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ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013

University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

College of Natural Resources Mission Statement The mission of the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources is to provide education, research and outreach in integrated natural resources management, environmental education, and paper science and engineering. The College of Natural Resources: • Provides undergraduate and graduate instruction combining theoretical concepts with practical experience, such as laboratory and field-oriented courses, internships and special projects. • Promotes scholarly activities that enhance the creation or application of knowledge or contributes to the resolution of environmental and natural resources management issues, especially through student research. • Shares faculty and student expertise with citizens, communities, agencies and industries through outreach, scholarship, and consulting.

Contents Fostering Student Success.................................................................... 1-6 Building Partnerships......................................................................... 7-10 Inspiring International Awareness.......................................................11-14 Supporting Faculty and Staff............................................................. 15-18 Reaching out to the Community......................................................... 19-22 Upgrading Facilities.......................................................................... 23-24 Enriching Education through Contributions......................................... 25-30 CNR by the Numbers......................................................................... 31-33

On the front cover (from left to right): Kelly Redmond, wildlife ecology major, classifies soil during a field lab exercise; UW-Stevens Point students Leiloni Nichols, Tessa Hasbrouck, Ashley Goschey, and Erik Hendrickson visit the Thinvillier National Park in Iceland as part of the European Environmental Studies Seminar; UW-Stevens Point Fire Crew student Brian Gorman assists with a prescribed burn on an educational trip to Okla. On the back cover (from left to right): Zeb Woiak, a WICFRU masters student, assists with musky sampling on the Menominee River; Alexa Cushman, a wildlife ecology major, holds a caracal during the African Wildlife Ecology Course offered during the winterim session; Forestry major Heath Brander transplants American hazelnut seedlings as part of a research project with Professor Michael Demchik.

The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution.

University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Fostering Student Success

Paper Science and Engineering junior Rachel Strelow received the 2012 TAPPI Student of the Year Award. (From left to right: Roger Hagan, president at Port Townsend Paper Corporation; Rachel Strelow, and Larry Montague, president and CEO of TAPPI) 1

2012-2013 Annual Report

New wildland fire science program Ron Masters, associate professor of wildland fire science, will lead the new Wildland Fire Science program this fall. Our strong integrated natural resources curriculum and presence of the nationally recognized Fire Crew student organization make this an ideal location for the first undergraduate program of its kind in the Eastern United States. Students will gain a number of skills including practical experience in developing prescribed burn plans, working knowledge of wildland fire policy, suppression, and use; predicting fire behavior; fuels management; fire plans; and fire ecology. Students will receive basic wildland firefighter certifications and have the opportunity to pursue additional training to make themselves more competitive in today’s job market.

Record turnout at 14th annual Student Research Symposium A record number of students participated in the 14th annual Undergraduate Student Research Symposium on April 5, 2013. Eighty undergraduate students showcased their research findings through poster and oral presentations under the watchful eye of faculty, staff, retirees, and other community volunteers who serve as judges during the event. The symposium is planned and organized by a steering committee made up of students with faculty and staff members assisting as needed. This year’s honorees are posted online at www.uwsp.edu/cnr/studentsymposium.

National accolades for Paper Science and Engineering students Rachel Strelow, a junior paper science and engineering major, received the national Technical Association for the Pulp and Paper Industry (TAPPI) Student of the Year Award at PaperCon, TAPPI’s annual conference held in Atlanta, Ga., at the beginning of May. Steven Swan, a junior paper science and engineering major, won the Robert W. Hagemeyer Scholarship and the Paper and Board Division Scholarship. Tyler Shimulunas, a junior paper science and engineering major, received the Engineering Division Scholarship. Steven and Tyler are currently participating in the Trans-Atlantic Degree Program (TAPS) in Germany and will be in Finland for the fall 2013 semester.

from top: UW-Stevens Point Fire Crew student Brian Gorman assists with a prescribed burn on an educational trip to Okla.; Sarah Rademacher, forest ecosystem restoration and management major, participates in the CNR’s 14th annual Undergraduate Student Research Symposium; Paper Science and Engineering students received awards and scholarships at the TAPPI annual conference.

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University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Forestry students selected as interns from national pool Four senior forestry students were chosen as summer interns by the Society of Municipal Arborists. Thomas Steele, Spring Green; Gary Tellefson, Edgerton; Michael Zalewski, Antigo; and Alex Estelmann, Madison, were among 11 interns chosen from a national competitive pool of 29 applicants. Interns spend 10 weeks working with mentor arborists in municipal forestry programs across the country.

Students gain real world experience through service-learning projects Students in Kristin Floress’ and Aaron Thompson’s natural resources classes gained real world experience through service-learning projects. Students worked with organizations such as the North Central Conservancy Trust, the city of Stevens Point, and High Cliff State Park. Some of the completed projects can be viewed online at the links below.

Strategic Conservation Plan for the Plover River Watershed www.uwsp.edu/cnr-ap/clue/documents/public/ploverriver_strategicconservationplan02.pdf

The Urban Agriculture Plan for Stevens Point www.uwsp.edu/cnr-ap/clue/documents/public/stevenspoint_urbanagricultureplan.pdf

City of Stevens Point Downtown Lullaby Site Redevelopment Planning Efforts www.uwsp.edu/cnr-ap/clue/documents/public/UWSP_NRES488-lullabysiteredevelopment.pdf

Woodland Sports teams defends championship Members of the Woodland Sports team successfully defended their championship for the third year in a row at the Midwestern Forester’s Conclave at Michigan State University in April, 2013. Conclave participants from UW-Stevens Point included seven women and 14 men who competed in crosscut sawing, wood chopping, axe throwing and log rolling as well as academic events such as tree and wood identification and inventory techniques.

from top: Forestry students practice tree climbing skills during an outdoor lab at UW-Stevens Point; Students work together on a strategic conservation plan for the Plover River Watershed; Spencer Johnson competes in the single buck event during the Midwestern Forester’s Conclave held at Michigan State University.

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2012-2013 Annual Report

Student learns about China’s sustainability efforts through Rivers as Bridges program Michelle Scarpace, a soil and land management major, visited several of China’s historic sites, shared cultural and educational experiences, and studied how China is addressing its environmental challenges in rural and urban settings as part of the Rivers as Bridges program. Scarpace was chosen from a pool of students to participate in Rivers as Bridges, a student foreign exchange program connecting Chinese and American culture, conservation, and commerce in hopes of creating sustainable river systems and communities. Cathy Stepp, Department of Natural Resources secretary, and Rick Otis, former Environmental Protection Agency assistant administrator, joined Scarpace and other Midwest college and high school students on the trip.

Students gain real world knowledge through summer field experiences Our summer field experiences continue to be an integral part of our program giving students hands-on real world experiences in all areas of natural resources. Students have the option of participating in a field training course in Wisconsin or a European Environmental Studies Seminar. Students participating in the Wisconsin field training course are split into three sessions. Two of the sessions are six weeks at our Treehaven facility in Tomahawk, Wis., and the third session is six weeks split between our Central Wisconsin Environmental Station (CWES) in Amherst Junction, Wis., and the UW-Stevens Point campus. One hundred and seven students participated in session one and 105 students in session two at our Treehaven facility and 60 students took part in session three at CWES/UW-Stevens Point campus for the 2012 summer field experience. The European Environmental Studies Seminar gives students two weeks of hands-on field experiences at CWES prior to their departure to Europe for five weeks of programming. Students spend two weeks in Germany, two weeks in Poland, and one week in Iceland learning about global natural resources practices. Eric Anderson, professor of wildlife ecology, and Sue Kissinger, coordinator of advising and recruitment, led 42 students on the 2012 international experience. From top: Michelle Scarpace, pictured at the Great Wall of China, visited China, with the Rivers as Bridges program; Students measure forestry plots during the Treehaven summer field experience; European Environmental Studies Seminar students hike to a lake in the Tatra Mountains in Poland with trip leader Sue Kissinger (far right).

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University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Forestry management student wins national championship Ben Hansen, a forestry management major, won the national title at the 2013 STIHL Timbersports Series collegiate championship competition held in Pigeon Forge, Tenn., June 7–9. Hansen won first place in the single buck competition, second place in the standing chop block, third place in the stock saw competition, third place in the underhand chop, and then won the championship by one point. Hansen will compete with the U.S. Timbersports relay team at the world championships in Stuttgart, Germany, October 24–26. He will also compete as a professional in the 2014 STIHL Timbersports series. UW-Stevens Point is one of two schools with two student collegiate timbersports champions. The university has also won four Midwest regional timbersports titles through Adam LaSalle (2009), Andrew Gollnick (BS Forestry Administration and Utilization ‘12) (2010), and Hansen (2011 and 2012).

Student presents at national diversity conference Brittany Ruttenberg, wildlife ecology student and president of the student chapter of Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Sciences (MANRRS), co-presented with Bobbi Kubish, international programs and recruitment coordinator, at “The Future of Diversity in Our Disciplines and Careers: Natural Resources and the Environment” conference held at Virginia Tech University in Blacksburg, Va. Ruttenberg discussed the efforts of the UW-Stevens Point student chapter of MANRRS to reach out to students, faculty and staff, and Kubish shared strategies that the college is utilizing to increase enrollment and retention of diverse students in natural resources.

High school students get hands on at Careers in Action Day Paper science and engineering students engaged Mosinee High School chemistry students in the papermaking process as part of the Careers in Action Day. The high school students were able to see firsthand how chemistry ties into the papermaking process. The students worked through six demonstrations focusing on retention/ suspension, fiber length analysis, rheology, paper formation, deinking, and kraft pulping. Students also toured the waste education center and the pilot paper machine plant. from top: Forestry student Ben Hansen won the 2013 STIHL Timbersports Series collegiate championship; Student Brittany Ruttenberg presented on MANRRS at the Future of Diversity in Our Disciplines and Careers national conference held at Virginia Tech. Va.; A Paper Science and Engineering student demonstrates how retention/ suspension works to Mosinee High School chemistry students.

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2012-2013 Annual Report

Fourteen students in the second cohort of the Graduate Fellowship in Residential Environmental Education received their master’s degrees in natural resources. Graduate fellows reside at the Conserve School in Land O’Lakes, Wis., during their program while completing distance learning and face-to-face courses at UW-Stevens Point. 6

University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Building Partnerships

Aaron Schauer, CNR graduate student, shows students from the Urban Ecology Center how to work the ropes during a tree climbing exercise. Students spent two days on the UW-Stevens Point campus learning about careers in natural resources. 7

2012-2013 Annual Report

CWES partners with Tomorrow River Community Charter School The Tomorrow River Community Charter School (TRCCS) formed a partnership with the Central Wisconsin Environmental Station (CWES) to bring the first Waldorf-inspired public charter school to Wisconsin. This new partnership will provide numerous collaborative opportunities including providing a unique real world experience for environmental education practicum students who will be teaching five nature study lessons a week. Renovations occurred in Becker Lodge and Maple Cabin to accommodate the kindergarten through sixth grade students and allow for the space needed to continue programming for visiting schools with the traditional environmental education program. TRCCS will take over the care of the chickens and the garden previously managed by CWES staff and students. A greenhouse was also installed, with grant funding acquired by TRCCS, to provide an additional learning space. The university and TRCCS will continue to look into more ways that partnerships and collaboration can occur. TRCCS staff will include Tomorrow River School District teachers and a garden intern. All teachers will be trained in the Waldorf Education Philosophy focused on a natural learning pace for each student incorporating aspects of music, art, and the environment. TRCCS is affiliated with the Tomorrow River School District and has to follow public school guidelines from the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, but will have freedom over their curriculum.

Youth from the Urban Ecology Center learn about natural resources careers and college Eighteen youth from the Urban Ecology Center in Milwaukee, Wis. spent two days in Stevens Point learning about natural resources careers and ways to prepare for college. Bobbi Kubish, recruitment coordinator, kicked off the two-day camp with a tour of campus and a presentation on career opportunities in natural resources. The students spent the second day participating in field activities. Aaron Schauer, CNR graduate student, demonstrated tree climbing techniques and Richard Hauer, associate professor of forestry, guided the students through basic tree identification skills and pruning strategies. The Urban Ecology Center’s mission is to foster ecological understanding as inspiration for change. The Center brings youth to UW-Stevens Point to learn about natural resources opportunities every other year as part of their outdoor leaders program. from top: Students learn about aquatic insects at the Central Wisconsin Environmental Station, the site of a new charter school; Tom Quinn, CWES program manager, helps install a greenhouse that will be used by the new Tomorrow River Community Charter School; Richard Hauer, associate professor of forestry, shares pruning techniques with students from the Urban Ecology Center in Milwaukee, Wis.

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University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

LEAF, Wisconsin’s K-12 Forestry Education Program, continues work with schools LEAF staff provides support in the development of school forests and outdoor education programs, connects educators with forestry education curriculum resources, and provides professional development for teachers. LEAF provided professional development for 500 educators and school forest consultation to 84 different school districts throughout the state. LEAF was created in 2001 to promote forestry education in Wisconsin. LEAF is partnership between the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources-Division of Forestry, the Wisconsin Center for Environmental Education, and the UW-Stevens Point CNR. Learn more about LEAF programs at www.uwsp.edu/leaf

Mid-State students bring life to solar power heating system at CWES The solar power heating system in the Walker Lodge at the Central Wisconsin Environmental Station (CWES) is back in working order thanks to a partnership with Mid-State Technical College (MSTC). The solar heating system, originally installed as part of the Walker Lodge heating, water, and air conditioning systems, has not been functional for more than ten years. Students from Mid-State did an assessment of the system and brought it back into working order. The newly updated solar system will be used to heat the air during winter months. MSTC students also did an energy audit of Sunset Lodge and the office area and provided recommendations for the reduction of energy use.

SHWEC joins forces with EPA to advance pollution prevention The Solid and Hazardous Waste Education Center (SHWEC) was awarded a grant from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the implementation of pollution prevention activities, including funding for green chemistry programming. The green chemistry activity is focused on developing a web portal for the manufacturing sector containing tools for identifying safer alternatives to hazardous chemicals used in manufacturing. SHWEC will be working with the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) Ad Hoc Group on Substitution of Harmful Chemicals in developing this resource portal . OECD is headquartered in Paris, France, and its mission is to promote policies that will improve the economic and social well-being of people worldwide. from top: Students from School for Agricultural and Environmental Studies Charter School in Fox Lake plant trees in their school forest; Solar cells were fixed on the Walker Lodge at CWES through a partnership with Mid-State Technical College; SHWEC acquired an EPA grant that will help create a web portal that will assist manufacturers in finding alternatives to hazardous chemicals currently in use.

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SHWEC is a partnership with the CNR and the University of Wisconsin-Extension. SHWEC’s mission is to enhance Wisconsin’s environment and economy by providing quality education, information and technical assistance to promote the sustainable use of natural resources.​

2012-2013 Annual Report

Collaboration produces high quality archival art paper The Wisconsin Institute for Sustainable Technology (WIST) collaborated with the university’s Department of Art and Design and the Department of Paper Science and Engineering to create a high-quality, archival art paper at an economical cost for students and faculty in the visual arts. Art faculty provided paper samples and described what they needed in a quality art paper. WIST produced paper in small trial runs, which students and faculty then used in all sorts of ways to test its quality and performance with various media. Several additional development runs later, a paper was created that was “just right” in spring 2012. Since then, UW-Stevens Point students and faculty have been using this archival paper to great success in everything from digital printing to drawing to watercolor. The paper was introduced at Print: MKE, the 2013 Southern Graphics Council International Conference in Milwaukee in March. The project began with the idea of making great-value art paper for the UW-Stevens Point campus but due to its success a decision was made to make it widely available. To date orders have been made to people in a half-dozen states. Orders can be submitted online at www.uwsp.edu/wist/Pages/ riverpointpaper.aspx.

WCEE joins Green and Healthy Schools Program The Wisconsin Center for Environmental Education (WCEE) became a third administrative partner in the Wisconsin Green and Healthy Schools (GHS) Program through a Memorandum of Understanding with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. The green and healthy schools program supports and encourages schools to create safe learning environments and prepare students to understand, analyze, and address the major environmental and sustainability challenges now and in the future through providing resources, recognition, and certification. Since December 2012, 110 Wisconsin schools have joined the program. The WCEE is a center of the UW-Stevens Point CNR and the University of WisconsinExtension working to improve environmental education in Wisconsin. from top: A College of Fine Arts and Communication student shows off her artwork created on paper made on the UW-Stevens Point paper machine; Green and Healthy School participants, Purdy Elementary students, show off the solar panels installed at their school; Students point to a mallard hen nesting in their school’s compost bin.

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University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Inspiring International Awareness

Eric Anderson, wildlife ecology professor, and students visited the Shamwari Game Reserve in Grahamstown, South Africa during the African Wildlife Ecology course. Shamwari Game Reserve is privately owned and gives visitors an opportunity to view free roaming wildlife up close. 11

2012-2013 Annual Report

Students go wild on wildlife ecology course to Africa Ten UW-Stevens Point students embarked on an adventure to Africa as part of the African Wildlife Ecology Course offered during the winterim session. This intense course was designed to study the ecology of African wildlife and engage students in wildlife research in several different ecosystems of South Africa. Students had the opportunity to observe and study a diversity of African wildlife including elephants, rhinos, lions, hippos, Cape buffalo, giraffes, and cheetahs. The students began the trip in the Cape area of South Africa and ended with a week in Kruger National Park, a park the size of New Jersey. Along the way, they explored social, political, and biological issues confronting African wildlife.

Students earn credit while making a difference in Kenya The Sustainable Natural Resources and Community Development course, led by Holly Petrillo, associate professor of forestry, took 14 UW-Stevens Point students to Nyumbani Village in Kenya for two and a half weeks of training. Nyumbani Village is a self-sustaining community serving orphans and elders who have been left behind by the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Africa. Students in the course performed community assessments relatd to cultural, social, natural, and economic resources; applied sustainability principles, methods, strategies, and techniques; developed sustainable land use plans; identified tools for developing sustainable and environmentally sound income generating activities; and developed tools for helping the community take steps toward more ecological and healthy lifestyles.

Peace Corps Masters International Program Two students in the Masters International Program (MIP) are on schedule to graduate December 2013. Scott Benton returned from Cape Verde, Africa, in January and is analyzing data regarding biodiversity assessment in native versus planted forest areas. Heidi Hull was stationed in Uganda as a Sanitation and Water Extension volunteer and is completing her thesis on waste management methods in the Mukono District. The Master’s International Program blends advanced training in natural resources with experience in the Peace Corps to prepare resource professionals with foreign language skills, cultural awareness and an international perspective for growing international resource protection and management opportunities.

from top: Alexa Cushman, a wildlife ecology major, holds a caracal during the African Wildlife Ecology Course offered during the winterim session; Nathan Callope and citizens of Nyambani Village completed a banana circle, which is a greywater system utilizing waste washwater to grow food; Heidi Hull, MIP student, works with other Ugandians to build a fuel efficient stove during her time with the Peace Corps.

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University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Trans-Atlantic Paper Science and Engineering Dual Degree completes final year The Trans-Atlantic Paper Science Undergraduate Dual Degree Program (TAPS) completed its fifth and final year of student exchanges. Three UW-Stevens Point paper science and engineering students, Tyler Shimulunas, Lucas Berg and Steven Swan, departed this past spring. Swan spent one semester abroad in Germany while Shimulunas and Berg spent one semester in Germany and an additional semester in Finland at the Jyväskylä University of Applied Sciences. Two European TAPS students, Gerrit Spiess, Germany, and Tommi Juhani Kuusisto, Finland, studied paper science and engineering at UW-Stevens Point this past year.

Students experience flora and fauna diversity on Costa Rica winterim trip Twenty one UW-Stevens Point students experienced some of the most biologically diverse ecosystems in the world on the winterim Costa Rica trip led by Tim Ginnett, wildlife ecology professor, and Anna Haines, director of the Center for Land Use Education and natural resources professor. Students explored rain forests, cloud forests, active volcanoes, estuaries, coral reefs, mangroves, dry tropical forests, beaches, and banana and coffee plantations. They observed the incredible array of flora and fauna, identifying several hundred species of birds, seeing howler monkeys, leatherback turtles, sloths, and crocodiles while learning about issues surrounding eco-tourism and sustainable development. This adventure in learning will embark for the 34th time during the 2014 winterim session. Learn more about this program and future offerings at www.uwsp.edu/cnr/International.

Author brings Malawian perspective on wind energy to Stevens Point

from top: Steven Swan, Lucas Berg, and Tyler Shimulunas visit the German Fruhlingsfest during their semester in Germany as part of the Trans-Atlantic Paper Science Undergraduate Dual Degree program; Students visit Savegre on the Costa Rica winterim trip; Environmental author, William Kamkwamba, was introduced by Chris Yahnke, chair of the Biology Department, at his presentation on campus.

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William Kamkwamba, author of “The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind,” offered a global perspective on wind energy to students and community members during two public presentations in March. Kamkwamba used library books to teach himself to build a windmill from scrap metal and other materials. The windmill created electricity for his home and village and caught the attention of educators and innovators across the world. William is currently a student at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire. A Walk in Their Shoes, a nonprofit group located in Wausau, Wis., and numerous community sponsors were integral in bringing Kamkwamba to Central Wisconsin.

2012-2013 Annual Report

William Kamkwamba built a windmill to power a few electrical appliances in his family’s home in Masitala, Malawi, using blue gum trees, bicycle parts, and materials collected in a local scrap yard. Since then, he has built a solar-powered water pump supplying the first drinking water in his village, and two other windmills, the tallest standing at 39 feet. 14

University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Supporting Faculty and Staff

Michael Demchik, forestry professor, is working with the Upper Midwest Hazelnut Development Initiative to grow a stronger hazelnut industry. Hazelnuts, native Wisconsin perennials, are rich in protein, unsaturated fat, fiber, vitamin E, magnesium, and B vitamins. The plants show promise as an oilseed and/or biodiesel crop. 15

2012-2013 Annual Report

A stronger hazelnut industry in Wisconsin’s future Michael Demchik, forestry professor, is working with UW-Stevens Point students and a team of researchers and growers to develop a stronger hazelnut industry in the Upper Midwest. Hazelnut plants require lower energy inputs to produce nuts, build soil fertility, store carbon, and protect surface and groundwater quality more effectively than annual row crops. Demchik’s research specifically focuses on characterizing the genetic structure and fine tuning micro propagation techniques for commercial production. He has been studying hazelnut plants on research sites in 21 areas in 10 counties throughout Wisconsin. Demchik’s research is supported in part by the Wisconsin Institute for Sustainable Technology Scholars program, a Wisconsin Consortium grant, and other grant funding sources. You can learn more about the Upper Midwest Hazelnut Development Initiative at http://midwesthazelnuts.org.

Isermann honored with best professional presentation at Wisconsin AFS meeting Dan Isermann, Wisconsin Cooperative Fishery Research Unit (WICFRU) assistant unit leader, received the best professional presentation award at the Wisconsin Chapter of the American Fisheries Society Meeting held in February 2013. His presentation, titled “Evaluating harvest regulations for lake sturgeon in the Menominee River”, was coauthored by Mike Donofrio, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and Ed Baker, Michigan Department of Natural Resources. The project was a collaboration with the Wisconsin and Michigan Department of Natural Resources with funding provided by WE® Energies Mitigation and Enhancement Fund. WICFRU is a partnership between the U.S. Geological Survey, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point CNR.

Franzen shares insight into what makes an educator at Illinois conference Becca Franzen, assistant professor of human dimensions of natural resource management, was the keynote speaker at the Environmental Education Association of Illinois annual conference in April. Franzen discussed how individuals come to be who they are in the field of environmental education. She guided us toward recognizing what created our values within education and those crucibles that may have seemed like nothing at the time but made us the educators we are today.

from top: Forestry major Heath Brander transplants American hazelnut seedlings as part of a research project with Professor Michael Demchik; Zeb Woiak, a WICFRU masters student, assists with musky sampling on the Menominee River; Rebecca Franzen receives a thank you gift for her keynote presentation at the Environmental Education Association of Illinois annual conference.

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University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Oak Woodlands and Forests Fire Consortium highlights Masters’ research Ron Masters, associate professor of wildland fire science, had his research, “The importance of shortleaf pine for wildlife and diversity in mixed oak-pine forests and in pine-grassland woodlands,” highlighted in the April 2013 Newsletter for the Oak Woodlands and Forests Fire Consortium. Masters’ paper explores mammal and bird interactions in different shortleaf pine ecosystems (oak-pine and pine-grassland) and their sensitivities to different fire frequencies. You can find the complete paper online www.nrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/gtr/gtr_p-15%20papers/6masters-p-15.pdf.

Wisconsin’s Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan receives award The National Park Service and the Society of Outdoor Recreation Professionals presented Wisconsin with the Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) Excellence Award on May 23 at the 2013 National Outdoor Recreation Conference in Traverse City, Mich. Primary authors of the Wisconsin SCORP included Anna Haines, professor of human dimensions of natural resource management and director of the Center for Land Use Education; David Marcouiller, professor, state extension specialist, and department chair of urban and regional planning at UW-Madison; and Jeffrey Prey, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. You can find the plan on the Wisconsin State Parks website at http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/parks/planning/scorp.

DuPlissis presents red pine wood supply study

from top: Ron Masters (far right), pictured with the UW-Stevens Point Fire Crew in Okla., had his research featured in the Newsletter for the Oak Woodlands and Forests Fire Consortium; Anna Haines was one of three lead authors on The Wis. SCORP that received national recognition; Participants in the Wis. Society of American Foresters 2012 Statewide Conference took part in a field tour.

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John DuPlissis, forestry outreach specialist, presented the results of a red pine wood supply study as the keynote speaker at the Wisconsin Society of American Foresters (SAF) 2012 Statewide Conference held in Stevens Point, Wis. One of the key findings of the study was that Wisconsin’s paper industry will face severe competition for pulp-sized timber by 2032 with demand greatly exceeding supply, if demand continues at the current level. The conference was attended by more than 130 foresters from federal, state, and county government, forest products industry and private enterprise from the Lake States region. Since that time DuPlissis has prepared reports for 7 Wisconsin forest products firms detailing potential red pine wood supply in five-year increments for the next twenty years including a discussion of the causes as well as pressures that have reduced, and may yet still further reduce, the total volume of pulp-sized red pine available as a raw material to these firms.

2012-2013 Annual Report

Markham addresses impervious surface impacts on fish, wildlife and waterfront property Lynn Markham, UW-Extension shoreland and land use specialist with the Center for Land Use Education, co-authored Impervious Surfaces: How They Impact Fish, Wildlife and Waterfront Property Values. The publication, developed for waterfront property owners and local officials, focuses on the impacts that impervious surfaces such as driveways and rooftops can have on waterfront property values, fish populations, and wildlife. You can find the article online at www.uwsp.edu/cnr-ap/clue/documents/water/ impervioussurfaces2013.pdf. CLUE is a partnership between the UW-Stevens Point CNR and the University of Wisconsin-Extension.

Turyk continues research on blue-green algae blooms in Wisconsin River flowages Nancy Turyk, fisheries and water resources scientist for the Center for Watershed Science and Education (CWSE), is continuing her research on the sources of phosphorus that plague parts of the Wisconsin River, in partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. The objective is to make Petenwell and Castle Rock flowages free of the blue-green algae that hinders the tourism and recreation industries. The Petenwell and Castle Rock flowages are the second and fifth largest reservoirs in Wisconsin. These reservoirs have been experiencing excessive blue-green algae blooms, limiting the recreational use of the waterways and causing a public health concern. The Department of Health services has documented numerous cases of exposure to blue-green algae resulting in respiratory ailments, rashes, and on rare occasions death. The information collected during the monitoring effort will help determine where land management efforts and funding can be targeted to aid in decreasing the nutrient levels in the waterways that cause the blue-green algae blooms. Turyk also leads lake assessment and planning efforts in Waushara and Marathon Counties. CWSE is a partnership between the UWStevens Point CNR and the University of Wisconsin-Extension.

Treehaven Director becomes certified professional facilitator Corky McReynolds, director of Treehaven and professor of human dimensions of natural resource management, has become a certified professional facilitator (CPF) through the International Association of Facilitators. As one of three CPFs in the state and first in the UW System, McReynolds is certified to help groups and organizations with team development, strategic planning and management of projects, changes and conflicts.

from top: “Impervious Surfaces� is a guide for lakefront homeowners with tips on reducing impervious surfaces to increase land value, fish populations, and wildlife; Research continues into how to reduce the excessive green algae blooms, like the one shown here at the Petenwell flowage boat landing; Corky McReynolds became one of three certified professional facilitators in the state of Wisconsin.

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University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Reaching out to the Community

More than 700 people attended the spring Candlelight Hike Festival at Schmeeckle Reserve. This free community event is held every spring and fall, and each festival has a different theme. The theme for the April 26 hike was “The Wonders of Pollination.� The event is made possible by the efforts of more than 50 student volunteers and Schmeeckle Reserve student employees. 19

2012-2013 Annual Report

Staff host a community presentation on Shoreland Zoning changes Community members were invited to a presentation on proposed changes to the Portage County Shoreland Zoning Ordinances. Lynn Markham, UW-Extension shoreland and land use specialist with the Center for Land Use Education, and Nancy Turyk, a water resources scientist with the Center for Watershed Science and Education, hosted the presentation on Saturday, February 23, 2013, at the Portage County Library, to discuss the proposed shoreland zoning changes and their potential affect on property, lakes, rivers, fish populations and wildlife.

Emerald ash borer management tool designed for city planners City foresters and arborists have a new tool to assist in management decisions related to the increasing presence of the invasive emerald ash borer. Richard Hauer, associate professor of forestry, and student Andrew VanNatta designed the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Planning Simulator to estimate the cost of managing ash trees over a 20-year span of an emerald ash borer infestation. Emerald ash borer larvae feed on the inner bark of ash trees, disrupting the trees ability to transport water and nutrients. The ash trees are generally killed within two to four years of the initial infestation. Since the invasive insects were discovered in Michigan in 2002, they have claimed the lives of tens of millions of trees. Wisconsin ash trees have no known natural defense against these pests leading to the creation of various management options. The EAB Planning Simulator was designed based on ash forests on the UW-Stevens Point campus. Hauer and his students combined basic information about the campus forests, using tree evaluation software programs from the U.S. Forest Service and the Council of Tree Landscape Appraisers. The model estimates the cost of managing the ash trees in four different ways: preemptive removal of all ash trees in the first five years of an infestation, removal and replanting with a different species, treatment with insecticides, and no action. Planners are able to see what the best option for their communities are, based on the management options that they are pursuing. You can download the EAB model at http://cnrfiles.uwsp.edu/hauer/eab-plansversionbeta.xlsx. from top: The community was invited to a presentation on the proposed changes to the Portage County Shoreland Zoning Ordinances; Richard Hauer, associate professor of forestry, created an emerald ash borer management tool with the assistance of students; Emerald ash borer’s have claimed the lives of tens of millions of ash trees in Wisconsin.

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University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

More than $320,000 in grant funds awarded for state and local environmental initiatives The Wisconsin Environmental Education Board (WEEB) awarded more than $320,000 to fund 37 project proposals in the areas of forestry, school forest, general environmental education and the newly established water education program. Projects included statewide initiatives such as Making Cool Choices in Green and Healthy School, as well as local projects such as the Fishing in the Neighborhood through the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. WEEB was established in 1990 to provide leadership in the development of learning opportunities that empower Wisconsin citizens with the knowledge and skills needed to make wise environmental decisions and take responsible actions in their personal lives, workplaces, and communities. Learn more about WEEB at www4.uwsp.edu/cnr/weeb.

Racers strap on snowshoes for event at Treehaven Treehaven hosted the second annual Treehaven Tromp Snowshoe Race on February 9, 2013. Eighty eight participants registered for the 5k and 10k races, nearly double the entries from last year’s event. The Treehaven Tromp was part of the Braveheart Snowshoe Racing Series and was a 2012-2013 United States Snowshoe Association (USSSA) Regional Qualifying Event.

Parker and Edmondson discuss environmental and diversity issues at public event The public was invited to a free presentation by Mamie Parker, a retired assistant director of Fisheries and Habitat Conservation for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Dudley Edmondson, a nature photographer. Parker’s presentation, “How Deep is your Love: Careers in Conservation,” focused on what draws people to careers in conservation. Edmondson discussed ways to get people of color into the outdoors in his presentation, “Reaching New Audiences: Working with Youth and People of Color in the Outdoors.”

from top: WEEB funded 37 project proposals including a project introducing people to fishing through the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources; Eighty eight racers took to the snow in the second annual Treehaven Tromp Snowshoe Race; Mamie Parker (front right) and Dudley Edmondson (back right) were guest speakers at a public event focused on the environment and diversity issues.

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Parker was the first African-American to serve as a regional director and head the nation’s fisheries program. She was inducted into the Arkansas Hall of Fame as the state’s first native to serve as an assistant director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. She is now president of MA Parker and Associates, a management consultant and public speaking business, and resides in Washington, D.C. Edmondson, a nature and wildlife photographer, videographer and author, wrote the landmark book, “Black & Brown Faces in America’s Wild Places,” which features Parker. A regular contributor to newspapers, magazines and lectures about diversity outdoors, his work is featured in galleries and in nearly 100 publications around the world.

2012-2013 Annual Report

WEAL Lab determines safety of water in homes across Wisconsin The Water and Environmental Analysis Lab (WEAL) tested drinking water for more than 3,000 households to determine if it was safe to drink. Ten percent of the households tested had water exceeding standards for nitrate levels and 17 percent were unsafe because of the presence of coliform bacteria. WEAL staff and students also helped conduct 14 Drinking Water Education Programs in partnership with county Extension and Conservation offices. Through these programs staff and students helped 1200 private well owners in 11 counties understand potential remedies for drinking water problems and the relationship of land use practices to groundwater quality. The Water and Environmental Analysis Lab is a state-of-the-art facility used to analyze water and other environmental media housed within the Center for Watershed Science and Education (CWSE). On average 20 students are employed in the lab gaining hands-on skills while earning money. CWSE is a partnership between the UW-Stevens Point CNR and the University of Wisconsin-Extension.

Streamside owners have new tool for managing waterways Streamside homeowners have a new resource to help improve and maintain waterways adjacent to their land. Mike Dombeck, professor of global conservation, coauthored My Healthy Stream with Jack Williams, Trout Unlimited senior scientist, and Chris Wood, president and chief executive officer of Trout Unlimited. The handbook provides basic principles and practices of good streamside management to landowners in rural and urban settings. Some of the topics included in the handbook are ways homeowners can assess the condition of their streams, ways to manage invasive species, and how to deal with extreme weather. The book may be purchased through the Aldo Leopold Foundation, www.aldoleopold.org/books.

Wisconsin Well Water Viewer gives citizens and agencies easy access to water quality data The Center for Watershed Science and Education (CWSE) unveiled the “Wisconsin Well Water Viewer” that allows citizens and agency staff to view drinking water quality in an interactive map anywhere a well sample was taken. The viewer plots water quality for a dozen parameters on maps than can be viewed from the state to section scale. In operation for just over a year, the viewer has been visited by 5,000 people. It is a great resource for people who have questions about water quality in their area. The Well Water viewer can be found at www.uwsp.edu/cnr-ap/watershed/Pages/WellWaterViewer.aspx.

from top: WEAL students utilize various analysis to determine the suitability of homeowner water samples for drinking; Mike Dombeck, professor of global conservation, co-authored a handbook for streamside owners titled “My Healthy Stream”; The Center for Watershed Science and Education designed a program allowing people to view water quality results across Wisconsin.

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University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Upgrading Facilities

Treehaven upgraded kitchen equipment, replaced windows in the Vallier Classroom Center, refinished the wood stairs in dorms and classroom buildings, and stained decks and stairways to keep the facility in tip-top shape for our summer field experience and workshops held at the facility throughout the year. 23

2012-2013 Annual Report

New Service Learning Studio for natural resource students A new Service Learning Studio is being developed for use by students, faculty, and staff in the Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Management (HDNR) discipline. Room 271 in the Trainer Natural Resources Building is being renovated to provide interactive instructional space for students. The service lab will include computers, software programs, and working space for students majoring in Land Use Planning, Natural Resource Social and Policy Sciences, and Environmental Education/Interpretation. Renovations are scheduled to be complete by the fall 2013 semester.

Central Wisconsin Environmental Station increases energy efficiency The Central Wisconsin Environmental Station (CWES) renovated Maple Cabin, originally a scout cabin built in 1930, with new windows, doors, ceiling, floors, insulation, drywall. A porch was also added on to the back of the cabin. The space will be used as a classroom for CWES’ traditional environmental education program. Becker Lodge was also updated with energy efficient windows, lighting, and baseboard heat. The Lodge will be utilized as a classroom for 4K and Kindergarten students enrolled in the Tomorrow River Community Charter School. (see page 8)

Advanced Computer Lab updates computers, printer, and plotter The Advanced Computer Lab (ACL) is a state-of-the-art teaching computer lab established to facilitate the teaching and learning of advanced computing skills and to provide necessary resources for faculty, staff, and students to carry out research and extension/ outreach projects. Twenty eight of the computers in the lab and one black and white printer were updated. A new HP DesignJet Z6200 42 inch plotter was also purchased. The plotter is used extensively by students who present their research at symposiums and conferences throughout the year.

Schmeeckle Reserve replaces boardwalks In 2012, the Sedge Meadow Trail boardwalks were removed and replaced by students and volunteers, a project funded in part by Point Bock Run, Inc. In May 2013, Schmeeckle Reserve began replacing the three boardwalks along the section of the Green Circle Trail that passes through the reserve, a project supported by the Green Circle Trail Fund. Schmeeckle Reserve is a 280-acre natural area that is managed to protect and restore native ecological communities of Central Wisconsin. It is open to the public and serves as a unique gathering place for the community and university.

from top: A new service learning studio will provide research space for students in the human dimensions of natural resource management discipline; Renovations to Maple Cabin at the Central Wisconsin Environmental Station will allow for more classroom space; Students and volunteers assist with the installation of a new boardwalk at Schmeeckle Reserve.

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University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Enriching Education through Contributions

Danielle Berger, a recipient of the Douglas Stephens Boone and Crockett Club Fellowship, presented her research on the Northern Bobwhite at the 2012 Undergraduate Student Research Symposium. The goal of the fellowship is to encourage research related to game species, with topics ranging from wildlife diseases, habitat, population dynamics, genetics, ecology, or hunting heritage. 25

2012-2013 Annual Report

Historic agreement signed with Boone and Crockett Club Faculty mentored wildlife research has taken a large leap forward, thanks to a handful of donors and a new collaborative agreement with the Boone and Crockett Club. The agreement, inked in March, calls for establishing the Douglas Stephens Boone and Crockett Club Fellowship in Wildlife Conservation at UW-Stevens Point. The fellowship is supported by earnings from a newly created endowment in the UW-Stevens Point Foundation and will provide research opportunities for undergraduate students (fellowships). In the future, the fund could eventually support graduate student research (assistantships) or even an endowed professorship to lead a proposed Wisconsin Center for Wildlife Studies. The goal is to “promote the conservation and management of wildlife, especially big game, and its habitat to preserve and encourage hunting and to maintain the highest ethical standards of fair chase and sportsmanship in North America” while advancing our educational, research and outreach mission. The agreement is more than 10 years in the making, with Dean Christine Thomas leading the effort in nurturing her relationship with Boone and Crockett Club as a professional member since 2002. Paving the way for the agreement were major gifts from Gerald and Helen Stephens of Peoria, Ill., Bob (BS-Urban Forestry, ’82) and Kim Spoerl of Waupaca, Wis., and the Boone and Crockett Club Foundation. In addition, Dean Thomas committed matching funds from the Jack and Marian Wilson Fund, an unrestricted endowment that benefits the CNR. “We are thrilled to formally create this partnership with the Boone and Crockett Club,” said Thomas. “The Club is the oldest – and among the most respected – wildlife conservation organization in North America. They are very selective in choosing national partners, and UWStevens Point is now one of them,” she added. To date the club has established programs at only a few schools, mostly major research institutions: University of Montana, Texas A&M University, Oregon State University, and Michigan State University. In addition to the recent agreement with UW-Stevens Point, new programs are also in development for Colorado State University and Oklahoma State University. Inaugural fellowships were awarded in summer 2012 to wildlife majors Danielle Berger of Marshfield, Wis., and Tessa Hasbrouck of Petersburg, Alaska. from top: The Boone and Crockett Club was integral in establishing the Douglas Stephens Boone and Crockett Club Fellowship in Wildlife Conservation; Danielle Berger was a recipient of the Fellowship and focused her research on bobwhite; Tessa Hasbrouck researched bobcats in Central Wisconsin with the help of the Boone and Crockett Fellowship.

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University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Many generous gifts have been made over the past year. Some of the highlights include: Margaret A. Cargill Foundation The Margaret A. Cargill Foundation gifted a large grant to build after-school camp programs in collaboration with the Rosholt, Amherst, and Iola school districts and the Portage County Boys and Girls Club. Eric Duffey Costa Rica Tropical Ecology Memorial Scholarship The Eric Duffey Costa Rica Tropical Ecology Memorial Scholarship was established in honor of Eric Duffey, a former wildlife student who passed away on March 3, 2012. The scholarship will help a wildlife student with an interest in sustainability and renewable energy go on the winterim Tropical Ecology trip to Costa Rica. Herb and Lenore Behnke Scholarship Endowment The Herb and Lenore Behnke Scholarship Endowment completed its campaign, exceeding their goal with 59 gifts from 43 contributors. Gutgsell Family Foundation The Gutsgell Family Foundation contributed funds to the Gutgsell Environmental Research Fund to support student research under the direction of Kyle Herrman, assistant professor of fisheries and water resources. Caitlin D. Kelly Memorial International Scholarship Caitlin Kelly, of Northfield, Minn., was a first generation college student majoring in water resources at UW-Stevens Point. After graduation, Caitlin looked forward to her dream career of being a hydrologist for the U.S. Forest Service. Caitlin, tragically passed away on Friday, January 18, 2013. This scholarship was created in her memory to support a student who will participate in the European Environmental Studies Seminar and shows a similar passion for natural resources.

from top: An elementray student participates in an after school program focused on the environment thanks to a grant from the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation; The Herb and Lenore Behnke Scholarship Endowment exceeded its fundraising goal; Susan Heikkinen, the daughter of William Heikkinen, is pictured with Sam Schuler, the scholarship recipient.

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William Heikkinen Conservation Scholarship The William Heikkinen Conservation Scholarship was established to honor the memory of William Heikkinen who, with his brother Carl, operated Heikkinen Tree Farms in Brantwood, Wisconsin, for more than 50 years. Although Mr. Heikkinen was a farmer, forester, land manager, and commercial logger by trade, he firmly believed in education. For 25 years he served on the school board of the Prentice School District. This scholarship supports worthy students in the hope that they may carry on his passion for conservation.

2012-2013 Annual Report

Donald and Eleanor Ansay Memorial Scholarship Karen McCulloch, a UW-Stevens Point alumna, contributed funding in March to establish the Donald and Eleanor Ansay Memorial Scholarship Endowment for forestry majors, to honor her parents memory. The Wilderness Society The Wilderness Society, Washington, D.C., contributed financial support to spring 2013 Gaylord Nelson Earth Day Fellowships for four graduate students in environmental education. Wisconsin Conservation Warden Association - Cordero “Cord” Rodriguez Memorial Cordero “Cord” Roger Rodriguez loved the outdoors and had been in the woods in a deer stand or turkey blind from the age of nine. He planned to go to UW-Stevens Point because he loved Wisconsin and would be able to continue to hunt and fish with his brother. Cord passed away on October 16, 2012, while in his senior year of high school. His family has established the Wisconsin Conservation Warden Association – Cordero Roger Rodriguez memorial scholarship as a way to honor Cord’s dream. Kopmeier Family Fund/Greater Milwaukee Foundation The Kopmeier Family Fund/Greater Milwaukee Foundation continued their financial support to the Treehaven Inner City Environmental Program, providing outdoor experiences at Treehaven for Milwaukee’s inner city youth for the 25th consecutive year. K.A.M.O./Joe Stecker-Kochanski Memorial Scholarship The K.A.M.O. and Elaine Stecker-Kochanski scholarship is in memory of Joe Stecker-Kochanski who passed away on July 19, 2012. Joe was a past graduate of UW-Stevens Point, receiving a B.S. in Forestry. His love for the outdoors was only exceeded by his desire to share it with others. The College of Natural Resources will award this scholarship to a student with the same passion and beliefs. Marv and Sandy Kramer The Kramers continued their support of five awards for the Marv and Sandy Kramer Summer Academic Scholarships for students attending the six-week summer field experience at our Treehaven facility located in Tomahawk, Wis. from top: Donald and Eleanor Ansay’s daughter established a scholarship in their memory; Michael Van Offeren, the first recipient of the Cordero Rodriguez Scholarship is pictured with (L-R) Jon Daniel, Bill Engfer, Jon Scharbarth, Randy Dunkel, Cord’s parents Roger and Vicki Rodriguez; Randy Stark; CNR supporters Marv and Sandy Kramer with their dog Wylie.

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University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Advanced Disposal Advanced Disposal, formerly Veolia Solid Waste, continued their financial support of the Advanced Disposal Scholarships, providing five awards in spring 2013. The company has supported CNR scholarship for five consecutive years. Dorothy Kopmeier Vallier Foundation The Dorothy Kopmeier Vallier Foundation continued their financial support for the Vallier Treehaven Resident Ecologist position. Kevin Burns is the current Resident Ecologist. James and Joann Bernd James and Joann Bernd continued to support 15 spring awards for the James and Joann Bernd Family Scholarships for students attending the six-week summer field experience at our Treehaven facility located in Tomahawk, Wis. Petenwell Castle Rock Property Owners Association Scholarship Established in 1976, the Petenwell Castle Rock Property Owners Association promotes the rights of the public so that full utilization of the lakes would be assured for all people. The association established this scholarship to facilitate the dreams and goals of natural resource students at UW-Stevens Point who share its passion for the outdoors and its commitment to ensure that such resources continue to be enjoyed by future generations. Wisconsin Wildlife Federation Scholarship - Milwaukee Police Officers Conservation and Sportsman Club, Ltd. Scholarship The new scholarship will be given to a student majoring in conservation law enforcement. The club hopes that their scholarship will help lend assistance in the proper enforcement of laws among all true sportsmen, landowners, and lovers of nature. The 2013 recipient was wildlife ecology major, Elizabeth Schultz. Veolia Environmental Services Veolia Environmental Services, Chicago Ill., contributed financial support to the CNR special projects fund to support planning of inaugural outreach programs through UWStevens Point’s new Waste Education Center. from top: Kevin Burns (far left), the current Treehaven Resident Ecologist, is funded with donations from the Dorothy Kopmeier Vallier Foundation; Kelly Redmond, one of the James and Joann Bernd Family Scholarships, works in a soil pit at Treehaven; Elizabeth Schultz was the 2013 recipient of the WWF - Milwaukee Police Officers Conservation and Sportsman Club, Ltd. Scholarship.

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2012-2013 Annual Report

Grant Partnerships Faculty, staff, and students earned 79 extramural grants totaling $3,867, 136 (includes $12,500 in WIST awarded grants shared with the College of Letters and Science) and 22 intramural grants totaling $37,300 in FY12 (these totals exclude FY12 pending grants). Thank you to all of our grant partners: • Alliant Energy

• State of South Dakota

• City of Marshfield

• U.S. Dept. of Education - FIPSE

• City of Wausau-Wausau Water Works

• USDA Forest Service

• City of Wausau-Wausau Water Works

• USDA NRCS-NSSC

• Clintonville Wastewater Treatment Facility

• University of Wisconsin-Sea Grant Institute

• Conserve School

• Waupaca County Solid Waste and Recycling

• Cool Choices

• Waushara County

• County of Dane

• We Energies

• Fond du Lac County

• Whiting Utilities

• Great Lakes Fishery Commission

• Wisconsin Arborist Association

• Lake Wausau Association, Inc.

• Wisconsin Association for Environmental Education

• Lumberjack Resource Conservation and Development Council

• Wisconsin Department of Transportation

• Madison Gas & Electric

• Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

• Marathon County

• Wisconsin Environmental Education Board

• Marathon County Land Conservation

• Wisconsin Environmental Education Foundation

• Marathon County Solid Waste Department

• Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corporation

• Marquette University

• Wisconsin Public Service

• McIntire Stennis

• Wisconsin SFI Implementation Committee

• Minnesota Department of Agriculture

• WPPI Energy

• National Council for Air and Stream Improvement

• Xcel Energy

• Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc. 30

University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

CNR by the Numbers

Students, Faculty, and Staff

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1771 students enrolled during the 2012-2013 fall semester

79 Academic Staff

44 Faculty

61 Classified Staff

2012-2013 Annual Report

Disciplines, Majors, and Minors 6 disciplines, 21 majors, and 15 minors. Majors: Forestry majors • Ecosystem Restoration and Management • Forest Administration and Utilization • Forest Management • Forest Recreation • Urban Forestry

Paper Science and Engineering major • Paper Science and Engineering

Fisheries and Water Resources majors • Fisheries • Hydrology • Water Resources

Wildlife Ecology majors • Information and Education • Research and Management

Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Mgt. majors • Environmental Education/Interpretation • General Resource Management • Land Use Planning • Natural Resources Social and Policy Sciences • Resource Management Law Enforcement • Youth Programming and Camp Management • Wildland Fire Science 

Soil and Waste Resources majors • Soil and Land Management • Soil Science • Waste Management

Minors: • Biofuels Engineering • Captive Wildlife • Conservation Biology • Environmental Communications • Environmental Law Enforcement • Forest Recreation • Forestry • International Resource Mgt.

• Land Use Planning • Resource Management • Soil Science • Sustainable Energy • Water Resources • Wildlife • Youth Programming and Camp Mgt.

Internships 171 students were placed in paid internship positions with government and private agencies. $544,000 is the approximate total annual payroll for students participating in paid internship positions. 32

University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Graduation and Job Placement 344 students graduated during the 2012-2013 academic year 309 graduates received their bachelor’s degree 35 graduates received their master’s degree 90% of CNR graduates found employment or went on for further schooling

Fundraising (Total Gifts of Cash or Stock (7/1/2012 - 6/30/2012)

427 gifts were received from 349 donors for a total of $532, 696.72. The CNR endowment principle was increased by $250,656.70 over the past year* *March 2012 = $4,910,530.92 vs. March 2013 (latest available report) = $5,161,187.62 (does not include market adjustment)

Centers, Facilities, and Programs Becoming an Outdoors Woman

Treehaven

Center for Land Use Education

UW-Extension Solid and Hazardous Waste Education Center

• UW-Extension Wisconsin Lakes Partnership Center for Watershed Science and Education

Waste Education Center Wisconsin Center for Environmental Education

• Central Wisconsin Groundwater Center

• KEEP, Wisconsin’s K-12 Energy Education Program

• Water and Environmental Analysis Lab

• LEAF, Wisconsin’s K-12 Forestry Education Program

Central Wisconsin Environmental Station

Wisconsin Cooperative Fishery Research Unit

Global Environmental Management Education Center

Wisconsin Institute for Sustainable Technology

Schmeeckle Reserve 33

2012-2013 Annual Report

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College of Natural Resources Trainer Natural Resources Building University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point 800 Reserve Street Stevens Point, WI 54481-3897

Phone: 715-346-4617 Fax: 715-346-4554 uwsp.edu/cnr facebook.com/UWSPCNR


University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources Annual Report 2012-2013