. In addition to onsite assistance at Live Oak Park Community Center, services are also available by appointment. For more information, contact the YWCA San Gabriel Valley at (626) 214-9465.

Understanding Your Bill FIRST & THIRD THURSDAY OF THE MONTH, 11 A.M.–1 P.M.

THIRD WEDNESDAY OF THE MONTH, 10–11 A.M. Get informed on senior health issues. Free and open to seniors, their families and caregivers. APRIL 17: PLANNING FOR LONG TERM CARE Workshop provider: Genworth Financial MAY 15: ON THE MOVE RIDERS CLUB (USING PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION) Workshop provider: Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority JUNE 19: KNOW THE 10 SIGNS: EARLY DETECTION MATTERS Workshop provider: Alzheimer’s Association

SENIOR CELEBRATIONS Celebrate this season at the senior luncheon program! The City’s Parks and Recreation Department will host several holiday-themed lunches for seniors to enjoy together. For reservations, call (626) 579-0461. Space is limited. SPRING TIME BINGO, APRIL 9 Spring into the changing season with a special edition of bingo! Come and play for a chance to win great prizes.

Meet with representatives of the Campaign for Social Justice at Live Oak Park Community Center to learn about bill errors, voice and data plans, and bills from Southern California Edison and Southern California Gas Company. English and Chinese services will be available onsite, with Vietnamese, Spanish and Tagalog services available offsite. This program is sponsored by the California Public Utilities Commission’s Telecommunications Education & Assistance in Multiple Languages (TEAM) collaborative. For more information, call (323) 987-8283.

30

Spring 2013

www.templecity.us

MOTHER’S DAY, MAY 10 Join us in celebrating the joys and memories of motherhood at this special luncheon dedicated to all those who “always know best.” FATHER’S DAY, JUNE 14 Nothing says Happy Father’s Day like a filling meal! Come and enjoy a delicious lunch as we honor all the dads, heroes and father figures in the community!

Senior Excursions

PALM SPRINGS FOLLIES

The City offers one-day excursions to local and nearby destinations. These memorable daytrips show off the incredible diversity of attractions in Southern California, and range from tours and shows, to dinners and shopping. For more information, call (626) 579-0461.

Spend a day in Downtown Palm Springs browsing and lunching on your own before settling in for the 1:30 p.m. performance of the Palm Springs Follies at the Plaza Theater. Featuring music and dance of the ’40s-’70s, with a cast old enough to have lived it, the 22nd edition of the fabulous Follies is sure to dazzle. Plus, you won’t want to miss a special performance by ’60s singer Lesley Gore! Registration deadline: April 13.

RONALD REAGAN PRESIDENTAL MUSEUM APRIL 6, 9 A.M.–4:30 P.M., $38 Get a glimpse into the life and times of President Ronald Reagan through personal photographs and memorabilia collected from his years in Hollywood to his days aboard Air Force One. The museum also features D23 Presents Treasures of the Walt Disney Archives—the largest exhibit ever curated by the Walt Disney Archives. Enjoy lunch on your own. Admission and docent-led tour included. Registration deadline: March 26.

TANAKA FARMS AND OLD TOWNE ORANGE APRIL 22, 9 A.M.–4 P.M., $39 With spring’s rains and sunshine bringing fresh produce, get a taste of the season with fresh fruits and veggies picked straight from the source at the famous Tanaka Farms. After the tour, enjoy shopping and an included lunch in Old Towne Orange. Registration deadline: April 9.

MAY 4, 9 A.M.–7 P.M., $66

‘ALL SHOOK UP’ IN PALM SPRINGS MAY 24, 9 A.M.–5:30 P.M., $57 While a southerner at heart, Elvis Presley also loved the California lifestyle. See how the King spent his days on this guided tour of his three-acre Palm Springs estate, often referred to as “Graceland of the West.” Lunch will be provided at the popular Sherman’s Deli & Bakery. After, spend time on your own in downtown before returning home. Admission is included. Registration deadline: May 13.

SPACE SHUTTLE TOUR JUNE 27, 9 A.M.–5 P.M., $41 Blast off to the California Science Center and explore the galleries and exhibits, including the Space Shuttle Endeavour at the Display Pavilion. Then we’ll enjoy an included lunch at L.A.’s famous Philippe’s Original French Dip, before taking off for a visit to the Columbia Memorial Space Center in Downey. Admission is included at both locations. Registration deadline: June 14. NOTE: Trips may be cancelled or changed at the City’s discretion. Refunds will be offered only if a replacement is found and notification of cancellation is provided at least eight days in advance of the trip.

Senior Luau JUNE 20, 4:30–7:30 P.M. Aloha seniors! It’s time to jump into your favorite Hawaiian duds because the City of Temple City is throwing a luau-themed party! Feast on BBQ pork ribs, potato salad and other island specialties while enjoying Polynesian entertainment. Residents aged 60 years and older are welcome to attend. Meals will be offered in conjunction with YMCA San Gabriel Valley’s Intervale Senior Services Program. The evening’s entertainment fee is $5 with an additional $2 suggested donation for dinner. Pre-registration for the event is required. For more information, call (626) 579-0461.

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31

RECREATE HOW YOU

RECREATE

A JUNGLE GYM HERE… A RUNNING PATH THERE. The City is developing a Parks and Open Space Master Plan to identify goals and

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Parks and Open Space Master Planning Workshops All ages welcome. Refreshments provided. Translation available upon request; please call ahead to arrange for services.

priorities for improving local recreation and leisure over the next 20 years. Share your ideas and hear others at one of our community workshops.

March 26 — 7 p.m. Longden Elementary, Memoli Hall 9501 Wendon St. (Entrance on Longden Avenue)

OR

March 27 — 7 p.m. Live Oak Park Community Center 10144 Bogue St.

CITY OF TEMPLE CITY • 9701 LAS TUNAS DR., TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780 • (626) 285-2171

temple city

ask city hall

Ask City Hall Temple City Connect addresses questions from residents on a wide variety of City activities, projects and policies, keeping you connected, engaged and educated. In this issue, we respond to inquiries about the City’s proposed redesign of Las Tunas Drive.

Does Las Tunas Drive really need to be redesigned?

Over the years, we’ve heard from residents and businesses yearning for the return of a bustling downtown on Las Tunas Drive. In its current condition, the street serves primarily as an auto-oriented thoroughfare and is not conducive to the type of pedestrian activity that distinguish successful downtowns. As such, a redesign is necessary to add attractive amenities that will draw people to hang out and businesses to open shop.

While it would appear that a reduction in traffic lanes would inevitably cause a reduction in traffic capacity, level of service is not simply a function of number of lanes. The City may use state-of-the-art traffic management techniques, such as signal timing, to accommodate impacts to traffic flow. Also, the potential reduction of lanes would shorten crosswalk lengths, decreasing pedestrian cross times and extending green lights for through traffic.

visitors can “store-hop” and visit multiple businesses at once. To develop that type of desirable retail environment, this project focuses on adding amenities that will attract pedestrians. For one, the back-in angled parking configuration provides a “flex-zone” option that allows for outdoor dining opportunities. After all, nothing attracts people more than seeing other people enjoying themselves and having a great time. We expect this project’s pedestrian focus to revitalize Las Tunas into a vibrant downtown destination.

Is it true that back-in angled parking is being proposed for this new downtown area? If so, won’t this cause accidents?

What’s the status of the project? Are there opportunities for community members to stay involved?

The selected Las Tunas plan does include backin angled parking, a new best practice being employed by major cities including Portland, Seattle and San Francisco. While its initial unfamiliarity may be off-putting to some, this arrangement provides many practical and safety benefits—increasing street parking supply, providing direct access to corridor businesses, improving visibility for drivers merging out, and keeping passengers out of traffic.

Last December, the City Council approved a Las Tunas streetscape plan as part of a grant application to receive up to $6.5 million toward construction. While awaiting word on whether the project receives funding, the City is working with the design consultant on refining project elements, to be shared at a second community workshop. More details will be announced as they become available.

Won’t reducing the number of travel lanes in the downtown area cause traffic congestion?

What’s being proposed?

The new design will make Las Tunas a “complete street” that accommodates all roadway users. Amenities such as marked crosswalks, midblock crossings, bike lanes, traffic calming and transit improvements will facilitate access into the downtown area for drivers, pedestrians, cyclists and transit-users alike. Meanwhile, aesthetic enhancements like public art, added plant life and gateway features; as well as outdoor dining and seating opportunities, will create interest and means for people to congregate. In the downtown area from Cloverly to Golden West avenues, the plan also proposes to reduce traffic from five to three lanes. This will slow the pace of traffic, allowing for a safer pedestrian environment, while prompting drivers to notice downtown businesses.

How will this project spur economic development?

Las Tunas’ contiguous storefronts make it an ideal “park-once” retail destination, where

VIEW THE PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS for Las Tunas Drive at www.lastunasdrive.com. To submit additional questions, or subscribe to the project’s distribution list, e-mail lastunas@templecity.us.

Temple City Connect

33

temple city

people

HOLLYWOOD STUNTWOMAN

Li Jing Can you tell us about the art of wushu?

In addition to owning Wushu Action

It’s existed in China for many years. In Mainland China, wushu and kung fu are the same thing. It’s just when earlier generations came to America and did wushu, they called it kung fu and that name became popular.

Star Academy, you’re also a Hollywood

What led to your interest in modern kung fu?

My father was my first coach. He’s a martial artist. His goal was to pass it on to the next generation. It didn’t matter if I was a boy or a girl—I was actually supposed to be a boy [because it was culturally preferred at the time]. So it was really not my choice in the beginning. But later on, as I got to a higher level, I became more appreciative that he introduced me to this form of martial arts. It changed my life.

stuntwoman. How did that happen?

Teaching is my hobby. After teaching at UC Berkeley, I moved to Hollywood. A lot of my students were directors and actors, so they introduced me to the film industry. Ever since 2002, it’s become my full-time job. What upcoming projects are you working on?

Since I’ve had my baby, I haven’t been able to work, but my last job was for the film Pacific Rim, a $200 million investment—the biggest movie for 2013. Congratulations on your recent newborn! Have you started training since giving birth?

I’m actually going to give myself some time off because it’s good to be a mom first.

You mentioned that you were ‘supposed to be a boy’—did people frown upon or

Will you teach your baby wushu when

respect you more when you practiced

she’s older?

wushu growing up?

This baby is already making a fist! She’s going to be a little action baby. Her father is also an athlete (a former judo player) so she’ll be very active.

They were more surprised. With the way my father raised me, it was really more of raising me like a boy. I always had short hair, a workout jacket and soccer shoes. The thing is, all the people in my city back then knew about me as this little girl who was a tomboy that could do awesome kung fu, and was very nice. I was actually pretty famous back then! 34

Spring 2013 www.templecity.us

3…2…1…ACTION! For more of Li’s interview and to view additional photos, logon to the City’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ConnectwithTC.

BY STEPHANIE CHAN

Li Jing is no stranger to the art of wushu. Training since the young age of five, her skills have led her to win multiple championships, earn the 1996 Wushu Hero Medal and receive Coach of the Year while teaching at the University of California, Berkeley in 2000. With a passion for teaching, Li eventually opened Wushu Action Star Academy in Temple City. When she isn’t busy being an instructor at her own school, Jing also works as a fulltime Hollywood stuntwoman—having recently appeared in The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift, Rush Hour 3, The Last Airbender and this year’s Pacific Rim. Between juggling her roles as an actress, teacher and most recently, new mom to her baby girl, Li found some time to talk to us about how she got started in wushu, and whether or not she’ll be passing along this form of martial arts to her daughter.

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Temple City Connect

35

Temple City Farmer’s Market

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Stay up-to-date on the latest Temple City Farmer’s Market news and events!

Every Sunday 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m. City Hall, 9701 Las Tunas Dr.

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City of Temple City 9701 Las Tunas Dr. Temple City, CA 91780

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ECRWSS

POSTAL CUSTOMER TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780


Temple City Connect Spring 2013